Page 1

7+(1$1<$1*

92/ 12

CHRONICLE

18

04  ,66112

NTU RUGBY TAKES ON

GAELIC

FOOTBALL|35

BEST FOOT

FORWARD

HELLO

BABY MISS A HITS SG

|28

1 ON 1 WITH

KWOK KIAN WOON

| 07

BURNING

BREWS |12


02 NEWS

7+(1$1<$1*

92/ 12

18

CHRONICLE 02

News Bites NTU NTU DEVELOPS ROBOT FOR HUMAN AID A team led by Prof Xie Ming from the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, has developed a humanoid robot called NASH, or NTU Advanced Smart Humanoid. NASH can perform simple tasks, and learn and adapt. It is intended to help people with menial tasks and assist the elderly. BLOOD TEST KIT TO PREDICT HEART ATTACK AND STROKE RISKS Researchers are working with the National University Hospital (NUH) on a blood test kit that can predict the chance of a person having a heart attack in the future. The team is working on identifying proteins called biomarkers that can be used to pinpoint those at risk of cardiovascular disease. Lead scientist Professor Newman Sze said they hope the kit would produce more accurate readings, compared with the current tests based on weight, blood pressure and cholesterol level.

$3M GIFT TO NANYANG BUSINESS SCHOOL NTU Pro-Chancellor, Dr Wee Cho Yaw, gave S$3 million to establish a new scholarship fund at for students in the Master of Science (Finance) programme. It is aimed at enhancing relations between Singapore and Chinese institutions, the Wee Cho Yaw Master of Science (Finance) Scholarship Fund will be open to eligible and qualified Chinese financial sector regulators.

MASTER’S PROGRAMME FOR AEROSPACE PROFESSIONALS

MORE DIVERSITY IN UNIVERSITY SECTOR

NTU partnered The University of Manchester, UK, to launch a new masters programme targeted at aerospace industry professionals. The degree programme in Project Management aims to cater to working professionals, with RollsRoyce’s staff and their partners in Asia among the first to benefit. The Duke of York Prince Andrew was present at the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding between the two universities.

Minister of State for Education Lawrence Wong called for a more varied university sector in Singapore. Speaking at the graduation ceremony of SIM University, he said the Ministry of Education wants to encourage more diversity in the university sector to meet the different aspirations of Singaporeans in higher education. This will allow each university to develop niches of excellence based on its individual strengths and traditions.

ELECTRONIC TABLET TO BE USED IN INDIA The I-slate, a low-cost electronic tablet developed by the Institute of Sustainable and Applied Infodynamics (ISAID), has undergone successful trials in India. It will be used as a substitute for schoolchildren’s traditional blackboard slates. The joint institute between NTU and Rice University is preparing the solar powered tablet to enter production.

SINGAPORE PUB RECOMMENDED TO RELOOK DRAINAGE SYSTEM A flood panel made its initial recommendations for the Public Utilities Board to reexamine the drainage system. More real-time information on rainfall should be collected. Other observations by the panel were that canals and drains were no longer enough to handle rainfall here and other ways to slow and retain rainwater, such as ponds or porous roads, should be added to the drainage system.

WORLD

AUSTRALIAN PEOPLE ARREST ALLEGED PEOPLE SMUGGLERS

SWEDISH POET WINS 2011 NOBEL LITERATURE PRIZE Swedish poet wins 2011 Nobel Literature prize Swedish poet Tomas Transtromer has won the 2011 Nobel prize for literature, the awarding committee said on October 6th. The Swedish Academy said the poet, 80, had won ‘because, through his condensed, translucent images, he gives us fresh access to reality’. The prize of 10 million Swedish crowns (S$1.9 million) was the fourth of this year’s Nobel prizes. Awards for medicine, physics and chemistry were previously given out.

INDEPENDENT S-LEAGUE A POSSIBILITY The Football Association of Singapore (FAS) has promised prospective S-League CEO candidates full autonomy in the running of the 16-year-old league next season. This includes employing a LIBYA MILITIA FINDSD MASS dedicated management team with GRAVES a competitions chief and media Two mass graves in Tripoli conmanager. For the first time since taining the bodies of more than 1999, the S-League could become 900 people who died during the an independent entity. Currently, rebel assault that ousted Mummar key decisions regarding the com- Gaddafi has been discovered, said petition have to be approved by a Libyan military unit on October the FAS Council. 5th. An official from the cemetery said the corpses had been colAC C O U N T I N G F I R M S C O N - lected from streets and hospitals TINUE HIRING following the rebel assault on the Accounting firms continue hiring Libyan capital in late August. Naji Leading accounting employers al-Issawi, a commander in a unit say they will keep hiring figures of Tripoli’s military council, said for graduates constant for the officials planned to dig up more upcoming year. The firms, in- of the site and start identifying cluding PricewaterhouseCoopers the remains. (PwC), Ernst & Young, Deloitte and KPMG, have said the uncertain economic situation means they will have to be more cautious in hiring. However, business for the firms is expected to be relatively resilient even in a downturn, and they will also need the manpower in the longer term.

Upcoming Events 22ND OCTOBER NATIONAL SANGUOSHA CHAMPIONSHIPS Time: From 9am onwards Venue: Exhibition Hall, Level 3, Nanyang Auditorium Categories: 3V3 and 8-Player Registration fee: $2 To register: Email your name, matriculation number, contact details and category to san_guo_sha@ hotmail.com or join he facebook group National Sanguosha Championships or the QQ Group: 16508837 For 3V3 category, participants may join individually, as a pair or in groups of three. Upon successful registration, participants will receive further details and instructions.

If you have any exciting events to publicise, please don’t hesitate to contact us at chronicle@ntu.edu.sg

Australian police arrest alleged people smugglers Australian police have disrupted an international people smuggling ring by arresting two suspected key players. Australian Federal Police officers arrested the pair, who allegedly helped foreign nationals to Australia illegally on boats from Indonesia, following a 10month undercover sting operation. Undercover agents contacted the suspects to arrange for a fictitious Afghan family to be brought to Australia by boat from Indonesia, he said.

TRANSGENDER AUSTRALIANS WIN RECOGNITION AS MEN Two transgender people won an appeal in Australia’s highest court on Thursday giving them legal recognition as men despite not having complete sex change surgeries. The court ruled that characteristics that identify a person as male or female are ‘confined to external physical characteristics that are socially recognisable.’ This recognition does not require knowledge of a person’s sexual organs, the court said. Transgender and intersex organisations said the ruling, as a precedent, would spare others from having to undergo medically unnecessary surgery to have their chosen gender recognised.

LIM CHONG YEN

I AM WEARING... A shor t slee ved me n’s c a r d i ga n from with a pair of baby blue Bermudas f rom Taiwan. My checkered shirt is from Padini, $60, paired wit h my converse sneakers.. MY PERSONAL STYLE... I prefer European fashion and st yle as t hey are more mature looking. MY STYLE ICON IS... Edison Chen. NTU CAMPUS STYLE IS... I think it is rather effortlessly stylish. I'D NOT BE CAUGHT DEAD WEARING... A si ng le t pa i r e d with three –quarter loose pants!

YEAR 4 / SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING


02 NEWS

7+(1$1<$1*

92/ 12

18

CHRONICLE 04

News Bites NTU NTU DEVELOPS ROBOT FOR HUMAN AID A team led by Prof Xie Ming from the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, has developed a humanoid robot called NASH, or NTU Advanced Smart Humanoid. NASH can perform simple tasks, and learn and adapt. It is intended to help people with menial tasks and assist the elderly. BLOOD TEST KIT TO PREDICT HEART ATTACK AND STROKE RISKS Researchers are working with the National University Hospital (NUH) on a blood test kit that can predict the chance of a person having a heart attack in the future. The team is working on identifying proteins called biomarkers that can be used to pinpoint those at risk of cardiovascular disease. Lead scientist Professor Newman Sze said they hope the kit would produce more accurate readings, compared with the current tests based on weight, blood pressure and cholesterol level.

$3M GIFT TO NANYANG BUSINESS SCHOOL NTU Pro-Chancellor, Dr Wee Cho Yaw, gave S$3 million to establish a new scholarship fund at for students in the Master of Science (Finance) programme. It is aimed at enhancing relations between Singapore and Chinese institutions, the Wee Cho Yaw Master of Science (Finance) Scholarship Fund will be open to eligible and qualified Chinese financial sector regulators.

MASTER’S PROGRAMME FOR AEROSPACE PROFESSIONALS

MORE DIVERSITY IN UNIVERSITY SECTOR

NTU partnered The University of Manchester, UK, to launch a new masters programme targeted at aerospace industry professionals. The degree programme in Project Management aims to cater to working professionals, with RollsRoyce’s staff and their partners in Asia among the first to benefit. The Duke of York Prince Andrew was present at the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding between the two universities.

Minister of State for Education Lawrence Wong called for a more varied university sector in Singapore. Speaking at the graduation ceremony of SIM University, he said the Ministry of Education wants to encourage more diversity in the university sector to meet the different aspirations of Singaporeans in higher education. This will allow each university to develop niches of excellence based on its individual strengths and traditions.

ELECTRONIC TABLET TO BE USED IN INDIA The I-slate, a low-cost electronic tablet developed by the Institute of Sustainable and Applied Infodynamics (ISAID), has undergone successful trials in India. It will be used as a substitute for schoolchildren’s traditional blackboard slates. The joint institute between NTU and Rice University is preparing the solar powered tablet to enter production.

SINGAPORE PUB RECOMMENDED TO RELOOK DRAINAGE SYSTEM A flood panel made its initial recommendations for the Public Utilities Board to reexamine the drainage system. More real-time information on rainfall should be collected. Other observations by the panel were that canals and drains were no longer enough to handle rainfall here and other ways to slow and retain rainwater, such as ponds or porous roads, should be added to the drainage system.

WORLD

AUSTRALIAN PEOPLE ARREST ALLEGED PEOPLE SMUGGLERS

SWEDISH POET WINS 2011 NOBEL LITERATURE PRIZE Swedish poet wins 2011 Nobel Literature prize Swedish poet Tomas Transtromer has won the 2011 Nobel prize for literature, the awarding committee said on October 6th. The Swedish Academy said the poet, 80, had won ‘because, through his condensed, translucent images, he gives us fresh access to reality’. The prize of 10 million Swedish crowns (S$1.9 million) was the fourth of this year’s Nobel prizes. Awards for medicine, physics and chemistry were previously given out.

INDEPENDENT S-LEAGUE A POSSIBILITY The Football Association of Singapore (FAS) has promised prospective S-League CEO candidates full autonomy in the running of the 16-year-old league next season. This includes employing a LIBYA MILITIA FINDSD MASS dedicated management team with GRAVES a competitions chief and media Two mass graves in Tripoli conmanager. For the first time since taining the bodies of more than 1999, the S-League could become 900 people who died during the an independent entity. Currently, rebel assault that ousted Mummar key decisions regarding the com- Gaddafi has been discovered, said petition have to be approved by a Libyan military unit on October the FAS Council. 5th. An official from the cemetery said the corpses had been colAC C O U N T I N G F I R M S C O N - lected from streets and hospitals TINUE HIRING following the rebel assault on the Accounting firms continue hiring Libyan capital in late August. Naji Leading accounting employers al-Issawi, a commander in a unit say they will keep hiring figures of Tripoli’s military council, said for graduates constant for the officials planned to dig up more upcoming year. The firms, in- of the site and start identifying cluding PricewaterhouseCoopers the remains. (PwC), Ernst & Young, Deloitte and KPMG, have said the uncertain economic situation means they will have to be more cautious in hiring. However, business for the firms is expected to be relatively resilient even in a downturn, and they will also need the manpower in the longer term.

Upcoming Events 22ND OCTOBER NATIONAL SANGUOSHA CHAMPIONSHIPS Time: From 9am onwards Venue: Exhibition Hall, Level 3, Nanyang Auditorium Categories: 3V3 and 8-Player Registration fee: $2 To register: Email your name, matriculation number, contact details and category to san_guo_sha@ hotmail.com or join he facebook group National Sanguosha Championships or the QQ Group: 16508837 For 3V3 category, participants may join individually, as a pair or in groups of three. Upon successful registration, participants will receive further details and instructions.

If you have any exciting events to publicise, please don’t hesitate to contact us at chronicle@ntu.edu.sg

Australian police arrest alleged people smugglers Australian police have disrupted an international people smuggling ring by arresting two suspected key players. Australian Federal Police officers arrested the pair, who allegedly helped foreign nationals to Australia illegally on boats from Indonesia, following a 10month undercover sting operation. Undercover agents contacted the suspects to arrange for a fictitious Afghan family to be brought to Australia by boat from Indonesia, he said.

TRANSGENDER AUSTRALIANS WIN RECOGNITION AS MEN Two transgender people won an appeal in Australia’s highest court on Thursday giving them legal recognition as men despite not having complete sex change surgeries. The court ruled that characteristics that identify a person as male or female are ‘confined to external physical characteristics that are socially recognisable.’ This recognition does not require knowledge of a person’s sexual organs, the court said. Transgender and intersex organisations said the ruling, as a precedent, would spare others from having to undergo medically unnecessary surgery to have their chosen gender recognised.

LIM CHONG YEN

I AM WEARING... A shor t slee ved me n’s c a r d i ga n from with a pair of baby blue Bermudas f rom Taiwan. My checkered shirt is from Padini, $60, paired wit h my converse sneakers.. MY PERSONAL STYLE... I prefer European fashion and st yle as t hey are more mature looking. MY STYLE ICON IS... Edison Chen. NTU CAMPUS STYLE IS... I think it is rather effortlessly stylish. I'D NOT BE CAUGHT DEAD WEARING... A si ng le t pa i r e d with three –quarter loose pants!

YEAR 4 / SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING


News

Interview with the Associate Provost – Page 7

WKWSCI students premiere two controversial films nation-wide

OVERCOMING BARRIERS: Organisers Roshilah bte Atan (LEFT) and Naresh Subhash (RIGHT) are set to screen films with explicit PHOTO | COURTERSY OF IVAN TAN content.

1$7$/,(7(2 TWO controversial films that have never been shown in Singapore before will premiere in an NTU film festival from October 27th to 30th. These two films have been rated R21, and will be shown without any cuts for Wee Kim Wee School

"SYNDROMES AND A CENTURY" Director: Apichatpong Weerasethakul The story is about director Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s parents who were both doctors, and director’s memories about growing up in the hospital environment. "CZECH DREAM" Director: Vít Klusák & Filip Remunda Czech Dream documents the transformation of two final-year film students into young, aspiring businessmen as they launch a nationwide advertising campaign for a hypermarket. But the hypermarket does not exist.

of Communication and Information’s (WKWSCI) Perspectives Film Festival 2011. “A Clockwork Orange”, the main draw of the festival with graphic portrayals of sex and violence, was previously denied from being shown in Singapore when another film festival tried to bring the film in under a M18 rating.

"CATERPILLAR"

The second film, “Caterpillar”, is a humanised portrayal of Japanese writer Edogawa Rampo’s horror-fantasy short story on an insatiable sexual instinct which was banned from reprinting in 1939. Apart from these, the four other films to be showcased are “The Battle of Algiers”, “Syndromes and a Century”, “Czech Dream”

"THE BATTLE OF ALGIERS"

Director: Koji Wakamatsu

Director: Gillo Pontecorvo

Lieutenant Kurokawa is the “god soldier” — a Japanese war hero who earns fame and glory for killing Chinese people in the Second SinoJapanese War of the late 1930s. He returns home as a war victim, deaf and mute, with all four limbs amputated and his face scarred with vicious burns.

The Battle of Algiers was created based on events during the Algerian Revolution that led to Algeria’s independence from France in 1962.

The burden falls on his wife, Shigeko, who struggles to meet the lieutenant’s unending demands for food and sex. Although she is repelled by him, she feels the duty to take care of him.

The film is about the organisation of a guerilla movement and the methods used to break free from colonial power. As Algerian insurgents plant bombs, demonstrate in the streets, and plan their next moves, the French army attempts to stop them by figuring out and dismantling the terrorists’ operation system.

and “The Blue Kite”. All the films are centred on the theme of controversy and will be screened at the theatres at VivoCity’s Golden Village and French language center Alliance Francaise. The organising team, consisting WKWSCI students, sought out films portraying controversial issues like sex and politics, because they felt that the film industry in Singapore works within restricted boundaries, and securing the rights for these films would make the film festival more appealing. “We initially brainstormed on several themes but settled on the theme of controversy after we became attracted to the word “banned”, “taboo”, and “red tape”,” said Eternality Tan, the festival’s director. “Controversies unite and divide us. Many of these films provide strong socio-cultural insights and are powerful commentaries on the nature of controversy, and indirectly, they broach the topic of censorship of cinema.” They hope to provoke conversation and inspire audiences to think about issues raised in the films. Although the R21 rating placed on “A Clockwork Orange” and “Caterpillar” may potentially alienate the younger crowds, Tan says that it is not a cause for concern. According to Mr Tan, their target audiences are young adults who are film enthusiasts or work-

"THE BLUE KITE" Director; zhuang

Tian

Zhuang-

ing professionals interested in the arts. "We are also targeting the older demographic because some of our films were released decades

“Many of these films provide strong sociocultural insights and are powerful commentaries." Eternality Tan Director Film Festival

ago, and these people may have some memory about the controversy and censorship issues surrounding these films and would like the chance to see them,” said Tan. Faced with difficulties liaising with overseas distributors, and bringing in directors to speak about their films during their screenings, the team is relieved that they were able to pull everything together in the last three months. “I think this stems from the fact that we all really like films, and really want to build the perspectives brand into a film festival that people will look out for,” said Grace Auyong, head of publicity and sponsorship.

"A CLOCKWORK ORANGE" Director: Stanley Kubrick

Set in China during Chairman Mao’s regime in the 1950s and 1960s, The Blue Kite conveys the impact of political movements on the family unit.

Set in a dystopian future in Britain, this bold and satirical crime-drama focuses on Alex, a young, domineering delinquent whose penchant for violence and sex leads him to be set up by his resentful gang.

Told through the perspective of a young boy, Tietou, the story portrays the evolution of his family through the course of the Anti-Rightist Movement, the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution.

In prison, Alex volunteers to undergo an experimental psychological treatment developed by the government as a cure for all criminal problems.

For example, the real father evolved from the loving patriach to the protective but unemotional stepfather.

Alex is conditioned to feel nausea in relation to violence and sex, and returns to society soon after — but is he really cured?


04 NEWS

7+(1$1<$1*

92/ 12

18

CHRONICLE 04

Starbucks opens at NTU campus :LWKWKHRSHQLQJRI 6WDUEXFNVDWWKH6$& VWXGHQWVFDQQRZJHWD FXSSDZLWKRXWWUDYHOOLQJ RXWRIVFKRRO .(11(7+*2+ YOU can now get your daily dose of Starbucks coffee right in school, from an outlet that has just opened on October 5 at the Student Activities Centre (SAC). Students and staff will also get 10 per cent off the prices of all food and drinks when they ďŹ&#x201A;ash their NTU identiďŹ cation cards at the counter. However, there are no seats in the outlet, although customers can turn to the sofas and armchairs at the SAC and Global Lounge. Starbucks said that this is due to space constraint at the SAC. President of the NTU Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Union, Ramanan Kumarasamy, 21, said the decision to bring in Starbucks to NTU was made after students expressed that they wanted a good place to have coffee while studying late. The Starbucks outlet will operate from 7.30am to 10pm on weekdays, later than most cafes and canteens in NTU, which close at 9pm. The outlet will also be open on Saturdays from 8am to 6pm, and on Sundays from 10am to 4pm. During the holidays, the coffee also continues brewing, from 8am to 5pm.

However, if the store trafďŹ c remains high, the outlet may operate 24 hours instead, on weekdays during the school term, said a Starbucks spokesman. Final-year student from the School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Marcus Lee, 28, believes that the main draw of having an outlet on campus is the convenience of getting quality coffee. Some students have expressed doubt that this outlet can replicate Starbucksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ambience, without sofas and coffee tables. National Institute of Education third-year student Ng Wan Ching, 21, said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I envision a cosy setting when I think of Starbucks but this is lost at the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outlet without the sofas.â&#x20AC;? However this was not an issue with others, who said that there were many seating options nearby such as the Global Lounge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most students just buy and bring their drinks to lectures or elsewhere to sit,â&#x20AC;? said Lim Ee Huai, ďŹ rst-year-student from the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering third-year student Muhammad SauďŹ , who visits Starbucks once a month, was also surprised by the outletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s location. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It should be in a more well exposed area, like where MacDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is, so that people can see the store once they step into the school,â&#x20AC;? said the 23-year-old. Director of Students, Associate Professor Lok Tat Seng, welcomed

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BREWING?: Students queue up for a cup of Starbucks coffee.

the opening of Starbucks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A great cafĂŠ which serves good coffee and food can contribute to the ambience and promote student interaction at the new Student Activities Centre and Global Lounge,â&#x20AC;? he said. Besides getting their coffee ďŹ x, students can also put up publicity materials for schoolbased events on the cafĂŠâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s com-

Public speaking champ

HONG KONG: The winner of PATW will represent Asia-PaciďŹ c in London. PHOTO | CURTESY OF MITALI KAKRAN

185$6<,4,1 ENGINEERS are not usually famed for their eloquence, but when Mitali Kakran speaks, the audience is sure to listen. The Ph.D student from the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering came out tops in the NTU round of the annual Present Around The World (PATW) public speaking competition.

The competition was organised by the Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) to encourage engineering students to hone their public speaking skills. After progressing through the national level, Kakran also won the Asia-PaciďŹ c regional round, held in Hong Kong. In November this year, she will represent the Asia-PaciďŹ c at the global round in London. Kakran, 25, clinched the top

spot in the NTU round with her presentation on Graphene, a carbon nanomaterial with numerous applications in the ďŹ elds of Electronics and Biomedicine. Her strategy for the 10-minute presentation was not to use scientiďŹ c jargon, but to explain it simply. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I presented by giving some real life examples. For instance, to illustrate how thin the graphene sheet is, I suggested that stacking three million of them will give thickness of about only 1 mm,â&#x20AC;? she said. Besides avoiding technical jargon, Kakran also noted that enthusiasm is key to charming the audience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you are passionate about the subject, the audience can feel that energy too,â&#x20AC;? she added. According to Kakran, the competition has helped engineers connect with engineering circles across the world. In addition to the excitement of meeting other engineers and learning about their work, Kakran added that PATW was also â&#x20AC;&#x153;a wonderful learning experience for engineers to brush up their presentation skillsâ&#x20AC;?.

PHOTO | MALCOLM KOH

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I envision a cosy setting when I think of Starbucks." Ng Wan Ching Third-year student National Institute of Education

munity board located in front of the counter. School of Material Science and Engineering ďŹ rst-year student Grace Chua said that she does not mind visiting Starbucks occasionally to unwind with friends. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is a nice environment to hang out with friends, with the fragrance of coffee lingering,â&#x20AC;? said the 19-year-old.

reach out to 30,000 readers get firsthand

experience of journalism*

*and some extra AUs / Hall Points never hurt

now recruiting - news editors - layout editors - business managers - photo editors

apply to duffy@ntu.edu.sg 7+(1$1<$1*

CHRONICLE


92/ 12

18

NEWS 05

7+(1$1<$1*

04 CHRONICLE

Making an honest living

LIGHTS OUT: The Japanese food stall's earnings were affected by the blackout. PHOTO | MALCOLM KOH

SELF-STARTERS: Lee Jie Sheng (Left) and Ewan Sou (Right) have set up Alldealsleak to solve your group-buying woes. PHOTO | MALCOLM KOH

%HJLQQLQJDVD UHVSRQVHWRDGLVKRQHVW RQOLQHJURXSEX\GHDO $OO'HDOV/HDNKDVQRZ WXUQHGSURĂ&#x20AC;WDEOH 1$7$/,(7(2 DESPITE its beginnings as a spontaneous response to a dishonest online group-buy deal, reviews website AllDealsLeak, has developed into a fully-ďŹ&#x201A;edged business venture. Recently, the site even clinched a $20,000 grant. It was set up in a collaboration by NTU undergraduates and alumni. Over a year ago, undergraduates Ewan Sou and Lee Jie Sheng, both 22 then, bought a food deal coupon online which entitled them to a discount. But they arrived at the store to ďŹ nd that the original price was understated, which reduced the discount. Frustrated, the two students from the School of Humanities and Social Sciences created a blog where they wrote entries about dishonest deals which they had heard about from friends. This was their attempt to make more people aware of such deals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At that time, the website was only a blog to inform other consumers out there to be careful of certain deals,â&#x20AC;? said Sou. The two started receiving emails requesting for reviews on

particular deals. They saw the potential to start a business when site trafďŹ c began to increase, and roped in Terrance Chung, a 32-year-old NTU alumni formerly from the School of Computer Engineering. Together, the trio founded AllDealsLeak (ADL), a website that reviews and advises consumers of group buys. The site now has about 1200 visitors every day, and has even been featured in The Sunday Times, The Business Times and iWeekly. ADL selects different deals from group-buy sites such as Groupon and StreetDeal and re-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;At that time, the website was only a blog to inform other consumers out there to be careful of certain deals." Ewan Sou Third-year student School of Humanities and Social Studies

views them. These group-buy sites harness the power of bulk-buying to get discounted prices for products and services for all. After doing the necessary research, ADLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s writers will com-

Blackout disrupts business at Can A

pare the cost and advise consumers on whether the deal is worth purchasing. However, they do not comment on the quality, as they do not purchase the deals themselves. Customers can also give more information about the various deals by posting on a reviewing forum on ADLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Consumers who have bought or redeemed their deals can share their experiences with other consumers,â&#x20AC;? said Sou. In August this year, their venture was greatly boosted by the Chua Thian Poh Venture Grant worth $20,000, when they submitted their business plan for the site. The grant was available only to students who have done a minor or a Masters in Entrepreneurship. Fortunately, Sou and Lee had previously taken NTUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Minor in Entrepreneurship (MIE) program. The minor programme taught them the theoretical aspects of running a business, such as marketing and accounting, as well as how to write a business plan, which helped them when they applied for the grant. â&#x20AC;&#x153;During the course of the program, we had to work with different people and teams to complete tasks in a short time frame, gaining essential skills that we use in every aspect of running ADL,â&#x20AC;? said Sou. ADLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website is at http://alldealsleak.com.

721*6,$1&+22 NTUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Food Connection was hit by blackouts during lunchtime last Tuesday, disrupting the business of food stalls there. The series of blackouts occurred at 10.55 am and lasted two hours. The gas supply was cut off as a result of the power shortage. This prevented stalls from running, thus affecting the amount of money earned that day. It is still unclear what caused the problem. Ms Jannie Toh, manager of Broadway Holdings Pte Ltd, the company that runs Food Connections, said that the Japanese and mixed rice stalls had to throw two pots of rice as they were going bad. According to Ms Esther Chew, who helps her husband at the Japanese food stall, the rain had brought in more business than usual as people took shelter in the canteen. She said that there was an increase of 20 per cent before the blackout occurred. After which, business was halted, resulting in lower earnings compared to most days. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was in a bad mood because the power shortage affected my business,â&#x20AC;? said the 33-year-old. Korean stall owner Chen Wen said his total loss amounted between $300 to $400 as the blackout left him with only uncooked ingredients since all his dishes are usually cooked on the spot, and this was impossible with the gas cut. Mr Chen was unhappy that this happened during lunchtime,

which is the peak period for business, and that no explanation was given by the Broadway Holdings. Power was initially restored but it was cut off again after 15 minutes. This continued for three more times before the electricity was fully restored two hours later. Although the cause of the short-circuit is still under investigation, Mr Wong, technical ofďŹ cer of the OfďŹ ce of Facilities Planning and Management, suspects faulty appliances.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was in a bad mood because the power shortage affected my business." Ms Esther Chew Stall owner Japanese food stall

To prevent such incidents from happening again, vegetarian food stall owner Thuy Nhi believes that the management should conduct more frequent checks on the power supply. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope that the school can send someone who is experienced to solve the problem once and for all,â&#x20AC;? she said. Mr Wong said that while his ďŹ rst response is to resume operation as soon as possible, he would also feedback to the management that thorough checks on the appliances should be more frequent.


06 NEWS

7+(1$1<$1*

92/ 12

18

CHRONICLE 04

Rising demand for TCM clinic

TCM: The clinic also serves the NTU popullation as well as the general public.

,QFUHDVLQJQXPEHUVRI SDWLHQWVYLVLWWKH178 &KLQHVH0HGLFLQH&OLQLFWR LPSURYHWKHLUZHOOEHLQJRU VHHNDOWHUQDWLYHVROXWLRQV DQGWUHDWPHQWV <(21*.$5<$1 EVEN the slightest breeze can cause student, Derrick Soh, 23, to break out in hives all over his body. It is a condition he has been marked with since his days in National Service. With hot and humid weather or wind elements like “the fan blowing straight at [him]”, a breakout will occur. The itchiness irritates him most especially when he’s studying. However, since he decided to seek treatment at the NTU Chi-

nese Medicine Clinic, the School of Biological Sciences (SBS) student has had less frequent breakouts. Soh has not had a single red spot on his body in two weeks. Soh and thousands of NTU students, staff and public have been benefiting from the treatment at the clinic, located at the School of Biological Sciences, since it opened. The high demand had even led to the clinic extending its hours. Since September 6th, the clinic has been operating till 8.30pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays, instead of 6 pm - a timing that better serves working adults, especially NTU and NIE staff. The clinic now receives more than 1000 customers every month since it began operations in 2010 last year. Speaking in Mandarin, senior physician Dr. Yuan Jinhong said:

PHOTO | LAM ZHAO YAO

“TCM’s benefits as compared with Western medication is that other than curing the illness or sickness, it can nurse one’s health from within the body itself rather than just treating the illness or sickness alone. “Some people who have been going to Western doctors may feel like they are not getting better as well. For example, if he or she has insomnia, they may not want to take sleeping pills so they head for TCM as a solution.” According to publicity officer Ms Poh Si Jia, 50 per cent of the clinic’s customers are from the public while students and staff from NTU and NIE make up the remaining 40 and 10 percent respectively. The TCM clinic serves as a learning base for students pursuing a double degree programme in Biomedical Sciences and Chinese Medicine.

As part of their internship in the second year students observe the senior physicians they are attached to during general clinical hours. The internship period this semester ends on November 11 and till then, prices are reduced to 50 and 30 percent respectively for NTU and NIE students and staff. A tui na therapy session which normally costs $10-20 in a private consultation, is only $5-10 at NTU TCM Clinic during clinic hours that students are interning. The general public can also enjoy a 15 per cent discount. Students often stream into the NTU TCM clinic and tend to seek treatment for common illnesses such as the flu, skin problems like acne, insomnia, stress, or they want to improve well-being or do tui na therapy for sports-related injuries, said Ms Poh. The physicians have also dealt with problems like infertility or backaches for older patients. The convenient location of the clinic and its affordability are the two main incentives for many students, especially those that stay in NTU’s hall of residences like Teng Ying Ying, a third-year student from the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. The 20-year-old hoped to improve her general health and wellbeing and the NTU TCM clinic was just what she needed. She has visited the clinic twice. “If it’s for flu, fever, cough, I will go to a Western doctor for medicine because the treatment is slightly faster. If it’s for general well-being, things that are more intangible, I will go to the Chinese side,” she said. “The doctors are quite trustable as well because they teach around here.”

More enroll in Chinese Medicine course &+22:(158, HIS friend, suffering from severe diarrhea at home, was too frail to travel to a hospital, so 27-year-old David Huang tapped on his Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) knowledge and administered acupuncture to him, and massaged his stomach. “He was skeptical at first, but the symptoms started to alleviate. After a nap, the pain and diarrhea were gone. I was amazed at the speed of his recovery,” said Huang. Huang was among the pioneer group of nine students who graduated with a double degree in Biomedical Science and Chinese Medicine (BMS). He said he always felt curious about the concepts and logics behind TCM, and felt that taking such a course allows him to ‘demystify’ TCM. Others like Ivan Ho, 23, a second-year BMS student, chose the

course because he was interested in acupuncture as he was cured of appendicitis by acupuncture in the past. The BMS programme is currently in its seventh year running. Two batches have graduated since. Around 50 students are taken in each year and the programme comprises of three years of education in NTU followed by two years in Beijing University of Chinese Medicine (BUCM), China. The students got to experience the coldest winter Beijing had in 60 years where the temperature fell to -16 degree Celsius, said Huang. Students also have to cope with Chinese language as the teaching medium, and had to learn anatomical and chemical names in Chinese, which was something out of the comfort zone of most students. However, he added that despite the rigorous teaching on the academic side, they had the chance to venture into the opera-

IN THE CLASSROOM: Lessons are conducted in Chinese.

tion theatre and witness gynecology operations during internship, something they did not get to experience in Singapore. However, a problem students face from BCM double degree programme is its financial demands. Apart from the five-year tuition fee, they also had to save up for their accommodation in Beijing, which can be taxing. With regard to the prospects

PHOTO | NG JUN FENG

of TCM practitioners, Ho, 21, felt that although the local TCM industry is not established now as compared to those in mainland China and Hong Kong, the market is expanding and there should be opportunities in the future. “I am keeping options open, still undecided between being a researcher, a clinical physician and the prospect of further studies,” he added.

TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE What is TCM and what are its benefits? Traditional Chinese Medicine is concerned with the balance of the yin and yang energy in the body. When we are unhealthy, there is a disharmony in our body. Instead of looking at the organs or structure of the body, TCM is more focused on the functions of the body. Diagnosis is mainly done by measuring the pulse and looking at the tongue. Acupuncture: Uses needles to inject certain points in the body to remove blockages of the qi (vitality or energy) and xue (our body functions) Student Price: $20 Duration: 30 minutes Benefits: Relieves stress, treats infertility, reduces neck or back ache, builds immunity, weight loss, insomnia. Cupping Therapy: A form of heat therapy using cupping – oxygen is first removed and a vacuum is created inside the cup by using fire when applied to the body to form skin suction Student Price: $5 – 10 Duration: 5 – 10 minutes Benefits: Pain management as well – rheumatic pains (in the joints etc), digestion problems, cold. Tui na: Uses special hand techniques to knead, roll, press or rub acupoints, muscles, tendons or other specific parts of the body to release tension Student Price: $50 – 100 depending on treatment plan and duration (subject to changes this semester) Duration: Generally Benefits: Pain management for sports-related injuries, headache, stiff body parts. Traditional Chinese Medicine: Prescription of Chinese medicine to cure illness Student Price: $5 – 6 Benefits: Can treat many problems including common illnesses like stress, skin problems, indigestion etc *All information provided by the NTU TCM Clinic For more information about its operating or general clinic hours and to book an appointment, visit http://www.ntutcm.com/


92/ 12

18

NEWS 07

7+(1$1<$1*

04 CHRONICLE

QUESTION YOUR TEACHERS $VVRFLDWH3URYRVW.ZRN.LDQ:RRQ FKDOOHQJHVVWXGHQWVWRVSHDNXS

A MAN OF SIMPLE NEEDS: Professor Kwok encourages student-initiated businesses and activities for a better student life.

Q: As the Associate Provost for Student Life, what in your opinion should a model student be? A: The first attribute involves moral character, broadly speaking, and the ability to reason and not just obey orders and to think through things. The second attribute is to be able to make a positive difference by being creative, innovative, by thinking beyond one’s own disciplinary confines. This is very important. The third feature is your own sense of solid and deep training in your own discipline. This kind of self-discipline will also enable you to engage in life-long learning. The world today is such that you have to keep on learning and perhaps unlearning some of the things that you have learnt before and sometimes relearning what you have learnt before. Now the fourth attribute involves leadership and the ability to work in teams to communicate your ideas and to also persuade and bring everybody onboard with you. The fifth attribute is the ability to respond to the world around you. I am very confident that the NTU graduates can develop these attributes, not only in the classroom but outside the classroom, our graduates will go out there, not only making a very positive difference, but they will stand out above the crowd. Q: The transition from junior college to university is never an easy one due to the changes in teaching and study methods. What’s your advice for first-year students on how to cope with these changes? A: I think students must embrace university life. It’s a great transition. The university is really a great laboratory for one to not just enjoy learning but also be enriched, be exposed, be engaged in experiments, be more proactive. And also, don’t just be on your own. Go and question the faculty, question yourself and your fellow students. That kind of learning is a very precious experience. When you go out to the working world, you will look back to

the university days as some of the best years of your life and you would keep wanting to have best years. Q: Are there plans to ease stress levels for students so they can enjoy a better student life? A: There should be absolutely zero stigma about going up to a counselor or student helper at the counseling centre to seek a listening ear. I’ve been a faculty, I know the struggles of students. Very close to the deadline, even some of my most cheerful, students turn into zombies, but somehow when they get through that hump, they are back to their normal cheerful selves. These kinds of challenges are seasonal and they are temporary and in life there are many more challenges still to come. Q: What has becoming a provost prevented you from doing? A: I lead a very fulfilling life. But I could do with a little more time to keep up with my reading, my hobbies and my interests. I’m a collector of odd objects. I love stones, for example, and many simple things in life make

“When you go out into the working world, you will look back to the university days as one of the best years of your life." me quite happy. Even a pebble can make my day. Q: With our advanced technology around school, and good facilities, it is hard to imagine a student life without them. What was your university life like? A: When I was an undergraduate, I certainly didn’t have Internet, we didn’t have social media, we didn’t even have the handphone. I’m a little nostalgic about those days. I can see the great ad-

vantages of today’s technology. On the other hand, we have to be a little careful because nothing quite replaces one-to-one interaction. Discussion not just between professor and student but among students themselves, and you cannot do this over MSN because many good ideas come out by just facing each other and debating with each other. There is a difference between information, data, knowledge and

PHOTO | WAN ZHONG HAO

teen without halal stalls. I’m sharing my belief that every canteen, in principle, should have a halal stall and there may well be good reasons why these two canteens do not. I am looking into why it is like this and how things can change. As for vegetarian food, I think we could do more to cater to different dietary needs. This could be also facilitated by student run businesses. Q: Which is your favourite can-

teen? A: This is quite sad to say but I’m constantly eating on the run and grabbing a sandwich or some food and bringing to my next meeting during lunch time. I empathize with any student or faculty member or staff during peak hours. We must do something about this and we must have a plan. Things of course will be better in the future. In the years to come we would have more halls, learning hubs and canteens.

“Many simple things in life make me quite happy. Even a pebble can make my day." what you might call wisdom and insight, which cannot be gotten by pressing just a few buttons. Q: What are some of the plans the university has to create a more vibrant environment for the students? A: There are many many things happening on campus. But somehow we have to make these many things add up to give a sense of a more vibrant environment. As for the physical environment, the leadership of the university has been working with the Student Union and has identified many spaces on campus that can be improved by adding some weather-proofing features and adding some new furniture and create some new spaces like informal learning spaces, interactional spaces. We will also be looking into schools and even student spaces can have more art on the walls or more public sculpture, outdoor sculpture. If let's say a wall is going to be painted once every few years, we could have a graffiti exhibition. Certainly that can be done. Q: Will it be possible for more Muslim and vegetarian stores to be opened in all the canteens? A: Currently there are two can-

NATURAL REACTION: Nature's response to Man.

PHOTO | LIM WEI TING

Professor's film accepted at international Film Fest A film depicting the relationship between Man and nature has been accepted in the Lucerne International Film Festival held in Switzerland from October 19 - 22. In his film, Professor Isaaz Kerlow told of the harmonious relationship between the couple deteriorated when the man became unkind to the woman. Her retaliations came in the form of Earth hazards. The film will be screened privately at Lido Theatre on October 13.


Lifestyle

Explore Daliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hometown â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Page 13

ĂŽ 

 /,ĂŽ +DOORZHHQ+RUURUVDWWKH1LJKW6DIDULPD\KDYHEHHQFDQQHGEXW\RXFDQ VWLOOKDYHDIULJKWIXOO\IXQWLPHRYHUWKHKROLGD\9DOHULH)RQJFKHFNVRXWWKH WUDLOVRIWHUURUODLGGRZQE\8QLYHUVDO6WXGLRV6LQJDSRUHDQGWKH6LQJDSRUH 3DUDQRUPDO,QYHVWLJDWRUV

HALLOWEEN HORROR NIGHTS

SPI GHOULISH TRAIL, SPOOKY WALK

:KHUH8QLYHUVDO6WXGLRV 6LQJDSRUH

:KHUH$URXQG6LQJDSRUH

:KHQ 2FWREHU² SP²DP 3ULFH %RRN\RXUWLFNHWVDW RU KWWSUZVHQWRVDFRP BECOME the next big star at Universal Studios Singapore (USS) come Halloween, when visitors will ďŹ nd themselves on the other side of the camera on the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Halloween Horror Nights. Modelled after the long running and highly successful Halloween events at its sister parks Universal Studios Hollywood and Universal Orlando Resort, Halloween Horror Nights at USS revolves around the concept of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;trappingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; visitors in a horror ďŹ lm. In what is USSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ďŹ rst Halloween special since its opening early last year, visitors will meet clowns and characters that look fresh out of a horror movie, including â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a sadistic ďŹ lmmaker obsessed with ďŹ lming tortured subjects. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; will cast visitors in one of his ruthless motion pictures, in which they have to survive to get through the night.

As they navigate their way to escape his clutches, visitors will have to ďŹ&#x201A;ee from hordes of rampaging mummies, deformed carriers of ďŹ&#x201A;esh-eating plague and mutated zombies in the setting of a post-apocalyptic town. Nasty surprises lie in wait, including â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Mad Scientistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; who will also be lurking around the corner, stalking unsuspecting visitors, waiting to catch them off guard and attempt to dismember their limbs. Incorporating an Asian twist , Halloween Horror Nights will also feature a dilapidated Peranakan mansionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;haunted by a demented matriarchâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as its main attraction among the scare zones. For an alternative adrenaline rush, visitors can go for select regular theme park attractions, such as thrill rides Revenge of the Mummy, Battlestar Galactica and Accelerator, which will stay open specially on Halloween Horror Nights evenings. Halloween Horror Nights is a separately ticketed event and will not be included in regular theme park admission prices. But, day time theme park guests will be able to upgrade their daytime park admission tickets in order to re-enter the park for Halloween Horror Nights.

:KHQ$Q\WLPHRI\HDU 3ULFH  *KRXOLVK7UDLO

)UHH 6SRRN\:DON

%RRN\RXUWUDLOVRUZDONVDW GHVPRQG#VSLFRPVJ

SEEK out supernatural scares on a trek through Singaporeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legendary haunted landscapes and visit sites like the abandoned Old Changi Hospital and the Bukit Brown Cemetery on the Singapore Paranormal Investigators (SPI) Ghoulish Trail. Previously used as a military hospital during the Japanese Occupation, the Old Changi Hospital is the site of numerous ghost stories such as Pontianak sightings. An abandoned public Chinese cemeter y, t he Bu k it Brow n Cemetery hosts the tombstones of famous pioneers, such as Gan Eng Seng, Lim Boon Lay, and Khoo Teck Puat. As such, the SPI Ghoulish Trail is also a good way to see monuments in Singapore and learn more about their past. Participants will be involved in small experiments such as the

HAUNTED SPOTS: Participants on SPIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ghoulish Trail will visit places rumoured to be haunted, like the Old Changi Hospital. PHOTOS | COURTESY OF RESORTS WORLD SENTOSA, INTERNET

setting up of gadgets around the perimeter of the locations, including motion sensors that could trigger presence of the supernatural. SPI Ghoulish Trails are designed for group activities like corporate and school events, and require a minimum of 30 participants for each group. They cover two to three locations, and usually last for four hours, from 7pm to 11pm, but can also be extended to 8 hours. Hardcore paranormal enthusiasts can explore trails by foot on the SPI Spooky Walk. Unlike the

Ghoulish Trail that transports visitors on a coach, the Spooky Walk is solely a foot-exploration expedition. These walks are more focused, and include tough trekking, climbing and bush bashing. The SPI Spooky Walks are also designed for groups, capping at 20 people. They visit only one location, and can be scheduled as a day or night event. It is usually free of charge, unless special logistics such as transportation to the location is required.


92/ 12

18

LIFESTYLE 09

7+(1$1<$1*

04 CHRONICLE 1. HALLOWEEN RAT TRAPS  Be adventurous and add some â&#x20AC;&#x153;rodentsâ&#x20AC;? to your diet with these strawberry rat drops, complete with bloodshot eyes and long curvy tails.

1

2

2. BODY PARTS SUSHI  Wrapped in seaweed, boxed as a bento set and packed with chopsticks to boot, this looks like your average sushi takeoutâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but with body parts sashimi. Indulge in some cannibalistic pleasure with a bloody, bite sized ear, nose, ďŹ nger, eyeball and brain.

3. CADBURY SCREME EGG  It is Easter gone wrong with Cadburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Screme Egg. The usual yellow â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;yolkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of the popular crème egg is now white with swirls of gooey green, thanks to the addition of spinach extract. Refrain from refrigerating for a runny â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;yolkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;.

3

4. CREEPY PEEPERS  These nasty looking peepers unwrap to reveal a milk chocolate shell generously ďŹ lled with a smooth and rich peanut butter paste. Serve all 20 odd pieces in a bowl for a lolling good time.

4

NO TRICKS JUST TREATS

,IKHDGLQJRXWWRDIULJKWIHVWLVQRW\RXUFXSRIWHDVWD\LQZLWK&KRR:HQ5XL¡VSLFNVRIWKH VZHHWHVWWUHDWVWKLV+DOORZHHQDV\RXFXUOXSZLWK\RXUIDYRXULWHKRUURUà LFNRQWKH79VFUHHQ

5. BLOOD DRIPS 6

 Get a sugar rush with Dr. Frankensteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s B+ blood transfusion bag of strawberryapple ďŹ&#x201A;avoured liquid. Though artiďŹ cially ďŹ&#x201A;avoured, it tastes very much like real juice. The â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;intravenous (IV) drip bagâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; comes with a thread lock in case you do not want to ďŹ nish it all at one go.

7

5

6. SMARTIES PUMPKIN  Join in the fun of Jack Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lanterns with this plum-sized milk chocolate â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;pumpkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; that holds a handful of Smarties.

7. CAULDRONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MIX  These gummies by the Natural Confectionary Co. are free from artiďŹ cial colours and ďŹ&#x201A;avouring. Enjoy a cauldron full of real apple, orange, lime, lemon, and blackcurrant juices topped with sour powder granules.

9

8. TROLLI MUMMIES  Create your own undead army with these inch tall mummies. In various colours including yellow, red, blue, and grey, these gummies are soft, chewy and not too sweet.

8

9. COOKIES Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SCREAM  Not just black and white, these cookies and cream skulls are wrapped in orange, green and black.

STOCKIST: Cold Storage 1800 891 8100 | http://www.coldstorage.com.sg/ PHOTOS | WAN ZHONG HAO


10 LIFESTYLE

7+(1$1<$1*

92/ 12

18

CHRONICLE 04

1

LABRADOR PARK LABRADOR NATURE RESERVE

/DEUDGRU9LOOD5RDG 6L[PLQXWHZDONIURPWKHVWDWLRQ

LABRADOR Nature Reserve is surrounded by ofďŹ ce buildings and ports which seem to detach it from the rest of world. But the opening of Labrador Park station will mean that the park will soon be a short walk away from the station. Adding to the convenience is a pathway expected to be complete in November, which will link the station and the park. History buffs will delight in the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rich past. A replica of the Dragonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Teeth Gate is all that remains of the unique rock formation that Chinese voyager Zheng

A LUSH ESCAPE: With the opening of Labrador Park station, this hidden park, which is also rich in history, will now be more accessible than ever.

2

HAW PAR VILLA PASIR PANJANG WHOLESALE CENTRE :KROHVDOH&HQWUH 7KUHHPLQXWHZDON IURPWKHVWDWLRQ

EVER wondered where restaurants and supermarkets get their supply of food? Look no further than Pasir Panjang Wholesale Centre. The compound houses 26 blocks of warehouses that sell fruits, vegetables and dried goods such as nuts and tidbits at wholesale prices. Even if you are not prepared to lug home a few kilogram of supplies, the friendly shopkeepers will welcome you even if you only wish to buy small quantities for personal consumption. In fact, shopkeepers hope the opening of nearby Haw Par Villa station will encourage shoppers to get their groceries here. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very excited here in the shop because this is an area thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very difďŹ cult to get to unless you have your own vehicle. With the circle line in operation itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just going to be a ten minute walk from the shop so people can come and

get their organic vegetables very easily,â&#x20AC;? said Ceridwen Wolf. The 57-year-old is the Product Manager at Zenxin Organic Food Singapore which supplies organic produce from farms in Malaysia to retailers island-wide. And even if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not looking to buy anything, the sights and sounds of the lively night market alone will make it worth the trip. The wholesale centre operates round the clock, but things at the auction hall start to heat up after 7pm when the vendors are ready for business. Come after 8pm to catch the auction bustle in full swing. You can also see how workers on forklifts weave their way around rows of crates and baskets of fresh produce. It is an eye-opening experience to witness how things are done here as they have for over twenty years.

He used as a navigational aid when sailing in the waters round Singapore. The original rock was blown up in 1848 to widen the entrance to the harbour. Though the area has seen little action of late, the site of the rock formation provides a stunning view of Keppel Harbour and cable cars in the distance. While you are there, look out for a nearby tunnel opening. It is rumoured to be the entrance to an underwater link between Fort Pasir Panjang and neighbouring Fort Siloso on Sentosa. The narrow opening is carved out of the side of

the hill and is blocked by bricks and rubble, but in the daylight, you can see a few metres into the tunnel. Visitors can also climb the Coastal Path, a steep ďŹ&#x201A;ight of steps to the top of the hill. On the way up, you might catch a glimpse of resident squirrels and other birds that forage for food in the area. If you decide to visit, bring your picnic basket as affordable food and drink options are limited, save for a few vending machines and water coolers scattered throughout the park.

OBSCURE

:KHQWKHUHPDLQLQJVWDWLRQVRQWKH&LUFOH/LQHRSHQRQ2FWREHULWZLOOEULQJZLWK LWVKRSVDQGHDWHULHVSUHYLRXVO\WXFNHGDZD\IURPRYHUWVLJKW$YULO+RQJDQG.HQQHWK *RKVKRZ\RXZKDWLVZRUWKYLVLWLQJDURXQGWKHQHZVWDWLRQV

3

HAW PAR VILLA HUA SONG MUSEUM

+DZ3DU9LOOD3DVLU3DQMDQJ5RDG 7HQPLQXWHZDONIURPWKHVWDWLRQ¡V([LW$

A FORGOTTEN PAST: Experience the rich history of Singaporeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early Chinese immigrants at Hua Song Museum.

FRESH PRODUCTS ONLY: Zenxin Organic Food Singapore is just one of the many stalls at Pasir Panjang Wholesale Centre that offers fruits and vegetables at wholesale prices.

HUA SONG means â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;in praise of the Chineseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, and the Hua Song Museum is one of the few places which casts a spotlight on the colourful culture of the seven Chinese dialect groups in Singapore. It is located within Haw Par Villa, a theme park on mythical Chinese characters, which has seen better days. Opened ďŹ ve years ago, the former cinema houses eight galleries which chronicle the journey of Chinese immigrants from China to Chinatown in Singapore. The area is mostly quiet, save for a handful of tourists and three local tours per month. A free guiding tour is conducted by the lone guide, Richard. The museum begins with the portraits of Li Yanbai and Madam

Tian, the founding ancestors of the Lee families in Guangdong, China. Mr Lee Kuan Yew, who belongs to the Hakka dialect group, is a ninth generation descendant. A noteworthy ďŹ nd in the Food Hall is little-known cuisine from the minor dialect group, Foochow, featuring dishes like the red wine chicken. The spacious Sur vivor Hall bears an unspoken aura of spookiness with realistic-looking wax figurines. They depict the various jobs, from Samsui women to fortune-tellers that Chinese immigrants took up in their new homeland. While galleries mostly consist of word-based exhibits, some provide realistic visualisations of

Chinese immigrantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life in the past. One such exhibit shows a gloomy kitchen in the 1960s, which features a cupboard for leftover food, and its sides are made of wire gauze to prevent insects from entering. The Clan Hall is filled with memorabilia from the yesteryears, which are on loan from clan associations. Some artifacts showcased now-extinct social practices. One of them is a silk cloth depicting names of newlyweds in mass wedding ceremonies organised by clan associations. Up to 60 weddings can be solemnized in such events, which were seen as a means to cut wedding costs. Other exhibits include uniforms and f loral displays of clan-based funeral rites.


92/ 12

18

7+(1$1<$1*

LIFESTYLE

04 CHRONICLE

4

ONE NORTH VERVE PIZZERIA

6OLP%DUUDFNV5LVH 6HYHQPLQXWHZDON IURPWKHVWDWLRQ·V([LW&

THIS Italian restaurant recently shifted from its original premises in Gilman Village, but fans of Verve Pizzeria should rejoice. The new Vespa-themed restaurant’s chic décor showcases restored vintage scooter parts and a glassed wine cellar. I suggest you go in the daytime because you would be able to bask in the sunlight streaming in through the full-length windows, which also offers a fantastic view of the lush greenery surrounding it. Large enough to hold 120 customers, this place is perfect for events as they also provide a screen projector on request. But the real show-stealers are their cocktails. Try the “Blue Bikini”, a well-balanced blend of Lychee, Bombay Sapphire gin and other secret brews the management declined to reveal. The best part is that patrons can order a cocktail

during happy hour and be entitled to a free slice of pizza every 20 minutes. T he F & B ma nager, Jason, stressed that everything on the menu is made from scratch. He recommended the Alto Bello pizza baked with spicy minced beef, bell peppers and topped with mozzarella. Also on the menu are their Enzo or Peking Duck Pizza; a simple topping of roasted duck, spring onions, Japanese cucumber and Hoisin sauce. And don’t worry if you and your friends are split on which topping to choose - just ask for a pizza with two different toppings. It is a tad pricey for students though. An 8-inch costs $19 and a 12-inch will put you back $26. But go with friends and share a pizza, as a 12-inch is good for two to three. Get 10% off when you flash your NTU Alumni Club membership card.

A PAMPERING TREAT: The tasty but pricey Alto Bello pizza, which features spicy beef, bell peppers, and mozzarella, is highly recommended at Verve Pizzeria.

NO MORE 6

11

BOTANIC GARDENS IMPRESSIONS ART STUDIO

&OXQ\&RXUW%XNLW7LPDK5RDG 7ZRPLQXWHZDONIURPWKHVWDWLRQ·V([LW$

5

FARRER ROAD WESTLAKE

%ON4XHHQ·V5RDG )LYHPLQXWHZDON IURPWKHVWDWLRQ·V([LW%

INNOCUOUSLY Innocuously nestled within a typical public housing estate at Queen’s Road is one of the pioneering eateries which brought braised pork buns to Singapore in 1976. Also known as Kong Bak Pau, it is a stalwart on the restaurant’s menu, with nine out of 10 customers ordering the dish on average. Consisting of five luscious pieces of pork belly served with piping hot steamed buns on a bed of lettuce leaves, this yummy delicacy costs $12. The key to making a good Kong Bak Pau is to ensure that it is not a greasy overkill, said Mr Robert Lim, 62, Westlake’s manager. He is a second-generation member in the family business. An eight-hour process painstakingly shaves some of the fat content. The pork belly is first boiled, then deep-fried, and finally marinated with dark soy sauce before getting steamed to remove excess oil. The result is a deliciously soft slab of pork belly. More than 200kg of pork is

used for each batch which is made every two days to ensure freshness. The tender piece of meat is perfectly sandwiched between springy steamed buns, together with lettuce leaves and parsley to give it a crunchy juxtaposition next to the well-marbled pork. The fluffiness of the buns is achieved by using Lye water, instead of baking powder. Westlake also serves an assortment of Zi Char dishes. Popular choices include the spicy Sze Chuan hot and sour soup ($8) and yam basket ($16). The Circle Line’s seven-year long constr uction has caused business to drop by 40 percent. Construction block-ups and massive traffic jams along Farrer Road made it inconvenient for diners to visit the restaurant. Although Mr Lim noted most customers come by car, he is optimistic about being near the new Farrer Road MRT station. “We hope that business will increase, as the Circle Line will provide another means of public transport for our customers,” he said.

EXPERIMENT WITH ART: Amateurs can now get their hands dirty with ceramic painting and batik painting.

GET an invigorating dose of art therapy by expressing your creativity on canvas, ceramics and cloths. The bare industrial-like palette of the art studio allows vibrant shelves of acrylic paint bottles, scrapbook accessories, pottery sculptures and paintings to stand out. Co-owner Ms Anna Peterson, 45, wanted to create a space for people to walk in and do art. “Most people need to set aside time to do a whole course on art forms like ceramic and Batik painting,” she said. Most popular among walk-in customers is ceramic bisque painting. These palm-sized pieces come in various shapes, such as dragonfly and soccer ball. For something more challenging, choose from a buffet of

ceramic sculptures to splash some colours on. They include practical accessories like trinket boxes, mugs, and piggy banks. But don’t get too excited about bringing home and showing off your artistic works after painting them in underglaze (ceramic paint). There is a two-week wait for the staff to fire the ceramics and add a glossy layer. Prices range from $9 for a dog figurine to $45 for a plate. Batik painting is another popular option. Customers colour the cotton canvas bearing waxed outlines of designs with batik dyes. The artwork can be transferred onto pillowcases, bags, and placemats. For those starved of artistic inspirations, you can turn to folders of

images categorised by themes such as animals and flowers for ideas. Besides do-it-yourself art services, the one-year-old art studio offers art workshops from animation drawing to pottery, which is taught by acclaimed ceramicist Winnie Go. With the opening of Botanic Gardens MRT station, Ms Peterson expects a 20 percent increase in walk-in customers. “Hopefully, more people will drop by this area, and it is also a good place for parents to drop their kids off before grocery shopping,” she said. It is advisable to call beforehand to check if there are spaces available if you are coming in a group larger than six.

SINFULLY DELICIOUS: Since 1976, Westlake is well-known for their Kong Bak Pau, which is pork belly sandwiched between steamed buns and lettuce. PHOTOS| RONALD LOH AND LIM WEI TING


12 LIFESTYLE

7+(1$1<$1*

92/ 12

18

CHRONICLE 04

foodsnoop

MIXING UP A STORM 7KHFRFNWDLOLVEDFNLQIDVKLRQZLWKDQHZJHQHUDWLRQRIPL[RORJLVWVVKDNLQJXSDVWRUP7RVHHZKDWWKHK\SHLVDOODERXW (OL]DEHWK/DZSXWVKHUWDVWHEXGVWRWKHWHVWDWEDUVWKDWRIIHUFXVWRPLVHGFRFNWDLOV

DRINK CULTURE

ABSINTHE ARTISAN

BAR STORIES

.UHWD$\HU5RDG 

$%RD\4XD\ 

$+DML/DQH 

MIXING PASSION WITH BUSINESS: Ethan Leslie Leong proudly serves up his signature FlambĂŠ drinks. PHOTO | LIM WEI TING

WALKING into Drink Culture feels like walking into the world of Alice In Wonderland. While the monochromatic decor is Victorian, the handdrawn characters on the back of bar chairs, along with waitersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; uniforms that are t-shirts made to look like shirts with bow-ties, the bar looks slightly confusing. But beyond this front is a group of people extremely passionate about their drinks, and committed to serving up the best quality cocktails specially tailored to your taste. All the waiters have been trained in mixology, and despite the extensive menu, staff give recommendations and customisations based on customerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preferences. Usually, they will ďŹ rst ask if you would like something sweet, sour, dry, or refreshing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We encourage interaction between customers and our staff because we believe that everyone has a unique palate that we hope to cater to,â&#x20AC;? said Ethan Leslie Leong, Drink Cultureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s master mixologist and co-founder. As I love gin, Mr Leong suggested the Brainiac ($22), a mix of crushed blueberries, gin, vermouth, blueberry liqueur, and a touch of lemon served in a martini glass. It is called the Brainiac because of the blueberriesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rich vitamins and anti-oxidants. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meant as a brain booster so you should drink more of this before your exams,â&#x20AC;? he joked. Instead of the normal Gordonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gin, I took the drink with Monkey 47, an artisan gin distilled near Germanyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Black Forest. With 47 different herbs and botanicals in it, it took the cocktail to a whole new level. To end off, Mr Leong brought out his signature FlambĂŠ Rum and Raisin ($28) ice cream. He said that rather than following a strict recipe, modern mixology is about putting together things that will not only taste good, but reinterprete classics as well. It is served in a tall martini glass coated with chocolate, with a top layer of frothed milk that has been scorched with a blowtorch, providing a sort of creamy crispy topping, topped with a dusting of cocoa powder. Below the ďŹ&#x201A;avourful surface is cold alcohol that has been mixed with chocolate liqueur, chocolate syrup and a dash of fresh milk.

HIDDEN on the second level of a Boat Quay shophouse, Absinthe Artisan (AA) feels like an exclusive membersonly bar. Just opened in August, it was meant to be a speciality absinthe lounge, but owners Goh Hock Soon and Chong Pei Lan realised that Singaporeans needed to be coaxed into liking the fabled green fairy. So they created speciality cocktails â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all laced with absinthe of course. For the uninitiated, absinthe is an aniseed-ďŹ&#x201A;avoured spirit made from anise, fennel and bitter wormwood. It was popular in the late 19th and early 20th century, but was banned in many places for 50 years due to its â&#x20AC;&#x153;hallucinogenicâ&#x20AC;? effects. Mr Goh recommends ďŹ rst-time customers to try Flight of Four ($75 for four drinks). It starts off with a fruity cocktail, followed by AAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reinterpretation of a classic cocktail, then a glass of absinthe served the traditional French dip p technique, q before a coffee or tea-based cocktail to end off the â&#x20AC;&#x153;mealâ&#x20AC;?. To encourage interaction with customers, t he r e i s no me nu , a nd t h e c o c k t a i l s have no names, just descriptions. The bar offers a wide range of fruits for their cocktails, and the pineapple with curry leaf ($22) is one of their bestsellers. Fresh pineapple and curry leaf are crushed, then mixed with vodka and brandy. It is served in a small square glass garnished with a sprig of curry leaf and a light spritz of absinthe. MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE: This The tart ďŹ&#x201A;avours of may look like a regular Gin and the pineapple and the Tonic, but the ice balls are laced fragrance of the curry with absinthe. leaf help to mask the liquorice ďŹ&#x201A;avour of absinthe, which is an acquired taste. They also make a mean version of a dry martini garnished with bak kwa ($22). The smokiness of the barbecued meat accents the herbal ďŹ&#x201A;avours found in both gin and absinthe. AA also has an unusual take on the classic gin and tonic ($22). Instead of using regular ice cubes, they make ice balls from tonic water laced with absinthe, and that changes the proportions of the drink as the ice melts. Once again, it is the herbs that stand out in the drink. For customers who still have their reservations about tasting a glass of absinthe served the unconventional way, AA offers a take on traditional coffee and tea ($22). Their version of coffee with milk, affectionately called â&#x20AC;&#x153;white nightâ&#x20AC;?, has a shot of espresso with condensed milk, coffee liqueur and a teaspoon of absinthe.

AA ONLY: Mixologists at Absinthe Artisan come up with creative ways to introduce absinthe to their customers. PHOTOS | KOH WEI JIE

N EST LED in a restored shop house along Haji Lane, Bar Stories is a small addition to the furniture shop, A Thousand Tales. Yet, their cocktails are anything but that. M i xologist Dav id Koh says that he prefers to be called a bartender, â&#x20AC;&#x153;because mi xology is just a really fanc y name for someone mixing alcohol together b e h i nd a ba r â&#x20AC;?. A n e x-c hef, he believes making FOR THE SWEET TOOTH: The Roasted cocktails is just Pineapple Blossom is a gin-based l i ke cook i ng â&#x20AC;&#x201C; cocktail that is a favourite amongst those who like their alcohol sweet. all about pairing PHOTOS | LAM ZHAO YAO a nd e n h a nc i ng ďŹ&#x201A;avours. Bar Stories offers a range of over 50 different spirits and liqueurs, and like most bespoke cocktail bars, they do not have a menu because according to Mr Koh, â&#x20AC;&#x153;every mixologist has their own signature drink, and a different interpretation of thingsâ&#x20AC;?. Customers are asked about how they feel that day, or what ďŹ&#x201A;avours they preferred. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like to tell customers Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m the menu,â&#x20AC;? Mr Koh added.

NOT A MIXOLOGIST: David Koh, a staff at Bar Stories, prefers the humble title of bar tender as he thinks that mixologist is just a fancy name for someone who mixes ďŹ&#x201A;avours.

For those looking for something sweet, Koh has a Roasted Pineapple Blossom ($25), a mixture of rum and pineapple juice topped with caramelised pineapple. I found the drink slightly oversweet, though, especially with the addition of brown sugar. One of Bar Storiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; most popular drinks is the Rosemary Cooler ($20). A gin-based cocktail that incorporates rosemary and lemons, the addition of the herb is intended to enhance the botanical notes within the gin. Another signature off the menu drink that Koh recommends is his own interpretation of a key lime pie ($25). Lime juice and vodka is shaken with ice to form the base, before being topped with frothed milk and torched with rum, making for a spectacular feast for the eyes too. The sharp taste of lime manages to cut through the diary topping, providing a nice balance.


92/ 12

18

7+(1$1<$1*

LIFESTYLE

04 CHRONICLE

13

travelogue

DALIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DWELLING $WUDQTXLOILVKLQJYLOODJHZRXOGQRWEHWKHILUVWLPDJH\RXZRXOGOLQNWR6DOYDGRU'DOLEXW3RUW/OLJDWDVPDOOYLOODJHRQD ED\QH[WWRXQDVVXPLQJ6SDQLVKWRZQ&DGDTXHVLVZKHUHWKHUHQRZQHGVXUUHDOLVWSDLQWHUFDOOHGKRPH9DOHULH$EDGLQHV WDNHVDSHHNLQWRZKHUHWKHJHQLXVGZHOOHG

T

he road towards Cadaques town is narrow and winding, f lanked by modest forests of olive tree groves and grape vines. Once at the mountain summit, Cadaques reveals itself to us. This Spanish town is painted white, punctuated with warm blocks of terracotta roofs, and guarded by emerald blue waters. We head down towards Port Lligat, a humble ďŹ shing village near Cadaques made famous by Daliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dwelling. The view that greets is that of serene beauty. T he ja g ge d out l i ne s of t he r oc k formations contrast against the delicate gradient created by clouds blanketing the sky, while a collection of small white and yellow boats line the dock neatly. Inside a makeshift tent at the end of the dock, ďŹ shermen are untangling their nets. Curious, I gesture towards the array of ďŹ shing nets and pails ďŹ lled with corals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Muchas trabajas,â&#x20AC;? he says, meaning â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;lots of workâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. He carefully weaves through the nets; a chaotic jumble of tangled strings and dead corals. Matching my curiosity, he ďŹ res a string of questions at me in Spanish. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are you on a holiday? Where are you from? What do you study?â&#x20AC;? he rattles on. I tried to reply in my inadequate Spanish, but my lack of vocabulary eventually failed me. He then continued working on his nets quietly as a comfortable silence followed, allowing me to observe him. Something felt peculiar about this scene. Just a few hours ago, I was at the Salvador Dali Museum in Figueres, immersed in the world of surrealism where nothing was ordinary. And watching this ďŹ sherman perform a routine task seems, well, ordinary. It was hard to picture Dali mingling with such unassuming people. Next to this earnest ďŹ sherman, Dali would almost seem like a madhouse escapee. As I bade the ďŹ sherman goodbye and walked back towards the beach, I was drawn to a wooden boat which had a tree growing out of it. Docked right in front of Daliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house, the imagery was just like something out of his painting. To me, that was part of the charm of this village: it lures you in gently with its unassuming natural beauty, and stops you abruptly in your tracks as you are faced with an oddity that could only be a Dali work of art. To be welcomed into the house-museum of Dali by a towering stuffed polar bear bearing a lamp and wearing enough bling to put Kanye West to shame was one such oddity. Explor ing Daliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house felt li ke a conversation with the man himself. It was easy to imagine him animatedly exclaiming in a thick Spanish accent, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I see a rhinoceros. No, a rhinocerosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; head, but not just the head, but with wings! Yes wings!â&#x20AC;? And there it would be hanging on the wall, a winged rhinoceros head. A nd wh i le spi res a re com mon i n European architecture, Daliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obsession with eggs made it all the way to the roof of

DALIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DECOR: Daliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obsession with eggs made it all the way to the roof of his house, beside the famous phallic swimming pool. PHOTOS | COURTESY OF VALERIE ABADINES

It lures you in gently with its unassuming natural beauty, and stops you abruptly in your tracks as you are faced with an oddity that could only be a Dali s work of art.

his house. A glance to the right reveals a irrelevant pair of hands on one panel, and looking out into the garden unveils the famous phallic swimming pool. To me, Dali had perfected the art of randomness. Dali carved windows that framed the idyllic scene outside like a postcard, and his ingenious use of mirror

allowed him to enjoy the views of the harbour from his bed. He also claimed that, as the eastern most point of the Peninsula, he was the ďŹ rst person to see the sunrise every morning over Spain, and his studios were designed to receive a generous amount of sunlight. Images of Gala, his wife and muse,

STARK CONTRAST: Daliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s artwork, including a stuffed polar bear wearing jewellery (above), stands out against ďŹ shermen at work in the idyllic ďŹ shing village (top).

were evident everywhere in the labyrinth of rooms. Dali lived and painted here until the death of Gala in 1982. Initially bought as a single block, it was extended over the years to house his studio and other artwork. After his death in 1989, it was converted into a museum in 1997. His house was a ref lection of his incomparable personality, and a preview into the mind of a genius. Dali was an artist who lived his art, and ensured that every detail in his work challenged and stretched the viewersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; imagination. And this is why I ďŹ nd it so fascinating that he chose Port Lligat, one of the most unassuming and quaint ďŹ shing villages to reside.


14 LIFESTYLE

7+(1$1<$1*

92/ 12

18

CHRONICLE 04

reviews

A DATE WITH DICK LEE 6LQJDSRUHKDV SURGXFHGIHZPXVLF DUWLVWHVRIQRWHEXW VLQJHUVRQJZULWHU 'LFN/HHLVRQHRI WKHP6QHKD*XUXUDM KDVDQH[FOXVLYH LQWHUYLHZ ALTHOUGH Dick Lee never studied at the National University of Singapore, he had performed there so many times as a new, upcoming artiste striving to create a name for himself, that people thought he was a NUS student. As a young artiste aspiring to make it big in showbiz, he went through many ups and downs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I went k nock ing on doors and worked so hard when I first started out,â&#x20AC;? he said. He has since come a long way from those humble beginnings. A d i rector, musicia n and national pop culture icon today, Dick Lee has become a household name in

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think artistes play a crucial role on contributing to the evolution (of the) Singapore identity.â&#x20AC;? Singapore. His contributions to the local arts scene have been tremendous. From releasing private music albums, to judging a reality show, and even directing the 2002 National Day Parade, Dick Leeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s career has gone from strength to strength. H i s produc t ion T he Adve nt ures of a Ma d Chinaman is still going strong since the original album made its debut in 1989. Thankful for all the recognition that he has received, he said it was great

to know that his music and work is so well-liked and well-received. Lee cannot decide which of his projects were most memorable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were all different, each a different set of experiences. I think the most important and often most challenging issue was creating and developing a unique creative vision. An eye for detail is also very important, I feel.â&#x20AC;? Perhaps his most memor able cont r ibut ion s to Singapore are the national day songs Home and We Will Get There. According to Lee, his musical compositions have an emotional core that he is unable to replicate. It is difďŹ cult to come up with songs with a similar feeling, he noted with a look of indignation, and then laughing, added, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good for me I suppose!â&#x20AC;? He has ach ieved numerous accolades for his work in the industry, winning the Fukukoa Asian Cultural Prize in 2003 and the Cultural Medallion in 2005. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What is especially special about (the Fukukoa Prize) is that it has been given to somebody not from the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;serious artsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, but a person who is a symbol of pop culture,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe that they have honored my attempt at creating an Asian identity,â&#x20AC;? he added with a smile. A s for the Singapore identity, Lee believes it has not fully developed yet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it will take at least two generations. It is an ever-evolving process and will take some time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think artistes play a crucial role on contributing to this evolution. They need to continually question, deďŹ ne and evaluate our culture and help it evolve. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After all, the industry is challenging and it is important to be able to survive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This generation is spoilt; they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to get promoted. They can and should

rise and prove themselves.â&#x20AC;? He also raised concerns about what â&#x20AC;&#x153;local musicâ&#x20AC;? really entails in this rapidly changing industry. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The idea of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;local artistesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is in itself a very contentious issue. What makes a local artiste truly â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;localâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;? I think in terms of deďŹ nition,

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I encourage the youth to come watch it. It will show them the kampung Singapore where I grew up.â&#x20AC;? is fairly hard. I think local music should always aim to be different, to be very unique. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think enough musicians and local artistes are actually considering what is truly unique and showcasing that to the world.â&#x20AC;? Dick Lee knows what it feels like to be an underdog, and hopes the youth will rise up to the occasion. He ended by stressing the need for youths to be more proactive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A r tistes should stop waiting to get promoted. They should go out and get noticed, work hard and do all they can to get that recognition.â&#x20AC;?

Show Information The Adventures of the Mad Chinaman 13 to 15 October Duration: 1 Hour 30 Minutes Venue: DBS A r ts Centre, Home of the Singapore Repertory Theatre $68 (standard ticket price) excluding booking fee PHOTO | FANTASTIC ENTERTAINMENT


92/ 12

18

LIFESTYLE 15

7+(1$1<$1*

04 CHRONICLE reviews

BOOKS THE KID Sapphire (Fiction) $25.64 available at Kinokuniya Published by Hamish Hamilton Limited THE KID takes the reader into the mind of Abdul, an underprivileged African-American child from the age of nine until well into his late teens. Abdul is the son of Precious, a character featured in Sapphireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s previous book, Push. In 2009, it was made into a critically acclaimed film, winning two Academy awards. Having been orphaned after losing his mother to HIV, Abdul is tossed from one abuser to the nextâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;he is ďŹ rst raped in his foster home by a fellow foster child, then left to struggle in a Catholic orphanage where he is constantly tortured by the priests for the next four years. From an abandoned, innocent nine-year-old, Abdul turns into an abusive adult himself. Sapphire is a cruelly explicit writer whose brutal writing might unsettle and even disgust her readers. Those unaccustomed to graphic descriptions of abuse and torment will not ďŹ nd any respite in this book. The Kid is a descent into Abdulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s demented mind and leaves the reader with a knot in the throat. There is no epiphany or emotional release as he begins to accept his lot in life despite his resentment. When Abdul transforms into a monster, he lacks the clarity of mind to feel remorse, nor does he feel it is necessary. There is no happy endingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;only a literal open door, suggesting that it is up to the readerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interpretation. The Kid is a good book, if emotionally exhausting. The phrase â&#x20AC;&#x153;so bad itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goodâ&#x20AC;? may be overused and clichĂŠd, but I found it extremely beďŹ tting of this book. -NATALIE TEO

WITHIN CHANGIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WALLS George L. Peet (Non-ďŹ ction) $29.96 available at Kinokuniya Published by Marshall Cavendish International (Asia) Pte Ltd

"I don t care about the past, I don t want it to handicap me from doing something even better in the future." Perry Farrell, frontman of alternative rock band Jane s Addiction, speaking in an interview with Spin, on his approach to failure and success.

WITHIN Changiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Walls is a take on the Japanese occupation of Singapore from a previously unexplored perspectiveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a British internee, George L. Peet. Put together by his granddaughter Emma G. Peet, this book is a collection of his diaries and records of his time as a civilian internee. What is most notable about this collection is Peetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gratiďŹ ed tone. Despite being taken prisoner by the Japanese, he continually asserts that he was treated fairly by his overseers, and in fact begins to accept, and eventually admire the Asian way of life. For instance, he observes that his fellow European comrades at ďŹ rst are resistant to the Japanese custom of bowing, but come to adopt it as a form of respect. Peet even begins to ďŹ nd corporal punishment acceptable. Peetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tone is largely sympathetic, perhaps reďŹ&#x201A;ective of his later occupation as an editor of The Straits Times, where he was trained to provide an objective view. However his viewpoint may not go over all that well in a society where history books have portrayed the Japanese as tormentors during their occupation. My advice would be to take it in context and with magnanimity. Peet tends to make judgments and classify people whom he interacts with into racial and gender stereotypes, which are sometimes a tad offensive. But the reader must also note that Peet interacted only with select groups. As a captive, he had no access to the truth and relied on rumors drifting about camp. Peetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s writings make for a good read, if perhaps a tad expensive at almost $30.

-NATALIE TEO

BOOKS FROM KINOKUNIYA

MUSIC THE GREAT ESCAPE ARTIST Janeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Addiction (Alternative Rock)

  The Great Escape Artist suffered a few setbacks during recording, including the departure of founding bassist Eric Avery.

ALTERNATIVE rock group Janeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Addiction may not be familiar to many now, but in their prime in the 1990s, the band was a potent force in the American music scene. The band returns with their fourth studio album, The Great Escape Artist, back on form and ready for another chapter in their colourful history. Eight years since the release of their last album, Strays, Janeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Addiction still sounds phenomenal. Perry Farrell retains his distinctive vocal style, crooning and wailing with as much swagger as he did 20 years ago. Dave Navarroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guitar solos are consistently electrifying, with his riffs driving tracks like Twisted Tales and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Hit You Back, while drummer Stephen Perkins lays down a solid rhythm foundation for the whole album. Slow burner End to the Lies is indicative of the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s revitalisation. The song builds on Perkinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; excellent drum beats while Navarro peppers the track with his masterful fretwork. Words Right Out of My Mouth is the heaviest track of the album but the instrumental onslaught is tempered by an acoustic break during the bridge, echoing the structure of some of the previous songs and displaying the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s versatility. One ďŹ&#x201A;aw in the album is the lyrics. Despite moving forward with their music, Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lyrics still remain as crude as they were in the 90s. Lines like: You were the foreskin/I was the real head are jarring and may cause more cringe than cheer. Overall, The Great Escape Artist is a solid rock album but it falls short of their masterpiece Ritual in 1990. Fans expecting the edgy Janeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Addiction of the past will be disappointed as the band embraces a more modern and polished sound this time round. That said, the album is deďŹ nitely an improvement from their previous effort Strays, as the band rediscovers some of that dynamism that made them so inďŹ&#x201A;uential in the past.

-KOK YUFENG

NEIGHBOURHOODS Blink 182 (Punk Rock)

 Neighbourhoods will be Blink 182â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ rst album to be entirely self-produced following the death of their long-time producer Jerry Finn.

IF YOUR teenage years were set to the punk rock anthems of longrunning band Blink 182, get ready to relive those memories. The once-defunct trio is back with their sixth album, Neighbourhoods. The album is named after the way each band memberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s distinct musical style and sound resembles any city with many different neighbourhoods. Kicking off the album is Ghosts on the Dance Floor. Based on the melody and tempo alone, it sounds like a fast-paced, rock songâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;typical Blink 182 fare. But deeper listening reveals lead singer Tom DeLongeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sense of loss as he yearns for a loved one whose faint memory lingers, with lyrics like: I saw your ghost tonight/I know it felt so real. Such perceptive lyrics reďŹ&#x201A;ects the band membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; developing maturity from their beginnings as anti-establishment symbols. After the band broke up in 2005 over tour conďŹ&#x201A;icts, Jerry Finn, their long-time producer, suffered a cerebral hemorrhage and died in 2008. Following that, Travis Barker, the drummer in the band, suffered major injuries from a plane crash. The succession of these two disasters seemed to have cut close to home and motivated them to get back together. Some have criticized the album for lacking a uniďŹ ed sound throughout the ten tracks. There are hard-edged and abrasive skate punk songs like MH 4.18.2011, which seem out of place in the same album as synthesizer-driven Snake Charmer that almost crosses over into the alternative genre. However, there is still much to be enjoyed, such as the cathartic experience of the angst-ridden Natives. While it may not be groundbreaking music, Neighborhoods attempts to mix fresh, progressive styles with recognisable Blink-182 punk rock and largely succeeds. Loyal fans will not be disappointed. PHOTOS | INTERNET

-VIVIEN SHAM


16 LIFESTYLE

7+(1$1<$1*

92/ 12

18

CHRONICLE 04

reviews

FILMS THE TREE OF LIFE DRAMA Brad Pitt, Jessica Chastain, Hunter McCracken

139 min

 RAKING in millions at the box ofďŹ ce has never been the goal of director Terence Malick. Instead, he strives to be unique. In his 38-year career, he has only previously directed four feature ďŹ lms (Badlands, Days of Heaven, The Thin Red Line and The New World), all of which are regarded as visual masterpieces. On the surface, Malickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest feature ďŹ lm The Tree of Life is a simple story revolving around a 1950s family in the suburban town of Waco, Texas. Brad Pitt plays Mr. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien, a stern father of three children. Longing for tenderness, the children turn to their angelic mother played by Jessica Chastain. The ďŹ lm is portrayed as a ďŹ&#x201A;ashback of the eldest son Jack (Sean Penn), who works as an architect. He attempts to seek closure in a tragedy he is still reeling fromâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the death of his brother. Pitt as the formidable father presides over his children like a tyrant in what is a very out-of-character role for the actor, yet still performed with panache. He enforces strict discipline and does not hold back from hitting his children for the slightest hint of disobedience. This riveting performance comes in

SPARE THE ROD AND SPOIL THE CHILD: Mr Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien (Brad Pitt) and his son Jack (Hunter McCracken) share a rare moment of affection.

a movie where dialogue is scarce. Malick invites the audience to revel in a sensory experience, and this is where the movie both succeeds and fails. The beautifully shot scenes evoke emotion, but without substantial conversation there is limited engagement with the audience. There is no concrete narrative thread, and

THE DARK SIDE OF THE MOON: Commander Nathan Walker (Lloyd Owen) struggles to survive an alien attack.

APOLLO 18 SCI-FI/HORROR Warren Christie, Lloyd Owen, Ryan Robbins

86 min

 DID THE United States of America really make a ďŹ nal space venture to the Moon on December 1974?

Apollo 18 explores this age-old conspiracy theory regarding Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last attempt at a journey to the Moon, and why they havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tried to go back since. This sci-fi horror film is directed by Spanish director Gonzalo LĂłpez-Gallego, who also directed the 2007 thriller The King of the Mountain. Gonzalo takes a slightly different tack here as he goes all out to spook the audience. In the story, Commander Nathan Walker

the random interjection of scenes that occur outside of the Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien family timeline adds to the confusion. It is not a ďŹ lm for everyone â&#x20AC;&#x201C; you need absolute patience and clarity of the mind to sit through one viewing, and even then, you would most probably not be able to comprehend it fully the ďŹ rst time. As an artistic piece of work, however, The

PHOTOS | INTERNET

(Lloyd Owen), Captain Benjamin Anderson (Warren Christie) and Lieutenant Colonel John Grey (Ryan Robbins) were sent to the Moon with the mission of placing detectorsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the United States surveillance devices to warn the Pentagon of any imminent missile launch from the Soviets. While Grey stayed aboard on the service module Freedom, Anderson and Walker proceed onto the Moon on lunar module Liberty. On their mission, they discover a Soviet

Tree of Life is almost perfect, which is probably the reason why it won the Palme dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Or at this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cannes Film Festival. If the story of the Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien family had been better developed, this confusing artistic piece could have been an exceptional cinematic experience for everyone.

-BENJAMIN LIM lander and the corpse of an unidentiďŹ ed cosmonaut at a nearby dark crater. With their mission completed, the duo prepare to leave the Moon, but a sudden violent shaking from Liberty forces them to abort the launch. Fear starts to set in when they realise that the extensive damage to Liberty could very well be the work of fearsome extraterrestrial beings, or aliens. Filmed in the style of a recovered surveillance tape, the movie is portrayed as previously lost footage of the Apollo 18 mission that had only been discovered recently. This is reminiscent of films such as Paranormal Activity and The Blair Witch Project, cutting down on most of the typical highlights, such as all the melodrama and special effects, only to let the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;truthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; speak for itself. The contrast between the professional demeanour of the astronauts in the beginning of the ďŹ lm and their abject terror as they slowly realise the true reason behind the attack on the lunar modules can be gripping at times. Besides the external attack, there is the ever-present horror of being left stranded on the surface of the moon, thousands of miles away from home. However, the mild build up and somewhat predictable climax was disappointing. Although the psychological terror and the mystery worked well initially, the long, drawn-out reveal of the aliens attacking the lunar module deďŹ&#x201A;ated the air of excitement rather than heightened it. Regardless, credit should be given to the effort made in trying to inject the concept of reality into the ďŹ lm. With minimal special effects and no fanciful portrayal of aliens, Apollo 18 is out to convince its audience with its close depiction of reality (as close as it gets in a sci-ďŹ ďŹ lm) and largely succeeds in creating a more intense element of fear.

-CHOO WEN RUI


18 SHOW

7+(1$1<$1*

92/ 12

18

CHRONICLE 04

dapper: your essential style guide

#

TERRESTRI#L #FF#IR |Credits| Photography: Gladys Ng Stylist: Hong Yu Ran Makeup: Jennifer Es Hair: Mark Cheng Models: Adler Poh, Tang Jie (Carrie Models) Photography Assistant: Akai Chew Styling Assistants: Foong Wai Harng, Wendy Goh |Stockists| Danny L, 402 Orchard Road, #02-23 Delfi Orchard. ATZU, www.atzu.org Blackmarket, 181 Orchard Road, #02-01 Orchard Central. ELOHIM by sabrina goh, 181 Orchard Road, #02-11/12 Orchard Central. The Reckless Shop, 181 Orchard Road, #02-08/09 Orchard Central. Pedro, 313@Somerset ,#02-25/26. The Corner Shop, 14 Scotts Road, #03-16, Far East Plaza All headpieces by Ian Kong Yi-Jun .

On Tang Jie: Military Vest, $169, The Corner Shop. Gown, $5800, Danny L. On Adler: Shirt with detailed sleeve, Grey Pants, ATZU.


20 SHOW

7+(1$1<$1*

92/ 12

18

CHRONICLE 04

92/ 12

18

SHOW 21

7+(1$1<$1*

04 CHRONICLE

dapper: your essential style guide On Adler: White Shirt with Black Capelet, $90, Black Pants, Price unavailable, ATZU. Metal Backpiece, Stylistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Own. On Tang Jie: Yellow Panel Dress, $169, The Reckless Shop. Acrylic Pendant, $99.00, S a t i n C lu t c h, $199.00, ELOHIM.

On Tang Jie: Corset Dress, $480, Danny L. Silver Booties, $29.80, Pedro. On Adler: Black Sleeveless Shirt $70, ATZU, Gold Bermudas, $239, The Reckless Shop. Gladiator Sandals, $69.00, Pedro.

On Tang Jie: Golden Lobster Dress, $249, Black Sheer Cape, $289, The Reckless Shop. Silver Heels, $89.00, Pedro

On Tang Jie: Jumper with pleated sash, $269.00, The Reckless Shop. Grey Heels, $33.90, Pedro. On Adler: White Shirt, $70, with Black Capelet, $90, Checkered Pants, Price unavailable ATZU. Gladiator Sandals, $69.00, Pedro.

On Adler: White Shirt, $70, Black Pants, Price Unavailable, ATZU. Brown Woolen Blazer, $329, The Reckless Shop.

|Stockists| Danny L 402 Orchard Road, #02-23 Delfi Orchard. ATZU www.atzu.org Blackmarket 181 Orchard Road, #02-01 Orchard Central. ELOHIM by sabrina goh 181 Orchard Road, #02-11/12 Orchard Central. The Reckless Shop 181 Orchard Road, #02-08/09 Orchard Central. Pedro 313@Somerset ,#02-25/26. The Corner Shop 14 Scotts Road, #03-16, Far East Plaza


5Q[[)൵՘দྔ ᄢ۪ᄢ໾üüृ၁

ྔ໛ ᇢሓᡁߢծពĶИ֨

߽჻ᇶ୔ᅀࡍ֬ହဣ‫ݡ‬ൠ࿗߽Ɠ5IZQ\QUM*][QVM[[;WKQM\aƔ‫੺ދ‬೫ढ़Ԃ ࿊ग़࠶࿗߽Ɠ/ZMMV;][\IQVIJTM<MKPVWTWOQM[;WKQM\aƔࣣӏएϾ၉༩ਠ ࢊቝƗါ౯਼პሌࡌᆓ‫ؚ֙‬༶Ⴜܸ‫ݡ‬ൠ‫ࣩ֬ߓދ‬ಪ૑ॢ฼Ɨເ࿗ഺ฻‫܉‬Ж ‫֬ݓ‬ၰࡵèᅽ௒dൺ٧࿗߽฻‫܉‬

ହဣ‫ݡ‬ൠ߽ᇂᄤ‫ݡ‬ᄕ‫ڢ‬༇ᄞந

੺೫ढ़Ԃ࿊ग़࠶࿗߽ߓГ໖൝

ହս჌۸࿗߽֬սࡌ๝Ⴢࡍ ್ਛྔӵ჻ḩḩହဣ‫ݡ‬ൠ࿗߽‫੺ދ‬ ೫ढ़Ԃ࿊ग़࠶࿗߽èཔࢧ჆ఊ෷࿗ ߽Ɨᆊ਍۸ྔധ๽֬‫ܒ‬๤า೫൥ᆓ ‫ؚ‬า‫׮‬ሌ၃൮Ӎè ӵ৲҉ࣹ֬ହဣ‫ݡ‬ൠ࿗߽߽჻ၟ չಭƗ‫଼۾‬চ‫ݡ‬ൠကࣵ༩ç‫܄‬ ഌܼয়༩ࣣࠪ࠽༩֬࿗ഺè ႼѠ჆ ఊ෷࿗ඓྦ࿗߽Ɨ࿗߽ሩᇞ჆ᄞந ၉ಜकШཔ֙๏ࡸ՝ൠ‫ݡ‬ᄕ‫ڢ‬༇ࢿ ֬࿗ഺè ‫ݡ‬ൠ࿗߽୆ᄤؒఀୄᆥ൛ӵເହ ս࿗߽ᆴ၉Ɨఊር࿟໅჻߽֬൤৶ ҉ढ़޴൱è ‫ݡ‬ൠ࿗߽‫ຶ୺ދ‬ቒս֬ഌ၃࿗ཱུ Ⴜሩ૨౔৺༩Ɨᆊ၀൥చ‫ن‬ᇽ༣෫ ੡Ծ൚Օ࿗߽֬‫ن‬ჾ‫׀‬è ‫ؚ‬჆ఊ෷ཟӵ৲ྔ࿗߽֬࿗ഺ ૓ƗഭເཱུႽ֬෷නƥõ൵༼း࿗ ߽ଃಙ֬‫׮‬໑ƗᄣႼԐቇ֬ሮࣈ‫ދ‬ ৶֬ധ߽ಭ൝ᆭԂèö

੺೫ढ़Ԃ࿊ग़࠶࿗߽Ɠ/ZMMV ;][\IQVIJTM <MKPVWTWOQM[ ;WKQM\aƔ ᄼ൥჆ಇ୔ᄌӵ৲֬ࢧ୔౥ധ ๽èᇈ৶჆ଛ౷‫׀‬౶çಭ৒ç৭ၴ ೟ᆇ֬ढ़Ԃ࿊‫ن‬ᅡè ఊ‫࣎҉૲ۉڴ‬དྷ჆ହսƗߕ‫ݫ‬ ‫ۉ‬಍‫ݚ‬è ᄤӵ৲ԡఀƗᆣ۸࿗߽ᇁႼ ಭƗۗչହսപ౯ྔധ๽ಭඛቒֵ њሠƗ҉‫ݝ‬ཊᄤಭඛၟ‫ئ‬չè ቛເ၉۸ྔӵ৲ധ๽Ɨ࿗߽ᇞ ‫׋‬ᄤ჆ࠩ‫ލ‬ӵ჻ྔཟٌƗѰ࿍Ե෷ ૓֬ӗၷ‫ދ‬য়୘Ɨ๤൏၀৺༩ఊ෷ པܸࠖ‫ܙ‬၉ఖ‫ލ‬ቛè ಇ୔෷૓ӼϾਛྔࡍ௨‫ދ‬೒൝ ढ़Ԃ࿊‫ن‬ᅡ֬ሌ฼‫׵ࠊߌؚ‬Ɨ֥֫ ਛହսཱུӐ֬ۡ؎ᄨ྿è ᆊ਍۸ྔ࿗߽೉ࣉᆥࡽࡽҋഏ ‫֨݌‬Ɨ݆଍ሸಝи҉ഏӵ৲ၟࣹ֬ ധ๽Ɨ၀໊Ⴜ‫׵ࠊ؎୔֬׮ܬ‬Ɨಶ ྺ൏࡞࿗༤ఊ෷࿗߽ࣣ֬႖଍൛è

ྔ ࣿ ହ ս ധ ๽  ෴ ‫׮‬ า ‫׮‬ ࿗ ഺ ಜ

8ZM\\a<]NNହս୶ഺൻഭ૤भ

ହսїઉ‫ॴؙ‬ਇࡵಪӬ

3UHWW\ 7XIIധ๽჆୔Ⴕ ଇ ହս࿗ഺቍӵƗ൏ᇇࣉಷƗധ๽߽ ჻ၟ‫ئ‬չƗ၀ၢો୔ ֬෕؎ ᅀӐè ധ๽൥၉۸ᇈ৶჆ହս୶࿗ഺ ૌ฿ൻഭؓਆ֬ധ๽Ɨો࿗ఀ‫؂‬ा ന໻ᇜॢӸƗોᇢᄤ฿ჩთॉৈᇖ ྖ࣐ྡྷ࿥ਇè ఊᇖෘྠᡁ኿‫ދ‬ൻഭᡁ኿ቒເ ൺ࿗჻૓ߒ႙èᄤࣔ࠲୔Ɨ8ZM\\a <]NNᄤᡁ኿ç௻ট฻ְᄕ‫ॢ׵‬Ӹ֬ ࠕԫഏჂࡍ್ਛ໾֠ॢӸƗႼࢮ ໾ç‫؍‬ொ໾ç‫ݩ‬໾ְƗ༒ႋਛ‫ئ۾‬ ໾֠π‫ށ‬ᆇ֬ࡍ್è Ю࿗ఀࡓఀƗ3UHWW\ 7XII֬าѠ ࠊ‫׵‬2]UXQVO +TIaۗۗჼનࢹඖè ܸ჆༶࿗ఀࠊ‫ߊࡀ׵‬Ɨদሸߋ࿗თ ഺ༅ߋ࿗༩3UHWW\7XII‫ڼ‬ᄺಭӮ߹ਥ Ɠ෦Ɣѝ൜ߕ໴ٌ๰੤༬ࢲè෹ නƥõ໨૓༶࿗ఀ߽ҭߊ‫۾‬Ⴜಆ֬ ߽჻ࠊ‫׵‬Ɨ౯୶൝૓ൡ଩ၢևèö

ହս߆მїઉ‫ؙ‬ӵ৲ၟࣣӐչ ୔Ɨၢ࿥ਇృ؎սçњሠۡçӵ ࠢ‫ށ‬ᇾӲèЮ࿗ఀϝᄌԡƗїઉ‫ؙ‬ ႙দ၉୔၉؎֬ᅸྔࠊ‫׵‬Ɨ༒ႋਛ ಭఴদИଇè ๠‫ݝ‬਍઄֬ॐ൲ƗఊᇖЎ‫ݪ‬к ൲ç૲൲ç‫ؚ‬їƗ ଇս၉ྔഺ๳ ԢᇞຽƗቒᇛӵїઉ‫ྔؙ֬‬ӵ჻è ᄤՕఀᇖ࡞༪ఀ࡞Ɨїઉ‫ؙ‬ᆥ ᄤ࣐ྡྷۡృ؎࿥ਇƗၢ႙ᅥᄌ֬ ׂఅࣄᇖ߆Н߆მїઉೞè ሸഏᇢा൚Ɨ෷૓ः၉ྙఀৼ ࿊੉ๆ࿥ਇƗો՘҉ങ჆੉۸ཱི ൏Ɨ֥ລഏ‫ئ׋‬ғ୆ࢹඖè‫ؾ‬ᆊ ဩ֬ॴਇߕࢃԂ࿊೟۸ྙఀƗᆷ֥ иೞè ෠ಝ௣൏࿥ਇྒྷॴƗ֓սࡌ‫؂‬ ‫ؚ‬ՕЗႼۡ؎ಪ౭è๤൏їઉ‫ؙ‬၀ ߽एྡྷЎࢠሷçऑқçԢ‫ੱݚ‬Ⴚְ ࠊ‫׵‬টࣔ‫ؙ‬჻࡞֬खঢ়èࣣয়၀߽ ࠪ൏‫ؙދ‬჻‫ܕ‬๠Ɨ࣐ྡྷྖয়ආ֤è

8ZM\\a<]NN֬๽჻ᄤ್૑ॢაঀਇ༤Ʀധ๽ԩਛ฻‫܉‬ᡁᠫç௻ট฻ְᄙ‫ॢ׵‬ Ӹ֬ࠕԫƗ၀ࡍ್ਛ໾֠ॢӸƗ༒ႋਛ‫ئ۾‬໾֠π‫ށ‬ᆇఴಇИଇè


92/ 12

18

25

7+(1$1<$1*

04 CHRONICLE

य़‫ڢ‬ሸഭᅷο‫ؚ‬ധ߽ബԢჸ൴

Ɠද൏ᆓƗ቗ఖƔƥᇲ႟ᅫ‫ދ‬ᄇହ֬‫ࡋ׵߁֬ؿܢ‬èᄤয়‫܄‬࿗ᄄ୘ඇ൏Ɨ෷Ҝࡍ ਛ࿗ᄄ֬ധ౼ၳ‫׵ࠊ܄‬ധ๽Ɨၢሸഭ֬৶ਏߴওധ߽èƓႾ༶Ɣ෷ᅂւ਼ଇྔ ࡍ௨࿗ഺၳ‫֥܄‬ᄇହ֬၉ࡌ‫ؿܢ‬따ाເఀϽ۸ᄌ֬ᆭჸࠊ‫׵‬èᅽ௒dൺ٧ሩ฻‫܉‬

ᇢ൉ឌĶИ֨

Ѭ

Ԃሩሀಭເঀৈᆴ Ю֬ྗ୘Ɨບѝဤ ݂֬ᇲ႟ᅫᄤ୐ࣩᇖᇞൎ ྗྖƗၢሸഭ֬৶ਏߴও ധ߽è ᆊଇഺ༅‫܄‬Ӹ༩၉୔ ࠰ഺԢഺ൏ЫᆗؕເႼ๗ फᅷοçනߌ၀Ⴜཻঙ଻ ‫نދ‬ႂ҉ฅ౩༐è ҉‫ݝ‬෷Ѱ҉ಱເሸ࠴ ҉ྤƗ٘‫ےؾ‬फધྤᄕƗ ࠕЮഏႡႼᆥӏಭ෵୆Ⴁ Ⴜ֬Ɨᇁ൥๗৶Ⴜ൏ް҉ ฅ‫ށ‬è ᇲ႟ᅫƓ෦Ɣಪᇚ ჆Ҝࡍၳ‫׵ࠊ܄‬Ɨಱເᆊ ဩढ़ၢЁሀࢧ҉ྤ֬ಭ ૓Ɨሸ࠴၀୆౛ഭ‫ے‬ൺ֥ ࠊሩ֬ৈಆè ෷ᄤൺ٧൏නƥõ໨ ༦ߒै֥ѠಭຸླྀƗ֙Ⴜ ಭᆎӻເሸ࠴֬Ёሀ‫ؾ‬ѝ ൜‫ࠞے‬൏Ɨ໨၀߽फ֫‫ޚ‬ ྤ‫ڥ‬èö ಻ࠍ)8*ࢉ࿗ࣈ ࣔಷࠍ֫࿷ฅ୚ࣼࠕ ࣈ߽Ɠ)8*ƔເҞࠬç൱ ๗৶ࠎმင୆৶ൺ෬֬ս ࿗ഺ฻‫ࢉ֬܉‬࿗ࣈè Ы໠ࠪࠍ֫ࢉ࿗ࣈ֬ ‫ے‬ཟ൏Ɨցሩሀ๗ఝ֬ᇲ ႟ᅫ௣ࣨ‫׀‬නƥõఊ൓ߕ ‫ށ‬Ɨߕཥ௣ӏ၉ဩèö ෷ѝ൜Ɨ෠ಝᄤࢧເ

τࣨ֬ߓࣩ༶๗ಭࢊߌߕ иࢧ౩༐Ɨ֓൥ᄤᕽᄝ֬ ߓࣩৡƗৼሀ๗ఝ၀Ё҉ ഏલƗႼ൏ྺး๠‫ݝ‬؇Շ ྠদЁሀয়ࢺè ᄤয়‫܄‬࿗ᄄ୘ඇ൏Ɨ ෷ᅂࣣւ਼ଇྔࡍ௨࿗ ഺၳ‫֥܄‬ᄇହ֬၉ࡌ‫ؿܢ‬ 따ाເఀϽ۸ᄌ֬ᆭჸ ࠊ‫׵‬è ෷૓ເ‫ཱུࢀྰؿܢ‬ ഡƗྰ‫ڶ‬෬ߑനേƗѰౖ ࢤ֤֙‫ݠ׀‬ሷ૓၉ཻ࡬֍ ֬ႎმè ՕບƗ෷Ҝࡍਛ࿗ᄄ ֬ധ౼ၳ‫׵ࠊ܄‬ധ๽è ሸ՝‫֙࠰୔ل‬ഏਛധ ๽ቍᆵᆇᆴ‫ޱ‬Ɨો‫ڎ‬ᇢଓ ѓւሩധ๽ӵ჻ಇဨুᄄ ౩ࢸռ೨‫ދ‬஫෷૓ਔๆƗ ࠎಇҞࠬ‫ؿ‬๧‫ڥ‬৭ᄄƗເ ‫ݠ‬ሷ૓നࡀႺ༫è ᇲ႟ᅫ֬୴৶҉࣎ߗ দ෷૓֬ॣ‫׮‬Ɨ၀൳ࠍਛ ധ๽஻Ⴝ֬ᆭԂთয়ࢺè ෷නƥõᄤ໨๗҉౩ Ԫ֬൏ްƗ஻Ⴝ߽ଷྖᇞ ‫ڶ‬න‫ߌ֬ݝ‬Ɨಥ໨‫ޚ֥ے‬ ໘Ꮵèö ӵӐࣣ৬ࡁၲႸྔ ಝ‫ؾ‬Ɨᇲ႟ᅫ෠ಝѝ ૲‫ۼ‬ᆥӏಭ၉ဩƗಖႼሩ ྒྷෝ֬ӵӐࣣ৬è ཱི࿗੉୔࠰൏Ɨ෷‫ދ‬ ুൄപ౯းҜთϲ࠰฿ჩ ࠊ‫׵‬Ɨ‫ুؾ‬ൄಖ֙ሩ಍ϲ ๤࿗ऒमਛ෷Ɨන෷ેႼ

ሮ۳ҜࡍèᆊؔߴၲƗ෷ ࡁၲႸྔè ਽ບ၉ؔߴၲ൥Ɨԡ ᇖুൄӹ‫ه‬෷ഏॢࢊߌƗ ಥ෷၉ᆷ୘ƥõ໨ഏॢᄣ ၀҉ࢊߌਛèö෷‫ن‬ႂ҉ ౩ԪƗᅸদ๤࿗֬Ӝླྀè ᇲ႟ᅫ၀ᅂ၉؎‫ޚ‬ሸ РƗಖࣣ‫ݝ‬၉ِ৖ࣨ֬ම ॐ‫ޱ‬Ɨफ֫҉୆ႀՕ‫߮ؾ‬ ྖ೥ఞè ෷නƥõ໨χሸۨෛ ሸ࠴Ɨሸ࠴ढ़ၢቚ֫иѠ ಭ‫ށ۾‬èö


26

7+(1$1<$1*

92/ 12

18

CHRONICLE 04 ငઉ

ѐࠧ൰

ᆟ‫ڢ‬൞ࢿๆғ్ࢋ;\M^M2WJ[֬ᄓ઒ ᅭࡹव ᇖ໚ѐࠧ

࣠಍౶֬඼࿦௲ๆ‫ۉ‬ ‫׀‬Ɨᆊः൥௡‫܋ݛ‬ය֬ ᇽ༣ൕׁ‫ోږ‬Ҋඵ;\M^M 2WJ[ ֬ႜའ৶è ௡‫ݛ‬჆ഏ۸ྙఀ‫ل‬ᆥ൛‫ن‬ ҊਛྔংQ8PWVM ;൴ࠖƗढ़൥ ۶၉ๆಖԵদోҊඵൣ൞֬ቩ ‫ނ‬Ɨಥսࡌյ൴҉ࠪè ௡‫׳ݛ‬ൠ߽‫ن‬Ҋഹଃѝ ൜ƥõൕׁ‫֬ږ‬ᩴᇍçಪ౭თ ࠊ৶Ɨ൥‫ڽڅ‬ç‫ۆ‬ആ໨૓ഺࠊ ໴ඛԾྔ֬দჾèႀເႼൕׁ ‫ږ‬Ɨ൞ࢿᄀᄀє֫‫ށ۾‬èö ෠ಝ௡‫໊ݛ‬නଃ඼ႀƗ֓ో Ҋඵ၉ᆷᄤ‫्ؚ‬ၖᄪλƗ‫୔ئ‬ ఴࢫൺ‫ې‬ᄪၔᆸƗ၉ᆷЫѯߘ ࣶӆèࣉ୔ ᄌƗ෷Ցಇ௡‫ྡྷݛ‬ ᆦቀґƗ࢓І‫<ۺ‬QU+WWSè ෷ഭ‫੄ޱ‬༶ఄሷ4I]ZMVMƗ ၢࠪ۸‫ݠ‬ሷèཡ୔෦֬ోҊ ඵӥֿ‫ۆ׀‬є྿‫ئ‬ಭ֬ഺࠊቛ ༖Ɨ൥ग़࠶ࢿ֬औ๯Ɨັັႋ ਼ӝੇƗಥ಍౶֬௡‫ݛ‬ૠ౻ᆴ ೖ᭚è

ҳ๴ǧߢࡋ߷

ᆴఴߘႼᄎ؇ᅷο֬෷Ѱે Ⴜս࿗п၃Ɨ၀ેႼ‫׏‬ାཔܸ ֬ሌ၃໚௤Ɨढ़൥෷ᆪଃਛӈ ௝ԩਛ൓ႯບƗߕ྽းႼሣᄇ ֬നࡀè ௡‫֬ݛ‬၉սา‫׋‬ः൥ൗႯ١ ൛࡬֍Ɨ ๠‫ݝ‬നࡀদનቇႯ߃ ֬ྺ౷Ɨӈ௝ः೉ሸ࠴ఀຳ֬ ଱ဩᄕྡྷҧቛƗ໴྽ّᄎҧቛ ൴үè

ోҊඵः௤Օᆟ‫݆ڢ‬۳ܲඣ ֬ग़࠶൞ࢿƗ཯‫ٵ‬ᆇთग़࠶֬ ߁‫׵‬Ɨ၀ႀ෷‫ۆؾ‬єè ᄤ෷਼֤֬༶Ɨ෷‫ދ‬๽‫ؙ‬၉ ఖက‫ن‬Ɨಥ௡‫܋ݛ‬ය֬Ծྔӈ ௝ᇶࡽӵເᇽੇƗ‫ۆ‬єਛ8+ç ‫׏‬ሷ‫ދ‬ඛ໑ૉ฿ӈ၃è ؆क၉۳֬௡‫׏ݛ‬ାçಥಭ ૓π҉൫൴֬ᇍ߷൴ࠖQ8PWVM ‫྄ຶދ‬ႍඞ၃֬Q8ILƗಭ૓ၟ

ສൃࢲ֟‫ݍ‬ॐမ࿗ഺ႒є୆৶

ϣ෷൱ቛᆊཻӈ௝֬‫׆‬ᄶᆇè ୫ሴॷ‫ޘދ‬೫ั਼ષၐၟࣣ ӵເోҊඵ֬њᇄè ഭҒൻཫ֬෷ቀ൥‫ܪ‬ቛറ ૤Ɨᄤ௡‫ݛ‬ӈ௝๾ࣁ߽ເԢ༣ ᆇ‫ދ‬௡‫ݛ‬π‫ށ‬ᆇԾᄶ࣠༦Ɨၢ ሸྗ֬๾ࣁ൴ٌ੠ࠍ྿‫ئ‬ಭ֬ ྖƗႋఖౄ‫ܚ‬ಪӝè ௡‫܋ݛ‬ය֬য়୘ḩḩ҉ຢૌ ғ୆գൗ࣐ҋƗಇማ౷ຢૌè

ᅼѩ

ᇢ൉ឌ

࡞ှഺ‫׵‬༅ჺჷ‫׮‬ ჆!ᄌֿएϾ֬ສ ൃࢲᇽ฼ࠊ‫׵‬Ы਩൏ಃ཯ ၉ൠƗಥ‫ئޚ‬ၟࣣ‫ܚ‬ௗ֬ ‫܋‬ᇠսເᆘ࣠Ɨ၀၉൏ࢃ ࿗ഺ֬ԛߊ๽‫ؙ‬ւ್჋ઉ ‫ڋ‬Ѷè кᆇಱເƗܼࣗှഺ ‫׵‬༅Гჩࠩ๽Ɠ?:;Ɣ֬ ब‫׮‬௪कᆡၷƗ҉‫ݝ‬ൺႜ འ֬ᆊଇ࿗ഺ҉٥ࢃᆊ õ໨૓๗୍֥૓ᆥᄤ࿠౷Ёલƌöҳ๴ǧ໸ຶव ۸ၰບመঊ֙ቛ૲਩֬۹ ᇜ࣌ࠫൠࡸ֬฻ఴဍਇè ‫׵‬ჷႀᆴ၉ḩḩõߓГö ႒ቚ၉۸٘ও‫ן‬ҷƗ๗ ๗Ԣ༣ᆇ‫ࢫ֬׵ࠊؚ‬ൺ җ ಃ ႒ ‫ ؚ‬յ േ ຢ ӵ ࡀ ҉၉ᇈè ߊƗғ൥ᆊಜ࿗ഺଵᇇ෵ ਽ ບ Ɨ Г ჩ ࠩ ๽ ෵ ฻ ‫ߒދ‬႙Ӹ؎è ‫ڋ‬Ѷӭ‫ޱו‬Ɨ࿗ഺ Ⴜ؇ᆇ႒֙මᙋ֬ൠ౭è Ԣ֬ఊ෸ჷႀƗ೉ƥࠊ‫׵‬ ‫ ڼ‬ᄺ ࠊ ‫ ֬ ׵‬࿗ ഺ ᄤ ྔ ҉‫ލڟ‬၇࡞‫׵‬༅ჺ฻ӗГ п၃ར଩֬ଈᄕƗෂ޳ ࡍ௨য়‫܄‬࿗ᄄྰ؇ሿ‫ ߽ލ‬ჩ‫ދ‬գ࣐ࡌ๝୧ऑ৶֬ሾ ે଱ીПܻè၉ཻࠕұ ᅡთར଩ܼয়ƗԛϾສൃ ᇂƗ၀ᄤະഏᄬ֥సᄺè თࠖ‫ٻٻܙ‬ས࿗ഺബԢ ࢲᇽ฼Ӎܽ൥෷૓֬п၃ Ҥգ֬ब‫׮‬Ɨਾᆊ ჸ൴Ɨ฻‫܉‬Ӎ‫׀‬ಥ෷૓ एϾສൃࢲࠊ‫׵‬è ར଩NQVIT aMIZ XZWRMK\è ଇԛϾᆇඖ൴໴ҭè ෠ಝ଩ఴເᆿƗᆊ ෷૓ቀ‫߄ܒ‬ਛఅ۸ᄌ֬൏ ‫݃۾‬ၳഏদࢊƗ෵Ⴜ ࡞Ɨԛࣣࠩ‫ٵ‬ƗҭߊҊᇉ ֬࿗ഺར଩ॐ‫މ‬໨૓֬Ɨ ཻ࿗ഺߕેႼᅺ֥ढ़ྡྷ ֬༬ࢲè ҉࣎൥ఙߊԛϾ୆৶Ɨ‫֬ ۾‬١ϊƗ֓൥෷૓ࣣ֬ Օ ར ࠊ ‫ ׵‬ሠ Ш ‫ ٵ ނ ܒ‬ॐမሩ໨૓ູࠖ԰য়֬਩ ৬ၟࣣ‫ۺ‬ਛ໨૓၉۸చ ൜ƥःཥສൃࢲЮഭ၉ ၇࡞‫׵‬༅ჺສჴƗѰ ൏႒є୆৶è ၟࣣ൹Ԣఫᅭ૑ௗƗཊ ᄤ ॐ ੵ ၉ ۸ ١ ϊ ൏ Ɨ ဩƗ֙ϫϵ୴৶ߗদ֬ ࣉಃ཯ࠊ‫֓҉׵‬ၰ໌ሩ૑ ҉٥၀ཟ༶ШႯ١ϊƗສ ҉൥ഺࠊ֬õม‫ݛ‬ö‫ؾ‬ ௗး಍‫ش‬຃ߕƗ‫ౖؾ‬෵Ⴜ ၉ტ֥๳‫ن‬౭ঊ၀߽ႀເ ൥õ֟઀ö൏Ɨ࠙ࠥႼ ֬ԛШႯং‫؂‬಍ҍঽ‫ٵ‬è ᄱႼׂ‫ل‬൴ሠШƗढ़ၢฃ ཹ‫׀‬႒‫ؚູࠖ‬ғ൥ढ़ྡྷ ᆊဩ֬‫ݛޱ‬཈ಝთӣ཮ࠊ ಝ԰ᆴè਽ບƗԛߊ൏၀ ᆴ֨è

Юોᇢ೟๾ྡྷ֬öሸШ‫ܚ‬ ༅ֆಷöƗႀӵཹ҉սࢃ ‫ٳ‬ԩƗಃ‫ؾ‬քᆴ֬൥ᆟ൳ෘਟֆ ֬‫ٵ‬Ⴏè ྔࡍ௨ߓࣩয়ൠ߽࿍ҊƗ೉ࣉ ᆥ๤ਲ਼൹၃ᆇทะས཯‫ٵ‬ᆇᆟ൳ ෘਟֆ‫ٵ‬Ⴏ֬ढ़୆ྦè೉‫࣐ݛ‬ᅡ ද৭Ɨྔ֬൳‫ٵ‬յേढ़୆߽ᄤଃ ୔๾ྡྷè ྔࡍ௨֬ෘਟֆႯਏ၉ས‫ޚ‬ ۡƗો୔း཯‫ނ‬ᄆၨ۸ෘਟ ֆḩḩཔ֙჆௣ यોಭ၉୔Ⴏᄆ ۸èᆊ‫ٳ‬ෘਟঞࠔೖ҉ࡍၢߴ ൳ƗࢃႬᄀ҉୆ሸྡྷࢍࢺƗӵເ ໱ಠ༅è ହսཱུჺୄ֬Ә൮‫ދ‬൑۵Ɨ଩ ఴߕ໊ा൚ས཯‫ٵ‬ᆇᆟ൳ෘਟֆ ֬‫ٵ‬Ⴏè ҉‫ܚݝ‬ઠఴƗӘ൮֬႖၃჻‫؂‬ ߽༼ᆟ࿟‫ܫ‬ॡ൥‫ྺڕ‬းෘਟֆƗ ൲๴࡯ങෘਟ֬ൗႯඛਏè кᆇᇢຽ֬๤࿗၀‫ે؂‬ႼሸШ ‫ܚ‬༅ֆ֬༤ܿè‫ؚ‬჆໊দෘਟֆ ढ़୆းᆟ൳‫ٵ‬Ⴏ֬ൠ౭Ɨ෷૓၀ ѝ൜‫ޚ‬Ԁ࣠Ɨവᇇ҉୆য়ࢺè ෷૓ಱເƗෘਟֆ႒‫ۅ‬൥ഌࡌ ฻‫ڢ֬܉‬༇ᆴ၉Ɨ࠮ൗး൳‫ٵ‬Ɨ ၀႒‫ۅ‬ႵഌࡌӼ֋è ႵՕैԢƗ࡯ങൗႯෘਟֆƗ ሸШ‫ܚ‬༅ֆᆊߓГܻ֬୘ߕ໊മ ್ಭྖèսҍ‫ٺ‬ಭߕ൥‫ޚ‬၎ধൗ ႯෘਟֆƗႀເࡂ١ѓჂ‫ށ‬Ⴏè

!!୔ᇞߴ௡‫ݛ‬ᆴ‫ޱ‬Ɨᄤ ోҊඵ֬‫ۆ‬۱ᆴ༶Ɨ௡‫܋ݛ‬ය ᇛ჆ሎঋເႛèోҊඵۗഏರ ൏Ɨ௡‫܋ݛ‬ය֬ঋ෬ۡչၨ ૌჴƗ၉୔‫ޱ‬ಖఌࠝϵ‫׀‬ಃ֫ !ၨૌჴ֬ႛ৭è ߴཟఖ֙൏Ыሸ࠴Ծ৲֬ ‫܋‬යಁᇶ൏ƗోҊᄤൕณ‫ڥ‬ս ࿗֬ဍࢊᅂන‫ݝ‬ƥõ՝၉ଇӵ ‫֬܆‬ዉዉᆇ֥၉ଇᗨᗰ֬ԡ࿗ ᆇƗ໨್࣐ਛഺଈᇖቒႼԾᄶ ৶֬၉۸ࢯؔèö ࢫሩƗ෷၀ᇌቛਛ൞ࢿഏׂ ၉ҍႯ‫׏‬ାᇌቛ֬‫׏߉׵‬ႜû ພकቀ‫׵‬჻üè ෷නƥõഺࠊ߽ଭఖ၉ॽል ๯ས୍֬ାֆഏ૙஌၉༶Ɨढ़ ൥҉း൅ಇྗྖèö ఊᇖƗಥкᆇႍཧቒമॠ֬ ൥෷֬ᆊचߌḩḩГԂࠜ‫ؼ‬Ɨ ГԂ჊Պè ᆊಥ໨๛‫؟‬çමॐ‫ދ‬ऍ࢘ሺ ࡞෵းѝչ֬၉ᇜഺࠊয়୘Ɨ ၉ᇜ҉ၥનቇ֬ሸ໨è ᆊଇๆғ్ࢋೂ‫ލ‬ਛग़࠶ თၣඓƗ‫ؾ‬ᙢಝሸ֫֬෷෵ නƥõ඼ຮः൥ഺଈᇖቒ‫֬ށ‬ ၉۸‫ن‬ଃèö

҉‫ݝ‬Ɨ֍॓ృᇌྦյേ൥ ‫ڕ‬୆୬ሎෘਟֆ֬ൗႯཊመƪ кᆇफ֫Ɨృᇌᆟ൳ෘਟֆ‫ٵ‬ ႯƗ൥ᇔњ҉ᇔЮ֬è໹Ⴅᇉ ၗƗདྷෘਾԢข‫ޱ‬Ɨෘਟֆ֬ ൗႯ߽ս‫࡯ڝ‬ങè ҉‫ݝ‬Ɨ྿‫ئ‬ಭ‫ঀޚ‬ѓ߽ࢫ ൺෘਟֆ൳‫֬ٵ‬ཊ൓Ɨ߄ల๴ ۸١ѓƗ࠲ષలࣣ֬࠽۞‫ۍ‬Ɨ ၟ‫଻ޚ‬չ֥དྷෘ֬ཹ‫ݛ‬Ɨ൳‫ٵ‬ དྷෘཹ‫ݛ‬൥҉ؕ࡯೗֬è ෘਟֆӵ‫׏‬Ԅग़࿗ྔ๳௬ ՝ӐᄀদैƗкᆇಱເᇞ ‫׋‬႒‫ۅ‬ᄤ჆ᅺ֥Ե๫ෘਟֆ֬ เք௝è ࣔಷƗ‫ݚ‬սଳૣग़࿗თग़ ࠶ར଩ۡ࠰ကࣵ჻ྍཁ୨ѷ ൝က‫ن‬Ԣ൞ࢿ൵۸ۡཹԬ୆ ଎ƓPQOP XMZNWZUIVKM MVMZOa [\WZIOM UMUJZIVMƔƗϣෘਟ ‫ۆ‬ሔӵ‫׏‬Ԅè кᆇཔྗƗᆊᇜࡂࢲ୆Ⴢ ߓГ֬ကࣵར଩ࢃ֥֫๾݃Ɨ Ѱౖ՝‫ۻ‬Юഏࢺबෘਟֆᄶӵ ߓࣩ໱ಠ֬໠฼è თՕ๤൏Ɨഭເ࿗ഺ֬к ᆇಱເƗହս၀႒‫ۅ‬းᇞ൱࡯ ങෘਟֆ֬ൗႯèᆥ೉֙ԡ฻ ӗႯқ‫ޱ‬ሸ‫ߕ݉׵‬қक֬‫ށ‬༤ ܿƗఊ൓၀൥߄‫ٵ‬ਛ၉ؔ൏࡞ ֬ӗ֤è ᇁး࿗‫ࡍڰ‬ృ๾݃৶؎Ɨ ሸ Ш ‫ ܚ‬༅ ֆ ၀ ߽ ફ ફ ᄤ ହ ս õੇྡྷöఖদè

႒ ‫ܤ‬ Կ ሸ Ш ‫ܚ‬ ༅ ֆ ֬ ‫ڋ‬ ഐ


92/ 12

18

27

7+(1$1<$1*

04 CHRONICLE

ഺࠊ

3۪‫ށ‬ಇ԰ྔࡍ௨3<>ս83 ಇ3<>ӖӖ۪Ɨ٩ළ၉༶ഭྖၟࣣӵເ൏༶୔౥ಭੇྡྷ֬ვৈ١൛èॢ჌ᆴ൏Ɨ࠲۸஻Ⴝࢹ ϻಇ3۪ӵਛ၉ᇜ࡯࿩֬‫ށ‬١ٌèᆊ၉ఀƗಥࡁᆇᅼѩເսࡌ෍ઌ൏༶ᇽੇ֬3<>Ӎ෵ƗѰ ᆓ‫ڢؚ‬༇çࡕ۳ְႀු࣐ྡྷ‫ؚ‬иè ™<MW0MVOI\6<=IT]UVQ+T]J 3<>;\]LQW(6<=IT]UVQ+T]J‫ؚ‬჆ହս࿗ഺদන၉‫҉׮‬ଚഺè Ӎ෵҉൹ರ‫֬࣡ࣼݪތ‬ႉਟƗ၀࣓ᆿ༒࿼Ɨᆊເ཯‫ٵ‬ᆇ฻‫܉‬ਛ੺ ೫ࡹॉ֬3۪ߓࣩèཔ‫ؚ‬჆ఊ෷3<>ƗҗႯཔ‫֬ࡕֵؚ‬ਏٛӘ൮ ࣣ႖ҭંƗ҉൳/;<‫ڢދ‬༇‫ٵ‬Ɨ၀ႀՕ༒ႋ࿗ഺ‫୔ދ‬౥၉቉֬཯ ‫ٵ‬ಜ฿èӍ෵฻‫ཱི܉‬ЎཕƗᇖЎཕ‫ދ‬սЎཕƗ‫ٺ‬Ѡ୆ಿଳවç੉ ‫ދ‬ൌಭè<MW 0MVOྔ๾Ԣਛԯ௧‫ދ۪׋‬໴ནડय़‫ڋ‬Ɨเքᄱཻ൏ ްႯေ६ఝ‫۪׋‬èཱིЎཕႂའཹ‫ࢧݛ‬၉ϵè҉‫ݝ‬ƗЮ‫ג‬൥ၢ٣࡞ ‫ؾ‬٫ಭ๯ເ֍໑দࡀෟ཯‫ٵ‬Ɨᆴఴкᆇთൌ۸஻Ⴝ၉๤ಇ3۪Ɨ ၉۸ಭᇁ߄ਛ೟ॽ‫ئ‬è ‫׋׀‬ƥƗ;TQU*IZZIKS[:Q[M \P4M^MT7NN6WZ\P*W]VI>Q[\I ࡕ۳ƥᇖ໽‫֥׋‬ລഏ‫׋‬ƥ ᇇჴ೟ཱི൏ ລഏ‫׋‬ၢ‫ޱ‬ƥᇇჴ೟ཱི൏ φ٣ෟ ‘‘‘‘‘ ๾ࡰᆾඛƥ



™3;]Q\M[1T]UI ྔࡍ௨ࡌ๝൛3<> 3 *7@ ๾Ԣ़ট73  3 ;=1<-; Ɨಥ۪Ӗ π‫ށ‬ᆇཡൺഝ߆Ⴢ൏᷵֬ྔ฿မèְް౼ၢऻ٬ቝྠ൛ಥ‫ܫ‬ॡя ٩ළяְཕ٣è3 ;=1<-;നႼ‫ئ‬ᇜᇽ฼ཕ٣Ɨቃ࣐ો࡞ཕ٣‫؂‬ ߜಝ၉ྔèો࡞ཕ٣‫؂‬നႼ߁৺ະ‫܆‬୆Ɨ๠࿦ണཥࠖƗડय़‫ࠪڋ‬ ‫ࠖـ‬è>18ཕ٣ৡനႼඹಭϛขçข౶ሤç߁‫׵‬Ⴚ༫౼Ɠ8TIa;\I \QWVƔְè๤൏ƗЎཕୄߕ๓ྖ฻‫܉‬൰ୄງཾࠪ‫׎‬ሷƗಥ‫ܫ‬ॡᚃ ঳ඹಭ३࡞è ‫׋׀‬ƥ>QK\WZQI;\ZMM\  ࡕ۳ƥᇢ၉֥ᇢ໻ƥቒֵ཯‫ ٵ‬ჴၢഏཱི൏Ʀᇢଓჴ ‘‘‘‘‘ ๾ࡰᆾඛƥ ™+I[P;\]LQW3IZIWSM +I[P ;\]LQW 3<>ƓలሓƔ໑჆൮ᇖྖ֬໰ࢲ੥ƗఊႱ߹֬ࡕ۳ਾ ෸ᄤ࿗ഺ‫୔ދ‬౥ಭᆴ࡞௪Ⴜଇఞè‫ג‬ୄߕาѠ‫ۺ‬࿗ഺϫ‫ٺ‬ᆴൌ֬ Ⴑ߹è҉‫ݝ‬ႀເ‫૲ג‬നᄤ‫׀‬༶೟ұƗ෵ၢཔ‫ؚ‬თఊ෷3<>ߓࣩཔ ‫ؚ‬иࢧ၉ϵèܼࣗ‫ג‬ୄ௣൏ᇁႼ਍֥೟ଇ‫ڢ‬༇ಭ჻Ɨ‫ڢ‬༇ཹ੸ಖ ‫ۡޚ‬è‫ڢ‬༇١൛၀‫ޚ‬෢ྦƗкᆇฅࣗྜྷӖ۪Ә‫ݝ‬ხ‫ׯ‬൏࡞Ɨ‫ڢ‬༇ ಭ჻ߕ൥‫ঁޚ‬ಿ‫׀‬ಥ໨૓૮‫ئٵ‬Ӗਛ၉۸ཱི൏è෵ၢƗ೉‫ݛ‬Ⴜ஻ Ⴝᄤ໰ࢲ੥݄ࢮཟးོོ࢝Ɨढ़ၢთ஻Ⴝಇ+I[P ;\]LQW 3IZIWSM Ӗ၉౾è





‫׋׀‬ƥ+*I[MUMV\5QVO)ZKILM7ZKPIZL ࡕ۳ƥᄱഏ‫֥׋‬༶໽‫׋‬ƥ೟ಭჴၢഏƗ‫ޱݝ‬ોಭჴ ༶໽‫׋‬ၢ‫ޱ‬ƥ೟ಭ ჴၢഏƗ‫ޱݝ‬ોಭჴ ‘‘‘‘‘ ๾ࡰᆾඛƥ ™?QQ3IZIWSM ቛເ၉۸ྔྜྷ֬3۪١൛Ɨ?QQಥພࡌ૓ᄤࡌৡ‫۪ݝ‬൴ᮖè৯೉ û़ট73۱ଈü൥3WVIUQ֬ಭఞӖ۪Ⴚ༫༩ਠƗພࡌྺးൗႯ ડय़‫ྡྷ࣐ڋ‬ဍӖƗႺ༫߽‫ۻ‬ओພࡌ۪࣐֬ྡྷ௦‫ٺ‬ƗЎচࢲቄְ‫؂‬ ൥Ҝॐးුè෠ಝࡌৡ֬ႂམനШढ़୆и҉ഏሌ၃3<>Ӎ෵֬ཹ ‫ݛ‬Ɨ֓൥୆ᄤሸࡌ૮‫ٵ‬Ӗ۪၀൥‫ޚ‬ᙢಝሸ֫֬è ๾ࡰᆾඛƥ‘‘‘‘‘





™7VTQVM>MZ[QWV ࠮ൗેႼ?QQƗ၀ߕ൥ढ़ၢᄤࡌৡ۪ۡè৯೉3IZIWSM8IZ\aᆊং ቒࣔྜྷఖ֬ະકႺ༫Ɨढ़ၢಥພࡌᄤན۪ӖèႺ༫߽‫ؚ‬ພࡌ֬ႂ ሠƗࢲ஌ְ௦‫ٺ‬দЁሀພࡌ฻۪ۡӖ࠶్è๤൏Ⴚ༫ߕ฻‫ؚ܉‬ᅥ ௣ขƗढ़ၢಥ୍თ஻Ⴝ၉ఖ๎ᅥè ๾ࡰᆾඛƥ‘‘‘‘‘ кᆇᄤ6<=IT]UVQKT]J֬<MW0MVO‫ދ‬஻ႽӖ۪è <MW0MVO֬ቃ঺‫ދ‬ཕ٣ ᇇ3;]Q\M[1T]UI֬҉๤ᇽ฼ཕ٣Ɨ‫ٺ‬Ѡເ.WVLM[\ç8QKKILQTTa ‫ދ‬-VKPIV\MLè ᇇ+I[P;\]LQW3IZIWSMƓలሓƔ֬ཕ٣è       ണႜdਦໆឤ






28

7+(1$1<$1*

92/ 12

18

CHRONICLE 04 ვৈ

ৈ௦ ႂৈ2]SMJW`

5Q[[)ྔࡍ௨൵Ӎႂৈ߽

ሌࠧƥ 27-A27-A ۪൴ƥ ಿቊ‫ؿ‬ ๾ࡰƥ û߄ఫඕüç û‫׋‬ü

‫ٿ‬රᄜჴເ;=BA౰ഺ



Ϭ

5Q[[)ाӍၢ‫ޘ‬ϩಛሔ਑པƗྦ‫҉ے‬൅ढ़πƗဍӖᇽռ۪õ/WWL*aM*IJaöè‫ٿ‬රᄤႂৈ߽ࢹඖᆴఴເቒ୔౥֬;]ba ሠШഺಷ࣠༦è቗၉਼໾Ɣണႜdߢव‫ډ‬

ϩဎឤᇢሓᡁĶИ֨

‫ݩ‬

‫୶ݚ‬ሷቍ‫ލ‬5Q[[)൵՘দྔाဍӖ߽Ɨः֥֫Ю‫۪׀‬ ૠ֬Ⴁ߀è ‫ٿ‬ර૓ᄤႂৈ߽ࢫ່ࣔഹ൏Ɨ‫ٿ‬රา‫׀‬฻ᄱເᄌಷ ‫ ݝ‬෦ഺಷ֬;]ba౰ഺƗѰౖս١෉ഏჴาѠ൴‫܄‬ᇌ ቛսྟ֘ۤƗಥ෹‫ੇ׵ے‬৓è ഭເ๽‫ؙ‬ᇖቒ୔౥֬ӵ჻Ɨ෹ఖԡຢ಍Ыથᄤ‫ܤ‬ৡƗߕ ၢເ֫ᄣ՘ԢӍѝဍτढ़۪౾è ෹ສສેཟ֥ᄤᇽԂಭ‫ދ‬ఊ෸೟໑ӵ჻֬χ൜༶Ɨ಍Ӎ ‫ٿ‬ර࣯ಝۡഹ‫ލ‬Ӗᇖႎ‫ݩ‬໚೟۸ϸЮ֬ûഺಷঀৈüè ᇽԂಭδ3MV၀‫؀‬ಆЁ;]baϣࡕలߗෟӵ‫ݩ‬тƗऔ‫ش‬ඛ ଩ಥ෹‫ے‬ธƥõ‫ݓށ‬Ɨ҉ഡ֫ԀƗ୆ϣ෸ւߴ‫ݚݩ‬ઞƪö ;]baᄤ྿ᄂ‫ݪޱ‬৓๰੤ਛ၉‫׋׋‬ሸ࠴֬ᄂຳƗ෹༗ຳӵ ჻୆‫ܛ‬ഭ฿ࡹॉƗѰӵເ࿷ᇤඛ၉ඛ‫୶֬ل‬ሷ๽฿è ๽჻ᆴ၉֬.MQනƥõ;]ba‫ޚ‬ങॲƗവᇇᄤ϶ࢉ‫ࢉ֫ৣ׌‬ ൏Ɨ෹၀ેႼॲƗढ़ࡵ෹ᆎ֬‫׵ےޚ‬èö ᆣӍဍԢჂ၉਑‫׋‬൥ 5Q[[ ) ֬۸ಭྵè༼൥5QVМ‫ن‬৶

ൌቇ֬໾֠Ɨᅡ൜ਛϝ୔ਇ༤ഺ൏ఀॠॴ࿥ਇ֬ӵ‫ݛ‬è ‫];ޱؾ‬baၢ၉༢ުಛԢཊᄤ໾ขᇖရƗߖߖ‫׀‬Ӗఖႎ ໚ඁ౭۪౾Ɨ฿ཊਛമޯ֬Ӗ‫܆‬è ;]ba҉࣎൥ྠཧ֋֙Ɨ‫۾‬ᄤӖ۪๒໾ഏ҉࿧჆ఊ෷ӵ ჻ఴТè ࣌ࢫሩ5QV‫ދ‬2QI๤൏Ԣཊᄤ໾ขഏƗࣈ‫ن‬অජս๒м όරսಪ֍౾õ:]V<PM?WZTLöƗఞ‫ٹ‬ಪМ಍Ӎè ᆊ՘֬ႂৈ߽෹ ૓ ၢᆊ՘ྔሌࠧ֬൵Ѷᇽռ ۪ö/WWL*aM*IJaö༺ा࿄ଥè෹૓၀ၢГ൶ಖ҉൅ྦ ‫ޘ֬ے‬ϩ‫ڢ‬ሔ਑པè ਍൵۪‫ޱ‬ƗᇽԂಭδ3MVҗ٧ᇖ‫ݚ‬ӵ჻2QIׂ೟՘দ ྔࡍ௨Ⴜ‫ےތ‬ཟƗ෹නƥõ‫ٿ‬ර‫ࡍ۾‬ಪ౭ਛƌ໨π୍ ૓ƌöႋఖข༶‫ٿ‬ර࡜ࢨ၉௒è ൺ٧൏Ɨૌ‫ݚ‬Ԣ֨֬5QVൗႯੇ৭֬ૌ൛ႎმቛպƗ ෹න" õ.MQःཥ໨૓֬ખખ෹୆ቚ಍൞ࢿቒ‫ށ‬Ԁ֬ٝ‫ۺ‬ ໨૓ ö ᄤ߁‫ࢲߓ׵‬Ɨ5Q[[ ) ౛ሸட‫ྤۺ‬ᄕ‫ٿ‬රሸ࠴֬భଇ ພ஄ၢࠪဍԢ൏ൗႯ‫֬ݝ‬൬௝è෷૓჆ഏᄌֿ‫־‬չྔࡍ ௨ƗएϾྔሌࠧõ)+TI[[ö֬၉ৼԸ࿍Եࠊ‫׵‬è

ஓࡈ২ƥԾቛ೉๤྆ಷࡁӖԢ֙༶ྖ౭ േᒹӨĶИ֨

࿉྆ӵႂ‫ڟ‬Ɨ ஓࡈ২ቒࣔۗ ‫ྔن‬-8ûӘ‫ۺ‬২üࢫ ൺЮИሌ٧ฒ֥ᄤ-8 ӎ൲Ծቛ֬‫ݝ‬Ӹè ෹නƥõԾቛ‫ؚ‬ ໨দනཥ྆ಷࡁƗϣ ሺဋߗӵႂ‫ڟ‬ƗӖԢ ሸ࠴֬༦୵ιৈèö ႂৈᄤᆊ໑ႂৈ ಭ֬ഺࠊᇖϹဍ‫ޚ‬ᇞ း֬࢟೫èЫ໠ࠪ෹ ೉‫ތ‬ໂԂ‫ؚ‬ႂৈ֬ಪ Ӭ൏Ɨ෹ߴպ҉Ⴏໂ Ԃèõႂৈ၉ᆷᄤ໨ ୄྖമ԰ಞകƗְև ࠌ৶಍ा֬၉ๆèö ఴûम‫];ؚ‬XMZ [\IZü୶ܺलஓࡈ২ ӼಱƗሸ࠴֬ྦ۳‫ޚ‬

ࡌৡƗԀሩ‫ۋ‬ਈ‫ݝ‬ሩ ಷሷèö ‫ؾ‬ฒ֥ቒఀ஖თମ ໑۪൴‫ލ‬ቛ൏Ɨஓࡈ ২ᆷ޲ƥõᆩྵ໚ƌ ༗ຳ୆‫ދ‬෹‫ލ‬Ӗ၉൵ ݃‫ױ‬მPQOP۪ƌ၀ఀ ஖თ‫ށ‬Ⴝߢ࣮અ‫ތދ‬ ໂࡹ‫ލ‬ቛèö ߴཟሩᆊཻ୔ᄤ ვৈಈ‫׽ڀ‬Ɨஓࡈ২ නƥõᆊ၉๏੥Ɨો ၉ҋ‫؂‬൥໨ફફቃ‫ݝ‬ দ֬ƗႡႼ౛஻‫ށ‬Ⴝ ၢࠪࡌಭ֬ᆭԂèö ஓࡈ২༗ຳ਽၉Ͻ൥๓ྖç‫ࡌܫ‬çႼഏ࣐ྖ‫ދ‬ ഭເ‫ݝ‬দಭƗஓࡈ ढ़ၢ၎॓֬ಭƗ༗ຳ୆ӵ৲ඒ෹ཱི֬ॉᆴࡌƗ ২ಱເЮ‫׀‬ႂৈಭೖ Ⴜ೟۸ၢഏ֬‫୶ؿ‬èᅽ௒d‫്ݖ‬Ӗ௒฻‫ ܉‬းӵ‫܆‬ƗःးႼ‫ئ۾‬ ಭ֬ᆭԂè ᆊ၀൥ஓࡈ২ᆊ՘ ‫ލڟ‬෵ඒྙቝḩḩऔ ӏऔྉ֬Ɨ໨ቒս֬ าᆟः൥उࡌè໨ढ़ ‫ދ‬ภչၢࠪUQKIXMT ྉቝè ෹҇Ԑƥõ໨൥٫ ၢે‫܄‬ቛः၉ᆷվᄤ TIƓྔࡍ௨IKIXMTTI๽

฿Ɣ‫ލ‬ቛ֬ჷႀḩḩ ໴٫൥ཟးϣЮ‫׀‬ႂ ৈ࿍ဟ֥‫ݡ‬ບè Ы໠ࠪ଩ఴ൥‫ڕ‬Ⴜ ྖၕ‫ؚ‬ཧƗஓࡈ২Ⴢ ߈࠘ߴպƥõ଩ఴ൥ ३ԺఀƗ֓໨൥֍ഭ ֬Ɨ෵ၢႼྖಭ൝ढ़ ၢᄤ໨֬[WKQIT VM\ _WZSৡ੄င୾ƌö ᄤࣉ୔֬ഺಷƗஓ ࡈ২ब‫਼׮‬ဨࡧ௸ᅗ ֬୶‫ݠ‬Ɨ༗ຳ୆ࣗ෵ ୆ᄶ‫ڥ‬ಭಜƗ๤൏༗ ຳ୶‫ݠ‬Ե൸ᆰൔ‫ྨۺ‬ ׄࢻ૏è ෹ৈܻ‫׀‬නƥõ ໨୴৶ማ౷ሸ࠴֬૚ ཟƗሉህ߽ࠖఴ࣐Ɨ ༗ຳ໨၀୆‫ۺ‬෷ಭࠖ ߽Ɨເሸ࠴ᇌᄶԢ໴ ඛढ़୆èö

ຉၢັ൅ਅ౭۪֬আࡖƗᆊᅭሌࠧ ෵းѝչ֬൥ಿቊ‫ঀؿ‬ৈཡൺಭഺ ֬ྖ౭Ɨࡍ್౾‫ڋ‬೉ੇྡྷඁ౭ç8WXְè ‫ދ‬ၢັ౾‫ڋ‬པ๤Ɨû߄ఫඕü൥၉ ൵ষষഏ८֬ඁ౭۪èಿቊ‫ؿ‬၀๓ྖ‫׀‬ ੪ᇌਛû߄ఫඕü֬ᇖ໚ϸЮûቒ‫ޱ‬౭ ಭüƗಥ۪ૠ୆၉Е‫ڥـ‬è û‫׋‬üᄼ൥၉൵ვৈྦࢧ۪ۡ֬ ౾Ɨࢲቄ౥ළაᄍƗ၉๾Ԣѓ಻֯ ۪ࣘࣈ౾ܺलЖቝèõ‫׋‬öჷ൥ഏ‫ݡ‬ ීმƗႯၢӜླྀ೵ఞࠎငྡྷ҉‫ލ‬ӏয়֬ ಭèಿቊ‫ؿ‬Ӳ۪Քთሸ࠴۸ྦཔӲƗႀ Օཟ๰‫۪ݝ‬౾‫ܤ‬৪ಭ૓ঀৈ֬૲‫ؚ‬ಭഺ ֬‫ूے‬è ਽๾ࡰûᰦ᰿ü‫ދ‬ûછೞय़üम‫ؚ‬ಥ ୍ӭࣖ჆༸ๆ֬ழஐèƓ໚ƚߢծពƔ

ሌࠧƥ û‫ྍے‬ πಭü ۪൴ƥ ৠࡋຸ ๾ࡰƥ û࡟ϐüç û‫ٺ‬۶ནü 

݂Ёܺलৠࡋຸ‫ྡྷن‬൵ᅭ۸ಭሌ ࠧû‫ྍے‬πಭüƗᅺদৠໆᑒçဴ ೖ੊ְ൓৶஑֬Ծቛಭদሀᆛè ൵Ѷᇽռ۪û࡟ϐü5>ႀເԋ؎ฅ ս‫ދ‬ୄಿ੤‫ܧ‬Ɨ෵ၢԾ༶AW]<]JM࣓ѳ൵ ৯è҉‫ݝ‬Ɨ༬๗ᆴ༶ᆊ൵۪മक଻؎Ɨׂ ၉ؔ‫۪ڳ‬྽ၢࡓႂদӖè෹֬ဍӖᅀ็౭ ‫ے‬ұ՘Ɨද৭Եչም್‫࡟ֿ֬ܨ‬ϐ‫ے‬फè Ⴕဴೖ੊ቛՔ‫ދ‬છᒹృቛ౾֬ûս ࠌü൥၉൵ॴ౭౭۪Ɨࡍഏৠࡋຸຢૌ֬ ೤ႂƗ‫ޚ‬ಿၥռ‫׵‬ಭྖè ೉‫ݛ‬ৠࡋຸ୆ᅀృഹႂїൔ؎‫ދ‬۸ಭ ᷧ৶Ɨ๗ᇠшႼ‫ڥـ‬èƓ໚ƚേᒹӨƔ

ሌࠧƥ õ?PW KIZM['ö ۪൴ƥ ޸ပѣ ๾ࡰƥ õ4QNMö  ᅽ௒dະક༶ᄢ

ૺᄕႯõ޸ö֬྅ႂƗ޸ပѣׂ֬ ᅭሌࠧքѝሸ࠴‫ؚ‬ႂৈ֬ಱᆎè ൵Ѷᇽռ۪õ4QNMöƗ޸ပѣःӎ൲ ਛZIX‫ދ‬නӖ֬ྔ౾‫ڋ‬Ɨս‫ۆ‬ၢັ౭۪۪ ൴֬ྠཧè û୶ಭ҉‫ۅ‬ಥ଺ಭੇ৓üႵ޸ပѣሸ ࠴ቛՔቛ౾Ɨဃ࿊û଺ಭ3<>üෛන଺ಭ ྖഹ֬‫ڋ‬۳è ሌࠧቒਾಭ൅ຳ֬൥޸ပѣّӖਦၲ ৻֬ûഋ‫ޙ‬üèढ़୆ႀເ༼್ເᇽƗ޸ပ ѣϸЮෂ޳ഔຸ࿧೫èƓ໚ƚߢ࿙ᠶƔ


92/ 12

18

7+(1$1<$1*

29

04 CHRONICLE

û!ü

ႜ௦ ‫׏‬ႜѳ႟൰

ѥఏҋဍӖ߽‫׏‬ႜ

֤ဍƥ༸ႬॉçӮ‫߰ݚ‬ ᇽးဍ჻ƥᅼ໚çӵ੊çৠѩѩçӮԑ





ҍ‫׏‬ႜ࡮ࠧ჆ಷЮ ۪‫ޱ‬ѥఏҋಇ୔ᄤ քքନ֬‫܋‬ဍƗ‫ؚؾ‬჆ᄀ ᄤၺ‫ٿ֬ݚ‬රƗ൥шै֬ ቛ௝è ෸୆ಥಭ‫ے‬फሸ࠴ः ᄤ߽ӍЮഭƗѰᇞ໘֙൏ ֬ఞ‫ٹ‬è ႜ௒ࢹ‫ލ‬ਛဍӖ߽Ю ഭ֬า೫ࠪ‫׏‬ାาཹƗ೉ ‫ދ߉׵‬ö՝ๆ‫ࢍؾ‬ö֬ნ ષთ߄ϼè ဍӖ߽ᇖƗѥఏҋၢ कႼМ‫ن‬৶֬೤ႂᆟ‫ڢ‬ਛ ಍ӍƦ໴ઉ൥ု‫ݖ‬౾଩Ɨ ೉õ5QKZWXPWVMöƗࠎ൥ ඁ౭۪౾Ɨ‫؂‬ቇၢಥಭ၉ Е‫ڥـ‬è ෸֬൱फཹ‫ݛ‬၀ൌ ‫߆ٺ‬২è௘ा,าཹ҉

ฒƗ໾ขനࡀ‫֬׌ࣣދ‬ѝ ဍ‫؂ڢ‬ൗಭธເܻᆿè ఊᇖႍཧമॠ֬൥Ɨ ෹ᄤဍӖõ>QZOQV :WILö ൏ഭԳ֬ϩ೫ࢹࠅৣ ‫ڢ‬ḩḩ෸ಛϬ֬Ӑ؎‫ދ‬ബ ᅡ໾ข၉ဩè ဍӖ߽֬༫झӵ‫۾ٺ‬

൥Ӷཊ჆õ*ITTILöᇖ֬ ؒझဍԢè ຾၉ૌᇖ҉ቇ֬൥Ɨ ႜ௒֬࡮ࢫ࡯ങਛဍӖ ߽ཊӍ֬ఞ‫ٹ‬Ɨ‫׏ؾ‬ ႜેႼሺଥƗೖ҉൥‫ٿ‬ රƗࢃࢧ଻ྒ഍ఊᇖ֬ ୄಿèƓ໚ƚཨФᐈƔ

û໻ᄌๆማ૚,6)ü ֤ဍƥᅭ಻ࠤçۡѮಊ ᇽးဍ჻ƥ໻ᄌๆç੅ೖႎçರཁ఑  

‫׏‬

ႜႵ਍۸ҍ‫ٺ‬ቍӵƥ໻ᄌๆûє ྠ,6)ü֬ဍӖ߽௒ؔƗࠪԳҳ ᄤ౾଩࡞֬Ⴜܸ‫୶ں‬౭çπ౭ç‫ྨދ‬૏ ౭֬‫ܪ‬ൠè‫ܪ‬ൠᇖᇽಭ໢‫ٺ‬Ѡ൥၉‫ںؚ‬ ୶ç၉۸֪൝යࠖƓರཁ఑൬Ɣთӷॡ Ɠ੅ೖႎ൬Ɣç‫ދ‬၉۸ঀ‫ׅ‬჻è࢟೫দ ሸ҉๤֬൞ࢿƗಖႀ໻ᄌๆऑࠩ၉ฝè ‫ؚ‬჆໻ᄌๆ֬‫ٿ‬රদනƗᆊ໴ၗ൥ шै֬၉ҍ‫׏‬ႜè‫׏‬ႜ֬৲฿ཹ‫ݛ‬ಥಭ ‫֥ے‬٦‫ڔ‬ഭᄤཊӍƗ஄ཥःᄤഭஜè၉ ाӍƗ໻ᄌๆःၢ၉൵õ,6)öӠಪఞ ‫ٹ‬èࢫ༶দƗဍӖ߽ഏ‫۾‬Ӷཊਛ൵൵‫ـ‬ ඊ୆ཞࣣ֬‫׌‬౾଩Ɨ೉ƥ ûᇛࢹ‫֍ܢ‬ü çûਅπQVOüçûऩృü‫ދ‬û໘ೃü Ɨಥ‫ٿ‬ර૓၉Е۪‫ڥـ‬è ԩਛ୆ᅀ็‫ؚ‬û໻ᄌๆü֬ಱൔƗᆊ ҍ໘Ꮵཱི௝‫׮‬୆ւদ࠲‫׵ےٺ‬Ɨ൨‫ލ‬಍ ࡌսཱིܻैèƓ໚ƚᅭᑥ‫ؽ‬Ɣ

ᅽ௒dະક༶ᄢ

ҍ‫׏‬ႜຨ೉၉ฝ৬ൕॢƗᅥᆡ Ӎ૲৬৬ᄤ଩Ɨжᆎ֬౭ࣦࢃ ܻᇠւ֥୔ఴ֬ྒྷ‫ݣ‬۱ଈè झ౭ࢊඔລ౩ଓ୔ƗୄႳບߘƗ ‫ؾ‬Ⴕ෫ᇖ೽ᅼ໚ ൬çߢྜྷƓӵ੊ ൬Ɣເ൵֬๤૗߽৲ᇄး๾ّ‫ڱ‬Ϯ֬ ౩ອӛƗࢹඖᇖ‫׃֬୔ݚ‬ᇌè ‫׏‬ႜढ़‫ٺ‬ӵවᅪƥû࿚ಠߢ߄ ۜüçû໺Ӌӳ൵ၳüçûဤ༸Г໖ ᅥü‫ދ‬ûԾࢀ‫ދܒ‬ᇌüƗᄤؒؒ ‫ٺ‬ᇙୄ࢓ևྒྷ‫ݣ‬۱ଈ֬৬ൕƗढ़ཟ‫ؾ‬ ᆰƗܻᇠೖ‫ؚ‬Օ৬ൕ҉౩ԪƗয়ࢺढ़ ୆߽པ֙Ԁ৶è ՕບƗ‫׏‬ႜ֬ᖒ๯ൌቇƗᄤࡇ୘ ྒྷ‫ݣ‬۱ଈϫᇢ୔֬๤൏Ɨᆊ၀൥ႜญ ս۩ӵ੊ׂ֬ҍ‫׏‬ႜè ढ़༛Ɨӵ੊֬‫ྟ׌‬໺ռӍ૲ᇁᅤ ၉ཱིҍ‫ٺ‬Ɨढ़୆߽ಥເ෷ଧଇ‫ؾ‬দ֬ ܻᇠ൅ຳè

‫۾‬ᆥ ó႒ϣӝੇԾྔ࣡ റ਽๮ఊ١ô Ɠ>WT 6W Ɨ၁Ɣ Ю໚฻֥ҳ๴Ⴕ໸ ຶव߉൥շ༉֬Ɨ ႒ເৠवၱƗาՕ ‫۾‬ᆥè

<I\[]UQ ֤ဍƥ౵ࣈ‫ݡ‬Ɠ-ZQK3PWWƔ 

ྔࡍ௨֤ဍ౵ࣈ‫ݡ‬Ɠ-ZQK 3PWWƔ ᆺ֤Ɨûөü‫ۆ‬ѐሸսൄөහ༦ ީ֬ሸԵû௕҂ಭഺüƗ࿂ඔսൄ೉‫ތ‬ ाԾӵಭબ߉ḩḩझ߉Ɠ/MSQOIƔḩḩ ֬၉ؔࡢྒྷ֨੥ƗఊᇖԳҳਛսൄఊ෷ બ߉ቛ௝ᇖ֬໻ᄼؒ‫ܪ‬ൠè ֤ဍ֬Ӷཊ൴ٌࠎ྿߽ಥಭफ֫‫׏‬ႜ ֬௒ؔਲ਼ೢè ҉‫ݝ‬Ɨܻᇠ҉଻‫ن‬ཊ‫׏‬ႜᇖսൄ֬ሸ Եҍ‫ٺ‬ၢࠪ࠲۸ؒ‫ܪ‬ൠ‫؂‬Ⴜ෵ৼ݁è ෠ಝкᆇ໴ٌຢ಍ਛࢺѰ฿߽֙൏֬ ৬ൕУࣦƗᆊᇜӶཊ൴్ٌૺ‫ލࢹ׀‬ਛ սൄ֬ሸԵၢࠪቛ௝Ɨಥಭ‫ـ‬଩၉ྔè սൄ֬ቛ௝฼Ғຽನሩ‫ل‬ᅥ‫֬ޱ‬ಷ ЮƗ฿ཊಭ֬‫ޘ‬χç‫ܢ‬؆‫ދ‬໴ସè Ⴕ჆սൄ֬ቛ௝п࣯൥ᆓ‫ؚ‬ӵಭƗႀ Օႜ௒ᇖҍ‫૲߉ٺ‬೉࿚ྚ‫ދ‬ઑ੤߉૲ढ़ ୆߽ᄶӵ၉ཻঙಧè

ࢫࣔ‫׏‬ႜ່ഹƗսൄᄤӉඔᇖන ֨Ɨሸ࠴ၟ෦Ɨಖಶ߽ࡆ࿊Ծቛè ଱‫ځ‬ᆺሩ֬ಪӬਾ໨മമ‫׵ے‬è

ᆊᇜ࣡റಙ൓ᆻ֫࿗༤Ɨ൥ ၉ҍᆻ֫ै֬‫߉׵‬௒è  Ɠ໚ƚஓೃႝƔ

ఊᇖƗкᆇಱເဍ࠶ቒ࣡ᅧ֬൥൬ဍ ੏ჭฅ‫ু֬ޱ‬༫‫ܧ‬Ӯԑè ෹֬ဋറಥಭഥ‫ڢ‬Ɨࡍഏృ‫֬ݵ‬ບ ѝƗൗ‫܌‬๚‫ދ‬ჶ൞ुƓ෫Ո൬Ɣ֬౭ࢲ ۳ບ࣡Ҙè ఊ൓‫׏‬ႜಓ‫׀֬ݴ‬١Ɨ൥෫ᇖ೽ᄤႯ ႎმႺනව‫ݚ‬ႆྡྷࡌ֬௒ؔುӐƗෂ޳ հႼනࢤ֬ၰ໌èƓ໚ƚᅭࡹवƔ


Opinions frankly, my dear

EDITORIAL

$FROXPQE\WKH&KURQLFOH(GLWRUVRQLVVXHVFORVHWRWKHLUKHDUW

STAYING TRUE TO YOU The recent death of Steve Jobs sent shockwaves around the world. Competitors and colleagues alike hailed him as one-of-a-kind. I ronic for a man who spawned millions of iPhone users, Steve Jobs showed the world the value still inherent in being unique. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Think differentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; was one of his most famed catchphrases. What set Jobs apart was his fearlessness to be true to what he loved. He upheld this principle to the extent of dropping out of college to discover what he really wanted to do. His advice to students at a 2005 Stanford commencement, was to follow their heart and intuition, and not to let othersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opinions silence their â&#x20AC;&#x153;inner voice(s)â&#x20AC;?. For t he N T U st udents o r g a n i s i n g t h i s y e a r â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Perspectives Film Festival, the boldness to be different would also be a familiar theme. T h roug h t he fest iva l, Singapore cinemas will show, for the ďŹ rst time, ďŹ lms that were cont rover sia l when released. Because of the ďŹ lmmakersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; loyalty to their point of view, their ďŹ lms pushed

conventions and beliefs beyond what was comfortable for the time. Today, t hese f i lms a re known to have a lasting impact on the societies that once misunderstood them, and to still stimulate and provoke. For us in NTU, this desire to go beyond the status quo should strike a chord. A university is meant to be positioned on the cutting edge, peeping over existing boundaries to see what lies ahead. Ta ke for e xa mple, t he NTU Biomedical Sciences and Chinese Medicine doubledegree programme, which recently saw its second batch of graduates. Despite general scepticism towards Traditional Medicine, its graduates are marr ying the best of East and West, modern and ancient, to bring about a new pa rad igm of medical treatment. It is easy to let societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expectations make important decisions for us. But there is something more to stand for, if we can ďŹ nd out what that is for each of us. After all, being true to what we love is no small issue. It might just affect the fabric of society, as we know it.

7+(1$1<$1*

CHRONICLE CHIEF EDITOR &DVVDQGUD<HDS SUB-EDITORS $XGUH\/LP(Q5XL %DVLO(GZDUG7HR /RZ:HL;LDQJ 6LD/LQJ;LQ 7ULFLD$QQD/LP3HL\X NEWS EDITORS 6DPDQWKD%RK 6KDULIDK)$OVKDKDE LIFESTYLE EDITORS 0DYLV$QJ,:HQ 7DQ6X<L.D\ REVIEWS EDITOR 6XODLPDQ'DXG DAPPER EDITORS +RQJ<X5DQ *ODG\V1J CHINESE EDITORS *UDFH&KHZ+XL0LQ 7HR-LRQ&KXQ OPINIONS EDITORS $QJ;XH7LQJ(XQLFH -D\DVKULGR/RNDUDMDQ

SPORTS EDITORS $QQDEHOOH/LDQJ /DL-XQMLH LAYOUT EDITORS 1LFKRODV.HLWK7DP :RQJ3HL7LQJ PHOTO EDITORS *RK&KD\7HQJ :DQ=KRQJ+DR GRAPHICS EDITOR *RK:HL&KRRQ ONLINE EDITORS 7UDQ7UXQJ.LHQ 3KDP7XRQJ0LQK BUSINESS MANAGERS /LP3HL<L9LYLDQ 1J:HL<LQJ  PRODUCTION SUPPORT 1J+HQJ*KHH 2QJ/L&KLD TEACHER ADVISORS $QGUHZ'XII\ 'HEELH*RK ;X;LDRJH

$VWXGHQWV¡QHZVSDSHUSXEOLVKHGE\WKH :HH.LP:HH6FKRRORI&RPPXQLFDWLRQ DQG,QIRUPDWLRQ :.:6&,

1DQ\DQJ7HFKQRORJLFDO8QLYHUVLW\ 1DQ\DQJ/LQN6LQJDSRUH 7HO 8QVLJQHGHGLWRULDOVUHSUHVHQWWKHPDMRULW\ YLHZRIWKHHGLWRULDOERDUGRI7KH&KURQLFOH DQGGRQRWQHFHVVDULO\UHĂ HFWWKHSROLFLHVRU YLHZVRI1DQ\DQJ7HFKQRORJLFDO8QLYHUVLW\ LWVHPSOR\HHVWKHVWXGHQWVRUWKH&RXQFLORI WKH8QLYHUVLW\ 6LJQHGRSLQLRQFROXPQVOHWWHUVDQGHGLWRULDO FDUWRRQVUHSUHVHQWWKHRSLQLRQRIWKHZULWHU RUDUWLVWDQGDUHQRWQHFHVVDULO\WKRVHRI 7KH&KURQLFOH 3ULQWHGE\.+/3ULQWLQJ&R3WH/WG /R\DQJ'ULYH6LQJDSRUH

:(:$1772+($5)520<28

Facebook: The Nanyang Chronicle Website: www3.ntu.edu. sg/chronicle General Enquiries: chronicle@ntu.edu.sg

Photography: Untold Truths

GRAPHIC | GOH WEI CHOON

WAN ZHONG HAO

PHOTO EDITOR

P

hotography is an art. Part of its allure is that it celebrates an individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unique perspectiveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and this continues to be the main driving force that keeps me in photography, five years on. Through the years, my relationship with photography has evolved. We were inseparable once but what remains is a bitter love-hate relationship. Photography is an expensive hobby as lens and strobes cost thousands of dollars. Certain effects cannot be achieved without a particular type of lens or ďŹ&#x201A;ash. As an artist, it is frustrating to be limited by technical constraints. In the early days of practising photography, my entrylevel Canon 400D dSLR (digital single lens reďŹ&#x201A;ex) camera failed at replicating colours accurately. I ended up spend ing ha lf my time repair ing images in Photoshop. It felt like I was spending more time enhancing images than practising photography. I had to work for better equipment, and commercial photography was the obvious choiceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it combined what I needed with what I loved. The world of commercial work was demanding and unforgiving. Missed a critical moment?

Cropped out a bit of the organiserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s logo in a group picture? Turned in a picture with the Guest of Honour dozing off? Each was considered a card ina l sin in t he com mercia l landscape. Commercial photography is concerned with the creation of images that suit the clientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs. Events must always be â&#x20AC;&#x153;crowdedâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;interestingâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;happeningâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;even for functions attended by 20 people. I quickly learnt to hide empty audiences and delete unglamorous pictures of VIPs. It took away what I lovedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the celebration of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s uniqueness. But for money, I swallowed my pride and sat through assignment after assignment. Finally, I was able to upgrade to a mid-high end model and bought new lenses, even a ďŹ&#x201A;ash. Disillusioned by commercial work, I decided to take a break. So in my freshman year in NTU, when there was an opening for the position of Photo Editor at The Nanyang Chronicle, I gamely took the role and dived into the world of journalism. It was a naĂŻve thought to think that working for an objective, non-proďŹ t organisation, would be any different from the commercial world. Part of my responsibilities is to ďŹ lter out images to be used in this paper. In each production, the Photo Desk receives close to a hundred

images from our photographers. We are tasked with picking the image that accompanies each story. The very act of choosing images disregards the complete vision of a photographer. However, it is a necessary process for our paper to be relevant. As an artist, the artiďŹ ciality demeans photographyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the perspective is limited and controlled. Yet as a reporter, these messages carry a news value to the readers that needs to be reďŹ&#x201A;ected. Unwittingly, I have become part of the process that I hate. I am now subjugating my photographersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; individual perspective â&#x20AC;&#x201D;reďŹ&#x201A;ecting only what the audience of this newspaper is concerned with. The pursuit of a unique perspective is abandoned in the mad rush of photographers clicking furiously to get the â&#x20AC;&#x153;safe shotâ&#x20AC;?. My newly upgraded equipment barely keeps up with the pros. I now stand at a crossroads. I still rejoice in the moments where photography happensâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;all elements of a picture perfectly synchronised and captured. Yet, reality is that most photography is driven by pragmatic concerns. Practising photography often turns out to be needs-based rather than giving the photographer absolute freedom. The only means to save myself, is to set aside time to shoot for my own sake.


92/ 12

18

OPINIONS 31

7+(1$1<$1*

04 CHRONICLE

a matter of perspective

Too risqué for school? CLAIRE YEOH

I

am not a huge fan of orientation camps—due to the prospect of getting up close and personal with a member of the opposite sex beyond my comfort zone. By this, I am referring to sexually suggestive orientation games such as having a male and female eating from opposite ends of a biscuit, or eating a sweet off the other person’s neck. Even more risqué games include sharing a “tissue kiss” with the opposite sex, where participants kiss each other with only a flimsy piece of tissue separating their lips. Call me a prude, but I have never felt comfortable with participating in such games. The level of physical intimacy involved was too close for comfort at times, and it felt embarrassing to participate in these games. Freshmen orientation camps such as those conducted by Halls of Residences in NTU have a clause in their application forms stating that students are “not bound to participate in any activity that you are not comfortable with, if it is against your culture or religion.” During my Hall 14 freshmen orientation camp a year ago, it was no different. I was given the option of sitting out from the activities if I felt uncomfortable. For the most part, the orientation group leaders also remained alert to anyone who may have felt uneasy about the games. But it is much easier said than done. I never dared to opt out of the games for the fear of being an outcast. Neither did I want to be singled out, or labeled as a bad sport. It was important for me to fit in and not stand out for the wrong reasons. Therefore, I had this fear of not being accepted by my peers. It was certainly a factor that prevented me from voicing my concerns. A 2009 study on gender differences of peer influence in China had also shown that females tend to be more influenced by peer pressure than males. The study, which was published in the Economics of Education Review, was conducted by Dr Li Han from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and Dr Tao Li from Peking University. The duo investigated residential peer effects in higher education by interviewing Chinese college students who stayed in dorms. They found that only women responded to roommates’ peer influence, in-line with social psychological theories that females are more easily influenced by their friends and peers. This would explain why female undergraduates may find it harder to speak out against games that

involve close physical contact. Often, I feel that it is a case of individuals wanting to fit in, rather than active group pressure that results in youths going against their personal values. I have a friend who grew up in a very conservative family. During one of the camps, she was put off by the very risqué “Seven Wonders” forfeit performed by her orientation group mates. This forfeit requires male and female participants to touch one another’s bodies in seven places, such as her leg to his backside or his nose to her cheek, often resulting in very compromising positions. Everyone at the camp however, was cheering as they watched. As a result, my friend felt that she was unable to voice her concerns openly as people seemed accustomed to the idea of such sexually suggestive games. But it is not only the girls who feel this way. A male friend was once asked to perform the “tissue kiss” forfeit with a girl. It was apparent that he felt uncomfortable as he had objected to participating, but his peers and orientation group leaders kept egging him on until he agreed. This sheds some light on how males may be equally susceptible

Often, I feel that it is a case of individuals wanting to fit in, rather than active group pressure that results in youth going against their personal values.

to peer pressure, despite studies claiming otherwise. In such circumstances, deliberate action is taken by peers to influence certain behaviour. Male participants are expected to be more sporting than their female counterparts. Thus, peers may be less forgiving if he were to opt out of certain games. Nevertheless, such games have become commonplace in orientation camps where students bond by roughing it out and getting down and dirty together. So until we learn to say ‘NO’ to peer pressure, camp organizers should learn to strike a balance between bonding participants and providing a comfortable environment for freshmen to get to know each other.

GRAPHIC | TRUNG

LOUISA ENG

T

he recent trail of notoriety involving Singapore Institute of ManagementUn iver sit y of London (SIM-UOL) orientation games as being too risqué, to the extent of driving some female participants to tears, brings this simmering issue to the fore once again. Such orientation camp games have been prevalent in many orientation camps across local universities. N T U was put under public scrutiny just two years ago when compromising images of team— building games that were played during orientation camps surfaced on the web. These include images of a girl eating a banana dangling inches from a male student’s crotch or with him in a push—up position, hovering over the female student lying beneath him. There were even images of the “Mouth to Mouth” game, where pieces of biscuit were passed from mouth to mouth amongst members of the opposite sex. However, is the hype over such games and the way they are played necessary? Te o B o o n R o n g , 2 2 , a n Orientation Group Leader (OGL) at this year’s Hall 3 camp, said: “These games are for students from across all the faculties to interact with each other.” He added that: “The participants were given a choice to opt out of the games at any given moment.” I feel that public attention

given to these games is misplaced. As young adults we should take charge of our own actions by speaking up when any activity makes us feel uncomfortable. Since we are not coerced into playing such games as camp participants, to put the blame on the games wholly is unwarranted. Instead, students should notify their OGLs whenever they feel uncomfortable playing such games. However, this is not just a solo effort. Camp participants should be understanding and respect a fellow student’s decision to sit out a game if they are uncomfortable with it. So why then are such games included in orientation camps in the first place? Nicolette Ong, 21, who is also an OGL at this year’s Hall 3 camp said: “The intent is not to purely add excitement in a scandalous or sexualised manner. These games are organised to add fun and variety, in addition to the competitive aspect.” She added: “Orientations are so long and span over almost a week. Therefore, the need to have a wide variety in the type of games played is important. This will help us as OGLs to keep up the high energy and spirits of the students.” But does this need for variety give the OGLs the green light to include more of such games in the orientation? Ong added: “There has to be a balance. Definitely not every game has to have a sexual element behind it.” Let’s face it. These games are here to stay. They serve as a sure-fire way of male-female interaction, and

bond the entire group together. I believe that participants should go to camp with an open mind. As young adults, they should expect to be pushed beyond their comfort zone. Yet, they should be mature enough to speak up for themselves, should they feel too

“These games are organised to add fun and variety, in addition to the competitive aspect. This will help us as OGLs to keep up the energy and spirits of the students.” Nicolette Ong Orientation Group Leader (OGL) Hall of Residence 3

pressured or too uncomfortable in participating in those games. The main reason why participants may be adverse to these games is perhaps the awkwardness that ensues – the embarrassment and discomfort of being in such close proximity to a stranger. But that awkwardness is momentary. When the orientation is over, participants can have a good laugh, reminiscing about these “embarrassing moments” of the camp. Friendships begin.


32 OPINIONS

7+(1$1<$1*

92/ 12

18

CHRONICLE 04

Hazards of green energy

GRAPHIC | SWARNALI MITRA

72+-,$(1

O

n September 30th, construction of the Myitsone Dam, a hydroelectric dam at the source of the Irrawady River, in Myanmmar, was suspended until 2015. As the head of the Irrawady River was considered to be the birthplace of Myanmmar, there was great political unease within the government that led to the suspension of the project. To me, it is a cause for celebration, as the dam would have submerged many cultural sites, flooded 776 square km of forest (about the size of Singapore) and threatened downstream rice paddy communities. It was a disaster waiting to hap-

pen, being only 100 km away from a major faultline. Following the decision to suspend the project which was funded by Chinese companies, Chinese Foreign Ministry Spokesman Hong Lei urged the Burmese government to put the commercial interests of the companies first since they had bought 90 per cent of the electricity required for the dam. This meant that green energy like hydropower would be used to support industries such as mining, timber extraction and oil and gas pipelines. While these industries form the material bases of our economy, they also scar the earth. Therefore, what we think is green energy is not so green after all. Instead of trying to find less destructive sources of energy for a growing economy, we should look into reducing our energy con-

louder than words

sumption. IMPACT ON ECODIVERSITY Hydroelectric dams are commonly considered environmentally friendly as they do not release carbon. However, they displace human populations, flood land areas, destroy the habitats of animals that live there and drastically change aquatic ecosystems. Recent examples include the Belo Monte Dam Complex, located on the Xingu River, within the Amazon Rainforest, and the Tipaimukh Dam, which is proposed to be built across the Barak River, in Manipur, India. The Brazilian government estimates that Belo Monte will provide 23 million households with electricity and prevent blackouts countrywide. The latter is intended for electric-

ity generation, and irrigation of farmland during dry seasons and controlling floods in wet seasons. However, according to non-profit organisation Amazon Watch, the Belo Monte dam will cause the flooding of 668 square km of land due to its two reservoirs (one is to be located on the Xingu River and the other will be near the dam). It will also dry up a 100km stretch of the river. Biodiversity loss is significant as biodiversity protects water resources, facilitates nutrient cycling and is a source of medicinal resources and pharmaceutical drugs. Likewise, for the Tipaimukh Dam, it would affect both India and Bangladesh greatly. It flows through heavily populated areas and supports many agricultural activities in both countries. This would cause a large area of land in Manipur to be flooded, destroying the diverse ecosystem and forcing the locals to relocate. For the Bangladeshi, the river provides 8 per cent of their total water supply, and the dam would deprive them of their share of the river. They would experience extreme floods in the rainy season and severe drought in the dry season-destroying their agriculture and fisheries. CLIMATIC IMPACT Dams also worsen global warming by releasing huge amounts of methane. Scientist Philip Fearnside, from the National Institute for Research in the Amazon, who has studied Brazilian dams, discovered that every dam releases more greenhouse gases than fossil fuels. This is because the flooding causes large amounts of plants to die and rot without

oxygen. This results in a buildup of methane. Rising levels of greenhouse gases worsen global warming, which leads to an increase in drought, food and water shortages and rising sea levels. Scientist Peter Baines from Melbourne University, concluded that global warming is the cause of 37 per cent of the decade—long drought in Australia and extended dry period in the US. Bangladesh is losing land area as sea levels rise, while the Bay of Bengal and the island of Kutubdia have experienced the most extreme change. SOCIAL IMPACT Furthermore, there are great social impacts. The 14 indigenous tribes living along the Xingu River depend on it for food and transport. As the river dries up, they will be forced to relocate. The nearby town of Altamira will experience heavy flooding as a result of the dam. The government has not announced how they will be compensated or relocated, making it impossible for indigenous people to decide whether or not this dam is in their own interests. Evidently, hydroelectric dams deny many people their livelihood, homes and food and cannot be said to improve a community’s standard of living. Ultimately, it is misguided to put economic growth ahead of everything else, since it is a poor indicator of quality of life and often worsens social inequality. When economic development comes at the cost of environmental protection and human rights, the latter cannot be sacrificed for the former.

GOH WEI CHOON GRAPHICS EDITOR


92/ 12

18

OPINIONS 33

7+(1$1<$1*

04 CHRONICLE 

Slut = Empowerment?

canteen talk 2Q2FWREHUWK6WDUEXFNVVWDUWHGEUHZLQJDWWKH 6WXGHQW$FWLYLWLHV&HQWUH+RZGRHVLWFRPSDUHWR ROGWLPHU &DIIH ([SUHVV RU VWXGHQWLQLWLDWHG 3LWFK VWRS":HĂ&#x20AC;QGRXWZKDWVWXGHQWVWKLQN

I usually prefer to go to Pitchstop because it is very close to HSS, where I study. I think all three offer reasonable prices.

â&#x20AC;?

SuďŹ artie Sudyono, HSS, Yr 3, 21

â&#x20AC;&#x153; GRAPHIC | GOH WEI CHOON

SNEHA GURURAJ

D

ecember 3rd is a signiďŹ cant day for womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights in Singapore. Slutwalkâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights movement, which has now gone global, is coming to Hong Lim Park. Slutwalk was precipitated by Toronto police ofďŹ cer Constable Michael Sanguinetti early this year. At a York University safety forum, he said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women should avoid dressing like sluts in order not to be victimized.â&#x20AC;? His controversial comment drew ďŹ&#x201A;ak from many countries, including the US, Argentina, the Netherlands, England and Indonesia. In response, women took to the streets in skimpy clothes as an act of deďŹ ance against the concept that women deserve to be raped if their dressing was offensive. Do scantily clad women deserve to be raped? My answer to that is a resounding no. Nobody wishes to be a victim of sexual abuse. Dressing in a particular way should never be perceived as a direct invitation for such an atrocity. A crime will always be a crime. However, the big question is this: Does Slutwalk necessarily transform womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights and fulďŹ lls its objectives? I believe womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights should never exist in a vacuum. Realistically speaking, they are always subject to social interpretation and acceptance by the community at large. Cultural relativityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;social attitudes and values being inďŹ&#x201A;uenced by the cultural context of that societyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is a signiďŹ cant inďŹ&#x201A;uence. For rights to evolve, there has to be gradual social change, and

that takes time. Being cautious and aware of what is acceptable in oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s society is an underrated characteristic. There is greater dignity when women actually change the state of womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights in communities in a tangible manner, instead of merely championing a cause that may not bring about real and relevant change to a society. What I ďŹ nd more worrying is the message sent to women. Self-professed advocates of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;slutsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stand for all women. These symbols of the modern feminist movement are banking on the chauvinist deďŹ nition of women as sexual objectsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as slutsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and this in itself is deeply ironic. Perhaps, the removal of the word â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Slutâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; from the Singapore version of the protests is timely for this reason alone. Madhura Bhave, 20, a secondyear School of Chemical and Biological Engineering student is a member of United Nations Women Empowerment Organisation (UNIFEM) Youth Team. The UNIFEM Youth Team is the youth wing of the United Nations Women Empowerment Organisation. She said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Although I applaud the cause, I think the focus of Slutwalk has been lost. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not about dressing provocatively. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about protecting yourself despite your clothing. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about being realistic, about safeguarding even the modestly dressed. Rape is beyond clothing; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a social attitude. We should teach donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rape, not â&#x20AC;&#x153;donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get rapedâ&#x20AC;?.â&#x20AC;? The challenge for governments around the world and for the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights movement is to come up with a more representative and sustainable movement that is realistic, given the social dynamics that women today are faced with. Essentially, all womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights

stand for the same thingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;respect and protection: from the community, family and males. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t deny that this protest has brought about some positive social change. The trend that it has started is relevant and impactful in the long run. It has ďŹ rstly galvanized pockets of the community in a uniďŹ ed stance, something that is important for any rights movement. It has, for example, united women from all socioeconomic backgrounds and walks of life. It has shed a lot of international scrutiny on pressing issues. Media scrutiny has raised a lot of public discourse on this issue. It has also pushed society to reevaluate what a woman truly is. People now talk about womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights more than before, each time reshaping the social consensus on what womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rights are and what they should be. Manik Jain, 19, a second-year School of Computer Engineering student speaks of these beneďŹ ts. He said: â&#x20AC;?Slutwalk has that shock effect, and although it may incite backlash, it is one of the best ways to start public discourse on these issues.â&#x20AC;? I believe that Slutwalk needs to be contextualized to remain relevant. It needs to come up with a realistic model of implementation. How is a woman in a conservative chauvinistic society, for example, supposed to balance her right to express her sexuality and manage the constraints placed on her by society? This balance of interests is a skill that has to be emphasized. Who a woman is, what she has right to do, and what her community needs are important considerations for any civilised society. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think you need to dress like a slut to realise that.

DeďŹ nitely Starbucks. I have been waiting for it for a long time. All my NUS friends have been bragging about the outlet in their U-Town. Tommy Cheng, SPMS, Yr 2, 22

I vote for Pitchstop. The setting is such that I am able to hold a private conversation without worrying about seats.

â&#x20AC;?

Pranav Sethaputra, HSS, Yr 1, 21

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

I think it is about time that Starbucks came to NTU. I think they make better coffee than Caffe Express, which is overpriced. Naresh Subhash, ADM, Yr 4, 25

I prefer the quality of coffee at Starbucks. But I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been to the new outlet yet as the queues are still very long.

â&#x20AC;?

Guo Meng, NBS, Yr 2, 21 TEXT | EUNICE ANG ; PHOTOS | GOH CHAY TENG


34 SPORTS

7+(1$1<$1*

bpl talk

Mancunian revolution or London submission? ERIC YAP THE TWO Manchester clubs have certainly stolen the early season limelight for the current Barclays Premier League campaign. The Red Devils have swept the likes of Tottenham, Arsenal and Chelsea with a strong start. With five consecutive victories, Roberto Mancini’s side have also impressed, only trailing United by virtue of goal difference. In contrast, the London clubs struggled to pick up points from their opening matches. While Wayne Rooney, Sergio Agüero and Edin Džeko have amassed 23 goals among them, the likes of Robin van Persie, Jermaine Defoe and Fernando Torres have only managed seven. One reason for this is due to the reinforcement in midfield by the Manchester clubs. New signing Ashley Young has slotted in well on the left, adding five assists for United, while City’s Samir Nasri has already chalked up four assists in just five appearances. In comparison, Arsenal lost

Cesc Fabregas and Nasri — their key creative outlets — during the summer transfer window. New addition Mikel Arteta’s fitness remains questionable, while Yossi Benayoun, on loan from Chelsea, looks to be waning in form and confidence. Spurs’ Rafael van der Vaart has put in brilliant displays, but his tendency to pick up knocks has halted a prolonged run in the first team. Steven Pienaar, a £2 million signing from Everton, has failed to nail down a first-team place thus far. Chelsea look to be the one London side with much promise. Their slow start has been partly due to the integration of new signings like Juan Mata and Raul Meireles who added incisiveness to the midfield, denying veteran Frank Lampard a spot in the starting eleven. Defence has also been a woe for the Londoners. The Gunners’ 8-2 obliteration at the hands of United proved Laurent Koscielny and Johan Djourou are hardly championship material. Per Mer tesac ker’s lac k of

92/ 12

18

CHRONICLE 04 they said that? First you have to win the lottery and then you worry about what to do with the winnings. F1 driver Sebastian Vettel is focused on winning the championship before he starts celebrating it. GRAPHIC | LEE JUNYI

pace and poor positioning were responsible for at least two goals against Blackburn. Chelsea’s David Luiz has entertained with his swashbuckling style, but his propensity for rash challenges means that John Terry has yet to find a stable partner in defence. The Blues have failed to keep a clean sheet for the last six games in the league. Spurs have talented but injuryprone centre-backs like Jonathan Woodgate and Ledley King. Without

them, it is often down to Michael Dawson to hold the fort. Arsenal remain in 15th position, but the public opinion is that Arsene Wenger can lead his side out of the doldrums. Yet, all is not lost for the London clubs. Spurs lie in 6th place after four straight wins, while Chelsea are 3rd after a 5-1 win over Bolton. Recent results suggest a gradual improvement in form, and in due time, the Londoners will surely restore parity with the Mancunian giants.

You don t have much time to get the calculator out at that point. F1 driver Mark Webber reveals that he didn’t have much time to think about his passing move on Fernando Alonso through g Eau Rouge g in Belgium. g

sports talk

Flair play has its benefits STEFANUS IAN THINK Lebron James’ pre-game powder ritual, Nani’s acrobatic goal celebrations and Usain Bolt’s “To Di World” victory pose. All these go to show that showmanship has become a prevalent trend in the sporting world today. Substance alone is not enough for athletes who want to make t hem selves more ma rketable. Through dramatic performances on the pitch or over-the-top celebrations, style is now just as important as skill, as it makes watching sports more attractive. But, there is a fine line between showmanship and showboating. Excessive flamboyance is redundant, tactless and disrespectful to opponents. Usain Bolt is a fine example. In his record-breaking 100-metre race during the 2008 Beijing Olympics, Bolt slowed down in the last 20 metres to look around and, even pounded his chest before crossing the finish line. This drew criticisms that he was disrespectful to his fellow competitors. Last year, footballer Cristiano Ronaldo came under fire for passing the ball with his back when Real Madrid were cruising to a 2-0 victory against their city rivals Atletico Madrid. Ronaldo’s actions were duly criticised as “provocative” by the Atletico side. While showboating can hardly

GRAPHIC | LEE JUNYI

be justified, showmanship may draw fans to a sport by giving it more entertainment value. It would thus be misleading to trivialise showmanship as mere overindulgence by the athlete. When utilised properly, showmanship can have a positive effect on performance.

An athlete’s flair has the power to bring the crowd to its feet, singing and cheering their team to victory. Footballers regularly call on the support of the “12th man” during decisive home matches, looking to feed off the energy from the crowd. For instance, no one can deny

the impact of the sold-out crowd at Jalan Besar stadium during the first leg of the World Cup Qualifier between Singapore and Malaysia earlier this year, which led to an exciting 5-3 victory for the home side. In basketball, a dominating and usually flamboyant turn of play, like a massive rejection or an audacious steal, can single-handedly swing the momentum of the game. Without a doubt, showmanship adds f lavour to a spor t. Showmanship is bor ne out of sheer unadulterated passion on the field of battle and this helps create an emotional connection between athletes and their supporters. Some sports leagues like the National Basketball Association (NBA) even embrace the principle of showmanship with the All-Star Weekend, where style is at its swashbuckling best. Players in the league showcase their style in events like the 3-point challenge and the Slam Dunk challenge. In the Slam Dunk challenge, players execute the most creative, flashy and gravity defying dunks possible—always a crowd favourite. Public response to these events has been largely positive, proving that it is possible for performance and entertainment to work hand-in-hand. The onus is now on the athletes to give audiences a good show. To me, showmanship is not a choice, but a responsibility.

GRAPHIC | GOH WEI CHO CHOON

If we re ever walking down the hallway, stay on the other side. You re totally out of control. You re a hater and you re unattractive inside. What a loser. Tennis player Serena Williams Ginepri with a tirade directed at chair umpire Eva Asderaki, who penalised Williams for violating the hindrance rule when she yelled during the US Open final.

Our goal isn t to win the League Cup ̶ it s another season in the Premier League. West Brom Manager Roy Hodgson on his relief at being knocked out of the Carling Cup.


92/ 12

18

SPORTS 35

7+(1$1<$1*

04 CHRONICLE

Volleyball team does it again AVRIL HONG THEIR first opponents were also their toughest. However, it did not stop NTU’s men’s volleyball team from beating rivals Singapore Institute of Management (SIM) in their first round-robin match. The team eventually emerged as Singapore University Games (SUniG) champions in the men’s volleyball event, that was held at NTU’s Sports and Recreation Centre from September 5th to 19th. T he win mark s the four th consecutive year that NTU has come in first for men’s volleyball at SUniG. The men’s win against SIM was no easy feat. Competition was fierce between both sides as veteran NTU players had already graduated, and new experienced players had joined the the SIM team. The rivals were deadlocked at 2-2 by the end of the fourth set. The stalemate was finally broken after NTU won the final set with a 15-11 scoreline.

Despite the win, coach Tan Paul Loong expressed dissatisfaction with his charges’ performance. “We won but I don’t think it’s a great victory because we lost two sets to SIM,” the 33-yearold said. Last year, NTU conceded just one set to SIM. Tan added: “(As defending champions) we’re not really satisfied with this and we’re going to work even harder.” A f te r t r u m pi n g Nat ion a l University of Singapore (NUS), t h e t e a m’s n e x t c h a l l e n g e was Si ngapore Ma nagement University (SMU). At the match, NTU came back from a 26-28 loss to SMU, by winning the the next two sets. Captain Lin Tinglong, 24, later sealed the victory with a well-executed spike in the fourth and final set to secure a 3-1 win. L i n , a f i na l-yea r s t ude nt from the School of Civ il and Environmental Engineering said: “We never harboured thoughts of losing. “We knew we could win and we knew we were going to win,

that was what kept us going.” “The team was close friends to start off with. We really fight for each other when we come together,” said Lin. He added that their success came from having a strong team with a good fighting spirit. Coach Tan agreed: “The players are very determined to fight. They have very strong fighting spirit. “The bonds that we have built over the years, not only as coach and players, but also as friends helped.” Tan anticipates a good showing at future competitions as the team’s height was an advantage. The average height of the team is 180 cm and their tallest player stands at 197 cm. “We have the advantage of height and this would be a good tea m to se nd to t he A SE A N Universit y games next year,” said Tan. Sadly, there was no repeat of the men’s performance for the women’s team. They secured a SUniG silverafter losing to NUS with a 3-0 scoreline.

TOWERING PRESENCE: The height of NTU players was an advantage. PHOTO | LAM ZHAO YAO

Irish training brings new dynamism to NTU LAI JUNJIE SPORTS EDITOR BARELY a week after finishing a disappointing t hird for t he Rugby 7s event at the Singapore University Games (SUniG), the NTU men’s rugby team were back on the pitch—with a twist in their training regime. Showing up at the team’s usual training session on September 22nd were t h ree new faces— Micheal O’Leary, John McLaughlin and Mark Hogan, students of the M BA programme at Nanyang Business School. The trio are Irish athletes from the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), introducing Gaelic football to the NTU team as part of a cultural exchange program. GAA is an Irish international sporting organisation that promotes Gaelic sports, like hurling and rounders. NTU’s rugby team hopes that exposure to the foreign sport, best described as a mixture of soccer and rugby, will boost their own rugby skills. O’Leary, 25, who is also a GAAcertified Gaelic football coach, was confident that introducing aspects of the game to NTU’s rugby team would be beneficial. He said: “Most Irish athletes play Gaelic football as they grow up and this has given the Irish rugby team a distinct advantage over other teams. In fact, the Irish team is known for their great ball-

What is Gaelic football?

BALL OF A TIME: NTU’s rugby team were trained in basic Gaelic football skills by Micheal O’Leary (centre in blue shorts), a certified coach. PHOTO | WAN ZHONG HAO

handling skills. “It’s very natural for an Irish player to carry and catch the ball over his head, which is something ver y diff icult for most r ugby players.” During the two-hour session, NTU’s rugby players were trained in basic Gaelic football skills, like catching high balls and executing hand passes. The new training regime was a welcome breath of fresh air. NTU captain Fadzil Wahed, 24, was concerned that the team’s training programme had become stagnant over the years. “For years, our way of training has been to train our players according to specialised skills and t hat has been a problem in some of our matches,” said

the final-year student from the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. He added: “By training in Gaelic football, each player on the team has become more robust and dynamic. This allows them to contribute in more ways on the field.” The team will face stiff competition from teams like N US and SIM in the upcoming QuadUniversity Rugby Championships in February next year, where NTU are the defending champions. “(Gaelic football) is a fresh and new concept (in Singapore), so hopefully this training will give us an edge over the other teams,” Fadzil said. Perhaps with more than a little reliance on the fabled luck of the Irish.

GAELIC football is an amateur sport which originated from, and is still being played mainly in, Ireland. It is a form of football best described as a mixture of soccer and rugby. Each team consists of 15 players: One goalkeeper, three fullbacks, three half-backs, two midfielders, three half-forwards and three full-forwards. The objective is to score goals by kicking or striking the ball by hand through the opposing team’s goalposts. The team with the highest score at the end of a match wins. Players advance the ball up the field with a combination of carrying, soloing (dropping and then toe-kicking the ball back into the hands), kicking, and hand-passing the ball to their teammates. The game is played on a pitch up to 145m long and 90m wide. The goalposts are the same shape as its rugby counterpart, although the crossbar is lower than a rugby one and slightly higher than a soccer one. Matches last for 60 minutes, with two halves of 30 minutes each. Senior inter-county games last for 70 minutes, with two halves of 35 minutes. Draws are decided by 20 minutes of extra time (two halves of 10 minutes).


Sports

Playing football with your hands? – Page 35

Long awaited victory ANNABELLE LIANG SPORTS EDITOR I T TOOK seven yea r s, but t he NT U Aquathlon men's team f inally emerged champions in the Si n g a p or e Un i v e r s i t y G a m e s (SUniG) held on September 17th at East Coast Park. The annual competition, into its second year, replaced the previous Institute-Varsity-Polytechnic Games t hat was open to local univer sities, poly technics and Institute of Technical Education colleges. SUniG is open to local universitiets only. NTU had previously won both the men’s and women’s team gold medals in 2004. This year’s Aquathlon event comprised of a 750m swim and a 7.2km run. All participants ran the race once and the team that took the fastest combined time won the team gold. Also, the fastest male and female participants, regardless of their team's performance, were awarded the individual gold. This was NTU's first team gold medal for its team spor ts this SUniG season. The women’s team came in third in their event, behind champions SIM and runners-up NUS. NTU Aquathlon also won the individual male and female gold awards. Team captain Danson Cheong, 22, felt the men’s team win was unexpected as the NTU team had always played second f iddle to former champions NUS, who had beaten them by a margin of more

FLASH AND SPLASH: Men's individual gold medalist Lim Lu Kai emerging from the water after the swim.

BLAZING A TRAIL: The NTU Aquathlon men's team taking off for a 750 m swim and 7.2 km run.

than five minutes last year. This year, the NTU men's team came in with a combined timing of 3 hours and 27 mins, more than two mins ahead of runnersup NUS. Cheong, a second-year student from the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, described SUniG as a “goliath's match-up" for the NTU team. He added: “Right until the results were tallied, I thought it would have been a very close fight and did not expect such a big winning margin. “But at the end of the day, we deserved to win as we fought like lions.” The team's performance did not come easy. In addition to official training sessions that took place three times a week, Cheong said that most members also swam and ran on a daily basis. He added: “Many of our SUniG team members didn’t compete in SUniG last year, so there was also a big question mark on whether they could cope with the challenge.” One such member was Chua Khai Leng, 20, a first-year Sports Science and Management student. Chua did not disappoint, winning the women’s individual gold with a timing of 45 mins and 6 secs.

The former track and field runner competed after training with the team for only six weeks. She said: “I really enjoyed the experience as it was my first aquathlon. Competition was strong but I managed to use the running segment to my advantage. “I would love to take part in future SUniG events.” It was also v ice-captain Heng Zh i Feng’s f i r st t i me competing in the SUniG, as he had failed to qualify through NTU’s internal trials last year. T he second-year st udent from the School of Computer Engi neer i ng felt t hat good attendance during trainings, including that of non-SUniG squad members, had helped boost team morale. T he 23-yea r- old sa id: “Ever yone’s effort and commitment played a big part. “Danson and I coordinated well too. He conducted trainings and talked to the team, while I handled administrative mat ter s and held t ra in ings when he couldn’t make it." Coach Poon Pek Ya, who has been with the team for

PHOTOS | COURTESY OF CAINE NG & CHIA CHIN YEH

two years, said the aquathlon team was more systematic and organised than in prev ious years.

“But at the end of the day, we deserved to win as we fought like lions." Danson Cheong Aquathlon captain

She said: “The team trained together a lot more this time round. We had talented new athletes who were willing to work hard, and key athletes who were team-focused. Some even sacrificed other race plans to focus on SUniG. “We did not only have individuals that were very good, but a strong team overall.” A stroke of luck may also have played a part. The NTU team found out on race day that national triathlete Mok Ying Ren would not be competing for NUS.

Mok , a for me r Sout hea st Asian Games gold medalist, was the individual men’s champion and part of the winning NUS team at the SUniG aquathlon men's event last year. Cheong said: “This relieved some pressure, and prov ided the extra motivation to push on harder. It left the race open.” Mok's absence also allowed Lim Lu Kai, 23, a third-year student from the School of Electrical a nd Elec t ron ic Eng i neer i ng, to clinch the men’s individual champion with a timing of 38 mins and 21 secs. He had finished individual second in SUniG last year. Lim said: “If Mok had competed, the race would have been a tougher fight.” In spite of the win, the race was a humbling experience for Cheong, who came in last among the men’s team on race day because of stomach discomforts. He said: “I didn’t have a very good race but the rest of the guys managed to pull up the f lag. Every race is an experience and this was certainly one for me. “As with each year, we hope to learn from our mistakes and get better.”


The Nanyang Chronicle Vol 18 Issue 04  
Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you