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GLOBAL TRADING GAME

Students become geologists, miners, economic advisors, and international traders as they analyze their country’s resources and needs and trade with other countries to enhance their country’s economic position and environmental quality.

GRADE LEVEL 4–12

SUBJECT AREAS Science Social Studies Math Language Arts


Teacher Advisory Board Shelly Baumann, Rockford, MI Constance Beatty, Kankakee, IL Sara Brownell, Canyon Country, CA Amy Constant, Raleigh, NC Joanne Coons, Clifton Park, NY Nina Corley, Galveston, TX Regina Donour, Whitesburg, KY Darren Fisher, Houston, TX Deborah Fitton, Cape Light Compact, MA Linda Fonner, New Martinsville, WV Viola Henry, Thaxton, VA Robert Hodash, Bakersfield, CA Linda Hutton, Kitty Hawk, NC Doug Keaton, Russell, KY Michelle Lamb, Buffalo Grove, IL Barbara Lazar, Albuquerque, NM Robert Lazar, Albuquerque, NM Mollie Mukhamedov, Port St. Lucie, FL Don Pruett, Sumner, WA Larry Richards, Eaton, IN Joanne Spaziano, Cranston, RI Gina Spencer, Virginia Beach, VA Tom Spencer, Chesapeake, VA Nancy Stanley, Pensacola, FL Doris Tomas, Rosenberg, TX Patricia Underwood, Anchorage, AK Jim Wilkie, Long Beach CA Carolyn Wuest, Pensacola, FL Debby Yerkes, Ohio Energy Project, OH Wayne Yonkelowitz, Fayetteville, WV

Teacher Advisory Board Vision Statement NEED Mission Statement The mission of the NEED Project is to promote an energy conscious and educated society by creating effective networks of students, educators, business, government and community leaders to design and deliver objective, multi-sided energy education programs. In support of NEED, the national Teacher Advisory Board (TAB) is dedicated to developing and promoting standards-based energy curriculum and training.

Permission to Reproduce NEED materials may be reproduced for non-commercial educational purposes.


TABLE OF CONTENTS Correlations to National Science Standards .................... 4 Overview of Game .......................................................... 5 Teacher Guide ................................................................ 6 Game Construction ........................................................ 9 Jobs & Descriptions Transparency Master ...................... 11 Country Profiles ........................................................ 12-17 Country Comparison Chart ............................................. 18 Teacher Key ................................................................... 19 Energy Bucks Master ...................................................... 20 Country Cards and Impacts ....................................... 21-56 Student Worksheet ......................................................... 57 Geologist Map ............................................................... 58 Impact Data Sheet ......................................................... 59 International Trade Center Sign....................................... 60 Game Boards ............................................................ 61-62 Evaluation Form ............................................................. 63

The information in this publication is from the Energy Information Administration (2004), U.S. Census Bureau, Rand McNally World Facts & Maps, and Dorling Kindersley Cartopedia.

The Global Trading Game was developed by the Ohio Energy Project.

© 2009

THE NEED PROJECT • P.O. BOX 10101 • MANASSAS, VA 20108 • 1-800-875-5029

Global Trading Game

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Correlations to National Science Standards (Bolded standards are emphasized in the unit.)

INTERMEDIATE (5-8) STANDARD–F: SCIENCE IN PERSONAL AND SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES 2. Populations, Resources, and Environments a. When an area becomes overpopulated, the environment will become degraded due to the increased use of resources. b. Causes of environmental degradation and resource depletion vary from region to region and from country to country.

3. Natural Hazards b. Human activities can induce hazards through resource acquisition, urban growth, land-use decisions, and waste disposal. c. Hazards can present personal and societal challenges because misidentifying the change or incorrectly estimating the rate and scale of change may result in either too little attention and significant human costs or too much cost for unneeded preventive measures.

4. Risks and Benefits c. Students can use a systematic approach to thinking critically about risks and benefits.

5. Science and Technology in Society a. Science influences society through its knowledge and world view. The effect of science on society is neither entirely beneficial nor entirely detrimental. d. Science and technology have contributed enormously to economic growth and productivity among societies and groups within societies. e. Science cannot answer all questions and technology cannot solve all human problems or meet all human needs. Students should appreciate what science and technology can reasonably contribute to society and what they cannot do. For example, new technologies often will decrease some risks and increase others.

SECONDARY (9-12) STANDARD–C: LIFE SCIENCE 4. The Interdependence of Organisms c. Humans modify ecosystems as a result of population growth, technology, and consumption. Human destruction of habitats through harvesting, pollution, atmospheric changes, and other factors is threatening global stability, and if not addressed, ecosystems will be irreversibly affected.

SECONDARY (9-12) STANDARD–F: SCIENCE IN PERSONAL AND SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES 3. Natural Resources a. Human populations use resources in the environment to maintain and improve their existence. b. The earth does not have infinite resources; increasing human consumption places severe stress on the natural processes that renew some resources, and depletes those resources that cannot be renewed. c. Humans use many natural systems as resources. Natural systems have the capacity to reuse waste but that capacity is limited. Natural systems can change to an extent that exceeds the limits of organisms to adapt naturally or humans to adapt technologically.

4. Environmental Quality a. Natural ecosystems provide an array of basic processes that affect humans. Those processes include maintenance of the quality of the atmosphere, generation of soils, control of the hydrologic cycle, disposal of wastes, and recycling of nutrients. Humans are changing many of these basic processes, and the changes may be detrimental to humans.

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Global Trading Game

© 2009

THE NEED PROJECT • P.O. BOX 10101 • MANASSAS, VA 20108 • 1-800-875-5029


OVERVIEW OF ACTIVITY Students work cooperatively in six groups, each of which is assigned an unnamed country. Each country has varying types and amounts of the following commodities: money, energy resources, technology, industry, and workforce. The students become citizens of their country and are provided with background information with which the students identify their country’s strengths and weaknesses, discuss the standard of living, and what they would like to change. The teams are then given game boards and game pieces for their countries. The game pieces represent various assets. Each group member chooses one of four occupations that play significant roles in the country’s ability to advance in the game. The occupations are geologist, miner, economic advisor, and international trader. Each team also receives a plastic bin that contains a plot of land that represents their country and its assets. Students begin to role-play their occupations. The geologists draw a map of the plot, then use straws to probe the earth and locate buried energy resources. The miners simulate a surface mine by removing each layer of sediment, then remove the energy resources from the soil. The geologists and miners work together to reclaim the land by replacing the layers as they found them. Meanwhile, the advisors and traders organize the number of each commodity with which their country begins the game. The goal of the game is then revealed––to finish with no more or less than five of each of the commodities: energy resources, technology, workforce and industry. Students buy, sell and trade on the global market to attain the goal. The economic advisors analyze the country’s resources and decide what needs to be bought, what is available to sell, and what would be best to trade. Economic advisors also decide what they are willing to pay for each commodity, and for what price they are willing to sell their commodities. The game continues with two trading rounds. After each trading round, the economic advisors organize the acquired commodities and plan for the next round. When the second trading round is completed, the teams are asked to compare their county’s current status to its status at the beginning of the game. Each team then learns that each commodity has impacts on the country. The students assess possible positive and negative impacts of each of the commodities and resources. The third trading round has the added goal of controlling the number of impacts made upon the country. Some countries must negotiate to reduce impacts while still maintaining the goal of five of each commodity. Usually the game results with more than one team meeting their goals. It is then revealed to the teams that each of the countries represents a real country in the world. Brief descriptions of the real world countries are included in this packet.

Option: As the real countries are revealed, the teams must locate the countries on a world map.

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THE NEED PROJECT • P.O. BOX 10101 • MANASSAS, VA 20108 • 1-800-875-5029

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TEACHER GUIDE DAY ONE Materials Needed „ „ „

Country Packets in Envelopes (see page 9) Transparencies (pages 11 & 18) Class Set of the Student Worksheet (page 57)

Preparation „

Divide the class into six groups.

Procedure 1.

Give an overview of the Global Trading Game, as follows: „

Each of the six teams represents a different country.

„

Each country, just as in the real world, has different amounts of money, industry, people and other resources. These commodities and resources have positive and negative impacts.

„

Everyone will have a job that is important to the country’s ability to advance in the game.

2.

Distribute a Country Packet to each group and a Student Worksheet to each player. Explain that prior to playing the game, each team must understand its country’s unique strengths and weaknesses, assets and needs.

3.

Instruct the teams to remove the country profiles and comparison charts from their envelopes. As they read about their country, use these questions to help guide their reading: „

What are three strengths of your country?

„

What are three weaknesses of your country?

„

Using the Country Comparison Chart, how does your country compare to the other countries in the game?

4.

Have each student complete the Student Worksheet.

5.

Using the transparency of the Country Comparison Chart, review and define the country profile categories. For example: „

Population: Abundant population can be an advantage by contributing to a strong labor force or be a disadvantage by increasing pollution and/or energy consumption.

„

Climate: Weather can be a factor in obtaining and consuming energy resources.

6.

Display the Job Descriptions transparency as you describe the occupations. After you have reviewed the occupations, have each student choose an occupation.

7.

Explain the procedure that will be followed for playing the game on Day Two and have the students return the packets to you.

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Global Trading Game

© 2009

THE NEED PROJECT • P.O. BOX 10101 • MANASSAS, VA 20108 • 1-800-875-5029


DAY TWO Materials Needed „ „ „ „ „ „

Country Bins Old Newspaper Country Packets Geologist Maps International Trade Center sign (optional) Game boards (optional)

Preparation „

Place students into their groups again and review what took place yesterday.

Procedure 1.

Redistribute the country envelopes to the student groups.

2.

Have the students discuss in their groups what they learned about their country on Day One. Place the country bins at the International Trade Center for distribution later in the game.

3.

Using Transparency 2––Jobs and Actions, have the students recall the job they chose and review and discuss the different roles.

4.

Have the students sort the industry, technology and workforce cards and organize them on the game boards. (If you are not using the game boards, have the students place the cards into three rows.)

5.

Call the geologists and miners to the International Trade Center to collect their country’s bin and old newspaper. Provide each group with a Geologist Map. Give them the following instructions: GEOLOGISTS: Observe the plot of land and make a sketch of the landscape on the map, labeling any hills or changes in the landscape. The large rocks represent hills and the sticks represent valleys. Use the straws to probe the soil for energy resources buried there, then mark on the map the location of any energy resources you find. MINERS: Carefully remove the earth layer by layer, and set each layer aside on the newspaper. Use the geologist map to locate the energy resources. When you find the energy resources, bring them to the facilitator and exchange them for game pieces. Return the energy resources to the bin and give the cards to your economic advisor. As the traders and advisors do their jobs, you must work with the geologists to restore the plot of land.

6.

Advise the economic advisors and international traders to prepare for the trading rounds. Give them the following instructions: ECONOMIC ADVISORS: Develop a strategy to allow your team to end up with five of each of the commodity cards. Decide what needs to be bought and how much the team is willing to pay for it, and what needs to be sold and at what price. INTERNATIONAL TRADERS: Use the economic advisor’s strategy and your ability to negotiate to obtain the commodities your country needs and trade the commodities you don’t need during the trading rounds.

7.

Explain the rules for trading: Trading may occur only at the International Trade Center. Only international traders may buy, sell, and trade commodities.

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If trading is done by anyone other than a trader, or in any place other than the trade center, the teams must forfeit the next round of trading. If any trading is done before or after the trading signal, the teams must forfeit the next round of trading. 8.

Give a warning, then signal the start of Round 1 trading. Allow 90 seconds for trading, then signal the end of the round.

9.

Have the students regroup for two to three minutes to allow the economic advisors to create a strategy for the next round of trading.

10. Conduct Round 2 trading for 90 seconds. 11. At the conclusion of the second round, have the students return to their groups and complete the Impacts Worksheets in their Country Packets. An impact is an effect on the environment as a result of energy production/consumption, industry, technology, or the workforce. Briefly discuss the definition and examples of impacts. 12. Have the students turn over all of the game cards to discover the impacts. 13. Explain that in the last trading round, teams must still attempt to obtain five of each kind of card, but must also try to end up with 21 or fewer impacts. Optional: It is a challenge for everyone to end up with 21 or fewer impacts, but possible. You might choose to make it easier, if you want everyone to win, by changing the number of impacts to 23, or make it impossible for everyone to win by lowering the impacts to 19. 14. Allow two to five minutes for the teams to form a new strategy for the final round of trading based on the number of impacts they have. 15. Signal the start of the final trading round. Allow three minutes for trading, then signal the end of the round. 16. Review the activity with the students using the Summary Questions listed below. 17. Evaluate the activity with the students using the Evaluation Form on page 63 and return the evaluation to the NEED Project.

SUMMARY QUESTIONS „

How many countries met the goal of five of each card with 21 or fewer impacts?

„

What are some reasons a country might have trouble meeting that goal?

„

Do you think the reasons we have come up with could occur in real countries?

„

In reality, what resources and impacts would countries want to increase and decrease?

EXTENSION ACTIVITY Refer to the following country profiles. State key information from each country profile and ask the students to guess which real country their profile represents. As an extension, have students locate that country on a world map.

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Global Trading Game

© 2009

THE NEED PROJECT • P.O. BOX 10101 • MANASSAS, VA 20108 • 1-800-875-5029


GAME CONSTRUCTION (Construction takes approximately four hours)

MATERIALS „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „ „

12 30 6 1 1 12 6 30 1 6 6 1 1 1

Plastic spoons Plastic drinking straws, cut in half Plastic storage containers, approximately 12”x 16”x 8” 50 pound bag of sand 25 pound bag of small aquarium gravel Rocks, approximately 2”– 3” in diameter Craft sticks Marbles or 1” pieces of wood Bell or whistle Sturdy envelopes – 9”x 12” Sets of 20 sheets of paper – each set a different color – 8 ½” x 11” Paper Cutter Laminator Photocopier

OPTIONAL: To construct game boards and signs, you will need the following: 13

8 ½” x 14” sheets of colored paper (all the same color)

PREPARATION 1.

Choose one color paper for each country. You will use this color for the game pieces and energy bucks. For example, the energy bucks and game pieces for Country #1 will be on blue paper, Country #2 on yellow, etc. The originals for the game pieces are found on pages 21-56. A page of impacts follows each of the commodity pages.

2.

Copy the game pages with the impact symbols on the back so that each game piece is two-sided.

3.

Copy and cut energy bucks for each country using the color for that country; the master is found on page 20. Each country requires a different number of copies:

COUNTRY

© 2009

# OF COPIES

# OF BUCKS

1

4

25

2

1

5

3

3

23

4

3

17

5

2

10

6

3

20

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4.

Using the same color paper as the game pieces and energy bucks, make six copies of the Country Profiles for each country, found on pages 12-17, one copy of the Geologist Map on page 58 and one copy of the Impacts Worksheet on page 59.

5.

Using the colored paper, make six copies of the Country Comparison Chart for each country, found on page 18. Make a transparency of the Country Comparison Chart, also.

6.

Make a transparency of the Job Descriptions and Actions found on page 11.

7.

Cut and laminate the energy bucks and playing cards. Laminate the Country Profiles and Country Comparison Chart, if desired.

PROCEDURE 1.

Create a teacher packet, including: The energy resource cards for all the countries in separate envelopes The two transparencies (pages 11 & 18) A copy of the Teacher Key (page 19)

2.

Organize the country materials above into the 9”x 12” envelopes for each country. Label each envelope 1–6 to correspond with the country number. Place the following into each country’s envelope: Energy bucks Industry, technology, and workforce cards (excluding energy resource cards) Country Profile sheets Country Comparison Charts Impact Worksheet 2 spoons 10 pieces of drinking straws

3.

Create plastic bins representing plots of land for each country. Number the bins 1–6.

4.

Each plot of land contains a certain number of energy resources that can be mined. The marbles or wood pieces represent energy resources. Use the following list as a guide to place the correct number of energy resources in each country bin: Country Country Country Country Country Country

1 2 3 4 5 6

7 4 1 10 5 3

5.

Bury the energy resources by filling each plastic bin with three inches of sand, then two inches of aquarium rocks or small pebbles.

6.

Place two large rocks and one craft stick on the surface of each plot of land. The rocks represent hills and the craft stick represents a valley.

OPTIONAL: Enlarge and copy the INTERNATIONAL TRADE CENTER sign (page 60) onto 8 ½” x 14” colored paper. Laminate for durability. Enlarge and copy the two game boards (pages 61-62) onto 8 ½” x 14” colored paper. Laminate each game board for durability.

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Global Trading Game

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JOB DESCRIPTIONS & ACTIONS GEOLOGISTS Make a map of the plot of land. Mark hills and differences in landscape. Locate your country’s energy resources by probing the soil using a straw. Mark promising sites with a straw. Assist the Miners in reclaiming the land after it is mined. Use your map as a guide.

MINERS Mine your energy resources using the surface mine method and the Geologist map. Remove each layer of earth until you reach the energy resources. Use the tools to mine the energy resources. You may not touch them with your hands until they are on the surface. Bring all mined energy sources to the facilitator to receive energy cards when you hear the signal. Work with the Geologists to reclaim the land.

ECONOMIC ADVISORS Develop a trading strategy. Decide how many cards your country needs and how much you are willing to pay for them. Decide how many cards you can trade and what other countries should pay or trade for them. Use the Country Comparison Chart to learn about the other countries. Explain your strategy to your International Traders and tell them what your cards are worth.

INTERNATIONAL TRADERS Persuade other countries to buy, sell and trade what your country needs. At the signal, report to the Trade Center. You will have 90 seconds to conduct your business during each trading session. At the end of each trading session, return to your Economic Advisors, and give them the cards and money for the next strategy sessions.

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COUNTRY PROFILE 1 SIZE

3,618,760 square miles; about half of the size of Russia

POPULATION

304.5 million; average life expectancy is 76 years. There are about 96 people per square mile.

ECONOMY

The average person in this country earns $43,424 per year. This country currently has one of the strongest economies in the world. The standard of living is considered high, but emphasis on technology has caused people without an education to make less money.

INDUSTRY

This country has many different types of businesses and more factories than any other country. It produces petroleum products, steel, motor vehicles, telephone service, chemicals, electronics, food, consumer goods, lumber, and mining. This country produces 40 percent of the world’s consumer goods.

ENERGY

This country consumes 99.2 quads of energy per year and imports 26 percent of the energy it uses. About 78.6 percent of the country’s energy production is fossil fuels, while 11.5 percent comes from nuclear reactors, and 3.3 percent from hydropower. The remaining 6.6 percent is produced by geothermal, wind, biomass, and solar sources.

TECHNOLOGY

This country is very successful in space exploration, chemistry, electronics, lasers, plastics, and computers. Robots have replaced human assembly lines in many factories.

RESOURCES

The country has energy resources of coal, petroleum, natural gas, and uranium. Other resources include copper, lead, phosphates, uranium, bauxite, gold, iron, mercury, nickel, silver, tungsten, zinc, and timber.

ENVIRONMENT

This country produces more carbon dioxide than any other country. It burns fossil fuels which can cause air pollution. Other issues are nuclear waste, water pollution, strip mining, and too much irrigation. The country is working to improve air and water quality and is doing a good job of protecting its native plants and animals.

GOVERNMENT

Multiparty democracy

CLIMATE

The extreme northern part of the country experiences long, cold winters and short cool summers. The extreme south is semi-tropical with no noticeable change in seasons. The eastern part of the country is humid, and the western part is very dry. The majority of the country is temperate with mild winters and warm summers.

AUTOMOBILES

More than one car per two people

LITERACY RATE

99 percent

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Global Trading Game

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THE NEED PROJECT • P.O. BOX 10101 • MANASSAS, VA 20108 • 1-800-875-5029


COUNTRY PROFILE 2 SIZE

1,222,559 square miles; one-third the size of the United States

POPULATION

1,166 million; average life expectancy is 64 years. There are about 924 people per square mile.

ECONOMY

The average person in this country earns $771 per year, and most of the people are farmers. Because there are so many people, there is a low standard of living. Most of the population doesn’t have enough food and medicine, and some do not have indoor bathrooms.

INDUSTRY

The major industries are producing clothing, chemicals, food, transportation equipment, cement, mining, petroleum, and machinery.

ENERGY

This country uses 17.7 quads of energy per year. 30 percent of that energy is imported from other countries. About 88 percent of the energy produced is fossil fuels, 2.0 percent nuclear, and 9.0 percent hydropower. This country experiences power shortages often.

TECHNOLOGY

This country’s scientists work to improve nuclear energy so that the people can have more reliable electricity. They are also working on better telephone and road systems. Robots are seldom used because there is a large labor force that needs jobs.

RESOURCES

This country ranks fourth in the world in coal reserves. It also has iron ore, mica, bauxite, titanium, chromite, natural gas, diamonds, petroleum, and limestone.

ENVIRONMENT

The biggest challenge is soil erosion, which affects 1/5 of the land. To feed the large population, forests have been cut down for farming and animal grazing. This lack of trees causes flooding. Other concerns are groundwater pollution, air pollution, and illegal hunting of wild animals. An effort is being made to preserve the diversity of plants and wildlife found in the country.

GOVERNMENT

Democracy

CLIMATE

The mountains in the north are permanently frozen due to their altitude. The west coast is a tropical rain forest and is always hot and wet. The center of the country is semi-desert which is hot with very little rain. The majority of the country is hot, but has seasonal rainfall, creating dry and wet seasons.

AUTOMOBILES

One car per 333 people

LITERACY RATE

60 percent

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COUNTRY PROFILE 3 SIZE

145,898 square miles; about the size of California

POPULATION

127.7 million; average life expectancy is 82 years. There are about 876 people per square mile.

ECONOMY

The average person in this country earns $21,681 per year. This country has the second largest economy in the world. The people are hard working and there is a large computer industry. The people don’t eat a lot of beef or chicken because there isn’t land to raise farm animals. Most people eat seafood, so the fishing industry is very strong. Most of the people are well fed, receive good health care, and have access to computers.

INDUSTRY

This is one of the world’s largest producers of steel and other metals, heavy electrical equipment, construction and mining equipment, machine tools, factory tools, trains, ships, chemicals, clothes, and food. This country is known for being very productive and efficient.

ENERGY

This country uses 22.8 quads of energy each year, and imports 81 percent of it from other countries. Transportation fuels are typically bought from other countries. Of the 4.3 quads of energy it produces, 70 percent is nuclear power, 5 percent is from fossil fuels, 19 percent is from hydropower, and 6 percent is from other energy sources.

TECHNOLOGY

This country has made many improvements in fuel-efficient automobiles, robotics, communications, cancer research, biotechnology, high-speed trains, and computers. Some work has been done with communications satellites.

RESOURCES

This country has very few mineral resources. The main natural resources are fish and seafood.

ENVIRONMENT

The number one challenge is air pollution from power plants. Other problems include acid rain and water pollution, both of which are hurting fish and sea animals. This country’s appetite for fish and tropical timber is contributing to the depletion of these resources.

GOVERNMENT

Constitutional Monarchy

CLIMATE

The weather is temperate with hot, humid weather in the summer and cool temperatures in winter. Seventy-five percent of the land in this country is very mountainous; most of the 127 million people live in a space slightly smaller than Indiana.

AUTOMOBILES

Almost one car per three people

LITERACY RATE

99 percent

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THE NEED PROJECT • P.O. BOX 10101 • MANASSAS, VA 20108 • 1-800-875-5029


COUNTRY PROFILE 4 SIZE

830,000 square miles; about one-fifth the size of the United States

POPULATION

24.2 million; average life expectancy is 75 years. There are about 29 people per square mile.

ECONOMY

The average person earns $15,131 per year. Eighty percent of this country’s money comes from selling oil to other countries. People who own the oil companies are very rich, but the rest of the people are very poor. They have good health care and access to standard technology.

INDUSTRY

The main industries are oil production, petroleum refining, plastics, cement, some steel mills, construction, and fertilizer. Almost everything is oil related. Most other materials, such as aluminum, most food, wood, cars, and glass must be bought from other counties.

ENERGY

This country consumes 6.9 quads of energy per year, but produces 24.7 quads per year. It exports 72 percent of the energy it produces to other countries. All of their energy (100 percent) is produced by fossil fuels.

TECHNOLOGY

Science and technology are very limited. Almost all technology is imported, especially the tools for refining oil.

RESOURCES

This country has the world’s largest known reserves of oil, as well as reserves of natural gas, iron ore, gold, and copper.

ENVIRONMENT

The biggest environmental challenge for this country is that it is running out of water and more and more land is becoming desert. The people are working hard to build machines and factories that can remove salt from seawater. There have also been many oil spills near the coast, causing pollution.

GOVERNMENT

Monarchy

CLIMATE

The weather of the country is harsh, dry desert with great extremes of temperature.

AUTOMOBILES

One car per seven people

LITERACY RATE

80 percent

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COUNTRY PROFILE 5 SIZE

470,693 square miles; about twice the size of Texas

POPULATION

47.9 million; average life expectancy is 51 years. There are about 102 people per square mile.

ECONOMY

The average person earns $5,005 per year. This country is a middle-income, developing country, with well-established telephone, electric, and transportation systems. The stock exchange is one of the 10 largest in the world. Most of the country’s money is from mining. Most people are well fed, receive decent health care, and have access to standard technologies, but some of the people are very, very poor.

INDUSTRY

The principal industries are mining, car assembly, metalworking, machinery, clothing, iron and steel, chemicals, fertilizer, and food.

ENERGY

This country consumes 5.2 quads of energy per year, but produces 6.0 quads. It exports 13 percent of its energy to other countries. About 98 percent of its energy production is fossil fuels, 1.8 percent is nuclear energy, and 0.2 percent is hydropower.

TECHNOLOGY

This country is working to advance its nuclear energy abilities to produce more electricity.

RESOURCES

This country has a lot of gold, chromium, coal, iron ore, manganese, nickel, phosphates, tin, uranium, gem diamonds, platinum, copper, vanadium, salt, and natural gas.

ENVIRONMENT

The main challenge in this country is lack of water. Many rivers are polluted, so the government often asks and, sometimes, forces people to use less water. Also, it is having challenges with air pollution, acid rain and soil erosion, all of which are causing more land to become desert.

GOVERNMENT

Democracy

CLIMATE

The western half of the country is desert or semi-desert. The rest of the country is subtropical and has sunny days and cool nights.

AUTOMOBILES

One car per eleven people

LITERACY RATE

87 percent

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COUNTRY PROFILE 6 SIZE

93,628 square miles; slightly smaller than Oregon

POPULATION

60.9 million; average life expectancy is 78 years. There are about 650 people per square mile.

ECONOMY

The average person earns about $40,086 per year. This country is one of the world’s great trading powers. This country is ranked seventh in the world economically. The people are well fed, get good health care, and have access to advanced technology.

INDUSTRY

The main industries are machinery, equipment for power companies, factories and railroads, shipbuilding, aircraft, cars and car parts, electronics and telephones, metals, chemicals, coal, petroleum, paper and paper products, food, clothing, and other consumer goods.

ENERGY

This country consumes 9.8 quads of energy per year, but it only produces 7.9 quads. It must import 20 percent of its energy from other countries. About 87.0 percent of the energy it produces comes from fossil fuels, 10.4 percent from nuclear energy, and 0.6 percent from hydropower.

TECHNOLOGY

This country does a lot of research through the military and defense. People from this country developed steam-powered engines and discovered DNA. Other research includes astronomy, superconductivity, and lasers.

RESOURCES

This country has large reserves of coal, petroleum, natural gas, tin, limestone, iron ore, salt, clay, chalk, gypsum, lead, and silica.

ENVIRONMENT

Power plants are causing air pollution, some rivers are polluted, and coastal waters are polluted because of the dumping of waste into the ocean. This country has many oil and natural gas wells in the nearby ocean, causing some people concern.

GOVERNMENT

Democratic Monarchy

CLIMATE

Temperate conditions with mild winters and warm summers are the standard; there is rain year round.

AUTOMOBILES

One car per three people

LITERACY RATE

99 percent

© 2009

THE NEED PROJECT • P.O. BOX 10101 • MANASSAS, VA 20108 • 1-800-875-5029

Global Trading Game

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Country 1 Resources


Country 1 Resource Impacts


Country 1 Industry


Country 1 Industry Impacts


Country 1 Technology


Country 1 Technology Impacts


Country 1 Workforce


Country 1 Workforce Impacts


Country 2 Resouces


Country 2 Resource Impacts


Country 2 Industry/Technology


Country 2 Impacts Industry/Technology


Country 2 Workforce


Country 2 Workforce Impacts


Country 3 Resources


Country 3 Resource Impact


Country 3 Industry


Country 3 Industry Impacts


Country 3 Technology


Country 3 Impacts Technology


Country 3 Workforce


Country 3 Workforce Impacts


Country 4 Resources


Country 4 Resource Impacts


Country 4 Industry Technology Workforce


Country 4 Impacts Workforce, Technology Industry


Country 5 Resources


Country 5 Resource Impacts


Country 5 Technology Industry Workforce


Country 5 Impacts Workforce, Industry Technology


Country 6 Resources


Country 6 Resource Impacts


Country 6 Workforce Industry


Country 6 Impacts Workforce, Industry


Country 6 Technology


Country 6 Impact Technology


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GLOBAL TRADING GAME Evaluation Form State: ___________

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Grade Level: ___________

Number of Students: __________

Did you conduct the entire activity? Were the instructions clear and easy to follow? Did the activity meet your academic objectives? Was the activity age appropriate? Were the allotted times sufficient to conduct the activity? Was the activity easy to use? Was the preparation required acceptable for the activity? Were the students interested and motivated? Was the energy knowledge content age appropriate? Would you use the activity again?

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

No No No No No No No No No No

How would you rate the activity overall (excellent, good, fair, poor)?

How would your students rate the activity overall (excellent, good, fair, poor)?

What would make the activity more useful to you?

Other Comments:

Please fax or mail to: NEED Project PO Box 10101 Manassas, VA 20108 FAX: 1-800-847-1820

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NEED National Sponsors and Partners American Association of Blacks in Energy American Electric Power American Electric Power Foundation American Petroleum Institute American Solar Energy Society American Wind Energy Association Aramco Services Company Areva Armstrong Energy Corporation Association of Desk & Derrick Clubs All Wild About Kentucky’s Environment Robert L. Bayless, Producer, LLC BP Foundation BP BP Alaska BP Solar Bureau of Land Management – U.S. Department of the Interior C&E Operators Cape and Islands Self Reliance Cape Cod Cooperative Extension Cape Light Compact–Massachusetts L.J. and Wilma Carr Center for the Advancement of Process Technology–College of the Mainland–TX Chesapeake Public Schools–VA Chesterfield County Public Schools–VA Chevron Chevron Energy Solutions ComEd ConEd Solutions ConocoPhillips Council on Foreign Relations CPS Energy Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District–TX Dart Foundation Desk and Derrick of Roswell, NM Dominion Dominion Foundation Duke Energy E.On EDF East Kentucky Power El Paso Foundation EnCana Energy Information Administration – U.S. Department of Energy Energy Training Solutions Energy and Mineral Law Foundation Energy Solutions Foundation Equitable Resources Escambia County School District–FL FPL Energy Encounter–FL First Roswell Company Florida Department of Environmental Protection

The NEED Project

Foundation for Environmental Education Georgia Environmental Facilities Authority Guam Energy Office Gulf Power Halliburton Foundation Gerald Harrington, Geologist Houston Museum of Natural Science Hydro Foundation for Research and Education Idaho Department of Education Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation Independent Petroleum Association of America Independent Petroleum Association of New Mexico Indiana Office of Energy and Defense Development Interstate Renewable Energy Council Iowa Energy Center Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition Kentucky Department of Energy Development and Independence Kentucky Oil and Gas Association Kentucky Propane Education and Research Council Kentucky River Properties LLC Keyspan KidWind Lenfest Foundation Llano Land and Exploration Long Island Power Authority–NY Maine Energy Education Project Maine Public Service Company Marianas Islands Energy Office Maryland Energy Administration Massachusetts Division of Energy Resources Michigan Energy Office Michigan Oil and Gas Producers Education Foundation Minerals Management Service – U.S. Department of the Interior Mississippi Development Authority– Energy Division Montana Energy Education Council Narragansett Electric – A National Grid Company NASA Educator Resource Center–WV National Alternative Fuels Training Center– West Virginia University National Association of State Energy Officials National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges National Hydropower Association National Ocean Industries Association National Renewable Energy Laboratory Nebraska Public Power District

PO Box 10101

Manassas, VA 20108

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection New York Power Authority New Mexico Oil Corporation New Mexico Landman’s Association North Carolina Department of Administration–State Energy Office Offshore Energy Center/Ocean Star/ OEC Society Offshore Technology Conference Ohio Energy Project Pacific Gas and Electric Company PECO Petroleum Equipment Suppliers Association Poudre School District–CO Puerto Rico Energy Affairs Administration Puget Sound Energy Roswell Climate Change Committee Roswell Geological Society Rhode Island State Energy Office Sacramento Municipal Utility District Saudi Aramco Sentech, Inc. Shell Snohomish County Public Utility District– WA Society of Petroleum Engineers David Sorenson Southern Company Southern LNG Southwest Gas Spring Branch Independent School District–TX Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development–Energy Division Toyota TransOptions, Inc. TXU Energy United Technologies University of Nevada–Las Vegas, NV United Illuminating Company U.S. Environmental Protection Agency U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy–Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies U.S. Department of Energy – Wind for Schools Virgin Islands Energy Office Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy Virginia Department of Education Virginia General Assembly Wake County Public Schools–NC Washington and Lee University Western Kentucky Science Alliance W. Plack Carr Company Yates Petroleum

1-800-875-5029

www.NEED.org


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