Page 1

NAN LIANG

Architecture Portfolio

1


2


2015 - 2018 NAN LIANG

3


Narrative Nan Liang 11. 14. 1994

Architecture, is about life and individual’s uniqueness. In order to achieve the uniqueness, architects more or less

experience with developing own design logic and aesthetics through working and living experience, accumulated study and practices—the personality. Through exploring personal life and study experience in your prestigious graduate program of Architecture, it is possible for Liang, one potential architecture designer to establish a specific way of considering projects,

City of Birth Xi'an, Shaanxi, China

and find new expression of spaces or experiences. Currently in the fifth year of bachelor Architecture program in the University of Arizona and as the daughter of one architecture designer who works in The Northwest design and Research Institute of China Architecture, Liang, has been

Education of Bachelor Degree University of Arizona

inspired by Chinese traditional dwellings’ layout, especially the courtyard-center organization, and idea of nature with

College of Architecture + Planning + Landscape Architecture

and modernity, and integrating planning and garden has been inherited from Liang’s family to some extent, the special

living. Emphasizing the importance of courtyard-center organization, exploring the combination of architectural tradition individual uniqueness from her past living experience.

Major Architecture

Through five years’ undergraduate practice in design studios, Liang constantly developed the concept of

“courtyard” with different programs. Starting with House N5 which won 2016 Monsoon Award, Liang tried to reflect Courtyard-dwelling organization, having the shared space for daylight, water collection, communication with natural elements for totally 6 units. Public Dwelling: Case-in-Case, which won The Second Year Excellence Exhibition Award, was

GPA 3.5 / 4.0

developed based on the same concept but different approach: a centered courtyard for protecting use. Finally, in the fourth year, the concept was developed into visual communication. Through sifting floor slabs and creating varieties of vertical shared spaces, two or more programs were grouped together corroborating with building envelop.The combination of tradition of Courtyard and modernity, and overall refelecting to the architectural theory: form floows function and fluid.

Beyond architectural design, Liang also has great interests in landscape and urban design. In Spring 2018,

Liang was one of the members held Downtown Tucson 2050 Exhibition with individual focus on Art, Culture, Education, approaching the design question: How will a healthy and active population be supported in 2050? Later in Fall 2018, Liang was in the design studio which focused on urban water system design. Liang would like to further develop the design logic and design strategies for sustainable design technologies, after Liang graduate from University of Arizona in Spring 2019.

4


CONTENTS CULTURAL STATION

Visual Communication ARC 401 | 2017 F

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CAMPUS

Walk in Shade ARC 302 | 2017 S

PUBLIC DWELLING

Case - in - Case ARC 202 | 2016 S

PRIVATE DWELLING

Dwelling N5 ARC 202 | 2016 S

DIA DE LOS METUROS MUSEUM

The Half ARC 201 | 2015 F

DOWNTOWN TUCSON 2050

Art, Culture, Education ARC 451 A | 2018 S

05 11 17 23 29 35 5


BL

X

sk

ate

Cafe Poca Cosa

bo

ard

Maloney's Tavern

sh

op

Imago Dei Middle School Miss Saigon Downtown

So na izo Ar

ve lA

o To

rn he ut

E

n tio

rta po

s an Tr m eu

us M

w ownto elers D w e J 14K

6

son

n Tuc


Cultural Station: Visual Communication ARC 401 | 2017 F 418 E Toole Ave, Tucson, AZ, 85701

05

The culture station locates in downtown Tucson, having the train station and Southern Arizona Transportation Museum as its neighborhoods. The site itself is narrow. In order to respond to the site, the design is developed based on linear geometry: Each zone is 20 feet wide, and the zones continue the museum’s layout, meaning that the major entries of the project face the pedestrian of the museum. The project is about transparency and double space. Thus, through shifting the floor slabs, there are layers evolved, creating different views. The façade of the project is using perforated metal panel with different angles to create dynamic interior light quality with interior light control by curtain and louvers. Based on the design concept, each zone is linear, and the whole space have lots of level shifting to create communication from different program and levels, the space becomes flexible with no fixed walls in the major activity spaces.

Site Plan

7


First Floor Plan - Access Hall + Cafe 8


e

lop

ve

en

re

tu

uc

str

ion

lat

cu cir

re

ltu

cu

re

ltu

cu

UC

ED

g

kin

or

-w co C U ED

l

cia

so fe

ca

ss

ce ac

ll

ha

Explorded Axon 9


View From South West

ROOF 84'

CULTURE LEVEL 5 60' CULTURE

CULTURE

LEVEL 4 45' EDUC + CULTURE

EDUC

CO-WORKING

LEVEL 3 30' CO-WORKING + EDUC

SOCIAL

LEVEL 2 15' A.D. OFFICE + SOCIAL

ACCESS HALL

CAFE

GROUND 0' CAFE + ACCESS HALL

LEVEL -1 -15' PARKING + MECH/ELEC

MODLING AS PROCESSING FORM FOLLOWING STRUCTURE 10

PARKING

LEVEL -2 -30' PARKING

1

Projram Diagram

2

PAR

3

4

5

6

7


Two main accesses are on the east and west side of the project, parallel to the train line. On the ground level, the access hall facing towards the Downtown Tucson, and the cafe is on the north, creating the connection to the 4th Avenue, museum’s cafe and courtyard. Floors are shifted, meaning from one floor, people can see the upper and lower levels, the "seen and be seen" of interior space.

the “seen and be seen” also applied to the views from outside to the site. Public stairs are on the both north and south side of the project, opening to the directions people coming into the site. Egress stairs locate on the two ends of the project in the trans zone together with restrooms and elevators. Because there are two elevators, the programs on the upper floors not only located facing 4th Ave or Downtown, but also according to the function, locate on either east or west.

The shading and perforated facade are outside. Interior layers used glass to close the space, so the whole space is transparent,

ROOF 84'

LEVEL 5 60' CULTURE

LEVEL 4 45' EDUC + CULTURE

LEVEL 3 30' CO-WORKING + EDUC

LEVEL 2 15' A.D. OFFICE + SOCIAL

GROUND 0' CAFE + ACCESS HALL

LEVEL -1 -15' PARKING + MECH/ELEC

LEVEL -2 -30' PARKING

RKING

8

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8 Section 1

11


2310

FFE 2312 FFE 2312 up

FFE 2314

FFE 2314

FFE 2312

up

up

0 231

FFE 2316

FFE 2314 up

up up

FFE 2318 up

up

2320

FFE 2320

FFE 2318

FFE 2318

up

FF up

up

FFE 2322

FFE 2320

10 23

FFE 2322 FFE 2322 FFE

232

6

2330

12

up

0

234


Unitarian Universalist Campus: Walk in Shade ARC 302 | 2017 S Saguaro National Park, W Ina Rd, Tucson, AZ, 85743

FE 2312

11

2300

The design focuses on land ethic through the consideration of visual communication, natural experience and equity in access. The location of the campus is chosen between the two rock-out-copings, further improving the relationship between the two site features. Four major buildings of the campus are placed due to the site: Information center and education buildings are beside the east rock-out-coping; spaces are shaded by natural elements. Sanctuary is facing the south mountain hall, and social hall has a direct view to the west rock-out-coping. The space between social hall and the sanctuary has a natural pass to the natural chapel which is an idea of bridge, connecting the two rock-out-copings. Applying courtyard organizations, four major buildings have equal access and views to the courtyard, an open communication area.Using ramp connected all four building in the circle benefits blinding the whole campus into the topography.

13


2

2270

100'-0"

226 0

226 0

2280

23 80

minor wash centerline w 50-0" required setba

23 80

23 80

2310

23 00

minor wash centerline with 50-0" required setback

minor wash centerline with 50-0" required setback

View From Natural Chapel To Campus 2290

2290

23 00

23 00

minor wash centerline with 50-0" required setback

2280

major wash (Picture Rocks Wash) centerline with 400-0" required setback

2290

major wash (Picture Rocks Wash) centerline with 400-0" required setback

2290

23 00

2270

2280

2280

major wash (Picture Rocks Wash) centerline with 400-0" required setback

226 0

2270

2270

2290

100'-0"

INA ROAD ACCESS EASEMENT

INA ROAD ACCESS EASEMENT

100'-0"

100'-0"

2

2

INA ROAD ACCESS EASEMENT

2310

2310

2290

2310

a

erosion hazard flood limit

2300

s

s a w

2330

o n

o

n

o n

23 20

i

2320

2430

2440

0

2450

2460 2480 2470 2490

100

23 40

N

23 30

300

2440

2450

100'-0"

2470

2480

23 50 23 40

N

23 30

300

2340

2480

0

23 40

N

23 30

300

2500

Solar Analysis 2420

238 0

2450

2430

2440

239 0

2460 2470

2480

2430

2450

2460 2480 2470 2490

237 0

24 50

2440

20 24

2440

600 FT

236 0

2430

240 0

241 0

100

80 23 90 23 00 24 10 24

2350

2420

239 0 2470

2430

2450

2460 2480 2470 2490

Water On Site

238 0

2450

2460

20 24

23 20

2500

237 0

24 50

2440

50 23 2360 2370

2360

2440

600 FT

236 0

2430

240 0

241 0

100

2350

2420

239 0

2460

0

Site Feature

238 0

2430

23 20

2430

2450

2500

237 0

24 50

2420

20 24

2460 2480 2470 2490

236 0

2500

80 23 90 23 00 24 10 24

Winter Sunset 63 west of south

2330

2350

2340 50 23 2360 2370 2360

2440

600 FT

2350

2320

100'-0"

23 20

80 23 90 23 00 24 10 24

100'-0"

20 24

23 20

2330

2350

2340 50 23 2360 2370

2360

Summer Sunset 118 west of south

100'-0"

2340

23 50

23 50

2330

2350

2340

Site 14

2320

2340

50 23 2360 2370

2310

229 0

100'-0"

23 20

2340

2330

229 0

VIEW

30 0'0"

THE MAJOR WASH ACROSSING THE SITE, CONNECTING TWO ROCKOUT-COPPINGS

100'-0"

2310

30 0'0"

30 0'0"

2320

VIEW 2310

229 0

100'-0"

m

m

i m

m

2310

80 23 90 23 00 24 10 24

o

i

i

n

r

r

r

w

erosion hazard flood limit

2300

2320

w

s

2330

a

2330

erosion hazard flood limit

2300

2320

r

w

a

2330

h

h

h

h

2290

2320

s

2320

240 0

241 0

2450

2460 2470


vs. orthgonal geometry

smooth geometry

sunlight faceted raditation

2

2

gradual raditation

-

INA ROAD ACCESS EASEMENT

100'-0"

INA ROAD ACCESS EASEMENT

226 0

226 0

-

+

wind

2270

high- and low- pressure mid wind pressure

2280

major wash (Picture Rocks Wash) centerline with 400-0" required setback

2290

major wash (Picture Rocks Wash) centerline with 400-0" required setback

23 00

minor wash centerline with 50-0" required setback

23 80

23 80

with ack

2310

2290

h

2290

s

2320

a

2330

erosion hazard flood limit

2300

r

w

erosion hazard flood limit

2300

o

m

i

n

229 0

30 0'0"

2310

30 0'0"

Summer Sunrise 118 east of south

229 0

100'-0"

2320

23 20

circulation

23 20

2340

23 50

23 50

2340

Winter Sunrise 63 east of south

2330

2350

2350

2340

dead view

50 23 2360 2370

80 23 90 23 00 24 10 24

2360 23 20

23 40

23 30

100'-0"

fluid view

N

23 30

300

600 FT

2350

Wind Analysis 2420

237 0

24 50

Concept Diagram

238 0

2430

2440

239 0 240 0

241 0

100

23 40

236 0

2500

237 0

238 0

2480

0

2450

2460 2480 2470 2490

2350

s

23 20 2430

2440

236 0

24 50

20 24

2450

239 0

2460

100'-0"

altitude at noon: Summer Solstice 81 Equinox 58 Winter Solstic 34

2360

2470

2480

240 0

241 0

15


JUN 21 10 AM Altitude: 57 Azimuth: 96

JUN 21 4 PM Altitude: 42 Azimuth: 274

DEC 21 10 AM Altitude: 25 Azimuth: 144

DEC 21 4 PM Altitude: 14 Azimuth: 230 Cross-Ventilation Passive Cooling

NURSERY

CLASSROOM

EDUCATION

SOCIAL HALL

East - West Section

Cross-V entilat

altitude at noon: Summer Solstice 81 Equinox 58 Winter Solstic 34

ion for

Water Colle

Passiv e Coolin

g

ction

2322

North - South Section SANCTUARY

16

SOCIA


20 FT

FFE 2318 ďźˆ0 FT) 2312

East rock-out-coping provides shade to the information center and education. Large overhang-continued roof shades the whole campus.Ramps are used for circulation. All spaces of the campus are surrounding with the natural open communication space, and keep visual connections to other spaces. Natural vegetation and the continued roof shade the campus. Due to the topography, the open communication space as a basin collects water from the site.

20 FT

2314 (0 FT)

AL HALL

17


18


Public Dwelling: Case -in-Case ARC 202 | 2016 S 246 E Broadway Blvd, Tucson, AZ, 85701

17

Designing public dwelling as school based on the Reggio Emilia Pedagogy which encourages kids doing self-study based on individual interests, applies "space-in-space" concept. By creating a huge case gives the boundary for the school as a direct sign to avoid people randomly accessing, and to keep kids inside. Secondary case is shading both exterior and interior building spaces with plants on roof. The third case is the actual classrooms’ walls. All the cases have openings allowing natural ventilation and sunlight. Through those openings, sunlight will be decreased to reach a comfortable level for kids to use in the classrooms. Huge trusses run across the top and covered by mesh as a light roof shading. Since circulation is pushed between the first case and second case, there is a public space in the middle of the school for outdoor activities and different types of study. By sharing the playground in the middle, adults in school can always keep eyes to the playground for kids’ safety.

19


North - South Section 20


21


East - Wast Section

50.5 Ft

0 Ft

West Elevation 22

North Elevation

East Elevation


4.7

1

2.3

2

36.8 43.8

3

27.5

4

199

66.4

93.9

5

3.8

61.3

57.5

6

7 8

50.5 Ft

50.5 Ft

2.7

0 Ft

5.7 8.4

44.5

48.1 140.5 159

47.9

1.9

8.2 10.1

0 Ft

A

South Elevation

C

D

F G

H

Second Floor Plan 23


A

B 11.25

10.61

1

14.75

2

60.00 9.20

3

14.83

4

10.61

5

6

24

D

C 60.00 38.75

10.00


Dwelling N5 ARC 202| 2016 | 2016 S ARC 202 676-798 S. Park Ave, Tucson, AZ, 85719

23

The six-unit private dwelling is located on 676-798 S. Park Ave, Tucson, AZ. Design concept is living with nature, having courtyards in apartments to benefit mental health. The courtyards divide units into parts:courtyards on the east keep the living spaces away from the traffic on Park Ave; the courtyards in the middle helps to divide the space to private space and main living space. Therefore, all the rooms in the unit have views to the nature. Since courtyards in the middle bring sunlight to interior spaces. As floor rises, the boundaries of courtyards push back, so sunlight can reach the ground floor. At the same time, the middle courtyards provide communication to the units on the different floors. Since the site has 6 lots shared in one design studio, the exterior wall used concrete providing opportunity for the neighbor lots to continue the constructions.

25


A

B 11.25

1

D

C 60.00 38.75

A

10.00

B 11.25

2

10.61

10.61

1

3

14.75

14.75

2

4

60.00 9.20

60.00 9.20

3

5

14.83

14.83

4

6

Second Floor Plan

10.61

10.61

5

6

Third Floor Plan N 0 1

2

4

8 FT

FLOOR PLAN LOT 5 FLOOR 2

D

C 60.00 38.75

10.00

Four zones(private, circulation, public and court yard) are laid from west to east. This decision is made based on the noise coming from the Park avenue. Double glazed window and court yard which plants bamboo help to decrease the amount of noise coming into the public living space,and simultaneously reject the light and view from the street. Because people in the public living space might also make nose, another court yard with bamboo is placed between the public living space and private living space. In order to protect the private living space to be quite and private, the windows also use double glazed, and have louver behind the window. Having a small courtyard between private living space and public living space provides a shared view for both of these two spaces. Future more this courtyard acts as a core open to sky, meaning communication can be evolved from three families. Having the courtyard between the private and public spaces not only brings more nature to the housing dwelling, but also collects water from roof. N

0 1

2

4

8 FT

FLOOR PLAN LOT 5 FLOOR 3

Design having deep slop roof and sharing walls to neighbors is under the influence from Shaanxi’s local tradition dwelling. Shaanxi also having the dry climate, and traditional houses have good strategies to collect rain water; one of the strategies is using the deep slop roof to lead water. Sharing walls to neighbors saves the land from structure, and the idea is also similar to the architectural history and theory: “Half a good house does not equal one small house.” North - South Section 26


45 42

28

14

11.25

A

38.75 60.00

B

10.00

C

D

East- West Section 27


Parti Diagram 28


pace

0 1

Unit A

0 1

2

4

8 FT

Structure Axon

Private Space

Unit A

Unit B

Private Space

Circulation

Public Space

2

Unit B

Public Space

4

8 FT

Structure Axon

Unit A

Unit B

Private Space

Circulation

Public Space

Court yard

Structure member

Circulation Court yard

Structure member

Court Yard Model In Lots 45 42

28

Court yard

Structure member

Structure Member 14

14.83

10.61

South Facad

6

5

9.20 60.00

4

14.75

3

10.61

2

1

East Elevation 29


or

do ut

O

n

io

pt

ce

Re

ea

Ar

or

do

n

io

pt

ce

Re

ea

Ar

op

Sh

ch s

ce

ffi

Ar iv e R

In

ift

G

O

oo ce en

s om ro

n Exhibitio

Co ns er va tio n

st Re

om Ro

m er nf Co

30

Ro om

Exhibitio n


Dia de los Meturos Museum: The Half ARC 201 | 2015 F 409 W Congress St, Tucson, AZ, 85701

29

The Half is a small museum for Dia de los Muertos with an urban site locating along the route of Tucson's All Soul's Procession. "The Half " is about the contrast through special experience: Heaviness vs. lightness; solid vs. void; darkness vs. brightness; death vs. life... By splitting a common rectangular space into two right triangles, and applying each compassion groups to these volumes, the final design of ARC 201 achieves the fundamental goal. While the noth volume represents life - performance, working area, shopping space, etc through curtain wall systems and steel structure, the south part is constructued by concrete with few openings to create specific experience and feeling with daylight, a dark and heavy space but still allowing for breath. Just as the meaning of Dia de los Muertos: No tears for people's death and the honor of the dead. First Floor Plan

31


Sec C

Sec L

Ex

Sec L

hib

itio

n O

utd

oo

rP

erf

orm

an

ce

Sp

e

Water Color Render - West Elevation 32

Sec C

ac

Second Floor Plan

Exterior Render


North Elevation

Longitudinal Section

Site

33


Section Detal 1

Cross Section

Exterior Render - North Elevation 34

Interior Render at Performance Space


Extruded Aluminum Retainer Cap

Block

Glazed Roof w Spider

Beam

Section Detail 2

Interior Render at Exhibition Looking To Proformance Space

Secondary Roof Frame Block Primary Roof Frame Curtain Wall Primary Steel Frame

Mullion

Secondary Steel Frame

Section Detail 1

1" Glass Fastener Seal 1' Concrete Roof

Section Detail 2

South Elevation

35


36


Downtown Tucson 2050 - Art, Culture, Education ARC 451A | 2018 S Downtown Tucson, Tucson, AZ

35

This semester-long project offers a vision for Downtown Tucson as growing, thriving, livable community in 2050, as collaboration in the whole design studio, sponsored by GLHN Architects and Engineers, and supported by six community mentors. As one part of the whole Downtown Tucson 2050 design, the portfolio only selects the works belonging to the Art, Culture, Education category: two building blocks design and TCC subdistrict renovation. Two building blocks' designs from Art, Culture, Eudcation coordinate with Public Health approaching the design question - How will a healthy and active population be supported in 2050? - which further provides the design logic of TCC renovation. Through the study and understanding of Plan Tucson, two prototypes are established with four Quantitative Goals which can be measured by Key Performance Indicators, and six design goals including accessibility, equity, adaptability, sustainability, identity and prosperity. Aerial Render

Additional Notification Downtown Tucson 2050 Exhibit May 12, 2018 Old Chicago Store, 130 East Congress Street, Tucson, AZ

37


Prototyping Pedestrian Street

Walk in Shade Pedestrian Street with trees and shade structure offering a walkability in summer for Downtown Tucson

A - Cafe Existing cafe for food, space for people to rest and stay

B - Local Store Existing shops, encouraging people to visit

C - Business + Office HQ. Existing high rise buildings for large scale economy

D - Solar Collection Photovoltaic umbrellas collect energy also acts as shading devices

E - Pedestrian Only Non-motorized street for people to walk with shading, nature and arts

Street Gallery

F - Rain Water

Open gallery on street, a new idea of gallery, exploding culture more open to people’s day life

1.) 1 street = 40, 463, 216 lbs CO2 2.) $0.07 per ft2 for maintenance of public art and open space. 3.) 883 ft continuous shaded walkway. 4.) 20 jobs created.

2050

2030

2015

Shading devices collect rain water to filter into potable water

1.) 2 street = 31, 591, 551 lbs CO2 2.) $0.02 per ft2 for maintenance of public art and open space. 3.) 3, 234 ft continuous shaded walkway. 4.) 81 jobs created.

1.) 3 street = 7, 212, 556 lbs CO2 2.) $0.02 per ft2 for maintenance of public art and open space. 3.) 5,677 ft continuous shaded walkway. 4.) 142 jobs created.

The pedestrian streets provide limited access for emergency vehicles if needed with emphasis placed on continuous connectivity of pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Consisting of green infrastructure and pleasant access to various areas of Down-town Tucson incluses street art, water collection and filtration pieces to in-need populations, and connections to small and large scale economy, such as food and retail along the way. 38


Community Center

Open Performance Temporary outdoor performance space for multi-function use

Prototyping

A - Shaded Bike line Bike line separated from motorized transportation zone with shaded structure

B - Multi-use Plaza Green space incorporated along side community center and street

C - Market and Exchange Temporary outdoor covered space provides opportunity for markets and art vendors

D - Grey Water Collection Systems underground to collect and store grey water and reuse for landscape

E - Roof Top Solar Collection Solar panel on roof to collect solar energy

Natural Courtyard

F - Natural Courtyard

Outdoor spaces for access to natural sunlight, fresh air, water features, and smaller recreational spaces

1.) 1 block = 19, 777, 384 lbs CO2 2.) $0.08 per ft2 for maintenance of public art and open space. 3.) 538 ft continuous shaded walkway. 4.) 6 jobs created.

1.) 2 blocks = 12, 162, 025 lbs CO2 2.) $0.06 per ft2 for maintenance of public art and open space. 3.) 961 ft continuous shaded walkway. 4.) 12 jobs created.

2050

2030

2015

Bring more sunlight, ventilation, and nature to the community center

1.) 3 blocks = 2, 820, 091 lbs CO2 2.) $0.05 per ft2 for maintenance of public art and open space. 3.) 1, 204 ft continuous shaded walkway. 4.) 18 jobs created.

The community center provides opportunities for both education and a hands-on museum. There will be gallery space, rooms for workshops, seminars, and lectures, a library with study rooms, a central courtyard with potential for wildlife exhibits (such as a butterfly room), a cafe, and finally consultation/counseling offices and space for family health services. 39


TCC Sub District Section Perspective East - west cuts through pedestrian bridge, central plan, utility cordoor and renovation TCC. North - south cuts through TCC, daylight wash which is the renovated design of the existing water feature in the TCC Sub District and the historical music hall.

RECYCLED WATER TANK

PRIMARY TANK

EQUALIZATION RECIRCULATION TANKS

RECYCLED WATER TANK

DISINFECTION

A - Adaptive Reuse

B - Central Plant

C - Living Machine

The same foundation is adapted to fit a green facade.

Energy hub for the TCC subdistrict.

Living machine system along the pedestrain street.

40 Batteries

Server Farm


Cultural Garden Cultural courtyard as garden to present artwork and to encourage social activities.

Through developing two building blocks relate to Art, Culture and Education, Downtown Tucson would like to increase its social communication while encourage more population experience art and culture in a experimental friendly surrounding.

RECYCLED WATER TANK

The TCC has one of the more widely disliked current conditions. The heat island effect caused by overuse of pavement and parking lots, combined with the lack of activity and economic activity in the area, made the TCC a less pleasant place to be. By replacing the pavement with open space, adding cooling pod parks, and implementing storm-water basins, the heat island effect is mitigated. Renovations to the TCC and adding housing complexes, hotels, large scale economy buildings, and a high school work together to reinvigorate the neighborhood and draw life back in. Combing the two building blocks prototypes with public health, the renovated TCC explodes the boundary of art and culture from the traditional ideas of museums and exhibition and benefits the usages of urban open spaces simultaneously. PRIMARY TANK

EQUALIZATION RECIRCULATION TANKS

RECYCLED WATER TANK

DISINFECTION

RECYCLED WATER TANK

D - Multiuse Basin

E - Daylight Washes

F - Cooling Pods

Water collection and treatment basin for multiuse functions.

Rain water collection channel increases plants for TCC subdistrict.

Water collection and treatment system for reclaimed water.

Fuel Cells

Batteries

Thermal Storage

Server Farm

PRIMARY TANK

EQUALIZATION RECIRCULATION

RECYCLED WATER TANK

41 DISINFECTION


42


43


19 20 --

IVERSITY O F | UN AR IZ ON

A|

14

|

TURE POR T F O ITEC LIO CH | AR 20

44

L n Niaang

| LIA NG ,N AN

Nan Liang - Architecture Portfolio  

University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ All works selected from 2015 Fall to 2018 Spring.

Nan Liang - Architecture Portfolio  

University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ All works selected from 2015 Fall to 2018 Spring.

Advertisement