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C U R R I C U L U M

V I T A E

OF

ERNANIE S. GONZALES 105 M. Francisco St. Caloocan City. M.M., Philippines Tel.. No.: +632 9294147 Email: nanie_gonzales@yahoo.com

EMPLOYMENT BACKGROUNDS Creative Art Consultant ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity (ACB), Quezon City ($XJXVWSUHVHQW) Duties and Responsibilities • •

overall layout and design of ASEAN Biodiversity newsmagazine layout of ARCBC coffeetable books, brochures, manuals tarpailis, calendars and other collaterals

Associate Art Director People and Advocacy, Quezon City (March 2004-'HFHPEHU) Duties and Responsibilities • • •

Web design and development of www.biotechnologyforlife.com.ph layout of select pages of Biolife magazine layout of various publication materials

Head Artist Media G8way Corp., Makati City (March-September 2005) Duties and Responsibilities • • • •

overall layout and design of Enterprise magazine section one layout of Computerworld newspaper layout of select pages of Computerworld on Campus, PC World and Stuff magazines supervise the art unit department

Creative Art Consultant ASEAN Regional Centre for Biodiversity Conservation (ARCBC), Quezon City (April 2001-December 2004) Duties and Responsibilities • •

overall layout and design of ASEAN Biodiversity newsmagazine layout of ARCBC coffeetable books, brochures, manuals and calendars


Creative Art Consultant Naitional Integrated Protected Areas Programme (NIPAP), Quezon City (July 1999-March 2001) Duties and Responsibilities • •

overall layout and design of Suhay newsmagazine layout of NIPAP coffeetable books, brochures, manuals and calendars

Graphic Design Consultant Indonesian Observer, Jakarta, Indonesia (August 1997-March 1999) Duties and Responsibilities • •

layout and design of select pages of Indonesian Observer newspaper layout and design of select pages of TV Kabel cable magazine

Senior Artist Mirror Weekly magazine, Makati City (July 1994-July 1997) Duties and Responsibilities •

layout and design of select pages of Mirror Weekly magazine

Art Director Medical Observer, Makati City (November 1992-June 1994) Duties and Responsibilities •

overall layout and design of Medical Observer magazine

Staff Artist Business Star, Port Area, Manila (July 1987-April 1992) Duties and Responsibilities •

layout and design of select pages of Business Star newspaper

Staff Artist Business Day, Edsa, Quezon City (November 1982-June 1987) Duties and Responsibilities •

layout and design of select pages of Business Day newspaper


EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUNDS Elementary Sampalukan Elementary School (1967-1973) Caloocan City High School Torres High School (1973-1975) Manila University of the East (1976-1978) Caloocan City College University of the East (1978-1980) Caloocan City

PERSONAL BACKGROUNDS Nickname: Nanie Birthdate: November 14, 1961 Birthplace: Caloocan City Nationality: Filipino Religion: Roman Catholic Sex: Male Civil Status: Married Spouse Name: Miriam B. Gonzales Childrens Name & Birthdate: Gianne Carlo B. Gonzales – March 27, 1982 Marian B. Gonzales – February 28, 1986 Ana Nirvana B. Gonzales – July 23, 1994 Micah B. Gonzales – December 12, 1999 Height: 5 ft. 4 in. Weight: 160 lbs. TIN: 112-950-120 SSS No.: 03-4965208-3

REFERENCES Rene Aranda, Editorial Cartoonist The Philippine Star, Manila Antonio Manila, AssistantDirector Protected Areas and Wildlife Bureau, Quezon City Ibarra Gutierrez, Chairman and Editor-in-Chief Media G8way Corp, Makati City


Readers’ Corner Editor- in-Chief Monina T. Uriarte Managing Editor Bridget P. Botengan Creative Artist Nanie S. Gonzales Writer-Researcher Sahlee Bugna-Barrer EDITORIAL BOARD Rodrigo U. Fuentes Executive Director Ma. Consuelo D. Garcia Director, BIM Lauro S. Punzalan Mayla A. Ibañez Aireen G. Tumimbang Amie B. Alejar ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) Headquarters: 3F ERDB Bldg. Forestry Campus University of the Philippines Los Baños College, Laguna, Philippines Telefax: +63-49.536-2865 E-mail: contact.us@aseanbiodiversity.org Website: www.aseanbiodiversity.org ACB Annex: Ninoy Aquino Parks and Wildlife Center North Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City 1156 Philippines Email: publications@aseanbiodiversity.org Printed by: Dolmar Press, Inc. No. of Copies: 5,000 Disclaimer: Views or opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent any official view of the European Union nor the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Secretariat. The authors are responsible for any data or information presented in their articles. Letters, articles, suggestions and photos are welcome and should be addressed to: The Editor-in-Chief ASEAN Biodiversity ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity College, Laguna E-mail: publications@aseanbiodiversity.org

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APRIL-JUNE 2007

Efficient Way GREETINGS. My name is Jennifer Heckert and I am in the Philippines doing research on “People’s Perspective of Conservation in the Philippines.” We briefly met at the Biodiversity and Climate Change Fair at the Department of Environment and Natural Resources in Quezon City last week, wherein I had picked up a few journals (ASEAN Biodiversity) to read. I have only positive comments on your journal. Overall, I think it is a very good publication and found the articles to be both intellectually stimulating as well as well-researched. I believe that organising each issue of the journal to focus on an environmental problem that is relevant to more than one SE Asian country (eg. fires) is an efficient way to put the message across that these problems are both serious and shared amongst the region – two reasons that these problems should be addressed. Also the beginning section of the journal that highlights the accomplishments, problems, policies, etc. regarding biodiversity conservation and the environment is very good. It is important to be kept aware of what is going on not only in one’s country of residence but also worldwide. This could enable networking in other parts of the world that share similar issues for support and capacity building. Jennifer Heckert MSc in Ethnobotany University of Kent, United Kingdom

Desertification I READ a copy of the ASEAN Biodiversity magazine while visiting the Protected Areas and Wildlife Bureau in

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Quezon City. The theme of the issue was Desertification, and I thought that it was an interesting topic given the growing concern over global warming and other human-induced environmental issues. Though desertification is still not a major concern in Southeast Asia, I think climate change and the continuing denudation of our forest ecosystems may hasten land degradation and eventually lead to desertification over time. We should work now to enrich our forests before desertification takes hold in the countryside. I also thought the nutshell portion was very interesting and gave me nuggets of information on conservation activities in other parts of the world. I look forward to reading more about conservation in your next issues. Cora Leal Quezon City, Philippines

Enlightening CONGRATULATIONS on an enlightening magazine! With all the current environmental concerns, ranging from pollution to global warming, it is good to find a magazine that features information on the environment and the efforts of others to address these issues. I hope to be able to learn more about the environment and contribute to local actions to better improve our quality of life. I look forward to reading your next issue. Jennifer Ramirez Makati, Philippines

Subscription WOULD it be possible to get a subscription to your magazine? I am interested in working on environmental concerns when I graduate from college and I found some of your articles on the internet. I look forward to more enlightening articles, particularly on climate change and global warming. Eril Alcantara University of the Philippines, Diliman

Disclaimer: This publication has been developed with the assistance of the European Union. The contents of this publication is the sole responsibility of the ASEAN Centre for Biodiversity and does not reflect the views of the European Union.


Contents

Volume 6, Number 2

ABOUT YOU AND US

From the Desk The Changing Environment .................................. 4 Second Quarter in a Nutshell ........................ 5 ACB Governing Board Appoints Rodrigo U. Fuentes as Executive Director .................................................... 9 SPECIAL REPORTS

Enhancing Biodiversity Conservation to Cope with Climate Change ................ 11 CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIODIVERSITY IN THE PHILIPPINES

A Decade of Research on Terrestrial Ecosystems ............................. 16 Climate Change and Initiatives ............. 25 PROFILES

Komodo National Park ............................................ 32 Mu Ko Surin - Mu Ko Similan Marine National Park ................................................. 36 Tubbataha Reef National Marine Park .................................................................................. 40 SURFING THE WEB ...OF LIFE ............................................................................. 44

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April-June 2007

CHAMPIONS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

Global Warming Receives Ultimate Recognition ................................................. 45 ASEAN Scientist Chairs UN&ST Committee to Combat Desertification ........................................................................ 46 BOOKMARKS

Evaluating Management Effectiveness for Protected Areas ................................................................... 47

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Region-wide Actions Proposed for SE Asia Terrestrial Protected Areas ................................................................... 48 ACB Holds Workshop on Governance and Protected Area Categories .................................................................... 49 ACB Collaborates with PFEN on Forestry Education .......................................................... 50 AHP Conference Participants Draft Action Plan for ASEAN Protected Areas .................................... 51 International Biodiversity Day Celebrations in the Philippines ................................................................ 53 SE Asia Environmental Economics Forum Tackles Climate Change and Biodiversity .................................................................... 54 ACB Joins Activities of Science and Technology Week ............... 55 PAWB Holds Biodiversity Summer Camp for Kids ....................................... 56 PUBLICATIONS

Capsule Reviews of Some Training Resources Database Entries ................................................................ 54 ASEAN BIODIVERSITY

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3


Mu Ko Surin Mu Ko Similan MARINE NATIONAL PARK M

U KO SURIN MARINE NATIONAL PARK, WHICH WAS ESTABlished in 1981, consists of a group of islands and surrounding sea in the Andaman sea. Its five main islands are Ko Surin Nua, Ko Surin Tai, Ko

Ree, Ko Glang and Ko Khai. The National Park is approximately 60 km off the coast of Ranong Province in the southern peninsular region of Thailand and only a few kilometres from the border of Myanmar. The Park covers an area of 13,500 ha of which 76% is sea. About 100 km south of the Mu Ko Surin is the Mu Koh Similan National Park. It is situated along the western coastlines of the Andaman Sea and the Indian Ocean. Established in 1982, the Park covers an area of 140 sq km and composes nine islands - Ko Bangu, Ko Similan, Hin Huwagrlok, Ko Payu, Ko Ha, Ko Hok, Ko Miang, Ko Payan, and Ko Huyong. These granite islands were created by upwellings of hot magma during the Teritiary-Cretaceous Period some 65 million years ago, and then smoothed by glacial ice and the wave action of the sea.

Habitats Mu Ko Surin and Mu Ko Similan consist of sea, coral reefs and islands. Terrestrial vegetation can be classed as mangrove forests (Rhizophora and Xylocarpus), beach forests (Barringtonia, Casuarina and Terminalia) and some primary rainforest 36

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including several deciduous species such as Sterculiacae and wild rambutans, Nephelium. Highest point on the islands is 350 m. The two largest islands lie close together and one can wade the 200 m between them at low tide.

Wildlife The islands support some 91 species of birds including 34 migratory species of mostly waders, terns and herons. Ko Surin is just about the only place in Thailand where the Beach Thick-knee can be found. Also, the forests of the Surin Islands support a fairly rich avifauna with Green Imperial Pigeons being very abundant and Orange-breasted Pigeon fairly common. Large Green Pigeon, which is scarce in Thailand, is also often encountered on the Surin Islands where Nicobar pigeons also occur. The White-bellied Sea Eagle and Brahminy Kite are common birds here. In addition, a number


of Tern species and possibly Frigatebirds can be seen on the crossing from Kuraburi. Other forest birds include hornbills, drongo, babblers, sunbirds and flower peckers. The islands are home to wild pigs, macaques and another 20 species of small mammals especially bats. There are pythons, monitors and other reptiles. Special attractions of the site are the marine turtles that nest there – green turtles, hawksbills and occasionally the rare Olive Ridley. Important tree species that grow on the islands include Manilkara sp., Cordia subcordia and Tournefolia argentia. The real value of the Park is under the sea where rich coral reefs are found with a multitude of dazzling fishes. The reefs are considered the most diverse in Thailand. On Mu Ko Similan National Park, the hard corals are deep water species of mostly staghorn coral types (Acropora echinata) and the smaller cauliflower-shaped types (Seriatopora histrix). Other marine life species include Gorgonian sea fans, flower-like soft coral, several species of crabs, spiny

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painted lobsters, squid, sponges, sea cucumbers and giant clams. Aboveground, a survey conducted in 1992 revealed that 39 species of birds can be found on the nine islands. Resident species include the Brahminy Kite and the White-breasted Waterhen, while migratory species include the Pintail Snipe, and Grey Wagtail. Temporary migratory species include the Barn Swallow, Cattle Egret, Watercock, and the Roseate Tern. The most commonly seen species include the Pacific ReefEgret, Nicobar Pigeon, Pied Imperial Pigeon, White-bellied Sea-Eagle, and the Collared Kingfisher. There are few natural freshwater reserves on Mu Ko Similan National Park, and as such large mammal species cannot exist. Some 27 species of small mammals occur within the Park, including 16 species of bats such as the Black-bearded Tomb Bat, the Lesser False Vampire Bat, the Intermediate Horseshoe Bat, the Lesser Bent-Winged Bat, and the Hairless Bat. There are 22 species of reptiles and amphibians, three species of squirrels and four species of rats. The more unusual but ASEAN BIODIVERSITY

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37


fairly common residents include the Bush-Tailed Porcupine, Common Palm Civet, Flying Lemur, Bottle-Nosed Dolphin, and the Hairy Leg Mountain Land Crab.

Threats The islands were formerly occupied and selectively logged of gum trees and ironwood. The reefs have been damaged until 1989 by reefblasting, and subsequently, by boat anchors. Mooring buoys are now available.

Conservation Programmes The National Parks Division of the Forestry Department has undertaken many activities to halt logging, resettle local people, protect the reefs and develop visitor accommodation and facilities. The staffs now manage a turtle hatchery to protect eggs through hatching period and then release the young turtles back to the sea. Surveys of coral reef condition, and the distribution of giant clams and edible invertebrates have also been conducted on the Mu Ko Surin Marine National Park. In the aftermath of the tsunami that hit Thailand in December 2004, Coral Cay Conservation (CCC), funded by the UK Government’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO), launched a project in the Mu Ko Surin Islands Marine National Park that was undertaken during February and March 2005. The project comprised two independent but complimentary studies: the first 38

APRIL-JUNE 2007

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was to quantify the level of tsunami-induced damage to the reefs, and the second, to assess the current state of the marine resources of the park. The objective of the latter was to produce a Geographic Information System-based resource map of the reefs of the National Park. To achieve this, baseline marine ecological data were gathered from a series of biogeographically diverse sites. From these data, a series of ecologically discreet ‘habitats’ was determined, further examples of which were then identified through the use of remote sensing applications. This kind of habitat mapping will play a major role in the creation and evaluation of management strategies for coral reef systems.

Other Interests Visitors have the opportunity to enjoy the beach life, swim with wild turtles as well as snorkel and scuba dive to as low as 35 m. Birdwatching is also a popular activity. A visit to the Chaw Le fishing village on Koh Surin Tai Island provides the rare chance to learn about the traditional culture of sea gypsies and witness ancestor worship ceremonies during the full moon in March.

Visiting Mu Ko Surin – Mu Ko Similan National Park Mu Ko Surin can be reached by boat from Ranong town or Kuraburi town. Special charters operate from Ban Hid Lad, Khulaburi and trips take about 4 hours. Boat rides from Patong or


PROFILES

Rawai on Phuket take about 10 hours, but speedboats can do the trip in just three to four hours. Longer diving trips are available that take in other groups of islands as well. Visitors can access Mu Ko Similan, by taking a boat from the pier in Ban Thap Lamu, Amphoe Thai Muang or from a pier in Amphoe Khura Buri for a three-hour trip on the 40-km route to Mu Ko Similan. The months of May to November are characterised by rough seas and strong rain of the southwest monsoon. The best months to visit would be December to April. Humidity is high and temperature averages 28° Celsius. The Forest Department maintains a bungalow beach accommodation and a large dormitory. For further inquiries, one can contact the National Park Office, Department of National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation, Chatuchak District Bangkok. References: Comley, James; O’Farrell, Shay; Hamylton, Sarah; Ingwersen, Chelsea; and Ryan Walker (2005). The Coral Reef Resources of Mu Ko Surin National Park, Thailand. Coral Cay Conservation (www.coralcay.org/science/publications/ thailand_2005_resources.pdf) MacKinnon, J.R. and G.B. Villamor (2004): ASEAN’s Greatest Parks. ASEAN Regional Centre for Biodiversity Conservation (ARCBC), Los Banos, Philippines. National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department of Thailand (www.dnp.go.th) Royal Thai Government website (www.thaigov.go.th) www..talaythai.com www.thaibirding.com

ASEAN BIODIVERSITY

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M

ore than 2,000 delegates from high schools nationwide are converging in Baguio City for the very first GO NEGOSYO TEEN EDITION from July 27 to 30, 2006 at the Summer Capital of the Philippines. The Baguio City National High School band will herald the arrival of guests and school delegations from various regions. No less than Department of Education Undersecretary Fe Hidalgo and Presidential Consultant for Entrepreneurship Jose “Joey” Concepcion III will receive the participants during the opening ceremony. Go Negosyo’s carefully designed learning program has divided the four-day conference into three entrepreneurial “mastery” levels: Personal Master Masteryy, Situation Master Masteryy, and Business Master Masteryy. DAY 1 will probe into the entrepreneur’s personal characteristics, leanings, uncommon drive and fearless spirit. Subsequent breakout sessions will test the entrepreneurial competence of each participant. A panel discussion on “Rags to Riches” will showcase life stories of business owners who rose from the bottom

of the entrepreneurial ladder. World-renowned Sining Kumintang ng Batangas will perform during the welcome socials. DAY 2 will analyze the typical situations faced by entrepreneurs. An Opportunity Seeking, Screening and Seizing session intends to show aspiring entrepreneurs how they can identify and grab opportunities. Participants will also get a closer look at today’s Promising Business Fields and Prospects Prospects. A succeeding panel, Moving Up from the Underground to the Mainstream Economy Economy,, will illustrate how even the smallest and simplest businesses can make it big. The Philippine Center for Entrepreneurship (PCE) will host an evening of exciting game shows. DAY 3 leads up to the level of Business Mastery—how to really run and make a business successful. Workshops and a forum on Successful School Implementors of entrepreneurship programs will be held in the afternoon. A colorful evening fashion show caps the third day, highlighting the life stories of renowned designerentrepreneurs who persevered to achieve their dream. DAY 4 recaps the entire program as young entrepreneurs

GO NEGOSYO TEEN EDITION is the first-ever Youth Entrepreneurship and Cooperativism in Schools (YECS) training and conference. Under the theme “Nurturing the Seeds of Entrepreneurship,” GO NEGOSYO TEEN EDITION’s aims are to: • Popularize the essentials of entrepreneurship and demystify its concepts for the appreciation of high school students and out-of-school youth; • Strengthen entrepreneurship education at the secondary level; • Initiate HS students and out-ofschool youth into entrepreneurial activities and challenges; • Provide a venue to learn innovative livelihood skills and micro-business prospects; • Share best practices in YECS implementation. Meaningful plenary sessions will give the delegates an excellent opportunity to learn first-hand from the roster of distinguished speakers from different entrepreneurial fields. Participants will also experience interactive sessions facilitated by the Department of Trade and Industry– Philippine Trade Training Center (DTIPTTC), get the chance to interact with celebrity-entrepreneurs and youth models, visit a business expo, and apply their learnings during interactive competitions. This program is spearheaded by the Department of Education-Center for Students and Co-Curricular Affairs, in partnership with the Philippine Center for Entrepreneurship, Office of the Presidential Consultant for Entrepreneurship, the Department of Trade and Industry-PTTC and Businessworks, Inc.

hold a special session of experience-sharing with the participants. Another session on Agri-Business hopes to fan interest in lucrative ventures that utilize and enrich the country’s vast agricultural resources. For the culminating activity in the afternoon, different groups will present their very own startup concepts as they vie for distinction in the Best Business Idea Awards.

Go Negosyo Magazine is published four times a year by the Philippine Center for Entrepreneurship Foundation Inc. • Executive Director: Imelda J. Madarang Magazine Editor: Oscar Gomez Jr. Assistant Editor: Niel Niño Lim Art Director: Nanie Gonzales Photography: Luke Esteban, Ivan Santos • We welcome your comments and any news originating from enablers and advocates of entrepreneurship. Write to gonegosyo@yahoo.com • PCE Secretariat: 5/F RFM Corporate Center, Pioneer corner Sheridan Streets, Mandaluyong, Metro Manila • Phone (632) 637-9229 Fax: (632) 637-78-73

2 NEGOSYO



2nd QUARTER 2006


T

he Department of Education, through its programs on entrepreneurship education, continually develops students to be creative, innovative and selfproductive. Success stories from the DepEd’s Youth Entrepreneurship and Cooperativism in Schools (YECS) program hope to serve as inspiration for other schools who have not yet established YECS in their institutions. Students who volunteer for YECS are trained to become entrepreneurs who can compete not only locally but also globally.

ZAMBOANGA CITY HIGH SCHOOL Launched on July 1, 1997, YECs at Zamboanga City High School only had P1,500 for its initial capital. Students would report during their free periods to make sandwiches and ice

water which they would sell themselves. It had a very good market to start with, since the school had a population of close to 10,000 students. The YECS moderator, Mrs. Emmylou Valeros, helped see to it that the student venture would prosper. After a year, a new YECS canteen was opened and run by 30 YECS members. Soon, the group launched two more food service innovations—the Rolling YECS and the Walking Store to serve students even outside the canteen’s four walls. Members’ skills were also enhanced through training on business strategy and management, meat processing and preservation,

8 NEGOSYO



and the art of cooking. Linkages were forged with the government’s departments of agriculture, trade and industry, science and technology, and social welfare and development, as well as the Cooperative Development Authority. With a pioneering and consistently improving program that champions campus entrepreneurs, YECSZCHS has bagged countless awards in regional, national and international contests. The latest recognition was a national award as Outstanding High School Entrepreneurship Program given last Feb. 23, 2006 during the Go Negosyo Entrepreneurship Summit held in Global City. The distinction was awarded by Pres. Gloria Macapagal Arroyo and DepEd OIC Fe Hidalgo. The school has been cited numerously as outstanding youth-based organization, most innovative YECS organization, and regional model YECS for 2003-04, among so many recognitions. In the international arena, Jayzel Laureano, the 200405 YECS-ZCHS chairman, won a student grant to Taipei in August

2nd QUARTER 2006

2004 to attend a youth summit. He partnered with another YECS student from Bicol to cop the major prize in the cooking demo competition. Many YECS-ZCHS graduates have moved on to rewarding and self-reliant lives. Some of them continue to supply the school with their own home-made delicacies, such as Spicy Mango Catsup from 4-H Club member Mikaila Ross Fernandez, and a Muslim delicacy known as “apa” produced by the mother of Jaymar Salim, who is now a third-year midwifery student in a local college. YECsZCHS also accepts made-to-order giveaways for weddings, birthdays, and junior-senior proms in the community.

DAVAO CITY NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL In July 1997 the Davao City National High School YECS started with a handful of interested, courageous students and a meager capital. Through the


years, more students have joined the cooperative, and DCNHS-YECS has acquired its own freezers, office air conditioner, office cabinets, food counter, electric air pot, office supplies and catering equipment that can serve 100 persons. It is now registered as the DCNHS Laboratory Cooperative with the Bureau of Internal Revenue. DCNHS has already been a Division Winner (SY 2001-2002), Regional Winner (SY 2002-2003), and National 2nd Runner-up (SY 2004-2005) of YECS. Today, the DCNHS-YECS is finding its way into the mainstream of Davao business. Given time, its member-students will find themselves financially ready and self-supporting in their studies. The experience and business acumen being developed in the students by YECS will go a long way towards helping young people become economically independent, largely through the development of their skills in planning and operating a business.

ILOCOS NORTE NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL Ilocos Norte National High School YECS started in 2000 with 22 members. Student-members paid a membership fee of P20 and a capital share of P30 per share with a maximum of five

shares. A P25,000 seed fund from Congressman Roque Ablan also helped start operations. From that point, YECS in Ilocos Norte has grown its total paid-up capital to P52,600. The INNHS-YECS manages a selfservice canteen, serving as the laboratory for the food service classes of the school. A P350,000-canteen building donated by Coca-Cola Bottlers Philippines sits on the main campus.

The YECS Club also engages in vegetable gardening, broiler production, and hog and cattle fattening. Student-members are trained to raise broilers and hogs, dress chicken, and butcher hogs the sanitary way. Other business ventures include silk screening of school uniforms and a sheet metal business which makes pails, basins and toolboxes. The student-members are elated to receive their dividends every end of the school year, and of course, to be given the opportunity to attend trainings, learn the systematic system and orderly recording of sales and managing businesses, and to foster the spirit of entrepreneurship and cooperation.

T

he Department of Education, through its Center for Students and Co-Curricular Affairs (CSCA) and in coordination with the Bureau of Secondary Education (BSE), former Youth Sector Rep. Anna Marie Periquet, and various government agencies, launched the Youth Entrepreneurship and Cooperativism in Schools (YECS), also known as the YECS sa DECS Program, in April 1997. The education department subsequently authorized the establishment of YECS clubs in all public and private secondary schools starting School Year 1999-2000. YECS objectives » Enhance the culture and instill the values of entrepreneurship and the formation of ideas and habits of cooperation among the students. » Develop the personal entrepreneurial competencies (PECs) of students in the operation of a micro-business cooperative; and » Help alleviate poverty and encourage long-range economic development in the countryside through career enhancement programs and provisions of lifelong learning for productive living. » Institutionalize YECS among public and private high schools nationwide by establishing networks with private organizations and other government agencies with expertise in entrepreneurship and cooperativism; » Provide the students with specialized trainings and assistance on entrepreneurship and cooperativism for them to create their own sources of livelihood when they are left by themselves; and » Expose the YECS members in different industries and technologies for them to create a base for their own business ventures within the school or in the future.

2nd QUARTER 2006



NEGOSYO 9


Business

2004 ELECTIONS

P50B in Econo

D

OOMSAYERS will find it hard to reconcile the pervading optimism for 2004 coming from a virus-, war- and budget deficit-inflicted Philippine economy of 2003.

Most industry observers believe the prospects look brighter for the country this year than the last, in spite of politics taking center-stage due to the presidential elections. The May polls, it turns out, will even help fuel the Philippines’ consumer-led economy. Regardless of who will win as President, the elections in itself is a blessing, like a drizzle during El Niño, as it will give the economy the muchneeded boost from the most-unlikely source: campaign funds. “We are talking about P3 billion in expenditures per presidential candidate and it does not count the other candidates. It will definitely grease the economy–both the above and underground,” said Joey Roxas, president of Eagle Equities, Inc.

{ Bloodline

Consumer spending has always been the bloodline of the Philippine economy, which accounts for about a third of gross domestic product. Figures from the National Statistical Coordination Board show that personal consumption expenditures grew 4.9 percent in the third quarter of 2003, in spite of it being a

54

PRIME

Issue05 February `04

lean season. The fourth quarter usually caps the year with better-than-expected figures, lifted mainly by increased spending due to the Christmas season. Economist Benvenuto Icamina of the Wallace Business Forum, a consultancy for multinational firms, shares the same view that the elections, which is estimated to be worth P50 billion in campaign funds, is a shot in the arm for the economy, at least for the first half of 2004. “This year will be better, no matter who wins for the presidency. The world economy is better this year, which will boost our exports. Even if we have political uncertainties this year, we have favorable prospects,” Icamina said. The country’s exports, particularly electronics, were among the casualties of a slowdown in the US economy, which reeled from the terrorist attacks from Muslim fundamentalists. Icamina predicts that the electronics sector–one of the country’s main sources of dollar revenues– will grow by as much as 10 to 15 percent this year from a contraction last year.

Betting on agriculture Even the Asian Development Bank and the World Bank see better prospects for the country.


mic ‘Grease’

}

By Czarina May Baetiong

The May polls, it turns out, will even help fuel the Philippines’ consumer-led economy. Regardless of who will win as President, the elections in itself is a blessing, like a drizzle during El Niño, as it will give the economy the much-needed boost from the most-unlikely source: campaign funds. Both institutions predict a 4.5-percent increase in GDP, citing a recovery in the agriculture sector. Only the International Monetary Fund expects the country’s GDP growth to remain flat at 4 percent. Economic Planning Secretary Romulo Neri also relies on agriculture and electronic exports for his 4.9- to 5.8-percent GDP projection for 2004. Foreign investments will be difficult to come by this year, as investors usually wait at least six months after a major political event–in our case, the elections–before deciding on investments. “It is really wait and see for the general business climate. We don’t expect the boost to come from investments this year. Investors will still look at what is going to happen (to our polls),” according to economist Icamina. Production from existing capacity will nevertheless cushion the lack of direct investments this year, he says. Most industries, including cement and electronics, only used 60 to 70 percent of their existing capacity last year from the usual 85 to 90

percent. This meant last year’s slack plus this year’s capacity would have better chances of getting sold given the brisk demand both from local and foreign sources.

Wild card

Optimism, however, ends with the peso, the most politically sensitive of all economic indicators. Astro del Castillo, a director of the Association of Securities Analysts of the Philippines, believes the peso will remain volatile this year due to political uncertainties. “The peso is now on the 55 (to a dollar) level, and investment inflows are quite slow. The market remains cautiously optimistic on who will be the steward of the country for the next six years,” Del Castillo said. He remains optimistic that the peso’s performance will strengthen the same way it did during the first year of former President Joseph Estrada’s term. The peso was then ranging at 42 to 45 to a dollar.

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{

Fashion

Your Dreams Come True at By Lita T. Logarta

John Robert Powers

‘Make it IN Asia — The Philippines in particular — since 1984, John Robert Powers is still very much in the business of making it happen for people. With Manila now the regional Asian headquarters, JRP schools flourish in Thailand, Indonesia, Korea and Japan. The JRP Center in Makati alone counts with a total enrollment of about 2,000 students, most of whom transform so amazingly at the end of their course that they are unrecognizable, according to Marivic Padilla-Catala, International Director of John Robert Powers International and director of JRP Manila. She enthuses, it’s so fulfilling and satisfying, for instance, to see a timid teenager metamorphose into a poised and radiant young woman ready to tackle a career in showbiz. Or to help a business executive achieve his full potential as a communicator and leader. I can’t begin to count the many success stories our students represent.” Catala explains JRP runs personal development/ personality enhancement, and modeling, communications and specialized interactive skills programs. At the same time, our comprehensive and

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happen’ unique curricular work creates positive attitudes in the student about self, develop presentational skills and enhance employment possibilities. This, the JRP system, she points out, is ideal for teenagers, aspiring business people, home-makers, and front-line personnel — including children as young as six to adults who are already CEOs and even diplomats! That is undoubtedly because JRP covers almost every area of human development possible. For instance, summer workshops being offered this year are especially crafted for teens and young children to boost confidence, and enhance to the maximum their character, creativity and skills. Thus there are workshops for Acting and Personal Growth, for the child who need to express himself; Social Graces for proper manners and behavior; Voice Communication for shy one; TV Hosting and VTR Projection, for the would-be perfomer; Celebrity Program for those aspiring for fame. That, Catala says, simply means harnessing your child’s potentials for success. What parent wouldn’t like that!

>>>>

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<<<< Catala indeed frowns on would-be applicants who are forced by their guardians or parents to enroll. “I tell the parents that under these circumstances, their children will not profit from the workshops. Any desire to improve or change must come from inside them. There are also parents who think JRP can enforce the discipline, which they themselves cannot enforce at home. That is not JRP’s role, although we do demand that our students follow the rules of the school about promptness, dress, behavior, etc. If the student does not have the right attitude or approach to the program, it will all be a waste of money and time! Catala in fact likens JRP to a finishing school. We finish off the student, put the polishing touches and smoothen the rough edges, so to speak. We have a psychologist on hand, so we also give counseling sessions, if necessary. So you see, our approach is more than physical. Further, explains Catala, a student is not just given a certificate when he completes a course. We evaluate progress reports, made by both the student and the teachers, so we are informed both ways. The student gets his certificate only after he demonstrates three major points: he must be confident, have poise, and be articulate. Those are the basics. But mostly, you see the student transforming right before your eyes, like a timid kid turning into a very outgoing one! Catala’s repertoire of success stories tell of varied characters such as insecure wives of politicians or diplomats, girls preparing for debuts or weddings or beauty contests or entertainment and/or modeling careers, would-be actors, aspiring politicians or CEOs who lack communication or image skills, wallflowers whose parents want them to be belles/ beaux of the ball, yuppies seeking upward mobility, and many others. So far, since she took over at JRP Center-Manila in 1999 (a job for which she had to undergo hands-on training at JRP in Boston and Hollywood)’ Catala says only two or three out of 2,000 students have asked for refund of fees paid. We would rather return the money than argue, because these are obviously people who hearts are not into the program. She says “What we really do here at JRP is help you make your dreams come true. We make it happen, but it’s up to you!” 54

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nanie gonzales  

curiculum vitae

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