Page 1

celebrating life in hastings county

TALKING CIRCLES LISTENING TO THE LAND WINTER’S OUTDOOR RESIDENTS THUMBS UP FOR FACEBOOK?

COVERING THE ARTS, OUTDOORS, HISTORY, PEOPLE AND PLACES

WINTER 2017/18


WE NEED YOUR HELP TO GROW OUR CULTURAL INVENTORY

If you are an artist, a cultural organization or a creative enterprise, or if you are involved with historical collections, cultural events and spaces and stories you’d like to share, we invite you to put yourself on our Map and Event Calendar on the Cultural Portal at culturalportal.ca

WWW.CULTURALPORTAL.CA


Stirling-Rawdon DESIGN • GROW • SUSTAIN

~ INTERIOR DESIGN ~

Follow Us On For Store Updates, Special Events & More!

20 Mill St., Stirling 613-395-2929 Open 7 days a week, Mon-Sat 10-5, Sun 12-4

All the best fashions can

Garden Planning Garden Maintenance Seasonal Planters PLAN AHEAD FOR SPRING TODAY CONTACT MEGAN TODAY, LIMITED SPOTS AVAILABLE text 613.827.4704 or email twigsgardenscape@gmail.com

Featuring 17th, 18th and 19th Century English Furniture and French Lighting. 22 Mill St. Stirling • 613-395-0110 www.antiqueelegancebydesign.com

Stirling-Rawdon EMBRACING THE FUTURE

be found at 20 Mill St., Stirling

613.395.2929

Open 7 days a week, Mon-Sat 10-5, Sun 12-4

Wed-Sun

11-9 MONTHLY DINNER CLUB

Five course meal once a month $35 per person. Call for information.

• CASUAL DINING •

Country Servings for Country Prices

Township Council & Staff would like to thank all the businesses and service clubs for their assistance and support throughout 2017. Congratulations to all businesses and service clubs on their successful events.

32 MILL ST. STIRLING 613.395.1515

Wishing everyone a successful 2018 and look forward to continuing our partnerships in the future.

Christian Books & Gifts

HOCKEY AND PUBLIC SKATING SCHEDULES WWW.STIRLINGARENA.CA

Hearts To God

FOR OUR GROUND HOG FEST AND OTHER UPCOMING EVENTS, VISIT WWW.STIRLING-RAWDON.COM

613.395.6177 22 West Front Street, Stirling Find us on Facebook - Hearts To God

227 West Front St., Stirling, Ontario 613.395.9444

#BESTBOMBSBESTPRICE

Natural, Locally-made Bath & Body Products by #SoapChefHeidi Body Butter, Lotions, Shampoos...

PREMIUM HAND-CRAFTED BATH BOMBS!

MOTOR SALES

19 YEARS OF ALL ORIGINAL EXPERIENCE

www.mckeownmotorsales.net

STIRLING SOAPCHEFHEIDI@YAHOO.CA

Clean Comedian, Emcee, Speaker 30 West Front St., Stirling • 613-395-0002 www.stirlingwine.ca

4

I

S H O P

Country Roads • Winter 2017/18

SPRINGBROOK • 10 KM NORTH OF STIRLING 613.395.3883 • 1.800.465.9297 For over 80 years “We keep doin’ what we’re doin’”

F R I E N D L Y

TIMMY BOYLE

www.upstandingcomedy.ca

S T I R L I N G


Country Roads

celebrating life in hastings county

PUBLISHING CONSULTANT

Country Roads

Every Story Deserves To Be Told

celebrating life in hastings county

CR Country

CO-PUBLISHER & EDITOR Nancy Hopkins 613 968-0499 CO-PUBLISHER & EDITOR John Hopkins 613 968-0499

Roads

SALES DEPARTMENT

CENTRAL HASTINGS & AREA

celebrating lifeGibson-Alcock in hastings county Lorraine

lorraine@countryroadshastings.ca 613.902.0462 NORTH HASTINGS & AREA Hope McFall hope@countryroadshastings.ca 613.202.1541 ART DIRECTOR Jozef VanVeenen CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Orland French Barry Penhale Lindi Pierce Michelle Annette Tremblay Brendan Troy Sarah Vance Shelley Wildgen

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Jason King Michelle Annette Tremblay Brendan Troy Sarah Vance Jozef VanVeenen

Company History Books Legacy Memoir Books Family History Books Historical Association Books

A harvest of apples and a harvest of gifts, ALL handpicked for you!

View recently published books: www.behance.net/tikit

DIFFERENT Unique Gift Ideas VARIETIES for everyone OF APPLES on your list!

DESIGN • PRINT • PUBLISH

NO MEDICATED FEED | NO HORMONES | 100% PURE Raised right here on our family farm, We ONLY feed what we grow! Try a roast, a few steaks, or custom order a whole, half or split side of beef... 10 RD |LIKE STIRLING, ON | K0K 3E0 cutWELLMANS just the way YOU IT! (613) 395-2395 (613) 395-3947

OVER 20 BOOKS COMPLETED

May 1 to December 31

OPEN DAILY | 10 to 5

TIKIT VISUALS www.tikit.ca • tikitvisuals@gmail.com 613.503.1210

COUNTRY ROADS, Celebrating Life in Hastings County is published four times a year by PenWord Communications Inc. Copies are distributed to select locations throughout Hastings County including the c­ ommunities of Bancroft, Belleville, Madoc, Marmora, Stirling and Tweed. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 1 year: $25.00 2 years: $45.00 3 years: $67.50 All prices include H.S.T. The contents of this publication are ­protected by copyright. Reproduction of this p­ ublication in whole or in part without prior written permission of PenWord C ­ ommunications Inc. is prohibited. The advertising deadline for the Spring issue is March 2, 2018 COVER PHOTO: GAIL BURSTYN, LYLIS DESIGNS Made possible with the support of the Ontario Media Development Corporation

Proud to be named One of Canada’s Most Reputable Companies By Canadian Business Magazine HOW TO CONTACT US Telephone: 613-968-0499 E-mail: info@countryroadshastings.ca Website: www.countryroadshastings.ca For written enquiries you can reach us at: PenWord Communications Inc. P.O. Box 124, Tweed, ON K0K 3J0

MADOC HOME HARDWARE 57 Elgin Street, Madoc

(613) 473-2332

RASHOTTE HOME BUILDING CENTRE 36 Metcalfe Street , Tweed

(613) 478-2539

BROADBENT’S HOME HARDWARE BUILDING CENTRE Highway #7 West, Marmora

(613) 472-2539

Winter 2017/18 • Country Roads

I 5


HASTINGS COUNTY 2017 MVP TOURISM AWARD

Nancy Hopkins, Publisher of Country Roads with the 2017 MVP Award, plaque and congratulatory letter. PHOTO BY JOHN HOPKINS

As publisher of Country Roads, receiving the 2017 MVP Tourism Award at the Hastings County Awards Celebration held recently at the Village Playhouse in Bancroft was a tremendous and humbling honour. In truth, the award is a reflection of the great amount of work everybody puts into Country Roads. We have an extremely dedicated staff that is committed not just to the magazine but also to presenting the best Hastings County has to offer. The annual Hastings County Tourism Awards were presented on Oct. 23 by the County of Hastings. The event recognized the tourism businesses, organizations and individuals who made significant achievements from September, 2016 to August, 2017. Congratulations to fellow award winners – Tweed & Company Theatre, Champion of the Year; and the Municipality of Tweed, Event of the Year for its Farm to Table community dinner.

Country Roads staff in attendance at the awards included (L to R) Hope McFall, North Sales Representative; Lorraine Gibson-Alcock, Central Sales Representative; John Hopkins, Co-Publisher; Michelle Annette Tremblay, Feature Writer & Digital Editor; Jozef VanVeenen, Graphic Design Director. We thank them and the many other Country Roads contributors who were not in attendance for their talents and dedication to the magazine and Hastings County. PHOTO BY DOUG ALCOCK

6

I

Country Roads • Winter 2017/18

EDITORIAL

At the risk of sounding like the proverbial broken record or should we say CD we are going to once again remind readers that Hastings County is the second largest county in the Province of Ontario. No way around it - that’s a lot of land. And who, how and why we care for this large plot of land is crucially important, not only for residents within its boundaries but for the regions all around that are profoundly affected by the health of the land, water and all its natural inhabitants. Fortunately there are many gatekeepers who advocate for and care for the ecosystem, organizations such as the multiple area conservation councils, the Hastings Stewardship Council, The Land Between conservation organization, and many more groups and individuals including those frontline people who work the land, farm, hunt, fish, and bee keep... We are blessed to have them working on mother earth’s behalf in this remarkable part of the province. In early November our Feature Writer Michelle Annette Tremblay attended a traditional Indigenous Talking Circle ceremony held in Madoc. One of four such events arranged by the Land Between conservation organization the sole purpose was to cultivate information from landowners about the local land. These Talking Circles represent the only initiative involving the very people who know the land firsthand. The results will be published next year. We are pleased to welcome a new writer and photographer to our pages. Brendan Troy’s article on the benefits of making friends with the outdoors in winter is sure to warm up even the most coldfearing, hibernating inclined amongst us. We’re delighted to bring his keen eye for the wonders found exclusively in winter – and his skills with a camera to your attention. This editorial has given you a taste of what you will find in this issue, but there’s more so it’s our hope you read it cover to cover. And let us know what you think of our stories. We can be reached by email through www.countryroadshastings.ca or our FB page. We look forward to hearing from you.

CONTRIBUTORS

Barry Penhale, veteran radio/TV broadcaster and publisher has treasured his love of Canada in general, and Ontario in particular. He also believes that recognition should shine on those too frequently unsung women and men who have contributed much to our country. His mission is to bring the stories of extraordinary Canadian people and places to public awareness. Still active in the historic community, Barry and his wife Jane live in an Ontario century farmhouse. Michelle Annette Tremblay writes because she’s interested in everything. Interviewing fascinating people and sharing their wisdom and ideas is one

of her favorite things and has led her to writing features for newspapers and magazines. After completing a Creative Writing degree from the University of British Columbia she spent many years teaching and writing on the west coast of Canada and internationally. But, a country girl at heart, she gave up the city life to return to her roots in Paudash, where she freelances for multiple publications and is the Creative Director of WordBird Media. When she’s not picking remarkable brains, writing or photographing the wonders of rural Ontario, she’s usually in her garden, running after her kids or cooking up something yummy with her husband.


VOLUME 10, ISSUE 4, WINTER 2017/18

CONTENTS 8

13

Fun Starts Here! Fresh Gourmet Fudge

75 Hastings St. N

Downtown Bancroft on the Strip

613.332.2332

Open seven days a week

Also visit Stirling General Mercantile 26 West Front St., Stirling 613.243.8462

“Caring for your family’s dental health”

14

18

Stirling Dental Centre Dr. Doug Smith A N D A S S O C I AT E S

Dr. Lauren Allen & Dr. Ross Erwin Family & Cosmetic Dentistry New Patients & Emergencies Welcome Friendly people and gentle dentistry for your whole family.

9B Tuftsville Road, Stirling, ON 613-395-2800

FEATURES 14 WONDERFUL WINTER WOES

8 CIRCLE OF HOPE

By Michelle Annette Tremblay

13 STILL SWINGING

By Brendan Troy

18 REMEMBERING

By John Hopkins

Remembering Vimy Ridge

DEPARTMENTS 6 EDITORIAL

17 JUST SAYING

6 CONTRIBUTORS

Facebook: Friending, ­Trending and Unending...

12 THE VILLAGE IDIOT

The path of the lonely runner

16 SOCIAL SCENE

20 COUNTRY CALENDAR 21 MARKETPLACE 22 BACK ROADS

Winter Fun!

THE LITTLE PHARMACY THAT GREW ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓

LARGER STORE ON ONE LEVEL BIGGER SELECTION OF PRODUCTS TRAVEL MEDICINE CLINIC IDEAL PROTEIN WEIGHT LOSS CENTRE SCOOTERS, ROLLATORS, WHEELCHAIRS THERAPEUTIC FOOTWEAR INJURY & HOME HEALTH AIDS MEDICAL EQUIPMENT SALES & RENTALS DELIVERY CAN BE ARRANGED

217 HASTINGS ST N, BANCROFT (BESIDE THE LAUNDROMAT JUST SOUTH OF TIMMIES)

613-332-6700 NHFP.ca nhfamilypharmacy@gmail.com

Winter 2017/18 • Country Roads

I 7


CIRCLE OF HOPE Talking about the land between B Y

M I C H E L L E

A N N E T T E

T R E M B L A Y

W

e were all drawn by the same thing. Even though it was Saturday morning, the official snoozing-ground of late-sleepers world-wide (of which I am a devout card-carrying member); even though it was cold and blustery; even though it was the first morning of the season that we had to scrape ice off our collective windshields, on Nov. 4 we all made our way to the Art Centre in Madoc. There were about 40 of us in total, coming from all directions, most having never met before. We were bee-keepers, educators, farmers, wildlife enthusiasts, artists, parents, hunters, foragers, activists. We all had one thing in common: a deep belief in the stewardship of ‘the land between.’ As we entered and quietly seated ourselves in a large circle, Anishinaabe elder Gerard Sagassige lit sage and cedar, began to sing and drum, and welcomed us to the Talking Circle of the Land Between. Nestled between the Canadian Shield and the St. Lawrence Lowlands, the Land Between extends across central Ontario from the Frontenac Arch in the east, to Georgian Bay and Southern Parry Sound. It is a regional belt spanning nine counties, running parallel and to the north of Highway 7. I spent my 1980s-childhood here, climbing trees and catching fireflies, but I never heard it called the Land Between until a few years ago. I always knew, somehow, that this area was special, but the actual specifics eluded me. I had just moved back to Paudash Lake in North Hastings after 15 years of education and world travel. I joked to my husband that I was like a salmon, swimming back upstream to have children in my own childhood home. And why wouldn’t I? I couldn’t shake the feeling that this place, this unique, diverse, high-vibrational place is the perfect setting to raise a family. Even though I didn’t know at the time just how important and unique this place truly is. So, what exactly is ‘the Land Between?’ If you talk to an ecologist, they’ll explain that it’s an ‘ecotone,’ a place where two distinct ecosystems collide and overlap. Our specific ecotone is a

The Land Between conservation organization grew out of concern over funding cuts to programs that encouraged dialogue between land stewards and government. Graphic courtesy The Land Between

8

I

Country Roads • Winter 2017/18


Nestled between the Canadian Shield and the St. Lawrence Lowlands, the Land Between extends across central Ontario from the Frontenac Arch in the east, to Georgian Bay and Southern Parry Sound. It is a regional belt spanning nine counties, running parallel and to the north of Highway 7. The Land Between Region covers nine counties and is distinguished by its water, plant, insect and animal diversity, which includes Ontario’s only native lizard. Graphic courtesy The Land Between

The Land Between Talking Circle drew some 40 participants from diverse areas of Hastings County with varying backgrounds and interests. Photo by Michelle Annette Tremblay

Anishinaabe elder Gerard Sagassige provided the welcome to the Land Between Talking Circle, setting the stage for an open and meaningful discussion among participants. Photo by Michelle Annette Tremblay

carnival of diversity; the most visually obvious diversity being our landscape. If you drive from Toronto to Apsley, for example, you’ll slowly notice a shift from flat farmland and deciduous forests, to rolling hills and emerging evergreens. As you continue to head north, you’ll still see some deciduous trees interspersed with the evergreens, but you’ll also notice more and more bodies of water, and exposed Precambrian rock.

side. There are also species living here that you won’t find anywhere else in the world, including the five-lined skink, Ontario’s only native lizard. Concerned by funding cuts to programs that encouraged dialogue between land stewards and government Leora Berman, CEO and cofounder of The Land Between conservation organization, has been working with her team to

The Land Between is the only area in the province with exposed rock barrens, and also has the highest concentration of lakes. We have an abundance of lakes, rivers, streams and wetlands; swamps, fens, bogs, and marshes. With all this water and plant diversity comes an explosion of animal and insect diversity. The Land Between hosts flora and fauna from both the north and the south, living side by

Winter 2017/18 • Country Roads

I 9


“It’s amazing what comes about at the community level,” says Berman. “What qualifies their leadership is democratic consensus, and you can only get that by hearing each other. All good work happens at the local level.”

increase awareness, protect this one-of-a-kind ecotone and create new opportunities. From producing a three-part documentary that aired on TVO, to creating a Facebook-like social media platform called ‘Frog-Circle’ for land stewards, to organizing annual turtle advocacy events, Berman has been busy defending the Land Between. “The Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, and the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs used to have district biologists or representatives that were involved with local hunters and farmers, but that’s no longer the case due to budget cuts,” explains Berman. “Even Ontario’s environmental bill of rights is limited in its application.” So Berman decided, with her partners, to hold four Land Knowledge Talking Circles throughout the Land Between region. Talking Circles are traditional Indigenous ceremonies where people share knowledge and ideas in a democratic process where everyone has a turn to speak uninterrupted, and everyone listens. Generally there are no recordings allowed, because talking circles are sacred. However, in this case, participants were audio recorded and Berman will be compiling a report which chronicles the participants’ concerns, observations and suggestions. The findings will be published next year. “Their knowledge and participation is more influential than they realize,” emphasizes Berman. “That’s because right now there is no other platform. No one else is asking landowners anything; there’s no forum. That’s why it’s so important to talk to land stewards: the people who live close to the land, interact with the environment, and make it a priority to advocate for the land.” Once Berman and Sagassige explained the day’s format, we began. One at a time, we were passed a goose feather, chosen because

10 I

Country Roads • Winter 2017/18

The Land Between CEO and co-founder Leora Berman, shown with Anishinaabe elder Gerard Sagassige, has been busy encouraging dialogue and increasing awareness through a variety of ventures, including a TVO documentary, a social media platform and annual turtle advocacy events. Photo by Michelle Annette Tremblay

Madoc’s Arts Centre was host for one of four Land Knowledge Talking Circles held throughout the Land Between region. Photo by Michelle Annette Tremblay

geese symbolise community. While holding the goose feather, each person had an opportunity to introduce themselves, and describe the changes they’d witnessed in the Land Between during the last few years. There was no interrupting. No hurrying. Everyone was given the same chance to speak, regardless of age, profession, or articulation. For myself, I usually get a bit anxious before speaking to a group, but this format had some

surprising effects. By the time it was my turn to speak, I had already been engaged in active listening for over an hour. I’d heard about the decline of the rusty-patched bumble bee. I’d heard about the plight of the turtles trying to lay their eggs in the spring without being flattened by speeding motorists. I’d listened intently while a hunter described the changes he has witnessed over a few decades of being in the bush. A darksky-region advocate talked about light pollution


from cities. I knew I couldn’t interrupt, so there was no planning-my-next-statement. I just listened. By the time it was my turn, I was so tuned in to the sharing that it didn’t occur to me to be nervous. There was no place for ego. We were a collective by then, all focused. All in tune with each other. “It’s amazing what comes about at the community level,” says Berman. “What qualifies their leadership is democratic consensus, and you can only get that by hearing each other. All good work happens at the local level.” After two hours of communion, we broke our reverence for a healthy vegan lunch and mingled for a while. Connections were made, email addresses were exchanged. But it was short-lived. There was more work to do. More sharing. More listening. After lunch, the sharing got even more profound. Members began building on what others had said before them. No one looked at their phones. By the end, two major themes stood out for me. Firstly, that it’s up to us, on a local level, to mobilize and advocate for the protection of the Land Between, and secondly, that we are all incredibly rich. Not necessary rich in the

materialistic sense, but rich with experience and access to something amazing. It’s been 12 years since I said to my husband, “Hey, how about we buy this house in rural Ontario and raise a couple of kids?” We go to large cities like Toronto very infrequently, and honestly we’re completely out of touch with how most Canadians live. After a day of reflecting, I suddenly felt waves of gratitude. We wake up to bird song every morning. We see a symphony of stars almost every night. We’re within walking distance of three different lakes. Our children can identify which berries are safe to eat and which aren’t. We interact with wildlife on a daily basis. Our cost of living is low. We swim all summer and ski all winter. We are surrounded by artists and back-to-the-landers. We are surrounded by pulsating life. We have space. Space to live. Space to think. Space to listen. Space to grow. We are as much a part of this ecotone as the beavers and the five-lined skinks. We are its keepers. By the end of the day, I honestly felt so much love for every individual that participated in the talking circle. There was so much knowledge and so much care that at the end we all emerged slightly dazed. Heads spinning with information.

More email addresses were exchanged, but this networking was devoid of any ulterior motives or career aspirations. There was an understanding. We’re in this together. And you are too. If you’re interested in being a land steward, and getting involved with the Land Between conservation organization, you can learn about their upcoming initiatives, including the new Blue Lakes Project, at www.thelandbetween.ca or even create a social media profile for yourself at FrogCircle.ca and connect with other land stewards.

By the end of the day, I honestly felt so much love for every individual that participated in the talking circle.

MARMORA AND LAKE SHOP, DINE, REST, SEEK ADVENTURE...

Sandra’s

Furnishing Mind, Body and Home

market

VISIT OUR NEW LOCATION

OUR PRODUCTS INCLUDE Hand Painted Furniture, Fusion Mineral Paint, Iron Orchid Design Transfers, Home Décor, Yarns, Fabrics, Custom Pillows

doTERRA & Now Essential Oils Essential Oil Diffusers • Himalayan Salt Products Giftware & Home Accessories Ladies, Mens and Childrens Clothing And Much More!

Statum Design upholstered furniture Alamode duvets and duvet covers Area Rugs & more

4 Matthew Street Marmora, ON, K0K 2M0 613.472.2272

14 Forsyth Street, Marmora, ON 613-472-2555 Follow us on FB for updates on workshops.

MARMORA MERCHANT

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK www.fb.me/shopatsandras E: shopatsandras@hotmail.com

WE ARE YOUR DESTINATION FOR ANYTHING ! FROM FRESHLY BAKED PASTRIES TO ESSENTIAL OIL INFUSED SKINCARE, HAND CRAFTED JEWELLERY AND HOME DECOR.

HUGE STOCKING STUFFER SALE

BEGINNING DECEMBER 14 AN INDOOR ARTISAN MARKET 1 MCGILL STREET, MARMORA, ON THURSDAY & FRIDAY 11 - 6 SATURDAY & SUNDAY 9 - 3

Winter 2017/18 • Country Roads

I 11


EXCELLENT READING FOR CHRISTMAS!

THE VILLAGE IDIOT BY JOHN HOPKINS

140 PAGES

WITH OVER

150 PHOTOS

The path of the lonely runner

A

THE COMMODORES ORCHESTRA

friend recently invited me to participate in a 5k run in his neighbourhood. I enjoy running – it is my physical activity of choice – and it was nice to take part in something organized that did not involve one of my regular routes. What I enjoyed most about the event, however, was the social aspect – not necessarily the hanging out before and after, although that was nice too – but actually sharing the road with other people. It was a strange and somewhat exciting experience. I enjoy running in part because it is an individual activity – I can schedule it pretty much whenever I want and I don’t need to travel to a rink or other sports complex and I don’t require a lot of expensive equipment. But for the most part it is not a social endeavour. This is especially true when you live in the country, where you are even less likely to come across a fellow runner, or even a cyclist or walker,

~ DANCE OF T H E DEC A DE S ~

Ninety years of history of Quinte’s own swing orchestra by current band leader Andy Sparling. This wonderful collection of memories and historic photos captures the beat of the swing years of the 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s.

THE DEFINITIVE HISTORY OF THE COMMODORES ORCHESTRA A V A I L A B L E

A T

• ASHLIES BOOK STORE, BANCROFT • BELLEVILLE AND HASTINGS COUNTY ARCHIVES • BOOKS AND COMPANY, PICTON • CHAPTERS, BELLEVILLE • NOVEL IDEA, KINGSTON • PINNACLE MUSIC, BELLEVILLE • QUINTE ARTS COUNCIL, BELLEVILLE • RIVERSIDE MUSIC, TRENTON • TWEED HERITAGE MUSEUM, TWEED • WWW.WALLBRIDGEHOUSE.COM This publication is a joint project of the Hastings County Historical Society and The Commodores Orchestra.

TO O R D E R B O O K O N L I N E V I S I T W W W. H A S T I N G S H I S TO R Y.C A

I enjoy running in part b ­ ecause it is an individual activity Thank you Quinte, Thank youBelleville, Belleville, Quinte “TheCountry” County” & & Eastern Ontario “The Eastern Ontario – I can schedule it pretty much Thank you Belleville, Quinte We now offer one of the LARGEST FACTORY “The Country” & Eastern Ontario DIRECT COLLECTIONS OF HANDCRAFTED CANADIAN s whenever I want and ni LarMENNONITE offer one ofinthe LARGESTONTARIO FACTORYHeirloom ry We nowFURNITURE EASTERN Den DIRECTare COLLECTIONS OF HANDCRAFTED CANADIAN pieces crafted from wormy & clear maple, flat & Thank you Belleville, Quinte I don’t need to travel to a rink or MENNONITE FURNITURE EASTERN ONTARIO “The Country” & Eastern Ontario 1/4 cut oak, rustic &Belleville, rough sawn pine &Heirloom cherry. Thank youin Quinte pieces are crafted fromBelleville, wormy & clear maple, flat & Quinte “The Eastern Ontario We Thank nowCountry” offeryou one of&the LARGEST FACTORY 1/4DIRECT cut oak, rustic & OF rough sawn pine & cherry. “The Country” &the Eastern Ontario other sports complex and COLLECTIONS HANDCRAFTED CANADIAN We Thank now offeryou one of LARGEST FACTORY Belleville, Quinte Thank you Belleville, Quinte MENNONITE FURNITURE in EASTERN ONTARIO Heirloom DIRECT COLLECTIONS OF HANDCRAFTED CANADIAN We now offer one of the LARGEST FACTORY “The Country” & Eastern Ontario “The Country” & Eastern Ontario pieces are crafted fromOF & clear maple, flat & MENNONITE FURNITURE inwormy EASTERN ONTARIO Heirloom DIRECT COLLECTIONS HANDCRAFTED CANADIAN don’t ­ xpensive Wecut now offer one the LARGEST We nowIoffer one of the require LARGEST FACTORYa lot of e 1/4 oak, rustic &of sawn pineFACTORY & cherry. pieces are crafted from wormy & clear maple, flat & MENNONITE FURNITURE inrough EASTERN ONTARIO Heirloom DIRECT COLLECTIONS OF HANDCRAFTED CANADIAN DIRECT COLLECTIONS OF HANDCRAFTED CANADIAN 1/4 cut rustic & rough pinemaple, & cherry. pieces are oak, crafted from wormysawn & clear flat & MENNONITE FURNITURE EASTERN Heirloom MENNONITE FURNITURE in EASTERN ONTARIO 100% Top Grain Leather &Heirloom Designer Fabric Sofas, equipment. 1/4 cut oak, rustic &inrough sawnONTARIO pine & cherry. pieces are crafted from wormy & clear maple, flat & pieces are crafted from wormy & clear maple, flat & We now offer one of the LARGEST FACTORY DIRECT COLLECTIONS OF HANDCRAFTED CANADIAN MENNONITE FURNITURE in EASTERN ONTARIO. Heirloom pieces are crafted from wormy & clear maple, flat & 1/4 cut oak, rustic & rough sawn pine & Cherry

MENNONITE FURNITURE

Accent Chairs, Chaise Loungers & Sectionals. 1/4 cut oak, rustic & rough sawn pine & cherry.

1/4 cut oak, rustic & rough sawn pine & cherry.

• Dining • Bedroom • Mattresses • Bookcases

Bedrooms sofas coffee & ends & ENDS • Entertainment • SOFAS Home Accent Pieces BEDROOMS COFFEE than if you were travelling the streets or trails of

BEDROOMS SOFAS COFFEE & ENDS • Home & Business Office Desks • Islands & Bars BEDROOMS

SOFAS

BEDROOMS BEDROOMS

SOFAS SOFAS

COFFEE & ENDS Belleville or Trenton. COFFEE & ENDS COFFEE & ENDS In addition to the social aspect there are practical BEDROOMS advantages SOFAS COFFEE & ENDS ENDS On my own I to runningCOFFEE with&others.

•BEDROOMS Jelly Cupboards •SOFAS Coffee & End Tables

Ruttle BRotheRs FuRnituRe

RUTTLE BROTHERS RUTTLE BROTHERSFURNITURE FURNITURE

613-969-9263 613-969-9263

613-969-9263

12 I

Country Roads • Winter 2017/18

613-969-9263

R0011294653

R0011294653

R0011294653

R0011294653 R0011294653 R0011294653 R0011294653

always have difficulty pacing myself – I tend to go as quickly (or as slowly) as the mood suits, and I GUARANTEED BEST PRICES IN ONTARIO ~ ~ 613-969-9263 sometimes struggle to find a challenging enough pace without overdoing things. There is also the sense of a shared struggle when running with a RUTTLE BROTHERS FURNITURE partner or a group, and the encouragement and RUTTLE BROTHERS FURNITURE support that comes from that. RUTTLE BOOKCASES BROTHERS SINCE 1974 FURNITURE DESKS & ACCENTS BOOKCASES SINCE 1974 DESKS & ACCENTS With that in mind I take companionship anywhere RUTTLE RUTTLE BROTHERS FURNITURE BOOKCASES BROTHERS SINCE 1974 1974 FURNITURE DESKS & ACCENTS www.ruttlebrothersfurniture.com BOOKCASES SINCE DESKS & ACCENTS find it, and that usually takes the form of BOOKCASES SINCE 1974 DESKS & ACCENTS I canSINCE www.ruttlebrothersfurniture.com BOOKCASES SINCE 1974 BOOKCASES 1974 & ACCENTS DESKS & ACCENTS 1 mile N. of WALMART on HWY 62,DESKS Belleville www.ruttlebrothersfurniture.com animals. Some animals seem to take a greater interest www.ruttlebrothersfurniture.com 1 mile N. of WALMART on HWY 62, Belleville www.ruttlebrothersfurniture.com www.ruttlebrothersfurniture.com in my activity than others. There are dogs that will 1 mile N. of613-969-9263 WALMART on HWY 62, Bellevillewww.ruttlebrothersfurniture.com 613-969-9263 1 mile N. of WALMART HWY62,62,Belleville Belleville1 mile N. ofperiodically 1 mile N. of613-969-9263 WALMART on on HWY WALMART on HWYflying 62, Belleville come out of an unfenced yard and 1 mile N. of WALMART on HWY 62, Belleville www.ruttlebrothersfurniture.com

make a major fuss, literally displaying more bark than bite. I often pass a herd of cows that collectively raise their heads when I jog by and slowly turn their heads as one, meditatively chewing their cud and watching impassively, probably wondering what on earth I am doing. I have had the odd horse trot along a fence line beside me, humouring me briefly before it became bored or frustrated by my slow pace. It is nice to come across other living creatures like these, but in terms of providing support or encouragement these animals are not particularly helpful. In that respect, my favourite spectators live together on a farm not far from our house. There is a large dog with thick, light-coloured fur, a couple of goats and two llamas. On a nice day they will all be out together and as a group watch me pass, perhaps adding a congratulatory grunt or nod. On a more imposing day, typically in fall, the dog will stand lookout for me and bark an alarm when I am approaching, drawing the rest of the crew out from the barn. At first this crowd, the llamas in particular, were not very encouraging and didn’t do much for my enthusiasm. On one occasion, an especially windy day, I could see the gang of them sheltering themselves from the wind behind a barn. As I drew near the dog came out and shouted the alarm, and gradually the sheep and llamas reluctantly came out as well. But the llamas were not impressed. One made a disparaging grunt and I swear the other spat in my direction. I think I heard them both snickering later. I was not terribly motivated. I can only assume the sheep or the dog had a talk with the llamas, because subsequently I have noticed that the llamas are more respectful of my efforts, or they at least do not show their ridicule so overtly. Whatever the reason, I have found recently that the llamas watch more quietly and keep their thoughts to themselves. On the bright side, at least the llamas come out and watch. I have had rabbits quickly run into hiding when I come trotting past, and on one or two occasions I have seen a deer disappearing into the wood as I approached. I have seen the remnants of dead snakes, chipmunks and squirrels on the road, a stark reminder to keep my eyes and ears open. I have not come across any bears in my travels, which is perhaps a good thing. I’m not sure how one would react to seeing me coming along the road. Depending on his mood, he may choose not to stick around, or I may find I have an unexpected running companion chasing behind me. I would definitely find out what sort of pace I could manage. That may even get those llamas to respect me.


Still swinging

Commodores Orchestra celebrates 90 years

I

By John Hopkins • Photos courtesy Andy Sparling

t seems like these days longevity in the music business is measured in years, perhaps months, but certainly not decades. Yet in 2018 Belleville’s own Commodores Orchestra will celebrate nine decades of swinging. It is an impressive achievement for any musical collection, but especially for a group that not only grew and thrived through the big band era of the 1940s, but has also managed to keep the music alive through the lean years as well. “The story is unique,” says Andy Sparling, the current band leader who has recently launched a book celebrating the band’s achievements, ‘The Commodores Orchestra - Dance of the Decades’. “These are musicians who have always had a mystical connection with swing music. It moved the band through its glorious heyday but also kept it going in the tough periods, when they played just one gig a year or were willing to forego payments. No matter what, they have been willing to put it all on the line.” The band debuted in May, 1928, opening the Bay of Quinte Golf and Country Club. It thrived through the 1930s, ‘40s and into the ‘50s, riding the popularity of jazz and swing music and musicians like Benny Goodman or Tommy Dorsey. At its peak the band opened its own winterized dance hall, Club Commodore, in 1945, refurbishing an old chicken barn at the Quinte Fairgrounds. “The core of the musicians invested the equivalent of about $30,000,” explains Sparling, a 25-year member of The Commodores. “By 1951 they had invested about $100,000, which in today’s terms would be about $1,000,000.

These were basically ordinary guys – plumbers, carpenters – and for them to make that kind of effort, to show that kind of commitment was almost unheard of.” At its peak, between 1945 and 1949, Club Commodore hosted four dances, bringing in 1,500 dancers, a week and featured dining and catering facilities. At the forefront was the 14-piece Commodore Orchestra. The city of Belleville provided a fertile ground for the popular music of the time, points out Sparling. With its location between Toronto and Montreal, and proximity to the United States, the region drew the top names of the day and was exposed to the popular hits of the era. “By 1950 the heyday of swing music was over in the United States and the move was to crooners, and you were beginning to see the first stages of rock and roll,” Sparling says. “But the music was still big here, and performers like Duke Ellington and Tommy Dorsey would come across through the 1,000 Islands, and they would have a Monday and Tuesday off before they played in Toronto, so they would look to pick up gigs in Kingston, Peterborough or Belleville.” As a result, The Commodores would mix and mingle with some of the biggest names in the business. Trumpet player Jimmy Elliott filled in with Count Basie when his band played Grant Hall at Queen’s University in Kingston. In 1950 the orchestra was on the same bill with Teddy Wilson, who broke the colour barrier playing with Benny Goodman at Carnegie Hall in 1936. But as glorious as The Commodores reign was during those peak years, the band’s survival through the 1960s and ‘70s, after the big band

sound had lost its voice, is perhaps even more impressive. “The club closed in 1963 and it was a shadow of itself,” Sparling explains. “The late 1960s and 1970s were grim days. The band became a travelling band again and played maybe one gig a year.” By the 1980s there was a slight resurgence, however. Top musicians like drummer and arranger Brian Barlow and saxophonist Bob Leonard, both Grammy Award winners, moved into the area, as did Juno nominated musician Dan Bone. The band has also modernized its sound, to a degree, and has recently launched a rock and roll show with noted radio and concert personality Freddy Vette. “We’re trying to keep up with the times,” jokes Sparling. The current line-up features a 17-piece orchestra with two vocalists, in the big band tradition. The drive to keep The Commodores alive centres on a passion for music that has seen the band through its leanest years. “At the end of the day, there’s nothing like playing in a big band,” says Sparling. “When you’ve got 17 players, all swinging together, playing their hearts out, going like hell, that’s what drives them.”

‘The Commodores Orchestra – Dance of the Decades’ can be ordered through hastingshistory.ca

Winter 2017/18 • Country Roads

I 13


Wonderful winter woes

Black-capped Chickadees are perhaps the most abundant form of winter wildlife, and are very comfortable with human interaction.

Plenty to celebrate in chilly months Story and photos by Brendan Troy

T

he alarm goes of at 6:00 a.m., wind is whipping across your house, giving small creaks a chance to be heard. You’re comfortably warm in your bed but you can only think of how much snow has emblazoned your car and buried your driveway. If you woke up on the wrong side of the bed, you also know that the snow-plow has already been by and your 2012 Honda Civic doesn’t have a chance to get onto the salty pavement. Maybe you call in sick for work, maybe you go back to bed and forget about your troubles. More likely though, you drag your coffeecraving, shivering body outside to clean your car off and curse at the skies for dumping such horrid white fluf over our country and your life. The sun crests the horizon and a Great Gray Owl glides across a snow-laden meadow to the security of the forest. Finding a comfortable branch, nestled close to the trunk, the winter ghost adjusts for a long daytime rest after a night of successful hunting. Meanwhile, a cow Moose with her yearling calf are scraping through the snow to find fresh shoots of nutritious growth. The morning wind blows the gleaming snow of their backs while the calf frolics

in its winter wonderland. Along the next concession, a vibrant Red Fox rolls in the snow before plotting its next attack on an unsuspecting vole. A Blackcapped Chickadee flutters past on its way to the local park where kind people have left sunflower seeds along the trails. Such contrasting mornings show how diferently a winter day can be viewed. Stuck in our nine-to-five lives and go-go-go mentality, it’s not uncommon to absolutely dread the winter and what it brings. Snow may be cumbersome to our roads, cars and sidewalks, but the way it dusts itself across the sweeping branches of a mighty White Pine will make anyone stare in awe. More importantly though, our wildlife in Hastings County has no choice but to adapt and make the best of our colder months. Some have learned that fleeing to warmer climes is best, but others simply don’t have that option. Completely adapted to snow and a lack of daylight and warmth, wildlife within Hastings County can be breathtaking. With a monochromatic backdrop, any wildlife species seems to jump out at you and can look surprisingly beautiful. Blue Jays seem to have an extra pop against our backyard feeders

and Pine Martens show of their zesty orange bibs. Evening Grosbeaks are absolutely stunning along snowy branches. Great Gray Owls move south during winter months, giving us southern Canadians a chance to gaze into their never-ending, yellow eyes. Often perched low above ditches and fields, they hone in on their prey with sight and sound before taking the plunge, sharp talons and pant covered legs first, making an outstanding educated guess at where a Meadow Vole may be scurrying under 12 inches of fresh snow. Shrugging snow of their face, vole in mouth, they hop back into the air and retreat to gobble up their meal. Moose are synonymous with winter. Their lengthy limbs aid them through feet of snow and hold them high to reach nutritious twigs. These Canadian giraffes can survive the toughest winters and look comfortable in any snowy scene. Often feeding along roadways for salt-rich plants, they can be a hazard for humans and vehicles alike though, when viewed from a safe distance, they scream Canada and our great white north. Avoiding wolves, coyotes and cars may be their biggest concern during the

Moose are synonymous with winter and their lengthy limbs help them navigate deep snow and reach nutritious twigs high in trees.

A stark white background of snow gives many animal species, such as Blue Jays, extra pop.

Great Gray Owls move into our area during the winter, providing an opportunity to marvel at their hunting techniques.

14 I

Country Roads • Winter 2017/18


lean winter months, which gives us a great chance to sit back and watch their grace. By far the noisiest creature of the woods is the Eastern Gray Squirrel, who must have no fear from predators. No matter the season, these small spirited mammals will often be the loudest force of the forest, though in winter they seem more obvious with their deep black fur contrasting against the never-ending white backdrop. More likely though, the most common winter wildlife species will be the ever-so charming Black-capped Chickadee. Fluttering from branch to palm, these tiny birds have found a small niche on which to capitalize: humans. They don’t fear people like other species, they actually do quite the opposite, following them through frozen fields. Waiting their turn for a free handout, these birds have won our hearts for years. Even landing on the out-stretched hands of eager, very noisy children, chickadees have become a face for nature and conservation. Rightfully so, they give us a unique way to connect with nature that not many other species will allow. Oddly enough, more impressive than our wildlife is the season itself. Winter is a colder, darker time when we can bathe in relaxation and self-reflection. Stepping into a freshly coated forest, whether it be on your friend’s acreage just outside of Madoc or on the trails of Potter’s Creek Conservation Area right in Belleville, almost feels like time has

stopped. If you can get away from other people, there is often no sound in our winter forests. Like a giant blanket, the snow mutes any sound made and dampens the wind cutting through the trees. The silence is in a way absolutely deafening, it consumes you in a thought-provoking manner, forcing you to take all of it in at once and notice the delicacy of individual flakes left on furrowed birch bark, or the simple expanse of our wildlands. Snow transforms the landscape into a gorgeous Group of Seven painting and can make you truly appreciate the harsh beauty of winter. While soaking in the silence, very little will break the barrier of sound and grab your attention. Insects are dormant, reptiles and amphibians are either frozen or deep beneath the ground, some mammals have succumbed to sleepy hibernation and most birds have vacated our northern lands. Winter is most definitely cold and can be absolutely harsh. The season is synonymous with so many negative words that it’s hard to believe that it can be enjoyable though, with the right attitude and the right gear, winter can be more enjoyable than summer. With so much less activity, it’s possible to get closer and more intimate with our native wildlife, which there is still plenty of. Geographically speaking, Hastings County is massive and covers a wide array of various habitats. Stretching all the way to southern Algonquin Park, Hastings County is rich in wildlife diversity.

The Eastern Gray Squirrel is by far the noisiest creature in the otherwise tranquil winter forests of Hastings County.

While it seems that we are stuck in a cold funk for the next four or five months, it could also be viewed as a brief change in scenery. While it may take a little longer and need a little more effort, we will all still make it to work, we will continue to live comfortably in our homes, and life will go on. With a simple stop in our mundane routines, it’s not hard to reflect on the simple beauty of winter. With its quiet glamour and great wildlife, winter is the absolute best.

Winter 2017/18 • Country Roads

I 15


ON THE COVER

COUNTRY ROADS SOCIAL SCENE We’re very social and we’d love to hear from YOU. Letters to the Editor can be sent via www.countryroadshastings.ca, email or snail mail. 

BOHEMIAN WAXWING Cover Photo: Gail Burstyn

This issue’s cover photo was taken last December by Gail Burstyn in the backyard of her home on Paudash Lake, south of Bancroft, using her Sony a6300 with a 70-200 mm zoom lens on it. “This is an ornamental cherry tree,” she explains. “I was walking through the house and spotted these Bohemian Waxwings in the tree, which was full of cherries. I have never seen these birds before and there was a flock of 50 or 60 of them in that tree. I grabbed my camera and took some shots through the window, through several layers of glass and screen. The images were too soft and when I tried to get outside to take some better shots the birds flew away. “I went downstairs to download the images and knew that I did not get a great shot. I went upstairs and they were back! I managed to slip out the door without them noticing this time and was able to get some very good shots of these magnificent birds. “It was quite a challenge as there were so many of them in the tree and to get the camera to focus on the birds closest, with no extra branches in the way. Also, when you are looking through the camera, you are only able to see a small part of the scene and need to constantly look away from the camera eyepiece to find a good composition and then try to get your camera into position to get the particular bird before it moved away.   “These birds cleaned the tree completely in a matter of maybe 15 minutes over two visits that I knew of. It was exhilarating to have seen them in such numbers in my yard and even more satisfying to get a few really good shots.”

the

COMPASS VISIT WWW.COUNTRYROADSHASTINGS.CA AND SIGN UP FOR THE COUNTRY ROADS’ NEWSLETTER TODAY!

16 I

Country Roads • Winter 2017/18

Dear Country Roads: I came across your magazine for the first time in Haliburton and wanted to say it was great in many ways. The columns...laughing in your face on racoons vs beavers, hit it right on. Quite iconic. And the column on jumping jack o lanterns, an original and humorous way of expressing how increasingly macabre halloween is becoming and how to make it festive again very interesting articles on solar power with Michele Gallo, and the wood craftsmanship trade. All in all it provokes me to want to visit further east in your area. Thanks! Shawne MacDonald, Haliburton, ON

FACEBOOK COMMENTS:

SOLAR’S BRIGHT FUTURE: North Hastings’ Gallo Charts Innovative Energy Path 4188 PEOPLE REACHED/ 6 SHARES

THE OLD TIN SHED’S NEW ADVENTURE 2,291 PEOPLE REACHED/ 16 SHARES

THE SOUNDS OF STIRLING: Village Ready to Host Fall Musical Feast 1770 PEOPLE REACHED /17 SHARES

An award so deserved! Wishing you continued success. Country Roads, Celebrating Life in Hastings County Magazine is indeed a treasure. Deborah Jeffrey, Bancroft, ON I totally love this magazine.and can’t wait for the next edition. So great to have local stories from such passionate contributors. Congrats!!! Lynn Carlson Neuman, Bancroft, ON

DID YOU KNOW UP TO 1,200 PEOPLE CHECK OUT WWW.COUNTRYROADSHASTINGS.CA  EVERY MONTH FOR GREAT HASTINGS COUNTY STORIES & MORE?

CANADA 150 AWARDS

“Service to Country and Community” 1867 - 2017

Congratulations to the 20 individuals from Hastings – Lennox and Addington Canada who recently received the Canada 150 Award. The awards were presented by MP Mike Bossio to community members who have demonstrated extraordinary service to country and community.

C A N A D A 1 5 0 AWA R D W I N N E R S Kevin Alkenbrack, Napanee Jessica Boomhower, Bath Cortwright Christian, Napanee Don DeGenova, Tweed Don Fenwick, Enterprise Nicole Flynn, Madoc Dr. Melissa Holowaty, Marmora Cathie Jones, Marmora Amy Mack, Napanee Chief R. Donald Maracle, Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte

Tracy McGibbon, L’Amable Winifred Perryman, Corbyville Rick Phillips, Plainfield Janet Scott, Stella Katherine Sedgwick, Queensborough Joey Shulman, Maynooth Maria Stebelsky, Napanee Keith Stephenson, Plainfield Ada Tinney, Bancroft Margaret Walsh, Tyendinaga Township & Napanee


JUST SAYING

BY SHELLEY WILDGEN

Facebook: Friending, Trending and Unending...

L

et’s face it. We all like to be liked. And now, thanks to Mark Zuckerberg and his college buddies, we can forever alternate between receiving compliments and delivering our opinions with barely a hitch. It would have been hard to imagine 30 years ago that this is where progress would land but it’s a warm, soft fact that social media now makes the world go ‘round. Nowhere is that more apparent than aboard the far-reaching tentacles of Facebook. For centuries we’ve searched for the perfect vehicle to convey our every thought. From hieroglyphics to photo albums to blaring our favourite tunes out an open car window, we have laboriously attempted to present our favourite things to our peers but reaching everyone wasn’t possible until now. The tablets of today bear very little resemblance to the etched stone tablets of our primitive ancestors but strangely the idea is the same. Add a little unlimited data, some handy dandy cameras and strong opposable thumbs to a virtual platform called Facebook and the beast is unleashed. The possibilities are limitless as we reveal our own pockets of personal information, and finally exceed our own expectations. Every hour of every day our food, parties, gardens, pets, funny faces and far off places can be laid out in mere seconds for absolutely everyone to see and approve of with their big, blue thumbs ups. All positive, right? Well, yes for the most part. Plans can be made super easily; isolated folk can now socialize from home and those pictures! Pups,

babies, ball games, weddings, re-memed memes. I mean can you even? Well, we love them (big heart next to the blue thumbs up) don’t we? And if we don’t, we learn fairly early in the Facebook game to scroll past or ‘unfollow’ pics and posts that disturb our day. We can even unfriend a nuisance online presence but really, all of it is so sanitized and easy to manage. Does life get any more perfect than this? I’m fond of saying “Facebook can be whatever you want it to be,” and it is. It provides fantastic promotion for a small business and it’s made the term ‘pen pal’ obsolete through its instantaneous ‘add friend’ option. A brief catching up on life chat with a hospitable pop-in from time to time, it’s the cocktail party of life. Ooooo, we’re all so popular. Never mind that a percentage of our Facebook friends are passing acquaintances or fully passed away, it’s still wonderful to see their smiling faces and see what they’re up to. Even the deceased friends continue to celebrate birthdays while we flock to their page to add memorable anecdotes. Nice. The occasional scroll through the pics of a life gone by never hurt anyone. Odd, yes, but I like it. Fun, frolic, tributes, testimonials, new purchases, daily complaints. Everything gets posted and acknowledged like never before. There is one danger, however - if we choose to acknowledge it - and that’s admitting how readily we’ve allowed Facebook’s replacement of real news. We no longer have to go through the exhausting process of watching an entire

newscast because we can get the highlights on the right side of our Facebook page while copying a recipe and thumbing up our neighbour’s dahlias. Why poke our head outside when we can rule our kingdoms seated in our jammies and, barring anything earth shattering, our lightweight method of navigating the outside world is pretty harmless. Second thought. The recipe and the dahlias don’t pose any imminent danger but perhaps gathering our news in much the same way as we used to read the funnies is somewhat problematic. If reports are true, the Russians allegedly saw fit to alter an entire country’s way of thinking and voting through strategically placed newsy Facebook ads. Of course, I can’t flesh out the details on that story because it flew by in favour of Kim Kardashian’s latest thigh report. What is clear though, is that Mr. Putin and his brightest brains must have shaken their collective heads when they realized that they can influence the behaviour of an entire continent simply by purchasing nonsensical political news ‘ads’ alongside Dr. Oz’s anti-aging cucumber fizzes. And no matter what your political leanings, the rubber has definitely met the road with this latest internet capability. Envisioning how that Kremlin board meeting looked is nothing short of ironically comical. Laugh or cry, what are we going to do? Serious snags aside, my own wee universe was affected recently, due to some unknown malfunction. Facebook disappeared for several hours. It was nothing short of agonizing having to wait to see if my just posted red berry bush pic was acquiring blue thumbs and if my friend, Lisa had replied to my east coast weather inquiry. A dozen Scrabble games were put on hold and updating my summer cottage rental pic had to wait as well. Here’s what I learned about myself. I am an impatient, compulsive, woman of a certain age with the attention span of a toddler. Ugly. Repeatedly launching and relaunching my Facebook page to no avail became mind numbingly frustrating. As it turned out, no cavalry was needed though because nothing takes long anymore. Facebook fixed itself. Sure as day follows night and I follow likes the problem mysteriously cleared and all was right with my virtual world once again. Big blue thumbs up on that!

Firewoodplus High Shore Road & Hwy 7, Marmora (3 kms west of town)

“The Firewood Experts” Sales, Delivery & Custom Orders • Commercial Accounts •

Call or text Doug 613.743.4166 info@firewoodplus.ca www.firewoodplus.ca

Winter 2017/18 • Country Roads

I 17


R E M E M B E R I N G

Remembering Vimy Ridge Preserving Our Military Past By Barry Penhale

For a young fellow from the Madawaska Valley the European battlefields must have seemed like a different planet but Robert Taylor made it there and back home in one piece. Photo courtesy Barry Penhale Collection

G

uardians of Canada’s history warrant a big vote of appreciation for the countless ways our war dead have been remembered. Honouring those men and women in the armed forces who gave their all is evident in the built memorials across Hastings County and by the annual November 11 Remembrance Day services. Large turnouts in Bancroft, Deseronto, Frankford, Madoc, Stirling, and elsewhere come to pay their respect for those who made the supreme sacrifice for the freedom we enjoy. Indelibly etched in each of our minds are the powerful images of a dwindling number of veterans in legion blazers and berets, and all too frequently in wheelchairs. But no matter how cold and sleety it may be they soldier on until their own time arrives when they too will join those we the living remember. And so the great tradition continues. As part of the Canada 150 celebrations there have been numerous reminders of anniversaries involving communities we call home or organizations that have been with us for eons. Historically, it would be hard to argue that any single event in 2017 equalled in scope and importance the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge. At the enormous cost

18 I

Country Roads • Winter 2017/18

of 10,600 casualties, the First World War battle waged from April 9-12, 1917, remains one of the defining events in the history of our country. The capture of the ridge (about 175km north of Paris) when other allied troops had failed to do so, is a lasting reminder of the loyalty and bravery of the Canadians in uniform 100 years ago. The men, often not much more than boys in age, came from all walks of life. Many hailed from Ontario — many from northern Hastings County mining and lumbering backgrounds. Regardless of occupation and social status back home, once overseas they fought as one, not only at Vimy but in other First World War battles. One such soldier was Robert (Bob) Taylor, brother to my friend Henry Taylor, long remembered fondly as Bancroft’s Man of the Century. Raised in the Madawaska Valley, each of the Taylor boys took turns working for nearby lumbering companies and Robert as a young man became a cook in such camps. Old Bob was well up in years when we met at his home in Arnprior. He was a wonderful person to interview with tales of early bush days but not once did he mention his First World War experiences. It

Farley Mowat’s recollection of his wartime service provide a vivid perspective. Photo courtesy Barry Penhale

is often said that war is hell and one can understand why most veterans keep painful memories to themselves. A rare photo of a young Bob in uniform, dating back to 1918 in Belgium, is a reminder of that time. That trees make a fitting tribute for Canada’s victims of war is evidenced by the achievements of the Highway of Heroes Living Tribute program, which began in November, 2015 with the planting of two trees at CFB Trenton and another two trees at the Coroner’s Office in Toronto. Communications director Mike Hurley informed me that a mix of native species numbering almost 17,000 trees have been planted to date with legions playing a vital supporting role. Gerry Foyle, president of Legion Branch #280 in Deseronto informed me of its members’ successful fundraising for a commemorative tree earmarked for the Highway of Heroes route and word from Al Clune also confirmed sponsorship of trees by Trenton’s Legion Branch #110. Their intent is a tree for each local fallen soldier who served in Afghanistan. A significant way of honouring our gallant soldiers has been the planting of Vimy Oak saplings at commemorative sites. The Vimy Oaks story is a special one centering around a soldier, Lieutenant Leslie Miller who, having survived Vimy, collected acorns from an English Oak tree found on the battle-scarred site. He sent these back home to be planted on his father’s farm. A number of these now massive trees thrive on what remains of that property. Today we are indeed fortunate that, in 2014, a group of volunteers banded together as the “Vimy Oaks Legacy Corporation” with a plan to repatriate offspring of those descendant oaks to replace original trees destroyed at Vimy in 1917. The Vimy Oaks Legacy group has made grownin-Canada saplings available to qualifying Canadian organizations and individuals, among them being Albert College and the City of Belleville. During a ceremony on the college grounds, middle-school student Tara Winter and Bay of Quinte MP Neil Ellis assisted Albert College head, Keith Stansfield, with the planting. It was noted that 2017 is also Albert College’s 160th anniversary year and the college headmaster reminded all present that the school’s memorial chapel is dedicated to past students who served in both World Wars. Any examination of Canada’s military heritage immediately leads to regimental histories and heroic accounts of often unsung individuals. The highly regarded regiment affectionately dubbed the “Hasty Ps” has an inspiring thoroughly documented record of service that does Hastings and Prince Edward


Albert College is rooted in Canadian history; now more than ever. An oak tree species native of Vimy Ridge — sight of one of the Canadian Forces’ defining battles — was planted on the grounds of the Belleville independent school on October 13. Bay of Quinte MP Neil Ellis (right) and Albert College Head of School Keith Stansfield, with students behind them, show the Vimy Oak tree planted at the school. Photo courtesy Albert College

Counties proud. And when it comes to military history few Canadian journalists currently are as well-regarded as Ted Barris, who recently spoke in Belleville on the topic of his best-selling book Victory At Vimy.

This article would be incomplete without inclusion of a special father and son with strong ties to Hastings County. The father, Angus Mowat, is remembered as a librarian whose posts included Trenton and Belleville. Born in Trenton in 1882

Angus, like others of his age, was to discover firsthand the horrors of the First World War. He and his wife had a son, Farley, who was destined to become one of Canada’s best-known personalities — a curmudgeon, storyteller and gifted writer whose books sold millions of copies worldwide. Among classics in the world of Canadian literature, two titles penned by Farley Mowat are must reads for anyone wishing to better understand wartime. The personal experiences are largely those of Farley during the Second World War combined with the published letters between the old veteran Angus and his fledgling-author son. Together, these accounts provide a rare blend of unclassified wartime information: Farley’s hopes for the future (should he get back home) and the caring observations penned by father. I cannot recommend any too highly And No Birds Sang (1979), and My Father’s Son: Memories of War and Peace (1992). In this special year, I also plan to reread both books as well as the Governor General’s awardwinning novel The Wars by Timothy Findley — the story of a young Canadian officer in 1915. With winter reading ahead, I invite you to join me, book in hand, as we remember those who gave us the freedom in Canada — freedom that should never be taken for granted. Not in this or any other year.

arts, eats & boutiques

beautifulbancroft NECESSITIES

22 Bridge St. W. BANCROFT

RETAIL STORE

613.332.2812

zihuaboutique@bellnet.ca www.zihuaboutique.ca

• Decor Items for All Seasons • Furniture THE BEST SELECTION OF IRON CRITTERS & HARDWARE

• Books • Home & Cottage Decorating

34 Hastings St. Bancroft 613.334.1513 Winter 2017/18 • Country Roads

I 19


C O U N T R Y

C A L E N D A R

Things to see and do in and around Hastings County.

To submit your event listing email info@countryroadshastings.ca or call us at 613 968-0499. ART GALLERIES/EXHIBITIONS ART GALLERY OF BANCROFT, 10 Flint Avenue, Bancroft, 613-332-1542 agb@nexicom.net www.artgallerybancroft.ca NOV 28 – JAN 27 – “FLOW” works by Freddie Towe – Opening reception Dec 1 at 7:30pm. BELLEVILLE ART ASSOCIATON, 392 Front St., Belleville, Ontario 10am to 4pm, Tues - Sat. 613-9688632 info@bellevilleart.ca www.bellevilleart.ca NOV 14 – JAN 6 – ANNUAL SMALL WORKS SALE – All pieces $50 or less. Proceeds support the Christmas Sharing Program providing food baskets to needy families during the holiday season.

THEATRE/LIVE ENTERTAINMENT BELLEVILLE THEATRE GUILD Pinnacle Theatre, 256 Pinnacle Street, Belleville 613-967-1442 or www.bellevilletheatreguild.ca NOV 30 - DEC 16 - “NOISES OFF” It has been called the greatest farce ever written about the theatre. It lampoons onstage and backstage carryings-on of those who take themselves too seriously — flub lines, miss cues, pamper egos, indulge romantic fantasies, battle cast mates, and otherwise behave badly.

sisters. While there, they must face the failed relationships between them, the broken nature of their parents’ union, and the impact of their own unfortunate choices. But there’s also humour and hope as the three sisters find reunion and regeneration at the site of what was once to be their childhood Wonderland — Marion Bridge. STIRLING FESTIVAL THEATRE, West Front St., Stirling 613-395-2100 1-877-312-1162 www.stirlingfestivaltheatre.com. N  OV 25 – DEC 31 – “LITTLE RED” PANTO - Little Red Riding Hood is grown up and is going back into the woods...this time to visit her Aunt Violet. Along the way she meets a woodsman named Jean Paul (whose initials are JP), a wood nymph and, yes, the big, bad wolf (B.B Wolf, who is now a blues singer). “My, Stirling, what a big panto you have.” “The better to make your life, my dear.” 

FEB 18 - THE PRINCESS BALL at The Hungerford Agricultural Building (Tweed Fair White Building). Tickets $12, 4 – 6pm

EVENTS DEC 9 – MAYNOOTH CHRISTMAS MARKET - Emond Hall and The Arlington Hotel, 42 vendors selling handmade products. 11am – 6pm. DEC 9 – MAYNOOTH BRIGHTEN THE NIGHT CHRISTMAS PARADE AND KIDS PARTY (at the ANAF after). Start time is 5 pm with set up on Young Street at 4 pm for judging of best floats.

DEC 18 – QUEENSBOROUGH CHRISTMAS CAROLLING CELEBRATIONS – Join in with your community from 2pm - 4pm for an old-fashioned sing song, a tree, treats and some fun gifts for every family. Ann Brooks 613-473-4550.

TWEED & COMPANY THEATRE, www.tweedandcompany. info@tweedandcompany.com FEB 17: 7pm & FEB 18: 1pm & 7pm - “SONGBUSTER: THE FULLY IMPROVISED MUSICAL” at The Tweed Hungerford Agricultural Building (Tweed Fair White Building). Tickets $12

FEB 1 – 17 – “MARION BRIDGE” - After years away, Agnes, an underemployed and alcoholic actress, comes home to Nova Scotia to be with her dying mother and two

DEC 17 – CAROLS BY CANDLELIGHT - St. Thomas’ Choral Academy presents a Festival of Nine Lessons & Carols at St. Thomas’ Anglican Church, 201 Church Street, Belleville at 4:30pm. The service will be presented in the traditional style of King’s College, Cambridge. Reception to follow. Admission by donation.

DEC 16 – DOWNTOWN WITH DICKENS – 1pm -4pm free apple cider, shortbread cookies & entertainment, Trenton Town Hall – 1861 Heritage and Cultural Centre, 55 King St, Trenton, 613-394-1333 DEC 16 – DESSERTS WITH DICKENS – 7pm – 8pm, “Charles” himself will read from his “Little Christmas Book”, The Christmas Carol. Guests will be invited to share in some Victorian Desserts. $15pp Trenton Town Hall – 1861 Heritage and Cultural Centre, 55 King St, Trenton, 613-394-1333

DEC 21 & 22 – CHRISTMAS IN THE VILLAGE - Command Performance Choir performs an evening of Christmas music at Bloomfield United Church, 272 Main St, Bloomfield 7:30pm Tea and scones will be served at the interval. Tickets $20 online at www.commandperformancechoir.com  or at Books and Co, Picton.  For Info 613-476-4148.

DEC 22 - “A DOWNTON CHRISTMAS” Command Performance Choir presents seasonal music set at “ Downton” of the Roaring Twenties, 7:30pm Picton Town www.commandperformancechoir.com 613-645-2160. JAN - DATE TBA - SKATING PARTY ON THE MILLPOND – Ice conditions permitting. Entry to the millpond is at 14 Barry Road.1pm Call Katherine Sedgwick 613 473-2110 or FB page: Queensborough Community Centre. JAN 21 – A CLARINET & BASSOON DUO CONCERT - Clarinettist François Laurin-Burgess and bassoonist Antoine Saint-Onge will present a concert at St. Thomas’ Anglican Church, 201 Church Street, Belleville at 4:30pm. Works by Bach, Beethoven, Poulenc and Kœchlin. Reception to follow. Admission by donation. FEB 18 – COMMUNITY POTLUCK SUPPER – Queensborough Community Centre, 1853 Queensborough Rd. Eat at 5pm, Joan Sims 613-473-1087. FEB 18 – AN ORGAN RECITAL Artist-in-residence at St. John the Divine Cathedral in New York City and international concert organist David Briggs will give a recital at St. Thomas’ Anglican Church, 201 Church Street, Belleville at 4:30pm. Briggs will perform organ works by J.S. Bach. Part of his programme will be dedicated to improvisation. Reception to follow. Admission by donation. FEB 19 – WINTER CHILL FESTIVAL Bring your skates and snowsuits for a day of family fun!! Contact Community and Corporate Services department, 613-354-3351.

ARE YOU NEW TO THE NEIGHBOURHOOD? health & pharmacy beauty food & home optimum post office

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Owner/Pharmacist: Helen Phan 118 Hastings St North Bancroft K0L 1C0 613.332.4846 (corner of Hastings & Station)

www.shoppersdrugmart.ca

20 I

Country Roads • Winter 2017/18

Visits are free. No obligation. Compliments of local businesses. Sharon: (613) 475-5994 sharon.welcome2014@gmail.com

1-844-299-2466 www.welcomewagon.ca


C O U N T R Y

C A L E N D A R

Things to see and do in and around Hastings County.

To submit your event listing email info@countryroadshastings.ca or call us at 613 968-0499. MAR - APR – TREATS ON THE BLACK RIVER - High water on the Black River signals the beginning of Whitewater Kayaking and great treats for sale at the river’s edge in Queensborough each weekend. Lud & Elaine Kapusta 613-473-1458.

homemade pies. Come learn from our senior pie-makers as they hold a demonstration class. This community event is open to men and women, young and old. Start time 1pm. For info Elaine Kapusta 613-4731458, or FB page: Queensborough Community Centre.

MAR 2 - 4 - BELLEVILLE DOWNTOWN DOCFEST – 3 days of outstanding documentary films celebrating life and human dignity around the world and right here at home. www.downtowndocfest.ca.

MAR 18 – A CELLO DUO CONCERT - VC² (Bryan Holt & Amahl Arulanandam) is an eclectic cello duo based in Toronto. A concert at St. Thomas’ Anglican Church, 201 Church Street, Belleville at 4:30pm centred on pieces written by cellists, for cellists. Reception to follow. Admission by donation.

MAR 3 – MASTER PIE-MAKING CLASS - Queensborough has a reputation for serving great

Early 1300’s Through the Eyes of Four Brothers: Mahingan, Kag, Wagosh and Mitigomij

CLUBS, LECTURES, MEETINGS HASTINGS COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 100 College St W, Belleville, Lectures 7:30pm. Ample parking and level access at rear of the building. Enjoy refreshments, displays & conversation following presentations www.hastingshistory.ca. JAN 16 - AUTHOR, RICK REVELLE  speaks on Eastern Canada in the

FEB 21 – SOCIETY DIRECTOR, TREVOR PARSONS speaks on the Aftermath of the 1837-38 Rebellion and the Impact on International Relations.  MAR 20 – BELLEVILLE CITY MANAGER, PERRY DECOLA speaks on A Brief History of Water, and the Drinking Water System in Belleville.

AUTOMOTIVE

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES • Gas Bar • Convenience Store • Laundromat • Movie Rentals • Propane

LB PERSONAL SERVICES Lawrence A. Bennett CLU CHS Estate & Financial Planner TAX CONSULTANT

Min & Julie Yoo Tel: 613-395-5360 Fax: 613-395-1491 208 North Street, Stirling ON K0K 3E0

FEB 26 – OF ROADS AND WILDLIFE - From his research on the 1000 Islands Parkway, Queen’s professor, Dr. Ryan Danby, will document the toll roads take on biodiversity and explain how we can minimize their ecological impacts.

QUINTE FIELD NATURALISTS ASSOCIATION - Meetings 7pm, Sills Auditorium, Bridge Street United Church, Belleville. All welcome, by donation.

marketplace

Celebrating Life in Hastings County

JAN 22 – THE FALL AND RISE OF THE BALD EAGLE - Renowned local naturalist Terry Sprague will tell of the disappearance and return of this majestic bird as a nesting species in Price Edward County.

613-743-3116 LBPersonalServices@gmail.com 1349 Rapids Road, Tweed, ON K0K3J0 LBPersonalServices.com

TO BOOK YOUR MARKETPLACE ADVERTISEMENT PLEASE CALL 613-968-0499

SPECIALTY SHOPPING

Kelly’s Flowers & Gifts Wedding Consultations, Wedding Rentals, Bridal & Attendant Bouquets Sympathy, Tribute & All Occasion Designs

Kelly DeClair 43 Durham Street S., Madoc, ON Tel: 613-473-1891 ~ Fax: 613-473-2712 kellysflowersandgifts@gmail.com • www.kellysflowers.net

HEALTH

Dawn Ebelt, R.M.T.

Registered Massage Therapist Providing effective treatments since 2003

@PhysioNorth

237 Hastings St. N Bancroft

Celebrating Family, Friendship & Love

613-395-2596

www.stirlingmanor.com

call 613-332-1010 cell 613-318-8227 debelt@sympatico.ca

218 Edward Street, Stirling

THEATRE

LAWN & GARDEN SALES & SERVICE

GRAVELY-ARIENS TROY-BILT-BOLENS

• Lawn & Garden Tractors • Roto-Tillers With 35+ years experience, Small but knowledgeable. (613) 473-5160 • R.R. #5, Madoc, ON K0K 2K0

wills / estate planning / business / real estate

Melanie Williams

BARRISTER & SOLICITOR • NOTARY PUBLIC

PH: 905.419.0489 • FX: 905.419.1698 TOLL FREE: 1.844.381.0489 MELANIE@LAWINMOTION.CA • WWW.LAWINMOTION.CA

(1 mile N. of Ivanhoe on Hwy. 62 - #11700)

Winter 2017/18 • Country Roads

I 21


Back Roads

Winter Fun!

The attached image is from the family photograph collection of Ruth Woodhouse (nee Muir - 1926-1997). The small child shovelling snow may be Ruth Muir, which would date the photograph to 1929 or 1930. The Muir family lived in Everett Street, Belleville. Photo reference: CABHC 2017-87/02. Photo courtesy of Community Archives of Belleville & Hastings County

22 I

Country Roads • Winter 2017/18


N

DISC

CE I

OV

THE DIFFER EN

ER

DOWNTOWN MAYNOOTH O u r S h o p s & S e r v i c e s We l c o m e Yo u

Linda Lang’s Brush With the North FEATURING LOCAL & CANADIAN ARTISANS

• Home Decor • Gallery • Gifts • Art Supplies

Steps from Heritage Trail.

Upcycled Vintage Furniture

Hot gourmet breakfast. Second floor exclusively for guests with full kitchen and dining area. Pillow-top mattresses, satellite TV, & WIFI. Open year round.

32 Maynooth Station Rd, Maynooth, ON K0L 2S0 613.338.3331 or 416.949.4550 lija1@sympatico.ca • www.trailsedgebb.com

Like us on FACEBOOK

Century Old General Store on the corner of Hwy 62 & 127 in Maynooth

33002 Hwy 62 Maynooth (613) 338-2984 www.BrushWithTheNorth.com

MADAWASKA ART SHOP GIFTS & GALLERY EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED! 33057 Highway 62, Maynooth, ON Phone: 613-412-9700 Email: christinehass44@gmail.com

Call for our winter hours www.madawaska-art-shop.com • 613.338.2555

OPENING FEBRUARY 1, 2018

MAYNOOTH Boutique & Botanicals 32965 Hwy 62 North, Maynooth 613.338.0008

Winter Market EMOND HALL IN THE MUNICIPAL BUILDING

2nd Saturday of the month January to April • 10am - 4pm Winter 2017/18 • Country Roads

I 23


COUNTRY ROADS, Celebrating Life in Hastings County WINTER 2017/18  

COUNTRY ROADS, Celebrating Life in Hastings County A seasonal, lifestyle magazine celebrating life in Hastings County, eastern Ontario, Cana...

COUNTRY ROADS, Celebrating Life in Hastings County WINTER 2017/18  

COUNTRY ROADS, Celebrating Life in Hastings County A seasonal, lifestyle magazine celebrating life in Hastings County, eastern Ontario, Cana...

Advertisement