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MOSAIC ART NOW Exhibition in Print 2010


Exhibition in Print

Curator’s Statement

G

iven that the history of mosaic art began more than 4,000 years ago and many works of mosaic art stand as some of the most enduring icons of art history, it is surprising just how many people today continue to think of mosaic making as the work of craftspeople rather than artists. Yet one only has to look to the beauty of the Greek wall decorations at Pompeii, Roman floor mosaics, the shimmering splendor of Byzantine interiors, and the organic undulations of Antoni Gaudí’s Art Nouveau creations at Park Güell to be certain that mosaics can, and do, aspire to the highest echelons of human expression. The lingering assumption that mosaics are craft stems in part from the fact that much mosaic art is not only visual, but utilitarian, and meant to bedeck floors, walls, ceilings, and the exterior of buildings. Yet painted murals perform many of these same functions, and few would argue that paintings, by virtue of their being incorporated into architecture, are not art. Others have belittled the mosaic medium by saying that the technique is simply too accessible, believing it to be an activity that anyone can participate in. To be sure, most of us made mosaics as children, often using dried beans, cut paper, and other objects found around the house. Yet few of us have gone beyond these humble beginnings. Of the practitioners that have, even fewer have taken their craft to the level of art. All of the pieces included here were made by artists—ones who have added to the mosaic tradition and pushed its boundaries, each time making abundantly evident that the art form is alive and well. To create art, conception and execution are equally required. In other words, some artists have ideas; others have technique. Those that bring both to the fore and can do it consistently are the artists. The medium itself matters little. It is the mastery of that medium, regardless of genre or utility, that his important. This technical mastery is a necessity. Without it, the end result is compromised—no matter how good the idea. As in the case of other traditional “craft” media such as glass, clay, and wood, mosaic artists have in recent decades begun to re-emerge in force internationally, which the beautiful diversity of production included here makes evident. As juror, it was my intent to try to show the breadth of global talent that submitted to this competition

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010

and, fortunately, excellent work was submitted in all techniques and styles. The artworks I chose to include exemplify a broad range of trends. Landscapes, figures, and pure abstractions were all worthy of inclusion. Flat works and objects in three-dimensions were both skillfully executed. Perhaps ironically—for a medium known for its functionality—very few of the mosaics submitted were meant to be used. One of these was selected, Don’t Cut Your Tounge on the Rhinestones, a vintage cash drawer ornamented with myriad tiles and found objects. A jewelry box extraordinaire, its usability nevertheless plays a minor role; this object is truly purposed to make viewers smile. Other artists found humor and whimsy in their medium and attained it by appropriating the past. These artists did not simply copy their sources, however, but used them as points of departure to make social comment and invoke nostalgia and a sense of innocence lost. The glitzy Miss Willendorf uses mosaic to fashion an updated, and far more secular, version of an ancient fertility idol, a comment on the consumerism and superficiality of contemporary society. Spaghetti Western appropriates kitsch by adapting and then embellishing a 1950s paint-by-number cowboy and bucking bronco. Surrounding this central image with ashtrays, belt buckles, toy guns, and spurs, the artist has created a pop icon that simultaneously oozes nostalgia and critiques consumer culture. White Rabbit also looks nostalgically at the past, but with a less cynical edge. With painstaking and gorgeous attention to detail, the artist turns to childhood literature to remind us of the frenzied pace of our own lives through that of the late-running hare. All of the artists whose work is depicted were true to their medium and exploited its unique expressive potential, and all of them brought depth and diversity to their pieces by using tesserae in a range of materials, shapes, and sizes. The work titled Ramblings focuses on the rich beauty of the artist’s materials, combining an infinitude of glass, semi-precious stones, millefiori, and smalti to create a lush abstraction that seems to have evolved organically and yet results in a remarkably cohesive whole. Others took advantage of their medium’s ability to assume three dimensions by richly layering forms, as in the case of Bull’s Eye and also Notturno, both of which breach the picture plane into luscious sweeping forms and patterns. Keep Me Warm uses this same approach but with a more homespun

result. Rippling mosaic squares become the drapery folds of a quilt that figuratively offers a traditional sense of family and community. In Primavera, flowers and leaves grow organically beyond the picture plane to culminate in a sculptural, blue-eye-shadowed Mother Nature and bird. Other artists omitted backgrounds altogether, creating sculpture in the round. Late Bloomer, Geology, and Meredith each look to nature for inspiration, finding harmony and universality in its microcosm. Late Bloomer is cocoon-like, incorporating silk fibers into the “skin” of a pod that also includes shells, turquoise, and gemstones. Geology delves beyond the earth’s strata to allow us to peer into hidden realms. Meredith evokes the bark of an ancient tree, the gorgeousness of the glass tiles both revealed and obscured by the mortar, which plays an integral in this complex, and yet very subtle, piece. Other artists approached their mosaic layers not as sculptors, but almost as painters. Carterton Lily Pond and Familiar Ground offer new takes on old subjects, yet are distinguished by the freshness of their approach. Familiar Ground takes landscape representation into conceptual realms through its incorporation of materials gathered from the Wisconsin site that is depicted. A more abstract approach to nature is evident in Sidonea Menageria, a tree of life that boasts watch-bellied birds perching on its gnarled branches. February Morning, Paris also features trees, but these are hauntingly barren, contributing to the paramount sense of loneliness of a nearly deserted Parisian street. Quite apart from the tranquility and quietude of these images, No! and Maria provide two very different, although equally disturbing, takes on contemporary life, each with elements of humor. While No! suggests through the actions of a child a universal human frustration at our lack of control over politics, the system, and our destiny, Maria evokes through a robotic goddess the future itself, one in which we have lost our humanity to technology and the machine. As these pieces make evident, mosaics are as diverse an art form as any other and at once contribute to and participate in international aesthetic trends. It is my hope that the pieces selected here prove as inspirational and eye-opening to the readers of this magazine as they were to me. Distinguished by a synthesis of original approach, technical realization, and formal achievement reflecting the personal creative vision of the artist, each piece, in its unique way, brings new vitality and contemporary perspectives to this ancient and enduring medium. Scott A. Shields, Ph.D. Associate Director and Chief Curator Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento

About the Exhibition in Print

W

hen we thought last year about possible enhancements to the Mosaic Gallery feature of Mosaic Art NOW, we knew we wanted to do something bigger, better, bolder. We wanted to do everything we could to present mosaics as fine art. We looked to our own jaw-dropping, never forgotten experiences at art exhibits for inspiration. What had made those particular museum/gallery visits so special? Our list started with the phrase great art and quickly progressed to selective, a cohesive body of work, curator commentary, interesting artist statements, the ability to linger over a piece and return for closer investigation, something is learned, and finally, the ability to purchase. So, we set out to do all those things – in print. Here is how things transpired: Step One: Attract submissions from mosaic artists. A prize for Best in Show was determined. We created an on-line submittal process. The opportunity to submit work was announced in mosaic circles around the world. Press releases and fliers went to museums and schools. And we crossed our fingers. By deadline, 301 artists from 26 countries had submitted 528 mosaics for consideration. Step Two: Secure the services of an art professional with high-quality credentials in judging and curating. We approached Dr. Shields, Chief Curator of the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento, California. The exhibition was explained. Dr. Shields found the opportunity intriguing. A professional fee for his service was agreed upon. We had our curator. Step Three: Execute a fair jurying process. The jurying process was designed to meet the standards of Dr. Shields and the expectations of submitting artists. Each work was assigned a random number for blind identification purposes. Dr. Shields used three different media in his multiple reviews of each mosaic: prints, digital images, and large-screen projections. When he had narrowed his candidates down to a manageable number, Dr. Shields used a table and the prints to create an “exhibition” that was both cohesive and representative of the various genres within the art form. He then selected the Best in Show mosaic. Step Four: “Hang” the exhibit. As you will see on the following pages, we created two-page layouts for each work with multiple, high-resolution photographs. Artists were offered editorial assistance with their statements and photographs. Finally, we put together the Artist Information/Price Sheet you see at the end of the exhibit. We will be replicating the sheet online. Our hope is that soon there will be “red dots” next to all available mosaics. We hope you enjoy the Exhibition in Print half as much we enjoyed putting it together. In the process, we discovered several marvelous new artists, had some interesting conversations about the nature of mosaics, and were able to go behind the scenes in a jurying process conducted by a professional. And to all the artists who submitted works, grazie mille.

Mosaic Art Now No. 3 2010

61


Exhibition in Print

Curator’s Statement

G

iven that the history of mosaic art began more than 4,000 years ago and many works of mosaic art stand as some of the most enduring icons of art history, it is surprising just how many people today continue to think of mosaic making as the work of craftspeople rather than artists. Yet one only has to look to the beauty of the Greek wall decorations at Pompeii, Roman floor mosaics, the shimmering splendor of Byzantine interiors, and the organic undulations of Antoni Gaudí’s Art Nouveau creations at Park Güell to be certain that mosaics can, and do, aspire to the highest echelons of human expression. The lingering assumption that mosaics are craft stems in part from the fact that much mosaic art is not only visual, but utilitarian, and meant to bedeck floors, walls, ceilings, and the exterior of buildings. Yet painted murals perform many of these same functions, and few would argue that paintings, by virtue of their being incorporated into architecture, are not art. Others have belittled the mosaic medium by saying that the technique is simply too accessible, believing it to be an activity that anyone can participate in. To be sure, most of us made mosaics as children, often using dried beans, cut paper, and other objects found around the house. Yet few of us have gone beyond these humble beginnings. Of the practitioners that have, even fewer have taken their craft to the level of art. All of the pieces included here were made by artists—ones who have added to the mosaic tradition and pushed its boundaries, each time making abundantly evident that the art form is alive and well. To create art, conception and execution are equally required. In other words, some artists have ideas; others have technique. Those that bring both to the fore and can do it consistently are the artists. The medium itself matters little. It is the mastery of that medium, regardless of genre or utility, that his important. This technical mastery is a necessity. Without it, the end result is compromised—no matter how good the idea. As in the case of other traditional “craft” media such as glass, clay, and wood, mosaic artists have in recent decades begun to re-emerge in force internationally, which the beautiful diversity of production included here makes evident. As juror, it was my intent to try to show the breadth of global talent that submitted to this competition

60

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010

and, fortunately, excellent work was submitted in all techniques and styles. The artworks I chose to include exemplify a broad range of trends. Landscapes, figures, and pure abstractions were all worthy of inclusion. Flat works and objects in three-dimensions were both skillfully executed. Perhaps ironically—for a medium known for its functionality—very few of the mosaics submitted were meant to be used. One of these was selected, Don’t Cut Your Tounge on the Rhinestones, a vintage cash drawer ornamented with myriad tiles and found objects. A jewelry box extraordinaire, its usability nevertheless plays a minor role; this object is truly purposed to make viewers smile. Other artists found humor and whimsy in their medium and attained it by appropriating the past. These artists did not simply copy their sources, however, but used them as points of departure to make social comment and invoke nostalgia and a sense of innocence lost. The glitzy Miss Willendorf uses mosaic to fashion an updated, and far more secular, version of an ancient fertility idol, a comment on the consumerism and superficiality of contemporary society. Spaghetti Western appropriates kitsch by adapting and then embellishing a 1950s paint-by-number cowboy and bucking bronco. Surrounding this central image with ashtrays, belt buckles, toy guns, and spurs, the artist has created a pop icon that simultaneously oozes nostalgia and critiques consumer culture. White Rabbit also looks nostalgically at the past, but with a less cynical edge. With painstaking and gorgeous attention to detail, the artist turns to childhood literature to remind us of the frenzied pace of our own lives through that of the late-running hare. All of the artists whose work is depicted were true to their medium and exploited its unique expressive potential, and all of them brought depth and diversity to their pieces by using tesserae in a range of materials, shapes, and sizes. The work titled Ramblings focuses on the rich beauty of the artist’s materials, combining an infinitude of glass, semi-precious stones, millefiori, and smalti to create a lush abstraction that seems to have evolved organically and yet results in a remarkably cohesive whole. Others took advantage of their medium’s ability to assume three dimensions by richly layering forms, as in the case of Bull’s Eye and also Notturno, both of which breach the picture plane into luscious sweeping forms and patterns. Keep Me Warm uses this same approach but with a more homespun

result. Rippling mosaic squares become the drapery folds of a quilt that figuratively offers a traditional sense of family and community. In Primavera, flowers and leaves grow organically beyond the picture plane to culminate in a sculptural, blue-eye-shadowed Mother Nature and bird. Other artists omitted backgrounds altogether, creating sculpture in the round. Late Bloomer, Geology, and Meredith each look to nature for inspiration, finding harmony and universality in its microcosm. Late Bloomer is cocoon-like, incorporating silk fibers into the “skin” of a pod that also includes shells, turquoise, and gemstones. Geology delves beyond the earth’s strata to allow us to peer into hidden realms. Meredith evokes the bark of an ancient tree, the gorgeousness of the glass tiles both revealed and obscured by the mortar, which plays an integral in this complex, and yet very subtle, piece. Other artists approached their mosaic layers not as sculptors, but almost as painters. Carterton Lily Pond and Familiar Ground offer new takes on old subjects, yet are distinguished by the freshness of their approach. Familiar Ground takes landscape representation into conceptual realms through its incorporation of materials gathered from the Wisconsin site that is depicted. A more abstract approach to nature is evident in Sidonea Menageria, a tree of life that boasts watch-bellied birds perching on its gnarled branches. February Morning, Paris also features trees, but these are hauntingly barren, contributing to the paramount sense of loneliness of a nearly deserted Parisian street. Quite apart from the tranquility and quietude of these images, No! and Maria provide two very different, although equally disturbing, takes on contemporary life, each with elements of humor. While No! suggests through the actions of a child a universal human frustration at our lack of control over politics, the system, and our destiny, Maria evokes through a robotic goddess the future itself, one in which we have lost our humanity to technology and the machine. As these pieces make evident, mosaics are as diverse an art form as any other and at once contribute to and participate in international aesthetic trends. It is my hope that the pieces selected here prove as inspirational and eye-opening to the readers of this magazine as they were to me. Distinguished by a synthesis of original approach, technical realization, and formal achievement reflecting the personal creative vision of the artist, each piece, in its unique way, brings new vitality and contemporary perspectives to this ancient and enduring medium. Scott A. Shields, Ph.D. Associate Director and Chief Curator Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento

About the Exhibition in Print

W

hen we thought last year about possible enhancements to the Mosaic Gallery feature of Mosaic Art NOW, we knew we wanted to do something bigger, better, bolder. We wanted to do everything we could to present mosaics as fine art. We looked to our own jaw-dropping, never forgotten experiences at art exhibits for inspiration. What had made those particular museum/gallery visits so special? Our list started with the phrase great art and quickly progressed to selective, a cohesive body of work, curator commentary, interesting artist statements, the ability to linger over a piece and return for closer investigation, something is learned, and finally, the ability to purchase. So, we set out to do all those things – in print. Here is how things transpired: Step One: Attract submissions from mosaic artists. A prize for Best in Show was determined. We created an on-line submittal process. The opportunity to submit work was announced in mosaic circles around the world. Press releases and fliers went to museums and schools. And we crossed our fingers. By deadline, 301 artists from 26 countries had submitted 528 mosaics for consideration. Step Two: Secure the services of an art professional with high-quality credentials in judging and curating. We approached Dr. Shields, Chief Curator of the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento, California. The exhibition was explained. Dr. Shields found the opportunity intriguing. A professional fee for his service was agreed upon. We had our curator. Step Three: Execute a fair jurying process. The jurying process was designed to meet the standards of Dr. Shields and the expectations of submitting artists. Each work was assigned a random number for blind identification purposes. Dr. Shields used three different media in his multiple reviews of each mosaic: prints, digital images, and large-screen projections. When he had narrowed his candidates down to a manageable number, Dr. Shields used a table and the prints to create an “exhibition” that was both cohesive and representative of the various genres within the art form. He then selected the Best in Show mosaic. Step Four: “Hang” the exhibit. As you will see on the following pages, we created two-page layouts for each work with multiple, high-resolution photographs. Artists were offered editorial assistance with their statements and photographs. Finally, we put together the Artist Information/Price Sheet you see at the end of the exhibit. We will be replicating the sheet online. Our hope is that soon there will be “red dots” next to all available mosaics. We hope you enjoy the Exhibition in Print half as much we enjoyed putting it together. In the process, we discovered several marvelous new artists, had some interesting conversations about the nature of mosaics, and were able to go behind the scenes in a jurying process conducted by a professional. And to all the artists who submitted works, grazie mille.

Mosaic Art Now No. 3 2010

61


Exhibition in Print

Best in Show Ellen Blakeley (USA)

Meredith 23 h x 7 w inches. Tempered glass, bark. There is a gigantic California Live Oak tree in the vineyard near my studio that is shedding its bark, its skin. As an artist, I can’t compete with nature — merely pay my respects intuitively. The shape is gently curved. The outline is organic, random and totally non-human — delightful boundaries to work into. Photographer: Douglas Sandberg

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Best in Show Ellen Blakeley (USA)

Meredith 23 h x 7 w inches. Tempered glass, bark. There is a gigantic California Live Oak tree in the vineyard near my studio that is shedding its bark, its skin. As an artist, I can’t compete with nature — merely pay my respects intuitively. The shape is gently curved. The outline is organic, random and totally non-human — delightful boundaries to work into. Photographer: Douglas Sandberg

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Doreen Adams (USA)

White Rabbit 36 h x 20 w inches. Venetian and Mexican smalti. “One tesserae at a time, painstaking, laborious, such is the truth of mosaic art. Opus veritas.” -- Massimiliano Salviati “Oh Dear! Oh Dear! I shall be late!” — The White Rabbit This is one of a series of mosaics I have made investigating the themes of Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.” I chose to render The White Rabbit larger than life to accentuate his urgency as he rushed through the scene checking his watch. Depicting the lushness and tranquility of an English meadow in the corresponding close detail, however, required the kind of commitment that makes a mosaic a labor of love. Every piece of glass was thoughtfully and carefully chosen to infuse as much movement, emotion, realism and humor into the scene as possible.

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Doreen Adams (USA)

White Rabbit 36 h x 20 w inches. Venetian and Mexican smalti. “One tesserae at a time, painstaking, laborious, such is the truth of mosaic art. Opus veritas.” -- Massimiliano Salviati “Oh Dear! Oh Dear! I shall be late!” — The White Rabbit This is one of a series of mosaics I have made investigating the themes of Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.” I chose to render The White Rabbit larger than life to accentuate his urgency as he rushed through the scene checking his watch. Depicting the lushness and tranquility of an English meadow in the corresponding close detail, however, required the kind of commitment that makes a mosaic a labor of love. Every piece of glass was thoughtfully and carefully chosen to infuse as much movement, emotion, realism and humor into the scene as possible.

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Jolino Beserra (USA)

Don’t Cut Your Tongue on the Rhinestones

20 w x 20 d x 28 h inches. Vintage cash-drawer, carved packing foam for the heart, and cast iron feet from a small room heater. The surfaces are covered in ceramic tile, glass tiles, smalti bits, blue mirror, dish ware, bowls, mugs, mirrored bottle bottoms, figurines, miniature soda bottle, salt and pepper shakers, brooches, stick pins, medals, marbles, GM keys, tongue milagros, rhinestones and a perfume bottle. The removable stopper has red glass beads attached. This mosaic is my statement about Temptation and the allure of all things shiny. My concept was to start with the “flaming heart” icon and create a functional piece of art around it. A small metal box in the back of the piece holds a button that opens the money draw with a BING. When you remove the glass “flame” at the top, you will find a rosary attached with a silver tongue milagro at the end of which sits a large rhinestone. Photographer: Don Saban Photography

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Jolino Beserra (USA)

Don’t Cut Your Tongue on the Rhinestones

20 w x 20 d x 28 h inches. Vintage cash-drawer, carved packing foam for the heart, and cast iron feet from a small room heater. The surfaces are covered in ceramic tile, glass tiles, smalti bits, blue mirror, dish ware, bowls, mugs, mirrored bottle bottoms, figurines, miniature soda bottle, salt and pepper shakers, brooches, stick pins, medals, marbles, GM keys, tongue milagros, rhinestones and a perfume bottle. The removable stopper has red glass beads attached. This mosaic is my statement about Temptation and the allure of all things shiny. My concept was to start with the “flaming heart” icon and create a functional piece of art around it. A small metal box in the back of the piece holds a button that opens the money draw with a BING. When you remove the glass “flame” at the top, you will find a rosary attached with a silver tongue milagro at the end of which sits a large rhinestone. Photographer: Don Saban Photography

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Irina Charny (USA)

Primavera 45 h x 14 w x 3 d inches. Smalti, gold, vitreous glass, millefiori, pebbles. Making mosaics gives me the chance to explore color, shape and texture while creating images that are both narrative and decorative. I am Russian by birth and the fantastical fairy tales and rich textures of my childhood seem to permeate my artwork often without my awareness of their influence. Primavera is Spring emerging in all her lushness and promise of new beginnings. Photographer credit: Ben Charny

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Irina Charny (USA)

Primavera 45 h x 14 w x 3 d inches. Smalti, gold, vitreous glass, millefiori, pebbles. Making mosaics gives me the chance to explore color, shape and texture while creating images that are both narrative and decorative. I am Russian by birth and the fantastical fairy tales and rich textures of my childhood seem to permeate my artwork often without my awareness of their influence. Primavera is Spring emerging in all her lushness and promise of new beginnings. Photographer credit: Ben Charny

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Maylee Christie (United Kingdom)

Ramblings 70 h x 60 w centimeters. Smalti, stained glass, semi precious stones, gold, mirror, millefiori. This mosaic grew slowly and intuitively over a period of several months. Usually, I concentrate on making patterns in my work because they have a very soothing effect on me. With this piece, I just let my mind create freely in a sort of fluid way. The result was some new, unexpected shapes that presented themselves almost magically — making an endless feast for my eyes and mind.

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Maylee Christie (United Kingdom)

Ramblings 70 h x 60 w centimeters. Smalti, stained glass, semi precious stones, gold, mirror, millefiori. This mosaic grew slowly and intuitively over a period of several months. Usually, I concentrate on making patterns in my work because they have a very soothing effect on me. With this piece, I just let my mind create freely in a sort of fluid way. The result was some new, unexpected shapes that presented themselves almost magically — making an endless feast for my eyes and mind.

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Candace Clough (USA)

Sidonea Menageria

24 h x 36 w inches. Stained glass, plate shards, vitreous, jewelry, watches, unglazed porcelian, polymer clay, keys, polished tigereye and agate, glass globs and shapes. My challenge in making this piece was to create something that would captivate and hold the imagination of a child with no mobility. How long can a person savor a beloved piece of art before it becomes just another known thing? Seeing the same thing day in and day out, our mind often begins takes beauty and detail for granted. How then to create a myriad of facets — texture, color, reflection — that would capture the long term interest of the consummate viewer — a child unfettered by distractions? Whose only play is study and imagination? My answer was this mythical tree, Sidonea menageria. Photographer: Gregory R. Staley Photography

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Candace Clough (USA)

Sidonea Menageria

24 h x 36 w inches. Stained glass, plate shards, vitreous, jewelry, watches, unglazed porcelian, polymer clay, keys, polished tigereye and agate, glass globs and shapes. My challenge in making this piece was to create something that would captivate and hold the imagination of a child with no mobility. How long can a person savor a beloved piece of art before it becomes just another known thing? Seeing the same thing day in and day out, our mind often begins takes beauty and detail for granted. How then to create a myriad of facets — texture, color, reflection — that would capture the long term interest of the consummate viewer — a child unfettered by distractions? Whose only play is study and imagination? My answer was this mythical tree, Sidonea menageria. Photographer: Gregory R. Staley Photography

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Piotr Czapracki (Poland)

No! 100 h x 90 w centimeters. Hand-made ceramic, glass. The mosaic “No!” is a visual exploration of the idea of man’s loneliness — the helplessness and frustration he feels — his resulting aggression against the world; politics, big corporations and the system.

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Piotr Czapracki (Poland)

No! 100 h x 90 w centimeters. Hand-made ceramic, glass. The mosaic “No!” is a visual exploration of the idea of man’s loneliness — the helplessness and frustration he feels — his resulting aggression against the world; politics, big corporations and the system.

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Julie Dilling (USA)

Keep Me Warm 22 h x 17.5 w x 2.5 inches. Smalti, stained glass, glass beads, millefiori. I was looking at family quilts recently and decided to make my own version. It may not warm the bones, but I hope it warms the heart.

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Julie Dilling (USA)

Keep Me Warm 22 h x 17.5 w x 2.5 inches. Smalti, stained glass, glass beads, millefiori. I was looking at family quilts recently and decided to make my own version. It may not warm the bones, but I hope it warms the heart.

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Karen Kettering Dimit (USA)

Miss Willendorf 2008 36 h x 22 w x 22 d inches. Gold smalti, smalti, stone, rhinestones, sodalite, bahia blue, kyanite, hardware, mirror, metal, resin. “Miss Willendorf 2008” is part of my “The Subway Goddess Pageant” series in which I juxtapose powerful, ancient goddesses carved in stone with contemporary goddesses, one might run into on the subway, created in mosaic. These works are light-hearted in imagery, but they are also tinged with a sense of something lost. The supreme selfconfidence of those robust goddesses seems to have given way to something far less sure and sadly superficial.

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Karen Kettering Dimit (USA)

Miss Willendorf 2008 36 h x 22 w x 22 d inches. Gold smalti, smalti, stone, rhinestones, sodalite, bahia blue, kyanite, hardware, mirror, metal, resin. “Miss Willendorf 2008” is part of my “The Subway Goddess Pageant” series in which I juxtapose powerful, ancient goddesses carved in stone with contemporary goddesses, one might run into on the subway, created in mosaic. These works are light-hearted in imagery, but they are also tinged with a sense of something lost. The supreme selfconfidence of those robust goddesses seems to have given way to something far less sure and sadly superficial.

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Gary Drostle (United Kingdom)

Carterton Lily Pond

2 h x 2 w meters. Unglazed vitreous ceramic (porcelain) and vitreous glass. In this work, I wanted to show that particular state of water where it creates a net-like pattern across the surface. This net is rendered in glass so that it reflects the light brilliantly as opposed to the matte, ceramic tiles used in the rest of the work. Some elements lying below the surface have their images broken by the water, whilst others interrupt the water’s flow, creating ripples and eddies on the surface. The shadows remind us that the surface itself is just a transition to the depths. The mosaic was commissioned by the town of Carterton near Oxford in southern England. The mosaic was intended to provide a relaxing focal point for their town square’s pavement.

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Gary Drostle (United Kingdom)

Carterton Lily Pond

2 h x 2 w meters. Unglazed vitreous ceramic (porcelain) and vitreous glass. In this work, I wanted to show that particular state of water where it creates a net-like pattern across the surface. This net is rendered in glass so that it reflects the light brilliantly as opposed to the matte, ceramic tiles used in the rest of the work. Some elements lying below the surface have their images broken by the water, whilst others interrupt the water’s flow, creating ripples and eddies on the surface. The shadows remind us that the surface itself is just a transition to the depths. The mosaic was commissioned by the town of Carterton near Oxford in southern England. The mosaic was intended to provide a relaxing focal point for their town square’s pavement.

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Sophie Drouin (Canada)

Bull’s Eye

28 h x 33 w 6 d inches. Marble, gold, onyx, travertine, scheelite, quartz, selenite, raku shards, copper foils and wire, glass, smalti, brick, Eco smalti, black and mahogany obsidian, terra cotta, dihroic glass, stained glass, mirror, opal, sandstone, slate, calcite. The form of this mosaic is an abstract organic one, depicting aspects of microscopic life, flowers, mother of pearl or even cosmic events like a nova and its lingering afterglow, the nebula. Paradoxically, the graceful aspect of a nebula belies the galactic violence inherent in its creation and our observation of its beauty is only possible from a great and safe distance. To simulate some of this explosive activity, spears of flying tesserae shear away from the surface of the mosaic which rises in petal-shaped crests around the central and concentric embers of the ‘‘eye’’ lying under a thin copper web.

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Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Sophie Drouin (Canada)

Bull’s Eye

28 h x 33 w 6 d inches. Marble, gold, onyx, travertine, scheelite, quartz, selenite, raku shards, copper foils and wire, glass, smalti, brick, Eco smalti, black and mahogany obsidian, terra cotta, dihroic glass, stained glass, mirror, opal, sandstone, slate, calcite. The form of this mosaic is an abstract organic one, depicting aspects of microscopic life, flowers, mother of pearl or even cosmic events like a nova and its lingering afterglow, the nebula. Paradoxically, the graceful aspect of a nebula belies the galactic violence inherent in its creation and our observation of its beauty is only possible from a great and safe distance. To simulate some of this explosive activity, spears of flying tesserae shear away from the surface of the mosaic which rises in petal-shaped crests around the central and concentric embers of the ‘‘eye’’ lying under a thin copper web.

82

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Pamela Goode (USA)

Late Bloomer 23 h x 36 w 8 d inches. Smalti, turquoise, minerals, gemstones, shell, metal, silk threads, glass on carved styrofoam base, carborundum on wire mesh branch, beaded insect leg. Late Bloomer illustrates my own slow emergence into self-expression. Partly inspired by Mesoamerican turquoise mosaics, I wanted to convey the opening of an ancient cocoon — mossy, barnacled, faded and filigreed with shiny, intricately beautiful insect paths — to reveal a fragile creature emerging far past the normal gestation period. I believe many can relate to this theme as we often wait until relatively late in life to give our creativity full rein. Photographer: Mark Fortenberry 84

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Pamela Goode (USA)

Late Bloomer 23 h x 36 w 8 d inches. Smalti, turquoise, minerals, gemstones, shell, metal, silk threads, glass on carved styrofoam base, carborundum on wire mesh branch, beaded insect leg. Late Bloomer illustrates my own slow emergence into self-expression. Partly inspired by Mesoamerican turquoise mosaics, I wanted to convey the opening of an ancient cocoon — mossy, barnacled, faded and filigreed with shiny, intricately beautiful insect paths — to reveal a fragile creature emerging far past the normal gestation period. I believe many can relate to this theme as we often wait until relatively late in life to give our creativity full rein. Photographer: Mark Fortenberry 84

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Jeannie Houston Antes (USA)

Spaghetti Western

42 h x 48 w inches. Italian and Mexican smalti built on tempered glass and lit from within. Western and Americana found objects in a handmade barnwood frame. This mosaic is my homage to the world’s fascination with the American West. The piece started with the cowboy and bucking horse image inspired by a 1950’s paint-by-numbers kit. In a nod to the Italo-Western films of the mid-sixties, I decided to use classic Italian glass smalti for that part of the mosaic and “Spaghetti Western” just took of from there. Spilling over onto the border or “frame” is a juxtaposition of iconic cowboy items from my obsessive thrifting; collection-trophy belt buckles, turquoise jewelry, ashtrays, toy guns and rusty spurs. The found objects stir up memories and associations in the viewer which inspires me to keep telling stories with my mixed media mosaic work. Photography: Louis Weiner. Detail: Andy Meadors

86

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Jeannie Houston Antes (USA)

Spaghetti Western

42 h x 48 w inches. Italian and Mexican smalti built on tempered glass and lit from within. Western and Americana found objects in a handmade barnwood frame. This mosaic is my homage to the world’s fascination with the American West. The piece started with the cowboy and bucking horse image inspired by a 1950’s paint-by-numbers kit. In a nod to the Italo-Western films of the mid-sixties, I decided to use classic Italian glass smalti for that part of the mosaic and “Spaghetti Western” just took of from there. Spilling over onto the border or “frame” is a juxtaposition of iconic cowboy items from my obsessive thrifting; collection-trophy belt buckles, turquoise jewelry, ashtrays, toy guns and rusty spurs. The found objects stir up memories and associations in the viewer which inspires me to keep telling stories with my mixed media mosaic work. Photography: Louis Weiner. Detail: Andy Meadors

86

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Gwyn Kaitis, Andryea Natkin, Laurie Peters (USA)

Familiar Ground

6 h x 12 w feet. Pebbles, driftwood, copper, jasper, agate, petrified wood, quartz, geodes, turquoise, chrysoprase, marble, chrysocolla, fossils, sheet glass, Italian and Mexican smalti. The triptych “Familiar Ground” was a commission for Johnson Financial Services of Racine, Wisconsin. It was designed to honor the Johnson family’s love of nature and the Wisconsin landscape that they treasure. The mosaic was inspired by a photograph of the Marengo River taken many years ago by the company’s founder, Sam Johnson. We were given access to the family’s private collection for much of the rock, fossil and mineral specimens used in the mosaic. Pebbles and driftwood were gathered from the Lake Michigan beach outside of the family home for inclusion as well. As artists, the three of us share an affinity for the natural world and being awarded this opportunity to work together to create such a personally meaningful work for the Johnson’s and their employees was an incredible honor for us. Photographer: Randall Bultman

88

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Gwyn Kaitis, Andryea Natkin, Laurie Peters (USA)

Familiar Ground

6 h x 12 w feet. Pebbles, driftwood, copper, jasper, agate, petrified wood, quartz, geodes, turquoise, chrysoprase, marble, chrysocolla, fossils, sheet glass, Italian and Mexican smalti. The triptych “Familiar Ground” was a commission for Johnson Financial Services of Racine, Wisconsin. It was designed to honor the Johnson family’s love of nature and the Wisconsin landscape that they treasure. The mosaic was inspired by a photograph of the Marengo River taken many years ago by the company’s founder, Sam Johnson. We were given access to the family’s private collection for much of the rock, fossil and mineral specimens used in the mosaic. Pebbles and driftwood were gathered from the Lake Michigan beach outside of the family home for inclusion as well. As artists, the three of us share an affinity for the natural world and being awarded this opportunity to work together to create such a personally meaningful work for the Johnson’s and their employees was an incredible honor for us. Photographer: Randall Bultman

88

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Nirit Keren (Israel)

Geology 36 h x 32 w 25 d centimeters. Yellow travertine, cement. My work is inspired by geological forms. This sculpture describes a cross section of the earth’s layers leading down into the core. Using one material in subtle ways allows me to recreate the minute changes in texture that indicate the differences between each layer. The overall shape of the work is an upward, thrusting motion — energy coming from the earth’s core up and out. This shape also feels decidedly spiritual to me for I see within it an abstract angel rising towards the heavens. Photographer: Elad H. Friedman 90

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Nirit Keren (Israel)

Geology 36 h x 32 w 25 d centimeters. Yellow travertine, cement. My work is inspired by geological forms. This sculpture describes a cross section of the earth’s layers leading down into the core. Using one material in subtle ways allows me to recreate the minute changes in texture that indicate the differences between each layer. The overall shape of the work is an upward, thrusting motion — energy coming from the earth’s core up and out. This shape also feels decidedly spiritual to me for I see within it an abstract angel rising towards the heavens. Photographer: Elad H. Friedman 90

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Kate Kerrigan (USA)

February Morning, Paris 32 h x 24 w inches. Italian stone, gold. Being both a photographer and mosaicist, I have recently begun to translate my photographic compositions into mosaic. It is exciting to see favorite photos of mine — like “February Morning, Paris” — come alive in a different medium. I am forced to focus on details and subtleties, sometimes painstakingly so. Because of this, my work is much more meaningful to me. I feel as though I have finally found my voice in the mosaic world. For that, I am grateful. Photographer: Sibila Savage 92

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Kate Kerrigan (USA)

February Morning, Paris 32 h x 24 w inches. Italian stone, gold. Being both a photographer and mosaicist, I have recently begun to translate my photographic compositions into mosaic. It is exciting to see favorite photos of mine — like “February Morning, Paris” — come alive in a different medium. I am forced to focus on details and subtleties, sometimes painstakingly so. Because of this, my work is much more meaningful to me. I feel as though I have finally found my voice in the mosaic world. For that, I am grateful. Photographer: Sibila Savage 92

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Julie Lucus (USA)

Maria 23 h x 7 w inches. Glass mirror, hundreds of metal parts ranging from a kazoo to a martini shaker, two full sets of antique typewriter keys, screws, plastic, and wire. Although originally inspired by Fritz Lang’s 1926 film, “Metropolis”, Maria’s concept drastically evolved over the 14 months it took me to complete her. Maria has come to represent many things to me which parallel my own life: strength, tenacity and fearlessness. Maria is a survivor, a warrior, a woman. And, while her exterior is tough and intimidating, I still find her surprisingly feminine.

94

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Julie Lucus (USA)

Maria 23 h x 7 w inches. Glass mirror, hundreds of metal parts ranging from a kazoo to a martini shaker, two full sets of antique typewriter keys, screws, plastic, and wire. Although originally inspired by Fritz Lang’s 1926 film, “Metropolis”, Maria’s concept drastically evolved over the 14 months it took me to complete her. Maria has come to represent many things to me which parallel my own life: strength, tenacity and fearlessness. Maria is a survivor, a warrior, a woman. And, while her exterior is tough and intimidating, I still find her surprisingly feminine.

94

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Giulio Menossi (Italy)

Notturno (Nightly) 80 h x 120 w x 10 d centimeters. Smalti, golds, pearls, marble. “Notturno,” (Of the Night) is the representation of the moon behind the clouds. The work is an example of my “Dynamic Mosaic” — sculpture that plays fullness against emptiness, lines that intertwine and wrinkle into each other, plasticity imbued with intrinsic meaning.

96

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Giulio Menossi (Italy)

Notturno (Nightly) 80 h x 120 w x 10 d centimeters. Smalti, golds, pearls, marble. “Notturno,” (Of the Night) is the representation of the moon behind the clouds. The work is an example of my “Dynamic Mosaic” — sculpture that plays fullness against emptiness, lines that intertwine and wrinkle into each other, plasticity imbued with intrinsic meaning.

96

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Exhibitor Information

98

Doreen Adams

Web: www.creativeartmosaics.com Email: doreen@creativeartmosaics.com

White Rabbit nfs

Jolino Beserra

Los Angeles, California, USA. 323 660-3525 Web: www.jolinoarchitecturalmosaics.com Email: jolinobyrd@roadrunner.com

Don’t Cut Your Tongue on the Rhinestones price on request

Ellen Blakeley

www.ellenblakeley.com

Meridith price on request

Irina Charny

Email: irina@icmosaics.com Web: www. icmosaics.com

Primavera price on request

Maylee Christie

United Kingdom. +44 7777693412 Email: maylee.christie@btinternet.com Web: www.mayleemosaics.com

Ramblings price on request

Candace Clough

Email: info@candaceclough.com Web: www. candaceclough.com

Sidonea Menageria nfs

Julie Dilling

Tesserae Mosaic Studio, 1111 N Jupiter Rd #108A, Plano, Texas 75023. 972-578-9006 (business); 817-507-9459 (mobile) Email: julie@tesseraemosaicstudio.com Web: www.tesseraemosaicstudio.com

Keep Me Warm $2,500 US Dollars

Karen Kettering Dimit

646-423-4060 Email: kkdimit@mac.com Web: www.kkdimit.com

Miss Willendorf 2008 $8,000 US Dollars

Gary Drostle

40 Strand House, Merbury Close, London, SE28 0LU, United Kingdom. +44 771 952 9520 Email: gary@drostle.com Web: www.drostle.com

Carterton Lily Pond nfs

Sophie Drouin

Email: sophie@sophiemosaics.com Web: www.SophieMosaics.com

Bull’s Eye price on request

Pamela Goode

Email: pamgoode@earthlink.net Web: www.wildhairmosaics.com

Late Bloomer price on request

Jeannie Houston Antes

PO Box 354, 40780 Village Drive, Big Bear Lake CA 92315 909-951-4156 Email: jhantes@gmail.com

Spaghetti Western $8,500 US Dollars

Gwyn Kaitis

Joliet, Illinois. 815-919-2576 Email: gwyn@organicartifacts.com Web: www.organicartifacts.com

Familiar Ground nfs

Andryea Natkin

Chicago, Illinois. 773-909-9179 Email: andryea@tinypiecesmosaics.com Web: www. tinypiecesmosaics.com

Laurie Peters

Elgin, Illinois. 847-532-0985 Email: lauriepeters@me.com Web: web.me.com/lauriepeters/Mosaics

Nirit Keren

Email: keren.nirit@gmail.com

Geology price on request

Kate Kerrigan

San Francisco, CA Email: kerrigan.kate@gmail.com Web: www.katekerrigan.net

February Morning, Paris $12,500

Julie Lucus

Email: julielucus@yahoo.com Web: julielucus.30art.com Phone: 435-723-7940

Maria price on request

Giulio Menossi

Email: info@menossimosaici.com Web: www.menossimosaici.com Web: www.menossimosaicschool.com

Notturno (Nightly) € 5.500

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010


Exhibition in Print

Exhibitor Information

98

Doreen Adams

Web: www.creativeartmosaics.com Email: doreen@creativeartmosaics.com

White Rabbit nfs

Jolino Beserra

Los Angeles, California, USA. 323 660-3525 Web: www.jolinoarchitecturalmosaics.com Email: jolinobyrd@roadrunner.com

Don’t Cut Your Tongue on the Rhinestones price on request

Ellen Blakeley

www.ellenblakeley.com

Meridith price on request

Irina Charny

Email: irina@icmosaics.com Web: www. icmosaics.com

Primavera price on request

Maylee Christie

United Kingdom. +44 7777693412 Email: maylee.christie@btinternet.com Web: www.mayleemosaics.com

Ramblings price on request

Candace Clough

Email: info@candaceclough.com Web: www. candaceclough.com

Sidonea Menageria nfs

Julie Dilling

Tesserae Mosaic Studio, 1111 N Jupiter Rd #108A, Plano, Texas 75023. 972-578-9006 (business); 817-507-9459 (mobile) Email: julie@tesseraemosaicstudio.com Web: www.tesseraemosaicstudio.com

Keep Me Warm $2,500 US Dollars

Karen Kettering Dimit

646-423-4060 Email: kkdimit@mac.com Web: www.kkdimit.com

Miss Willendorf 2008 $8,000 US Dollars

Gary Drostle

40 Strand House, Merbury Close, London, SE28 0LU, United Kingdom. +44 771 952 9520 Email: gary@drostle.com Web: www.drostle.com

Carterton Lily Pond nfs

Sophie Drouin

Email: sophie@sophiemosaics.com Web: www.SophieMosaics.com

Bull’s Eye price on request

Pamela Goode

Email: pamgoode@earthlink.net Web: www.wildhairmosaics.com

Late Bloomer price on request

Jeannie Houston Antes

PO Box 354, 40780 Village Drive, Big Bear Lake CA 92315 909-951-4156 Email: jhantes@gmail.com

Spaghetti Western $8,500 US Dollars

Gwyn Kaitis

Joliet, Illinois. 815-919-2576 Email: gwyn@organicartifacts.com Web: www.organicartifacts.com

Familiar Ground nfs

Andryea Natkin

Chicago, Illinois. 773-909-9179 Email: andryea@tinypiecesmosaics.com Web: www. tinypiecesmosaics.com

Laurie Peters

Elgin, Illinois. 847-532-0985 Email: lauriepeters@me.com Web: web.me.com/lauriepeters/Mosaics

Nirit Keren

Email: keren.nirit@gmail.com

Geology price on request

Kate Kerrigan

San Francisco, CA Email: kerrigan.kate@gmail.com Web: www.katekerrigan.net

February Morning, Paris $12,500

Julie Lucus

Email: julielucus@yahoo.com Web: julielucus.30art.com Phone: 435-723-7940

Maria price on request

Giulio Menossi

Email: info@menossimosaici.com Web: www.menossimosaici.com Web: www.menossimosaicschool.com

Notturno (Nightly) € 5.500

Mosaic Art NOW No. 3 2010

Mosaic Art NOW - 2010 Exhibition in Print  

Mosaic Art NOW print magazine, PDF.

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