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Timber: Built Works Students of Architecture + Design - Europe

Paul O’ Brien

Dublin School of Architecture Press


Conway, Chambers, Crowley + Forristal

Tea House.

Location: Linen Hall, Bolton St., Dublin, Ireland Construction Year: 2011 Area: 45sqm.

The Teahouse was constructed in response to a fourth year studio brief. The program for the brief was open; the concept was to examine the existing empty studio space and to create sub-spaces on a human scale therein. It was stipulated that the spaces be fabricated from plywood and be used to display drawings and store models. Four students collaborated to create something which fulfilled their needs; on a scale otherwise not achievable by any student independtly.The outer passageway denies the user direct access the inner space and form a spacial threshold which contains the Tea Station at the end. Through the internal walls, one enters into the internal volume which contains a stair to the upper deck. Conceptually the structure is comprised of a cube within another larger cube.Structurally the deck is is notched together so as to keep the thickness to a minimum allowing for maximum head height below and maximum balustrade height above which is limited so as to match the datum of the clearstory windows. Again notching is used to support the outer walls without unsightly screws while also naturally covering the profile of the cross notching of the upper deck. The whole inside of the structure is then lined in butter paper so as to provide spacial autonomy inside, sculptural qualities on the outside, as well as giving the surface a unique animated appearance at night. The intension would be to provide internal lighting and audio to create a unique sensory experience within.


00.00 mm), 1:50


Roof detail of Tea House.


Biographies Michael Warren This book is the third in a series of publications by the Dublin School of Architecture Press. The intention of these books is to highlight and celebrate, in a variety of content and subject matter; the accomplishments of both students and tutors of the school. This edition focuses on the extracurricular research and experimentation carried out by current students and recent graduates of the Dublin School of Architecture and various other schools of architecture throughout Europe. The workshop method of construction is condusive to better design as it involves collaboration and skill sharing. The lasting effects of participation in workshops can been seen throughout the body of work students produce to thesis and beyond. The theme of this book centres around education, craft and workmanship. It is quite fitting that the release of this edition coincides with the amalgamation of the various departments in architecture and construction from DIT Bolton Street to the Linen Hall. The Linen Hall has served independently as the School of Trades for DIT for many years. With this new merging of disciplines and facilities, I believe, the way in which architecture is educated in our school will morph and evolve positively for the forseeable future. This new direction will be bolstered by a greater understanding of tectonic elements and the creation of the 1:1tactile model.

Brian Attley This book is the third in a series of publications by the Dublin School of Architecture Press. The intention of these books is to highlight and celebrate, in a variety of content and subject matter; the accomplishments of both students and tutors of the school. This edition focuses on the extracurricular research and experimentation carried out by current students and recent graduates of the Dublin School of Architecture and various other schools of architecture throughout Europe. The workshop method of construction is condusive to better design as it involves collaboration and skill sharing. The lasting effects of participation in workshops can been seen throughout the body of work students produce to thesis and beyond. The theme of this book centres around education, craft and workmanship. It is quite fitting that the release of this edition coincides with the amalgamation of the various departments in architecture and construction from DIT Bolton Street to the Linen Hall. The Linen Hall has served independently as the School of Trades for DIT for many years. With this new merging of disciplines and facilities, I believe, the way in which architecture is educated in our school will morph and evolve positively for the forseeable future. This new direction will be bolstered by a greater understanding of tectonic elements and the creation of the 1:1tactile model.

Paul O’ Brien This book is the third in a series of publications by the Dublin School of Architecture Press. The intention of these books is to highlight and celebrate, in a variety of content and subject matter; the accomplishments of both students and tutors of the school. This edition focuses on the extracurricular research and experimentation carried out by current students and recent graduates of the Dublin School of Architecture and various other schools of architecture throughout Europe. The workshop method of construction is condusive to better design as it involves collaboration and skill sharing. The lasting effects of participation in workshops can been seen throughout the body of work students produce to thesis and beyond. The theme of this book centres around education, craft and workmanship. It is quite fitting that the release of this edition coincides with the amalgamation of the various departments in architecture and construction from DIT Bolton Street to the Linen Hall. The Linen Hall has served independently as the School of Trades for DIT for many years. With this new merging of disciplines and facilities, I believe, the way in which architecture is educated in our school will morph and evolve positively for the forseeable future. This new direction will be bolstered by a greater understanding of tectonic elements and the creation of the 1:1tactile model.

Kieran Donnellan This book is the third in a series of publications by the Dublin School of Architecture Press. The intention of these books is to highlight and celebrate, in a variety of content and subject matter; the accomplishments of both students and tutors of the school. This edition focuses on the extracurricular research and experimentation carried out by current students and recent graduates of the Dublin School of Architecture and various other schools of architecture throughout Europe. The workshop method of construction is condusive to better design as it involves collaboration and skill sharing. The lasting effects of participation in workshops can been seen throughout the body of work students produce to thesis and beyond. The theme of this book centres around education, craft and workmanship. It is quite fitting that the release of this edition coincides with the amalgamation of the various departments in architecture and construction from DIT Bolton Street to the Linen Hall. The Linen Hall has served independently as the School of Trades for DIT for many years. With this new merging of disciplines and facilities, I believe, the way in which architecture is educated in our school will morph and evolve positively for the forseeable future. This new direction will be bolstered by a greater understanding of tectonic elements and the creation of the 1:1tactile model.

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TIMBER: BUILT WORKS_JAMIE DRAFT