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NATHAN ALESKOVSKY architecture portfolio

Master of Architecture Syracuse University Master of Science in Entrepreneurship and Emerging Enterprises Syracuse University Bachelor of Design in Architecture University of Florida


CONTENTS 01 The Center for the American Quilt 13 Engage The Alley 19 Transitional Housing 31 Social Stitch 39 The Integration of a Vessel 45 A Definition Constructed 51 Agenda 44


1

The Center for the American Quilt Date: Spring 2011 Critic: Terrance Goode Site: Cambridge, MA Team Member: A. Maiolatesi The museum was conceived as a stereotomic mass inserted into the existing context within which delicate sewn artwork are displayed and preserved. Layers of tectonic materials shield this mass from heat, light, and humidity while a central atrium circulation system provides unique sights lines to interior and exterior vantage points. The primary factor concerning quilt display and storage is light penetration. For this design, the faรงade assembly was use to alter lighting conditions within different programs within the museum. By arranging different levels of glass opacity with varying densities of ceramic louvers, the interior program of the museum dictated the fenestration of the faรงade. The compact and irregular geometry of the site allowed the creation of a pedestrian path, through the museum to connect the adjacent streets, as well as opportunities to explore unusual programmatic arrangements.


SERVICE

OF FIC E R’S

OR’S

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OF FIC

RS ON N

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DIR EC TO IAL

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AD M

S

ECT IVE DIR

TOILE

T ROOM

CUT EXE

LIBRARY

PUBLIC

SCHOLARS’ OFFIC

FIN AN C

GA

S G ROOM MEETIN

ES

100sqf t

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OM E RO

POR T

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N]

S

OM

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ILE TO

RO

A

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[P

M ER

LL CO NT NE

R TO

IPP SH

E

ING

G IVIN CE

WO

/ RE

ENT DOC

S KER LOC

LOADING

DOCKS

SERVICE SPACES

AS GL

SUP

O RO

S ILT QU

OCCUP ANT US AG E

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F AF ST

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MUS

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CE RE

t 0s qf 10

qf t

100s

MU

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EA AR

SH

R LLE

OP

t

qft 0s 10

10

4800sqft FOOTPRINT

IES

sqft

sqf

AD MIN IST RA TIV

ft 0sq

S

IE

PY O

O

H

L PP SU

CIRCULATION/EXTRA

AM

VERTICAL GALLERY / ATRIUM (TBD)

PU BL

t

C

TO

REQ UIR ED

LIBRARY (2000SQFT) 4,000 BOOKS/PERIODICLES 4 STUDY CARRELS WORK AREAS

100

100s qf t

100

100sqf t

sqf

100

LECTURE ROOM (1000SQFT) SEATING FOR 75 PEOPLE ACCESS FROM STREET

SCHOLARS’ OFFICE (900SQFT) DESKS AND SHELVES

0

10

MUSEUM SHOP (400SQFT) SHELVING MATERIAL STORAGE

MEETING ROOMS (900SQFT) SEATING FOR 25 PEOPLE (EACH) TOILETS

ft sq

PRO GR AM

T UN O

1st

RECEPTION AREA (400SQFT) CATERING

GALLERIES (4500SQFT) TRAVELING EXHIBITS MUSEUM COLLECTION ARTIFACTS ARTWORK

BB Y

2nd

LO

3rd

LOBBY ENTRANCE (200SQFT) VESTIBULE INFORMATION TICKET COAT CHECK

TR Y

4th

EN

5th

OFF ICE

2

TIO EC

O RO

RK

M

HT LIG OF

LOUV ER D EN SIT Y


FORM GENERATION AND EVOLUTION

EXTERIOR RENDERING - DAY

3


4

4th FLOOR

3rd FLOOR

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

4

5 ESTCODE

3 MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

3

1 MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

3 2

4

2 5 ESTCODE

3

3

1

3 2


2nd FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR

BASEMENT

TRADENAME MODELNUMBER MATERIAL PRODUCT

TRADENAME MODELNUMBER MATERIAL PRODUCT

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

MODELNUMBER TRADENAME PRODUCT MATERIAL

5

4

1 1

3

3

2

1 2

SECTION PERSPECTIVE Through entryway and basement/auditorium

5


6

LOUVERED FACADE SYSTEM PRIMARY STRUCTURAL STEEL MEMBER RUBBER GASKET ALUMINUM TUBE STEEL ATTACHMENT BRACKET FRICTION HINGE HIGH TENSION STEEL CABLE STEEL BOX TUBE FRICTION HINGE

WINDOW WALL DOUBLE PANED GLASS ARGON GAS UV DIFFUSING COATING WINDOW FOOT RECEPTOR SILICONE SEALANT ALUMINUM FLASHING WINDOW HEAD RECEPTOR FINNGLASS RADIANT HEAT ELECTRODE GENERATORS

POST TENSIONING SYSTEM 1’ SITE-CAST POST-TENSIONED CONCRETE SLAB WITH SLAB BAN MULTI STRAND BONDED CABLE MORTAR ANCHORAGE WEDGE TENSION CABLE CAP

DETAILED SECTION + ANNOTATION Through glass and louver facade system

EXTERIOR RENDERING - NIGHT


WEST

7

EAST

SUN PATH ANALYSIS

DEC JAN/NOV FEB/OCT MAR/SEP APR/AUG MAY/JUN JUN DUSK

DAWN

LOUVER + GLASS LIGHTING ANALYSIS To determine appropriate facade arrangement depending on interior program lighting requirements

0% OPACITY

35% OPACITY

90% OPACITY


8

SECTION PERSPECTIVE Through museum galleries, facade system, and street


1’ SITE-CAST POST-TENSIONED CONCRETE SLAB WITH SLAB BAND

CONCRETE PANEL CEILING SYSTEM 2” RIGID FOAM INSULATION ALUMINUM VERTICAL C BRACKET FRICTION MEMBRANE KEIL UNDERCUT ANCHOR + LOCKING SCREW ALUMINUN SUSPENSION BRACKET ADJUSTABLE ALUMINUM SUSPENSION CLAMP 1” HIGH-STRENGTH CONCRETE PANEL

SUSPENDED CEILING SYSTEM STEEL U CHANNEL PERIMETER SUPPORT WAFER JACKPOINT SCREWS STEEL L CONNECTION BRACKET PERFORATED STEEL DROP COLUMN PERFORATED STEEL BOX TUBE STEEL LOWER C CHANNEL STEEL CHANNEL INTERSECTION CONNECTOR 3/4” GYPSUM BOARD

CONCRETE PANEL WALL SYSTEM 3/4” GYPSUM BOARD 2” RIGID FOAM INSULATION 2” X 2” WOOD FURRING STRIP REINFORCED CONCRETE MANSONRY KEIL UNDERCUT ANCHOR + LOCKING SCREW ALUMINUM VERTICAL C BRACKET FRICTION MEMBRANE 2“ RIGID INSULATION WATERPROOF MEMBRANE AIR GAP ADJUSTABLE ALUMINUM CLAMP 1” HIGH-STRENGTH CONCRETE PANEL

CONCRETE PANEL FLOOR SYSTEM 1” HIGH-STRENGTH CONCRETE PANEL ALUMINUM FLASHING WATERPROOF MEMBRANE 2” RIGID FOAM INSULATION ALUMINUM ADJUSTABLE CHANNEL CLAMP ALUMINUM CHANNEL RAIL KEIL UNDERCUT ANCHOR + LOCKING SCREW CONCRETE ANCHOR ALUMINUM CHANNEL

1’ SITE-CAST POST-TENSIONED CONCRETE SLAB WITH SLAB BAND L.E.D. RIBBON LIGHTING

INTERIOR FINISHING 3/4” GYPSUM BOARD 3/4” GYPSUM BOARD 2“ RIGID INSULATION 2” X 2“ WOOD FURRING STRIP REINFORCED CONCRETE MANSONRY 2” X 2“ WOOD FURRING STRIP 2” RIGID INSULATION 3/4” GYPSUM BOARD

DETAILED SECTION + ANNOTATION Through entryway cladding system, ceiling, and floor

9


10

DETAILED LATERAL SECTION

MECHANICAL & HVAC SYSTEMS

4th FLOOR

3rd FLOOR

2nd FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR

BASEMENT


1’ SITE-CAST POST-TENSIONED CONCRETE SLAB WITH SLAB BAND SUSPENDED CEILING SYSTEM COLD FORMED STEEL C CHANNEL HEADER STEEL L CONNECTION BRACKET PERFORATED STEEL DROP COLUMN PERFORATED STEEL BOX TUBE STEEL LOWER C CHANNEL

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DETAILED SECTION + ANNOTATION Through quilt display assembly

STEEL U CHANNEL PERIMETER SUPPORT WAFER JACKPOINT SCREWS STEEL CHANNEL INTERSECTION CONNECTOR 3/4” GYPSUM BOARD HANGING QUILT DISPLAY SYSTEM [TOP] ALUMINUM RAIL CONNECTOR ALUMINUM QUIT FRAME RUBBER CLAMPING SYSTEM ALUMINUM MIRROR FRAME 1/2” GLASS MIRROR

TYPICAL INTERIOR WALL WHITE MATTE LOW V.O.C. LATEX PAINT 3/4” GYPSUM BOARD COLD FORMED STEEL STUD 3-1/2” HIGH DENSITY FIBERGLASS BATT INSULATION 3/4” GYPSUM BOARD WHITE MATTE LOW V.O.C. LATEX PAINT COLD FORMED STEEL C CHANNEL FOOTER

1’ SITE-CAST POST-TENSIONED CONCRETE SLAB WITH SLAB BAND SUSPENDED CEILING SYSTEM COLD FORMED STEEL C CHANNEL HEADER STEEL L CONNECTION BRACKET PERFORATED STEEL DROP COLUMN PERFORATED STEEL BOX TUBE STEEL LOWER C CHANNEL STEEL U CHANNEL PERIMETER SUPPORT WAFER JACKPOINT SCREWS STEEL CHANNEL INTERSECTION CONNECTOR 3/4” GYPSUM BOARD

HANGING QUILT DISPLAY SYSTEM [BASE] STEEL SUPPORT BRACKET STEEL ROD THREADED CLAMP STEEL ROD SOCKET JOINT EXTRUDED STEEL PIVOT HINGE CONNECTOR EXTRUDED STEEL HINGE RECEPTOR STEEL HINGE RAIL CONCRETE ANCHOR

ACOUSTICAL WALL/CEILING SYSTEM ALUMINUM U CHANNEL ALUMINUM Z CLIP ACOUSTIC BAFFLING (2) 3/4” GYPSUM BOARD 3-1/2” HIGH DENSITY FIBERGLASS BATT INSULATION COLD ROLLED STEEL STUD 3/4” GYPSUM BOARD COLD FORMED STEEL C CHANNEL FOOTER

1’ SITE-CAST POST-TENSIONED CONCRETE SLAB WITH SLAB BAND

1’ SITE-CAST POST-TENSIONED CONCRETE SLAB WITH SLAB BAND SUSPENDED CEILING SYSTEM COLD FORMED STEEL C CHANNEL HEADER STEEL L CONNECTION BRACKET PERFORATED STEEL DROP COLUMN PERFORATED STEEL BOX TUBE STEEL CHANNEL INTERSECTION CONNECTOR STEEL LOWER C CHANNEL STEEL U CHANNEL PERIMETER SUPPORT WAFER JACKPOINT SCREWS 3/4” GYPSUM BOARD

1’ SITE-CAST POST-TENSIONED CONCRETE SLAB WITH SLAB BAND

TYPICAL INTERIOR WALL 3/4” GYPSUM BOARD 3-1/2” HIGH DENSITY FIBERGLASS BATT INSULATION COLD ROLLED STEEL STUD 3/4” GYPSUM BOARD COLD FORMED STEEL C CHANNEL FOOTER

DETAILED SECTION + ANNOTATION Through auditorium acoustical wall and ceiling assembly

1’ SITE-CAST POST-TENSIONED CONCRETE SLAB WITH SLAB BAND

DETAILED SECTION + ANNOTATION Through interior wall and ceiling assembly


12


13

Engage The Alley

Date: Fall 2010 Critics: Bret Snyder / Lori Brown / Anne Munly Site: Charleston, SC Team Members: N. Blasetti, T. Poore, I. Zhupa 3rd Place Winner - Architecture for Humanity Charleston Transit Hub National Design Competition

Grappling with the frictions between a historic city center and its developing surrounding suburbs, ENGAGE reaches beyond the walls of a transit hub and injects connective corridors across the cityscape. Just as iconic church spires pierce the Charleston skyline, so do stone-clad footpaths carve through the dense street fronts of the downtown business center. Meandering alleyways are the connective tissue of the city; often overlooked, they amplify the virtual threshold between public and private, intimate and exposed, discovery and familiarity. ENGAGE brings traditional alleyways into a community landscape that is genuine and specifi­c to Charleston and its transit needs. Undulating walkways, bike paths, and transit rails weave through the urban plaza to frame neighboring views across the new landscape. Populated by local materiality & vegetation, a fabric of hardscape and softscape intertwine to form a natural fi­eld condition shaped by the forgotten residual space of Charleston’s historic footpaths.


14

Retail

Sun Deck

Bus Ticketing

20’

rain garden

24’ 20’

rain garden

outdoor dining 18’

bus lane

8’

foot path

C

E

A

D

B

Bike Shop


15

Administration

Ticketing

Cafe

8’

bike path

15’

walking trail

15’

concourse

15’

light rail


16 No

Site Plan

r th Ch le ar sto n

light rail nodes existing alleys pedestrian

sant Mt. Plea

Typical Suburban Node

land

ley

James Is

sh tA es W

Typical Urban Node


17

CONTEXT ANALYSIS Illustrated sections of environment and materiality within several alleyways in Charleston

Prices Alley

St. Michaels Alley

Program

Traffic Patterns pedestrian pathways programmatic volumes Service

Office Office Retail

Transit

Philadelphia Alley

Retail

pedestrian bicycle access

Public Transportation light rail bus transit


18


transitional housing?

transitional housing

Nathan Aleskovsky | Erdy/McHenry | S12

19

transitional housing

2 of 18

Nathan Aleskovsky | Erdy/McHenry | S12

Transitional Housing

Date: Spring 2012 Critics: Scott Erdy + David McHenry - Erdy McHenry Architecture Site: Philadelphia, PA What is “Transitional Housing”? How should a “Transitional Home” function? Transitional housing is temporary refuge, a middle ground between the street and a traditional housing arrangement. It is functional, efficient, and focused on advancing its residents through education, job training, and community involvement. This transitory respite is a dissemination of three conceptual ideals: efficiency, privacy, and community The proposed program calls for abundant and spacious apartment units for its residents. However, this project does not provide a substantial economic return and will therefore be built with funds raised through charity donations and federal grants. Therefore, in order for Project Home to rescue the largest population of homeless, the proposed program had to be modified – removing more than 30,000 square feet from the residential units to significantly reduce the cost per occupant. This saving could be used to build more housing or redistribute to other programs. Through detailed analysis, it became obvious that privacy was the major aspect of homeless life that was missing from that of a housed individual. By recognizing the phenomenon and placing it relation to the idea of a transitional home, the housing units (with their reduced square footage) were designed to provide a hierarchy of privacy based on the unit typology. For example, the Single Resident Occupant (SRO) consists of private sleeping quarters and lavatory, however cooking, eating, relaxation, and bathing take place in a communal setting. As a method of reinforcing a spirit of community, the idea is developed that the residents in the housing units are giving back their non-essential square footage for the betterment of the entire community. As such, the programmed community square footage increased from 5700 square feet to 15000 square feet.

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25%

bathing

25%

eati ng

50%

bathing

25%

eati ng

75%

50%

LEVELS OF PRIVACY Analysis of the levels of provacy that exist for different levels of housing

g epin sle

75%

50%

g epin sle

bathing

homelessness - philadelphia

75%

g epin sle

eati ng

20

Total Number of Homeless served by shelters in 1 year

transitional housing

7 of 18

Nathan Aleskovsky | Erdy/McHenry | S12

= 100 homeless people

Adults Without Children Head of Household Children

African-American Causacian Other

chronically homeless

20%

Adults Without Children

13%

Head of Household (Families)

PHILADELPHIA HOMELESS Breakdown of the homeless population in Philadelphia, PA


EXTERIOR RENDERING

21


22

FORM GENERATION The overall strategy for the design focused on eliminating non-essential personal space from the private living quarters and redistributing it to the community

ENCOURAGE COMMUNITY Growth

community space: (+) 176 sf 59%

Non-Essential Personal Space

community Space

x 24 Program: 300 SF

Proposed: 124 sf

transitional housing

reallocate living spaces 18 of 18

Nathan Aleskovsky | Erdy/McHenry | S12

community space: (+) 346 sf

transitional housing

14 of 18

Nathan Aleskovsky | Erdy/McHenry | S12

58%

x 56

Program: 600 sf

Proposed: 254 sf

transitional housing

Nathan Aleskovsky | Erdy/McHenry | S12

reallocate living spaces

community space: (+) 530 sf

x 12

ansitional housing

athan Aleskovsky | Erdy/McHenry | S12

available: 33680 sf

program: 3720 sf

58%

Program: 1200 sf transitional housing

Nathan Aleskovsky | Erdy/McHenry | S12

Proposed: 670 sf


program privacy - sro 23

privacy (+) SLEEP

SLEEP

SLEEP

SLEEP

SLEEP

bathe

SLEEP

bathe

cook / eat

x 12

SINGLE RESIDENT UNIT 124 SF

privacy (-)

program privacy - effeciency

transitional housing

Nathan Aleskovsky | Erdy/McHenry | S12

privacy (+)

8 of 18

SLEEP

SLEEP

SLEEP

SLEEP

SLEEP

SLEEP

bathe

bathe

bathe

bathe

bathe

bathe

cook

cook

cook

eat

SENIOR RESIDENT UNIT 254 SF

privacy (-)

program privacy - family unit transitional housing

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Nathan Aleskovsky | Erdy/McHenry | S12

privacy (+)

privacy (-)

SLEEP

SLEEP

SLEEP

SLEEP

SLEEP

SLEEP

bathe

bathe

bathe

bathe

bathe

bathe

cook / eat

cook / eat

cook / eat

cook / eat

cook / eat

cook / eat

FAMILY UNIT 670 SF


24 EDOCTSE

EDOCTSE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

EDOCTSE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

EDOCTSE

EDOCTSE

EDOCTSE

EDOCTSE

ESTCODE

ESTCODE

GROUND FLOOR

2nd FLOOR


25

distribution TYPICAL FAMILYprogram UNIT FLOOR

TYPICAL SENIOR UNIT FLOOR

the “neighborhood” Limiting Mass Proximity

privacyPARTI

Varying levels of privacy across plan and section

UNIT ORGANIZATION STRATEGY Fewer units per floor adjacent to communal space

typical low-income housing Many units open on to narrow corridors. Community feeling is completely absent.

PLAN

TYPICAL SINGLE RESIDENT UNIT FLOOR

section

Proposed solution

Few units open to comunity spaces, establishing a sense of community between same floor residents. Sense of belonging


26

ADMINISTRATION / LEGAL

RETAIL / CAFE/ MEDICAL

SRO UNITS

FAMILY UNITS


27

SRO COMMUNITY SPACES

SKY YARDS

EFFECIENCY / SENIOR UNITS

LAUNDRY / ENTERTAINMENT/ FITNESS


28

DETAILED LATERAL SECTION

EXTERIOR RENDERING - DAY + NIGHT


29

COMMUNITY SIDE ELEVATION

FRONT ELEVATION

RESIDENTIAL SIDE ELEVATION


30


31

REBUILDING COMMUNITY & BINDING RACIAL DIVISIONS THROUGH EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE

AND ECONOMIC STIMULATION Detroit’s implementation of over 41,000 miles of roadways from the 1950’s until today has created one of the worst suburban failures in United States history. This is the stem of Detroit’s current economic and social problems. The goal of the Social Stitch is to use the existing roadway infrastructure to create a network of dense and economically stimulating nodes along an extended Woodward Avenue Light Rail, in an attempt to revitalize the decrepit city. In addition, the Social Stitch attempts to bind the racial divisions that occur in multitude throughout the city – in different scales and locales.

Social Stitch

Date: Fall 2010 Critics: Bret Snyder / Lori Brown / Anne Munly Site: Detroit, MI Detroit’s implementation of over 41,000 miles of roadways from the 1950’s until today has created one of the worst suburban failures in United States history. This is the stem of Detroit’s current economic and social problems. The goal of the Social Stitch is to use the existing infrastructure, especially the extensive roadway system, to create a network of dense and economically stimulating nodes. In addition, the Social Stitch attempts to bind the racial divisions and reestablish a sense of community in different scales and contexts. Because of the racial tensions surrounding 8 Mile Road, most residents avoid crossing the racial boundary at all costs. This unwillingness to become the minority has led the suburbs of Detroit to have a programmatic redundancy within the city limits. Daily required conveniences such as restaurants, medical facilities, grocery stores, etc. occur at similar scales on both sides of 8 Mile simply to accommodate, and exacerbate, the current social stigma. In addition, it can be argued that Detroit has lost its sense of ‘community’ and has become an ‘association’ instead. According to the sociologist Ferdinand Tönnies, a community (or Gemeinschaft) is perceived to be a tighter and more cohesive social entity, due to the presence of a “unity of will”. A society (or Gesellschaft), on the other hand, is a group in which the individuals who make up that group are motivated to take part in the group purely by self-interest. Metro Detroit has lost its sense of community because it has lost a “unity of will” to correct its social and economic catastrophes, in favor of fleeing to the selfserving suburban oasis. In order to begin to counteract this divisional and detrimental process, the Stitch at 8 Mile Road and Woodward Avenue is positioned within the interstitial space between the white and black neighborhoods of Detroit. While this could be interpreted as a symbolic gesture, the placement provides an extremely high level of awareness and connectedness while remaining void of racial control. Formally, the project is conceived of as a programmatic stitch as well – weaving the required and desired programs of the context with a collaborative spine that serves as a gathering space for the exchange of ideas a promoting the redevelopment of a community environment. Injected within this spine is a central transit hub for the Woodward Ave. Light Rail System, which would further promote a sense of connectedness and community by stitching the outlying suburbs with the downtown city core.


MILES OF INTERSTATE HIGHWAY

41,000

BUILT BETWEEN 1950 AND 2000 IN DETROIT

POPULATION IN 1950

BI-RACIAL MIXTURE

1,849,568 WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS

POPULATION IN 2000

951,270

SOUTHFIELD / I-6 1” = 500’

WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS

DEMOGRAPHICS IN 1950

BLACK

WHITE

BI-RACIAL DIVIDE

WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS

DEMOGRAPHICS IN 2000

WHITE

BLACK WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS

8 MILE ROAD / W 1” = 500’

BLACK WHITE

VACANCY IN 1950

1%

WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS

VACANCY IN 2000

10.3%

HISPANIC ASIAN BI-RACIAL DIVIDE TRI-RACIAL POCKET

WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS

URBAN JOBS IN 1950

800,000

HAMTRACK / I-75 1” = 500’

TOTAL EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLE

URBAN JOBS IN 2000

350,000 TOTAL EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLE

SUBURBAN JOBS IN 1950

800,000

TRI-RACIAL DIVIDE BI-RACIAL MIXTURE

TOTAL EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLE

SUBURBAN JOBS IN 2000

1,900,000 TOTAL EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLE

WARREN AVE. / L 1” = 500’


EXISTING DIVIDING CONDITIONS

33

EXISTING CONTEXT

SOUTHFIELD / I-696 1” = 500’

8 MILE ROAD / WOODWARD AVENUE 1” = 500’ MILEROAD

HAMTRACK / I-75 1” = 500’

PROGRAM HEALTHCARE LIGHT INDUSTRIAL RETAIL RESTAURANT GROCERY DEMOGRAPHICS WHITE BLACK TRANSPORTATION PROPOSED EXTENSION OF LIGHT RAIL WOODWARD LIGHT RAIL BUS ACCESS

WARREN AVE. / LONYO ST. 1” = 500’

1 MILE


34

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MEDICAL MANUFACTURING

CURRENT CONDITION: PROGRAMMATIC REDUNDANCY SO

UP

KIT

PROPOSED CONDITION: PROGRAMMATIC STITCH

CH

GROCERY

RE

BUS TRANSIT

GROCERY

LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT

EN

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NK

T

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SM

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AN

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FOOD SERVICE WAREHOUSE

EXTERIOR RENDERING


35


36

40’ 30’

15’

0’

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

ROAD LEVEL PLAN

GROUND LEVEL PLAN


37


38


39

The Integration of a Vessel Date: Spring 2007 Critic: Mark McGlothlin Site: Pensacola, FL

The design of this building was inspired by two distinct items. The first inspiration was the canopy of vegetation that surrounded the proposed site. The climate conditions under the canopy were distinctly milder than that of the exposed building location. Because the area where the buildings would be located is absent of any shade producing objects, the sun heavily penetrated the area. The second inspiration was to allow the building to function as vessel, exhibit, and research specimen, similar to the work that was being performed within it. After personally surveying the site in Pensacola, Florida, the developer of the land expressed his desire to establish an energy research institute within his proposed “off-the-grid� community. He required that the building have research and presentation facilities, as well as short term housing for visiting scientists. I accomplished these strategies through multiple approaches. In order to limit the amount of outdoor traveling a visitor or employee would have around the complex, I designed the 2 buildings in close proximity to each other. This approach not only limited travel distance, but also allowed for continuous shade during the journey. Both the idea of canopy and exhibition were the driving forces in the design of the roof structure for the main pavilion and the sleeping quarters. The expansive roof system creates a canopy-like environment within the main exhibition hall, and directs the flow of the frequent and heavy Florida rainfall through the building and into storage cisterns, a process that is visible to visitors. The recovered rainwater provides most of the necessary gray-water for the building, including irrigation for the surrounding farm land. It is the path of water from the canopy, through the building, and then returning to the ground that embeds Sky Institute into its site.


40

SITE MODEL Scale: 1” = 50’

2

3

CONCEPTUAL SITE MODELS

SITE PLAN RENDERING


CONCEPTUAL DIAGRAM Connection of sky, building, and earth

CONCEPTUAL DIAGRAM Building embedded within the artwork of landscape

4

41

5

6

SECTION Through formal presentation space (L) communal space (M) and entry (R)


42

GROUND FLOOR

PHYSICAL MODEL Scale: 1/8”


43

2

4

3

5

SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE Computer edited physical model illustrating rainwater capture and reuse system


44


45

A Definition Constructed

Date: Spring 2007 Critic: Mark McGlothlin Site: Gainesville, FL

This project focuses on analyzing the definition of a ‘house’ and its ability to provide shelter, safety, and comfort. The proposed occupants of the house are displaced urban peasants, that is, a modern family of three that is living off the land on which they reside. While visiting the site, I mapped the locations of each of the moderate to old growth trees in order to develop a visual plan of the unbuildable areas of the site. After accomplishing this task it became clear to me that the most effective design would be one that not only was embedded in the landscape, but one that respects its evolution - a design that allows the landscape to provide the formal and conceptual restrictions of the design. To preserve the fertility of the site, great care was taken in the design not to remove vegetation and to construct in a material scale that required no large equipment. Diffused penetration of both light and wind form the language of the construction, while attention to the solar path defines the orientation. The form of the house wraps around existing trees allowing views of the canopy that provides shade to the house and the forest floor. In order to provide safety, in this case mostly from weather, the house is defended by two massive concrete walls that mitigate against wind, as well as provide additional shade from the Florida sun. Comfort is provided through the lightweight breathable structure. The primary wall construction is a louvered panel that allows for cross ventilation and bilateral illumination.


46

2nd FLOOR

PHYSICAL MODEL Scale: 1/16”

GROUND FLOOR

3

4

CROSS SECTION

LONGITUDINAL SETION


47

LIGHT + SHADOW STUDY Hand rendering of longitudinal section

5


48


49

EXTERIOR RENDERING


50


51

situated

corrido

itals

jor hosp

on I-75

Agenda 44 _

_ 4 ma

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Date: Spring 2009 Critics: Greg Pasquerelli + Jonathan Mallie - SHoP Architects Site: Gainesville, FL Agenda 44 is a federally funded production hub, constructed sequentially over the course of forty-one years, with a programmatic focus on advancing and implementing the agenda of the 44th President of the United States, Barack Obama. The assignment called for a project that would involve the sports culture of the University of Florida. Instead of affecting the sports culture, we allowed the sports culture to affect our project, that is, we chose to use the notoriety and prestige of UF sports to drive recognition and awareness to our project. Further research into possible funding options during this tough economic time led us to the initial idea of Agenda 44. At this stage, we compared the items on Obama’s agenda with the goals of both the University of Florida and the City of Gainesville and found remarkable cohesiveness. We determined that Gainesville was the best place to establish a center for the implementation of the presidential agenda. In order to more effectively control all 400+ individual agenda items, as well as the 100+ goals of UF and Gainesville, we categorized the items into six groups based on their general focus: Sustainability, Medical Research, Technology Research, Job Creation, Global Outreach, and Education. We then established a timeline for each item. The general timeline provided in the presidential agenda had several durations, starting between 2009 and 2040, and ending between 2012 and 2050. Form generation was a difficult and disjointed process, but the result was a series of 6 components based on the aforementioned categories. Using Paracloud, we controlled the program to find the “best fit� formation of components into 41 groups, called panels, one for every year from 2009 to 2050, based on a number of criteria. The first criterion was based on funding and thus the current economic condition each year. We deduced that if the economy was doing well, more federal funds would be available to be placed into the ongoing construction of Agenda 44. Therefore, the variation in the physical width of each panel is directly related to the projected economic status of the nation. The second criteria was also based on funding. However, in this case, the focus was on how much funding would be available for certain categories based on the presidential timeline. This criterion was responsible for the quantity of each component in the annual panel. For example, if in 2012 Obama wanted to begin focusing on finding a cure for aids as well as begin securing international nuclear weapons, there would be more funding available for medical research and global outreach. Consequently, more medical and global outreach components would be placed in the 2012 panel. The physical connection between the panels was achieved through a series of tubes programmatically specific to the component they were passing through. Also, fenestration patterns on the tubes allow the occupant to visually and spatially determine the programmatic charge of their location. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of the circulation tubes occurs when the tube passes through several different programs. The result is a collaboration of programs that could facilitate increased production or spark new research. The overall construction of the project is to be completed is a sequential manner because at any time, due to natural disaster, political change in the presidential office, etc., federal funding could be relinquished. If an overall infrastructure was built first and then components plugged into that existing infrastructure and funding was cut before completion the result would be an hideous, half-build construction and a permanent reminder of failure. In the current scenario, each panel is completely self-sufficient and is only enhanced by the connection to neighboring panels. Therefore, if at any time funding was pulled, the result would merely be an addition to the current buildings at the University of Florida. NOTE: Acceptance to this vertical studio was highly selective and was based on outstanding performance in previous studio semesters. It was conducted in New York City and Gainesville, Florida.


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SECTION PERSPECTIVE Through multiple programmatic nodes


2050

2049

2048

2047

2045 2046

2044

2043

2042

2041

2040

2039

2038

2037

2036

2035

2034

2033

2032

2031

2030

2028 2029

2027

2026

2025

2024

2023

2022

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2013 2014

2012

2011

2010

2009

projection of u.s. economy

width

2050

2049

2048

2047

2045 2046

2044

2043

2042

2041

2040

2039

2038

2037

2036

2035

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2032

2031

2030

2028 2029

2027

2026

2025

2024

2023

2022

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2013 2014

2012

2011

2010

2009

amount of government funding

sustainability

education

job creation

quantity of program

medical research

technology

global

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FORM GENERATION DIAGRAM Form and configuaration of programmatic nodes are based on economic projections, anticipated need, and levels of government spending

glass skin

program tubes

circulation

sustainability

medical research education job creation

panels

technology

global

ground articulation

national debt

parking

overall health

EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC


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[ programmatic skin variations through circulation tubes ] [ timeline of development ]

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 2038 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 2044 2045 2046 2047 2048 2049 2050

program 3

program 2

program 1

SEQUENTIAL DIAGRAM Illustrates process of annual development

RENDERINGS - DAY + NIGHT

PROGRAMMATIC OVERLAP Aperature configuaration blends as program changes within the node


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The Dichotomy of Time in Media Date: Spring 2008 Critic: Alfonso Perez-Mendez Site: Charleston, SC The Charleston Public Library System was in search of a proposal for a new branch in downtown, historic Charleston, South Carolina. The library had acquired a piece of land that was currently being used as a parking lot and, more importantly, a pedestrian access route to the nearby river. After visiting the site, I noticed that the challenge here was to design a large building to house the expanding collection of the library, while maintaining pedestrian access through the site and negotiating the implementation of a modern building into the historical fabric. Delving further into the current and future state of the library, I noticed a shift from transcribed media such as books and periodicals to digital media such as e-books and the internet. The proposal for a new branch of the Charleston Public Library is an attempt to architecturalize the dichotomy of time in media, that is, the separation that exists between past and present in relation to the experience of the written word. The program of the library focuses on the idea of a library from an historical standpoint – as a center for knowledge through the use of books and other transcribed media, and its relationship to the library of the present and future – with collections that are based primarily in the digital realm. In order to accommodate the program of duality, the building is spatially separated into two semiautonomous sides. The digital realm of the library is open and free-flowing – emphasizing the collaborative work environment that digital media allows. Light is controlled through articulated openings in the façade and roof. The transcribed realm of the library is more intimate in order to enhance the experience of the written word and provide more private areas for concentration. Careful consideration of wall height and variation in floor height limit the amount of personal contact between occupants. The library is set back in the site, creating an entry plaza and maintaining the physical connection between the bordering streets and the river. The plaza is a destination in which to relax, read, and experience the cultural abundance of the city.


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EXTERIOR RENDERING - MASSING

PHYSICAL MASSING MODEL

LONGITUDINAL SECTION Conceptual

PHYSICAL MASSING MODEL Light Study

LATERAL SECTION Conceptual

SITE PLAN + CONTEXTUAL DRAWING


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5

4

3

2

1

FINAL MODEL Scale: 1/16”


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EXTERIOR RENDERING


Aleskovsky Architecture Portfolio  

Selected projects from my Undergraduate and Graduate work at the University of Florida and Syracuse University School of Architecture

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