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HEALTHY

LIVING

HEALTHY

PLANET

#YOURCARBONFOOTPRINT #NOSTRAWSNOLA

#COASTALRESTORATION April 2018 | New Orleans & The Northshore | NALAmag.com


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letter from the publisher

his is our Climate Health issue and while I tried to touch upon some of the most important and relevant issues facing the environment today, especially locally, there are just so many issues facing our planet, it would be impossible for me to cover it all. From global warming to the plastic taking over our lands and our seas to animal extinction to the ever-increasing magnitude of natural disasters—the health of our planet affects every aspect of life here on mother earth. Personally, I always thought if there was any one big issue I wanted to focus on in my life, it was the health of our wetlands. Being born-and-raised here in New Orleans, I know the wetlands are our protection against our biggest natural threat, hurricanes. The sponge that soaks up the storm surge and has protected our land for centuries. We have all heard the statistic, Louisiana loses a football field of wetlands every hour—every hour of every day. I wrote a bit about what we can do to help protect those wetlands that protect us in Mel’s Take 5, but I still feel somewhat helpless in what I can do as an individual. I have given time and money, but I know that we would need a big movement and major changes to make any real impact. I know the very levees that keep the sediment from replenishing the wetlands are the very levees that bring us the commerce that made us the port city we are today. But if we don’t protect our city with the wetlands, will any of that commerce even matter? What I don’t understand is if this is our best protection from our biggest threat—why isn’t this the biggest movement in our city and our state today? Let’s change

Read our DIGITAL EDITION on your phone or tablet! Download the ISSUU app and search NALAMAG. TEXT “NALAMAG” TO 22828 to subscribe to our digital edition and receive free discounts and exclusive invites to all things #NaturalinNOLA.

that. First thing is to start the conversation, then call your local councilmember and call the state, donate time, money, and effort, do everything to continue to make it relevant. As I have said before, each one of us is very powerful, but together as a group, our power is infinitely limitless. Then let’s continue to do what we can as individuals in our daily life to make small changes in how we live so we can take care of the earth that gives us everything. First of all, please stop using plastic in every way you can today— plastic straws, bags, bottles, cups, food containers—our earth can never never absorb it. Let’s continue to recycle everything we can, consider composting or bringing your compostable garbage to Compost NOW, bring your glass to local recycling locations since the city doesn’t take glass (speaking of which…), use less water, drive a little less, ride a bike more (it’s more fun anyway and better for your health), use less energy, make your home more energy efficient, eat locally and eat foods that have less impact on our earth, keep the environment in mind when shopping. Over time, these small changes, when done by all of us, will make a much larger impact than we realize. The tide is turning and we are becoming more aware of the issues facing our planet today. Let’s keep it up. We only have one mother earth—let’s love her, nourish her, take care of her—like we do our own bodies and as we do with our families. We need a healthy mother earth for our children and our children’s children—their future depends on what we do today. Happy Earth Day and happy fest season too! Your Publisher,

Melissa

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FOR ALL THINGS NATURAL IN NOLA

contact us Publisher Melissa Burbank Editors Lauren A. Pirosko Marc LaPorte Layout Design Laura Sanders Graphic Design Vanessa VanDaele Distribution Big Art’s Distribution Metro Distribution Contributors Julie Holman Carla Robertson

Eat Fit NOLA Fit NOLA

LifeCity 504-872-3919 info@nalamag.com NALAmag.com

© 2018 by Natural Awakenings. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reproduced and reprinted, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing. Natural Awakenings is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. It is available in selected stores, health and education centers, healing centers, public libraries and wherever free publications are generally seen. Please call to find a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business. We do not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the articles and advertisements, nor are we responsible for the products and services advertised. Check with a healthcare professional regarding the appropriate use of any treatment.

Natural Awakenings is printed on recycled newsprint with soy-based ink.

PLEASE RECYCLE WHEN DONE ENJOYING. natural awakenings

April 2018

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Natural Awakenings is your guide to a healthier, more balanced life. In each issue readers find cutting-edge information on natural health, nutrition, fitness, personal growth, green living, creative expression and the products and services that support a healthy lifestyle.

Contents 7

10

ADVERTISING & SUBMISSIONS

TO REACH THE PUBLISHER Contact Melissa R. Burbank at publisher@nalamag.com. HOW TO ADVERTISE To advertise with Natural Awakenings or request a media kit, please contact Melissa Burbank at 504-872-3919 or email advertising@nalamag.com. Deadline for ads: the 14th of the month.

5 6

DIS ’N NAT

7

RAMP UP PERMITTING FOR DIVERSIONS

PLASTIC STRAWS BAN EXPANDS

8 10

RECIPE FOR SUCCESS

Pickled Blackened Shrimp over Cabbage Slaw dressed with Honey Mustard

12 14

UNDERSTANDING YOUR CARBON FOOTPRINT

7

MEL’S TAKE 5

8

TO COOL THE CLIMATE 16 GREEN BUSINESS CHANGE YOUR TIP WITH LIFECITY DIET Good Food Choices 16 ASK THE Enable Global Health LIFE COACH

What to Do to Save Our Wetlands

16

10 SIMPLE WAYS TO WAGE WAR ON PLASTIC POLLUTION

Festival Season Alone

HEALTHY HERO Christina Andrini

EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS Email articles, news items and ideas to: submissions@nalamag.com. Deadline for editorial: the 7th of the month. CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS Email Calendar Events to: calendar@nalamag.com Deadline for calendar: the 7th of the month. REGIONAL MARKETS Advertise your products or services in multiple markets! Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp. is a growing franchised family of locally owned magazines serving communities since 1994. To place your ad in other markets call 239-434-9392. For franchising opportunities call 239-530-1377 or visit NaturalAwakeningsMag.com.

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DEPARTMENTS 6 global briefs 7 local briefs 8 green living 10 recipe for success 14 green living

18 calendar 19 lagniappe 20 ongoing

calendar 23 the marketplace


Dis ’n Nat #NOSTRAWSNOLA Service to others is the rent you pay for your room here on Earth. –Muhammad Ali

DID YOU KNOW? THE PLANET’S AVERAGE SURFACE TEMPERATURE HAS RISEN ABOUT 2.0 DEGREES FAHRENHEIT (1.1 DEGREES CELSIUS) SINCE THE LATE 19TH CENTURY, a change driven largely by increased carbon dioxide and other human-made emissions into the atmosphere. Most of the warming occurred in the past 35 years, with 16 of the 17 warmest years on record occurring since 2001. Not only was 2016 the warmest year on record, but eight of the 12 months that make up the year — from January through September, with the exception of June — were the warmest on record for those respective months. https://www.climate .nasa.gov/evidence/

EARTH DAY is APRIL ��ND WWW.EARTHDAY.ORG

TOP POLLUTERS JUST 100 COMPANIES EMIT MOST GLOBAL EMISSIONS In July 2017, historic new research from environmental nonprofit CDP, in collaboration with the Climate Accountability Institute, revealed in the Carbon Majors Report that 71 percent of all global greenhouse gas emissions since 1988 can be traced to just 100 fossil fuel producers. It’s the first in a series of planned publications to improve transparency and highlight the role companies and their investors could play in tackling climate change. Offenders ExxonMobil, Shell, BP and Chevron are among the highest-emitting investorowned companies. If fossil fuels continue to be extracted at the same rate for the next 28 years as they were between 1988 and 2017, global average temperatures would be on course to rise by 7.2 degrees Fahrenheit by the end of this century, likely causing catastrophic consequences, including substantial species extinction and global food scarcity risks.

READ THE REPORT AT TINYURL.COM/CARBONTOP100LIST. natural awakenings

April 2018

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global briefs

BANS ON PLASTIC STRAWS IN RESTAURANTS EXPAND TO MORE CITIES by Daniel Victor

T

he latest is Malibu, Calif. Before that came Seattle; Davis and San Luis Obispo, Calif.; and Miami Beach and Fort Myers, Fla. They’re all cities that have banned or limited the use of plastic straws in restaurants. Straws, routinely placed in glasses of water or soda, represent a small percentage of the plastic that’s produced and consumed but often end up on beaches and in oceans. Advocates said laws aimed at cutting back on the use of plastic straws can help spur more significant behavioral changes. “I think a lot of people feel overwhelmed by the magnitude of the plastic problem,” said Diana Lofflin, the founder of StrawFree.org, an activist organization based in San Diego. “Giving up plastic straws is a small step, and an easy thing for people to get started on. From there, we can move on to larger projects.”

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The City Council in Malibu voted on Monday to bar restaurants from giving out plastic straws, utensils and stirrers. Similar measures are being considered in other coastal cities, including Berkeley, Calif. A bevy of restaurants across the country have also voluntarily stopped providing straws. It’s not just happening in the United States. Scotland plans to be rid of plastic straws by 2019, and Taiwan is banning single-use plastic items, including straws, cups and shopping bags, by 2030. Around the world, people have wrestled with the environmental effect of plastics, which do not naturally degrade and are frequently used once before settling in landfills, clogging storm drains or collecting in the ocean, often for long periods of time. Many countries have banned, limited or taxed the use of plastic bags. Some of the leading organizations in the plastics industry have said they agree with the idea of reducing the use of straws, but have said laws are the wrong way to go about it. They haven’t fought the laws with the same vigor they used to oppose bag bans. The American Chemistry Council has taken a softer approach to straw bans than it did with bags, suggesting that restaurants provide straws only when a customer asks for one. “We believe providing straws through an ‘on-demand’ system gives customers choice and helps prevent waste by ensuring that straws are distributed only to those who need them,” Steve Russell, vice president of the organization’s plastics division, said. Scott DeFife, vice president of government affairs for the Plastics Industry Association, said in an interview that the problem of ocean debris was complex, stemming more from inadequate resources for waste management. “We, as a nation, are not going to solve our marine debris issues by banning straws in restaurants,” he said. He said straws had become “the new poster child” for environmentalists.


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local briefs

MEL’S TAKE 5 YOUR PUBLISHER’S GUIDE TO ALL THINGS #NATURALINNOLA

WHAT CAN YOU DO TO SAVE OUR WETLANDS? STATE AND FEDERAL AGENCIES SIGN AGREEMENT TO RAMP UP PERMITTING FOR DIVERSIONS

O

n January 26, 2018, Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards announced the issuance of a memorandum of understanding between the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) and other state and federal agencies to collaborate on permitting for the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion. Located in Plaquemines Parish, the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion is a Louisiana Coastal Master Plan project that would direct sediment, freshwater and nutrients from the Mississippi River into nearby wetlands to build and maintain land in Louisiana’s Barataria Basin. “One step closer to the coastal restoration we need” In response, Kimberly Davis Reyher, Executive Director of the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana (CRCL) released the following statement: “We applaud Governor Edwards and the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority for working diligently with the federal government to meet the ambitious construction timeline of breaking ground on the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion by 2020. Today’s agreement will hopefully make that goal a reality.”

We live on a sinking river delta and the water is rising around us. We need to do this now. The best available science says harnessing the power of the Mississippi River through the Mid- Barataria Sediment Diversion is the most effective way to rebuild land along Louisiana’s disappearing coast. CRCL called for construction of sediment diversions nearly 30 years ago in our report, “Here Today, Gone Tomorrow?” We’re pleased with this step. But there are still many more between where we are now and construction of the project. It is critical that we keep this moving forward.” Founded in 1988, The Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana is the longest standing statewide organization driving bold, science-based action to rebuild Coastal Louisiana through outreach, restoration and advocacy. With the support of members and volunteers, CRCL advocates for strong coastal policies and implements restoration projects across coastal Louisiana. Contact: Jimmy Frederick, Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana, 225-767-4181, jimmy. frederick@crcl.org. Visit crcl.org.

1. GET TO KNOW YOUR WETLANDS. Spend time outdoors on any of the numerous trails, nature centers and refuges in the coastal region of Louisiana. 2. JOIN A NONPROFIT

ORGANIZATION that works to preserve the coast and its wetlands.

3. CONTRIBUTE FUNDS, SERVICES OR SUPPLIES to nonprofit organizations that work to preserve the coast. With decreases in government funding most non-profits cannot carry out their mission without active support from the public. 4. PARTICIPATE IN A WETLAND RESTORATION PLAN. Contribute your professional expertise or elbow grease to cleaning pollution, replanting or planning habitat restoration. 5. SPEAK OUT FOR PROTECTION for Louisiana’s coast and coastal wetlands, marshes, cheniers and barrier islands to your elected officials. Let them know the coast has a voting constituency. See www.americaswetlandresources. com/background_facts/links for a list of organizations involved in preserving our wetlands.

YOU CAN REACH MELISSA AT PUBLISHER@NALAMAG.COM AT ANY TIME. natural awakenings

April 2018

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green living

TO COOL THE CLIMATE, CHANGE YOUR DIET GOOD FOOD CHOICES ENABLE GLOBAL HEALTH by Judith Fertig 8

New Orleans

nalamag.com

Three years ago, The New York Times added a new word to the world’s food vocabulary: Climatarian (n.) A diet whose primary goal is to reverse climate change. This includes eating locally produced food (to reduce energy spent in transportation), choosing pork and poultry instead of beef and lamb (to limit gas emissions), and using every part of ingredients (apple cores, cheese rinds, etc.) to limit food waste.


C

hanging our food choices to support this model can have a ripple effect. Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara, in a 2017 study published in the journal Climatic Change, looked at how diets impact personal health, the healthcare system and climate. They found that adopting a more plant-based diet reduces the relative risk of coronary heart disease, colorectal cancer and Type 2 diabetes by 20 to 40 percent. National annual health care costs could drop from $93 billion to $77 billion. Direct greenhouse gas emissions could annually drop 489 to 1,821 pounds per person. Such a perspective involves considering water usage, greenhouse gas emissions and carbon footprint—the energy required to cultivate, harvest and transport food—plus processing associated food waste.  Here are some top choices.

Foods that Go Easy on Water Hydroponic greens are hands-down winners. The Shelton Family Farm, near Whittier, North Carolina, weekly produces 10,000 to 12,000 heads of hydroponically grown Bibb lettuce. The controlled environment and carefully engineered nutrient delivery systems maximize all resources. “It’s an enclosed system that runs 24/7, and it’s highly efficient from a waterusage standpoint because we recycle the water,” says William Shelton Jr., a fourthgeneration family farmer. “The only water that’s actually consumed is what’s taken up and transpired through the plants.” In a moderate climate, energy costs to recycle the water and keep the plants at an even temperature are moderate as well. Dry-tilled heirloom tomatoes, okra, melons and quinoa are drought-tolerant and only use available rainfall.   

Foods that Go Easy on Greenhouse Gases

Hopeful Developments

Plants beat meat. “Livestock farming produces from 20 to 50 percent of all manmade greenhouse gas emissions,” says nutritionist and climate activist Jane Richards, of GreenEatz, in Mountain View, California. “You can reduce your footprint by a quarter by cutting down on red meats such as beef and lamb.” An exception: the vegetarian staple of rice. According to researchers at Project Drawdown, a climate solutions organization in Sausalito, California, rice cultivation is responsible for at least 10 percent of agricultural greenhouse gas emissions and up to 19 percent of global methane emissions. New farming techniques, like mid-season draining of the rice paddies, could cut methane emissions by at least 35 percent. Richards notes that “Meat, cheese and eggs have the highest carbon footprint; fruit, vegetables, beans and nuts, much lower. The carbon footprint of a vegetarian diet is about half that of a meat-lover’s diet.” Root crops such as carrots, radishes, potatoes and beets have a lower carbon footprint than above-ground plants due to less food waste. A beautiful beet is easier to grow than a bell pepper that blemishes more easily. Seasonal, regional fruit, vegetables, herbs and honey have a lighter carbon impact because they are transported shorter distances. Usually what grows best in a region and is consumed locally is best for the climate. Foods naturally suited to their environment grow and taste better, and are packed with more nutrients, reports Sustainable Table, an educational nonprofit that builds healthy communities through sustainable eating habits (SustainableTable.org).

New agricultural developments can also benefit our climate environment. According to Project Drawdown research, perennial grains and cereals could be pivotal in reaching soil, carbon and energy targets. The Land Institute, in Salina, Kansas, has been working with the Rodale Institute, in Berks County, Pennsylvania, to develop a perennial wheat that would not have to be planted from seed each year. This would save soil, carbon and both human and machine energy. Kernza, a new perennial grain proven to prosper in natural grasslands like the Great Plains, is not yet widely distributed. Maria Speck, author of Simply Ancient Grains, advises, “With up to 15-foot-long roots, it can be harvested for five years and uses less fertilizer than conventional wheat. Kernza tastes almost like a cross between rice and wheat— sweet, grassy, mesmerizing.” Michael Pollan, author of Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual and creator of the film Food, Inc., suggests we keep it simple: “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants.” Climatarians would add another guideline—eat as locally as possible. Judith Fertig writes cookbooks plus foodie fiction from Overland Park, KS (JudithFertig.com).

e natural awakenings

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recipe for success

EAT FIT AT FRENCH QUARTER FEST! Ochsner’s Eat Fit team of dietitians has worked with restaurant vendors to incorporate nutritious, delicious dishes at this year’s French Quarter Festival presented by Chevron – just look for the Eat Fit seal of approval on menu board! With more than 20 stages throughout the French Quarter, the French Quarter Festival presented by Chevron celebrates local music and represents every genre from traditional and contemporary. April 12-15. Admission is free. Stop by the Kingfish booth for just one of the many Eat Fit options you’ll find, or try this DIY recipe at home.

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New Orleans

nalamag.com


BY KINGFISH KITCHEN & COCKTAILS

MAKES 4 SERVINGS

EAT FIT NOLA

Pickled Blackened Shrimp over Cabbage Slaw dressed with Honey Mustard 1 pound jumbo shrimp, peeled, with tail-on 1 tablespoon low-sodium blackening seasoning (e.g., Chef Paul Prudhomme’s Blackened Seafood Magic) ¼ cup seasoned rice vinegar 4 cups shredded cabbage 2 tablespoons honey mustard (recipe below)

PICKLED BLACKENED SHRIMP

HONEY MUSTARD

Season shrimp generously with blackening seasoning. Sear in a hot pan with oil. Cool immediately. Toss with seasoned rice vinegar and set aside. Toss shredded cabbage in honey mustard (recipe to the right). Add heaping handful to plate then top with pickled blackened shrimp.

2 cups honey 2 cups dijon mustard Dash of salt

For more ways to spice up your table, check out Ochsner Eat Fit recipes at EatFitNOLA.com

3 cups sherry vinegar 4 cups olive oil

Mix honey, mustard and dash of salt. Whisk in vinegar. Add oil slowly, whisking continuously to emulsify.

Per serving: 200 calories, 10 grams fat, 1.5 grams saturated fat, 575 mg sodium, 13 grams carbohydrate, 2 grams fiber, 7 grams sugar, 17 grams protein. natural awakenings

April 2018

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UNDERSTANDING YOUR CARBON FOOTPRINT 12

New Orleans

nalamag.com


W

ithin the last few decades, more people around the world have become aware of their impact on global warming and climate change. However, it can be difficult to understand your personal impact on climate change. This is where the carbon footprint comes in. By understanding your carbon footprint, you can find ways to reduce your impact on the environment.

WHAT IS A CARBON FOOTPRINT? A carbon footprint is the total amount of greenhouse gases you produce directly or indirectly. In this case, greenhouse gases are usually expressed in tons of carbon dioxide, or CO2. You produce a certain amount of greenhouse gases or carbon dioxide every time you drive your car, take a trip, heat or cool your home, buy food and purchase electronics and other items.

WHAT IS GLOBAL WARMING? Global warming is a phenomenon where the average temperature of the planet rises. As the temperatures rise, the additional heat causes the Earth’s delicate ecosystem to change. For example, the glaciers and polar ice melts, affecting sea levels. Rising temperatures also have an impact on the weather, causing abnormal weather patterns and increasing the number of extreme weather events, including droughts, floods and tornadoes.

HOW DOES YOUR CARBON FOOTPRINT CONTRIBUTE TO GLOBAL WARMING? Greenhouse gases, such as CO2, capture heat that comes from the sun. As the amount of CO2 and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere increases, more heat is trapped, causing the Earth’s temperature to rise. The more CO2 and other greenhouse gases you create, the more you contribute to global warming.

HOW CAN YOU CALCULATE YOUR CARBON FOOTPRINT? One of the easiest ways to get an estimate of your carbon footprint is to simply use a carbon footprint calculator. You can find a free calculator at carbonindependent. org. The calculator allows you to input your electricity use or get a quick estimate if you do not have your bills on hand. All you will need to do is enter your household data and your personal lifestyle and travel choices. The world average for CO2 production is 4 tons per household per year. The U.S. average is a staggering 20 tons of CO2 per household per year, far more than China and India, which produce 3.2 tons and 1.2 tons per household per year, respectively. The estimated sustainable figure is 1.5 tons of CO2 emissions per household per year.

IS THERE A WAY TO SLOW DOWN OR PREVENT GLOBAL WARMING? Every person has an impact on the environment and contributes to global warming. Anything you consume produces CO2 and other greenhouse gases. As such, reducing your carbon footprint is done by either consuming less or changing what you consume. This could potentially mean going solar instead of relying on natural gas to run your home, using alternative forms of transportation instead of driving or altering your food habits. Even small changes add up and can start to reverse the trend of over-consumption.

natural awakenings

April 2018

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green living

10 SIMPLE WAYS TO WAGE WAR ON PLASTIC POLLUTION

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lastic is a wonder material, with endless uses. It’s also an environmental menace because it’s not easily biodegradable. It litters the world’s beaches, kills marine life and is a huge contributor to landfill sites. Phthalates and Bisphenol A, chemicals used in plastic food and drink containers, are known to have the potential to damage human health, with extra risks for babies and children. You can’t avoid plastic products, but you can cut down on their use.

1. DITCH PLASTIC CARRIER BAGS – not only single use bags, but also the sturdier type that is reusable. It’s estimated that a staggering 100 billion plastic bags, made using 12 million barrels of oil, are used annually in the U.S. alone. Use a “bag for life,” made of a washable material that degrades, such as cotton or hemp. Reused plastic bags may harbour bacteria and can be a health hazard.

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6. THINK DESIGN. Many goods include plastic purely to add color, not functionality. Cutlery and many household utensils works just as well without plastic handles and last longer in the dishwasher. 2. FIND SUBSTITUTES FOR PLASTIC ITEMS IN THE HOME. Buy wooden clothes pegs. Use cotton cloths instead of sponges for washing. If you have to use sponge scourers, you can wash and reuse them when they get grubby. Plastic tubs for food leftovers last for years and are the ecofriendly alternative to miles of clingfilm wrap. 3. SAY NO TO BUBBLE WRAP. Tightly packed crumpled paper usually does the job just as well. Also, don’t use padded envelopes if the contents aren’t delicate. 4. GO RETRO WITH CHILDREN’S (AND PETS’) TOYS AND FURNISHINGS. The plastic versions are highly likely to go to landfill in only a couple of years. Wooden or wicker toy boxes and children’s chairs look better and are recyclable. Good quality items even have a resale value, and some become treasured family heirlooms. 5. SHOP SMART WHEN IT COMES TO PACKAGING. Lots of manufacturers traditionally use or have switched to paper packaging: eggs, coffee, washing powder, toilet paper and cat litter are just a few. Buy loose fruit and vegetables instead of prepackaged. Read the labels on packaging. You may think that those clear plastic bags that products like apples are packed in are recyclable, but often they aren’t.

7. SQUASH OR SMASH YOUR TRASH. Compressing the stuff you’re throwing out could halve the number of trash bags you put out for collection. 8. BEWARE OF POLYPROPYLENE, a synthetic plastic polymer that lurks in places you’d least expect it. It’s widely used in teabags, for example. It’s also very commonly used in carpets and mats. Quality alternatives are always available. 9. GARDENS ARE PLACES FOR NATURE TO THRIVE, SO WHY NOT FIT THEM OUT ACCORDINGLY? Plastic planters and garden furniture may be cheap but it’s not durable. Terracotta or ceramic pots last forever, age beautifully and are in keeping with their environment. They also have a resale value if in good condition (which isn’t hard to do). 10. GIVE UP CHEWING GUM. One of its key ingredients is a synthetic rubber known as polymerized styrene-butadiene. It might not be conventional plastic, but it’s still a by-product of petroleum that fouls sidewalks worldwide.

It’s impossible to go plastic-free, but reduction, recycling and awareness of the hazard it poses, to people and the planet, are the first steps in a desperately needed global clean-up.


FIT NOLA'S

GREEN BUSINESS TIP

WITH LIFECITY

DID YOU KNOW THAT THE MAJORITY OF AMERICA’S CARBON FOOTPRINT IS DUE TO THE TRANSPORTATION SECTOR?

Y

ou and your business can support clean transportation by supporting public transportation and the use of electric vehicles. LifeCity member, Solar Alternatives, focuses on providing affordable, productive, and durable clean energy solutions for the Gulf South. Additionally they do a lot of policy work to promote clean transportation through electric vehicles that don’t emit emissions.

ASK THE LIFE COACH

HERE’S A FEW THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT EVs: 1. Unlike many hyrbids, electric vehicles are quite fast and fun to drive! (they are actually making special tires that can handle their torque capabilities!)

with Carla Robertson

Carla is a master certified life coach in New Orleans. Have a question for Carla or want to learn more about her programs, events or services? Contact her at carla@ livingwildandprecious.com or 504-507-0687.

It’s festival season but I am lonely and have no one to go with. Everyone else is out enjoying themselves and I’m feeling miserable. What can I do?

– Margaret

M

argaret, the first thing you want to assess is just how blue you are. Are you having trouble managing your day to day activities? Is everything feeling flat and dull? You may be more than lonely. You may be depressed, and if so you should reach out to your health care practitioner for support. If the rest of your life is running smoothly and you’re simply short on social buddies, you have a bunch of op-

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New Orleans

2. The cost of fuel is about a quarter and a half of what it is for gas vehicles 3. There is virtually no maintenance, no oil changes or transmission work 4. They are a lot quieter, and much easier to drive. If you’re interested in purchasing an electric vehicle, some good options are the Chevy Volt, Nissan Leaf, Hyundai Ioniq, and Tesla Model 3. All should cost you under $40,000 new and under $10,000 used.

nalamag.com

tions. Try going by yourself. You may be surprised at how much you can enjoy events you thought you needed friends to attend. Spend your time people watching. Choose exactly what you want to do. Strike up a conversation with an interesting stranger and you might have a friend by the end of the day. You can also try connecting with likeminded folks on platforms like Facebook groups or Meetup. I’ve

witnessed many new friendships blossom while hosting my NOLA Women Living Wild and Precious Meetup, and there are dozens of social groups like this to join. Lastly, and this is the most challenging, take a careful look at yourself. Are you someone that others would enjoy spending time with? Do you possess the qualities you’re looking for in the friends you seek? Sometimes we have a blind spot that we don’t realize is energetically pushing others away. Perhaps we have gotten in the habit of complaining all the time, or we’ve grown harsh and judgmental, or we talk only about ourselves. We perceive the world as a mirror of how we see ourselves, so once you refocus on the lovable and amazing aspects of yourself, you’ll be more likely to attract lovable and friendly people to your orbit.


HEALTHY HERO CHRISTINA ANDRINI

J

abi Haki Yoga founder Christina Andrini has a vision of creating a community centered around wellness, and to facilitate this dream she hosts various events throughout New Orleans that focus on healthy choices and healthy eating. Christina is also a health pioneer in New Orleans by creating one of the first Aqua Yoga classes that broaden yoga’s reach to more populations. Christina continues to be a pioneer in her yoga outreach in the New Orleans Latin community, amongst service members and veterans. Currently, Christina teaches a variety of yoga and wellness classes throughout New Orleans; to learn more about Christina and her class covering, email her at info@ jabhaktiyogafoundation.org.

Fit NOLA & Whole Foods Market together launched Healthy Heroes—a program to celebrate community members leading healthy efforts across New Orleans. Each month, residents are invited to NOMINATE A HEALTHY HERO ONLINE at nola.gov/ health-department/fit-nola/healthy-hero/.


calendarofevents

TELL NOLA WHAT YOU’RE DOING! All calendar events must be received via email by the 7th of the month. Email calendar@nalamag.com for guidelines and to submit entries.

mark your calendar Blue Cliff College, Massage Therapy Department, Continuing Education, CEUs for LMTs May 26-28, 2018

Ortho-Bionomy: Chapman’s Reflexes, Debby Benson, Advanced Instructor SOBI

June 23-24, 2018

Atoning Chakra Massage, Toshii Cooper, LMT & Reiki Master Instructor

August 4 & 5, 2018

Lymphatic Drainage, Tamika Dillon, Certified Lymphologist

October 13-14, 2018

Advanced Myofascial Techniques Magnus Eklund, BCSI For information: 504-293-0972. PeggyS@ BlueCliffCollege.com

APRIL 1, 2018

Free Fridays at NOBL – 12-10pm. New Orleans Boulder Lounge, 1746 Tchoupitoulas St, New Orleans. ClimbNOBL.com

Artivism Dance Class – 12:30-2pm. Art Klub, 1941 Arts St, New Orleans. ArtivismDanceTheatre.com

Studio 504: Disco for Dance with Big Freedia – 5:30-9:30pm. $35 Advance, $50 Door. New Orleans Jazz Market, 1436 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd, New Orleans. CommitChange.com

April Fools’ Day Parade – 5-8pm. $50 to join. Mimi’s in the Marigny, 2601 Royal St, New Orleans. KreweDuFool.com

APRIL 2, 2018

Yogalates at the Plaza – 5:30pm. Also April 9, 16, 23, & 30. Join Footprints To Fitness for an awesome Yoga + Pilates Fusion Class! Free. Duncan Plaza, 1201 Perdido St, New Orleans. FootprintsToFitness.com Art of Asana: Yoga at the Ogden – 6-8pm. $10, Free for Members. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St, New Orleans. OgdenMuseum.org

APRIL 3, 2018

Ideal Protein Weight Loss Program – 5:30pm. Dr. Debbi Hannan presents: The Ideal Protein Weight Loss Program at Hannan Wellness. Free. 101 Clearview Pkwy at Airline Dr, New Orleans. 504-454-2000

APRIL 4, 2018

Home Tweet Home – 4pm. Through April 8th. City Park, 1 Palm Dr, New Orleans. SCapley@NOCP.org

APRIL 5, 2018

Sketching Animals in Audubon – 9:30am-3pm. $130. Audubon Nature Institute, 6500 Magazine St, New Orleans. BlueEaselClub.com or Carol@CarolPeebles.com to register. Palmetto Pals Kick-off Party – 5:30-8:30pm. Free. Woodlands Conservancy, 449 F Edward Hebert Blvd, Belle Chasse. WoodlandsConservancy.org Rooftop Sip & Flow Yoga Social – 6-8pm. $10. Catahoula Hotel, 914 Union St, New Orleans. NOLATribeYoga.com LearnToLive 2018 Fundraising Gala – 7-10pm. $125, Student $65. Beauregard-Keyes House, 1113 Chartres St, New Orleans. LearnToLiveGlobal.org

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APRIL 6, 2018

Asylum Chorus Easter Show – 11am-1pm. $35. Preservation Hall, 726 St Peter St, New Orleans. PreservationHall.TunesTub.com

Beyond Incarceration Summit – 6pm. Through April 8th. Free. St Charles Avenue Baptist Church, 7100 St Charles Ave, New Orleans. TheGraduates.net Femme Friday: Cross Stich & Book Swap – 7-9pm. $25 Advance, $30 Door. Mini Art Center, 341 Seguin St, New Orleans. MiniArtCenter.com

APRIL 7, 2018

Poolside Tribe Yoga – 9:30-11am. Also April 14, 21, & 28. $15. The Drifter Hotel, 3522 Tulane Ave, New Orleans. NOLATribeYoga.com

APRIL 8, 2018

Woofstock – 8:30am-3pm. Make sure to grab the family, four-legged companions included, and head to the highly anticipated festival that brings over 3,000 people each spring for one day of peace, love and doggie poop! Castine Center, 63350 Pelican Dr, Mandeville. STHumane.org/Woofstock 1st Annual Mudbugs and Music – 2-5pm. $20, $37 VIP. Ugly Dog Saloon, 401 Andrew Higgins Blvd, New Orleans. TeamGleason.org Spring Fairies – 3-5pm. Longue Vue House & Gardens, 7 Bamboo Rd, New Orleans. TimeWornTales. Bigcartel.com

APRIL 10, 2018

Ideal Protein Weight Loss Program – 12:30pm. Dr. Debbi Hannan presents: The Ideal Protein Weight Loss Program at Hannan Wellness. Free. 101 Clearview Pkwy at Airline Dr, New Orleans. 504-454-2000. Swedish Massage Clinic – 12:45 & 2:15pm. Also April 18. Help a student with their education at our student massage clinic. NMT is a deep massage that targets a problem area such as low back pain. $30. Blue Cliff College, Clearview Mall, across from food court, Metairie. Info or appointment: 504-293-0972


Neuro Muscular Therapy Clinic – 6:15 & 7:30pm. Also April 17th & 24th. Help a student with their education at our student massage clinic. NMT is a deep massage that targets a problem area such as low back pain. $30. Blue Cliff College, Clearview Mall, across from food court, Metairie. Info or appointment: 504-293-0972 Visions of Our Global Future: Respecting the Tension of the Opposites – 7:30pm. $15, Students $10, Members Free. Unitarian Universalist Church, 5212 S. Claiborne, New Orleans. JungNewOrleans.org

APRIL 13, 2018

Neuro Muscular Therapy Clinic – 12:45 & 2:15pm. Also April 20, 25 & 27. Help a student with their education at our student massage clinic. NMT is a deep massage that targets a problem area such as low back pain. $30. Blue Cliff College, Clearview Mall, across from food court, Metairie. Info or appointment: 504-293-0972

APRIL 14, 2018

Bio Blitz – 8am-9pm. City Park, 1 Palm Dr, New Orleans. CAS. LoyNo.edu/Environment/BioBlitz Bridge Run – 8:30-11:30am. $20-30. St Charles Parish West Bank Bridge Park, 13825 River Rd, Luling. uwaysc.org/bridge-run Home: A Collection of Children’s Art – 10am-2pm. Treo, 3835 Tulane Ave, New Orleans.

APRIL 19, 2018

Peaceful Mamas Monthly Class – 7:45-9:15pm. Wild Lotus Yoga, 4842 Perrier St, New Orleans. TeamLotus@ WildLotusYoga.com or WildLotusYoga.com

APRIL 21, 2018

Girls on the Run NOLA Spring 5K – 8-11am. $30-40. Audubon Park, 6500 Magazine St, New Orleans. RacePlanner.com or GOTRNOLA.org Family Fun Fest – 9am-1pm. Bring families together and focus on health and nutrition in a playful, yet active way. Wild Wayne of 93.3, DJ Huh Brah aka Ike Numberz and our celebrity chef, Chris Hayes of the Food Network will be in attendance and vendors include GirlTrek, Fit NOLA, Geaux Cycle Nola and The US Black Ambassador (LeighAnna Kingvalsky.) Vanisia Winston Evans Park, 5100 LaSalle St, New Orleans. NORDC.org NOMA Edible Book Day – 10am-2pm. New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, New Orleans. SCork@ NOMA.org or 504-658-4117 Crawfish for Cancer – 125pm. $75 Advance, $100 Door. Mardi Gras World, 1380 Port of New Orleans Pl, New Orleans. Contact@CrawfishForCancer.org

APRIL 22, 2018

APRIL 15, 2018

Motorcycle Open Track Day – 8am-5pm. $150. NOLA Motorsports Park, 11075 Nicolle Blvd, Avondale. msreg.com/ bikeotdapril2018

APRIL 17, 2018

Walk With a Doc featuring Dr. Hebert – 2-4pm. Dr. Hebert facilitates a personal, non-clinical conversation around health. Daughters of Charity will do free health screenings out of their mobile unit, Fit NOLA/NORD is sponsoring the fitness line dance instructor, and Q93 will be broadcasting live with a DJ. Free. Lafitte Greenway near Lemann Playground, 628 N Claiborne Ave, New Orleans. wearefitnola@ gmail.com or fit.nola.gov

Photo Walk & Social – 9:30am1:30pm. NOMA Besthoff Sculpture Garden, 1 Collins C Diboll Circle, New Orleans. Eye-Creative.com Ideal Protein Weight Loss Program – 5:30pm. Dr. Debbi Hannan presents: The Ideal Protein Weight Loss Program at Hannan Wellness. Free. 101 Clearview Pkwy at Airline Dr, New Orleans. 504-454-2000 MCNO Mixer – 5:30-7:30pm. Pearl Wine Co, 3700 Orleans Ave, New Orleans. MCNO.org Swedish Massage Clinic – 6:15 & 7:30pm. Also April 24. Help a student with their education at our student massage clinic. NMT is a deep massage that targets a problem area such as low back pain. $30. Blue Cliff College, Clearview Mall, across from food court, Metairie. Info or appointment: 504-293-0972

APRIL 24, 2018

Ideal Protein Weight Loss Program – 12:30pm. Dr. Debbi Hannan presents: The Ideal Protein Weight Loss Program at Hannan Wellness. Free. 101 Clearview Pkwy at Airline Dr, New Orleans. 504-454-2000

APRIL 26, 2018

18th Annual Tree School – 7:30am-4:30pm. Free. Jefferson Performing Arts Center, 6400 Airline Dr, Metairie. FriendsOfJefferson TheBeautiful.org Yappy Hour Hosted by NOLA Bombshells – 6-8pm. Urban South Brewery, 1645 Tchoupitoulas St, New Orleans. NOLABombshells.com

APRIL 27, 2018

Experiments in Dollmaking with Emma & Robert Connolly – 9:30am-2:30pm. $65. Uptown Needle & Craftworks, 4610 Magazine St, New Orleans. 504-302-9434 Zoo To Do for Kids – 5-9pm. Members $20, Non-Members $25, Early Admittance $40. Audubon Zoo, 6500 Magazine St, New Orleans. AudubonNatureInstitute.org Fatherless Print Posse Show – 10pm. Also April 28th at 8pm. Gallery Two, 831 Royal St, New Orleans. WeAreFatherless.com

APRIL 28, 2018

Saturday Morning Massage Clinic – 9:15 & 10:30am. Help a student with their education at our student massage clinic. Swedish Massage Clinic. $30. Blue Cliff College, Clearview Mall, across from food court, Metairie. Info or appointment: 504-293-0972

APRIL 29, 2018

Marche Creole 4th Sunday Market – 11am-3pm. Established to highlight local artists, wine makers and community partners. The market is free and open to the public and will feature partner organizations. 1001 S Broad Ave, New Orleans. marchecreole@ gmail.com

APR 2018

FOSSIL FREE FEST APRIL 2-8, 2018 In New Orleans, we know that times of transition are best met with community and celebration. Our society’s transition from the Fossil Fuel Era is no different. Timed to precede the Jazz & Heritage Festival Presented by Shell, Fossil Free Festival will unite community for one week with art, food, music, film screenings, and workshops, carving out a dedicated and open space for us to dig deep into the ethics and complexities of funding art and education with fossil fuel money and to imagine a #FossilFreeCulture. For full event description and schedule details, visit www. fossilfreefest.org. All Fossil Free Fest events are free and open to the public. SCHEDULE: FILMS APRIL 2-5, 6:00pm  The Broad Theater  Evening feature film screenings and StoryShift shorts salon. FEST APRIL 6-8  Three days of food, art, music and conversation  @ Joan Mitchell Center  and Grow Dat Youth Farm  

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sunday

Tai Chi in the Park – 8-8:45am. Last Sunday of the Month. Peristyle in City Park, 42 Dreyfous Dr, New Orleans. OchsnerFitness.com. Introduction to Zen Meditation – 8:30am (except the first Sunday of the month). By donation. Midcity Zen. 3248 Castiglione St, New Orleans. MidCityZen.org. Mindfulness Meditation – 8:5010am. Meditation, a reading and discussion. 1st & 3rd Sundays. Free/By Donation. Yoga Sanga, 2013 Claiborne St, Mandeville. ResourceForLife@bellsouth.net. Community Hot Quickie – 9-10am. Sixty minute, Bikram-inspired hot yoga. Same therapeutic practice, less time! All levels welcome; no class package required – by donation every week! Yes, Yoga. 8338 Oak St, New Orleans. YesYogaNOLA@gmail.com. YesYogaNOLA.co. Sunday Morning Meditation – 9am. Unity of New Orleans Spiritual Center, 3722 St Charles Ave, New Orleans. 504-899-3390. UnityNewOrleans.org. A Course in Miracles – 9:30am. Unity of New Orleans Spiritual Center, 3722 St Charles Ave, New Orleans. 504-899-3390. UnityNewOrleans.org.

TELL NOLA WHAT YOU’RE DOING! All calendar events must be received via email by the 7th of the month. Email calendar@nalamag.com for guidelines and to submit entries.

Basic/Beginners Aikido Class – 3:30pm-4:30pm. Practice the art of peace. First class free. NOLA Aikido, 3909 Bienville St, Ste. 103 in Mid-City, New Orleans. 504-2084861. Info@NOLAAikido.com. Yin Yoga – 5-6pm. Gentle, restorative yoga: Long holds. Deep stretching. Props. Yoga newbies encouraged! Yes, Yoga. 8338 Oak St, New Orleans. YesYogaNOLA@ gmail.com YesYogaNOLA.co encouraged! Yes, Yoga. 8338 Oak St, YesYogaNOLA.co

monday

Compost NOW – 4-5:30pm. Free. Accept fruits and vegetables scraps, coffee grounds, tea bags, eggshells, nut shells, seed shells, plain bread, grains, and rice. No meat, bones, or dairy. Bring in a paper or compostable bag or a reusable container and freeze your scraps. Children’s Resource Library.

Unity of New Orleans Spiritual Center Sunday Service – 11am. 3722 St Charles Ave, New Orleans. 504-899-3390. UnityNewOrleans.org.

Connected Warriors Yoga – 12-1pm. Higher Power Yoga and Cycle, 514 City Park Ave. Free Yoga for Veterans, Service members, active, military, and their friends and family.

New Orleans

Core + More! – 6-6:50pm. Transform NOLA, 8509 Oak St. 985-6402648. mia@TransformNOLA.com. www.TransformNOLA.com.

Powerpath Mastermind Miracles Sangha – 6:30pm. 3722 St Charles Ave, New Orleans. 504-899-3390. UnityNewOrleans.org.

Basic/Beginners Aikido Class – 6:15-7:15pm. Practice the art of peace. First class free. NOLA Aikido, 3909 Bienville St, Ste 103, in Mid-City, New Orleans. 504-2084861. Info@NOLAAikido.com.

wednesday

Gentle Yoga – 10:30-11:30am. Free. Lyons Rec Center, 624 Louisiana Ave.

Qigong/Dao-In – Noon. Tues & Thurs. Bring a mat. $5/class. New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St Claude Ave, 2nd Fl Upper, Ste. 220, New Orleans. 985-467-0900 or dc@affordablehealingarts.com.

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Northshore Table Tennis Club – 6:30-9:30pm. $5 per session. Abita Recreation District #11. 22517 Hwy 36, Abita Springs.

Basic/Beginners Aikido Class – 6:15pm-7:15pm. Practice the art of peace. First class free. NOLA Aikido, 3909 Bienville St, Ste. 103 in Mid-City, New Orleans. 504-2084861. Info@NOLAAikido.com.

Strength Palace – 10-11am. Nopressure group exercise class for real people promoting positivity and strength for all. 4210 St Claude Ave, inside Shaolin-Do Kung Fu & Tai Chi, New Orleans.

Eckankar – 11am-12pm. Discover what Eckankar can do for you to enrich your life with Divine Guidance. NO Healing Center, 2371 St Claude Ave, 4th floor.

HIIT at the Peristyle – 6-7:30pm. All levels. Bring a water bottle and a friend. Free. Peristyle on City Park.

Qi-Gym – 10-11am. $10 Donation. First Class Free. Broadmoor Arts & Wellness Center. 3900 General Taylor St, New Orleans. BrainHeartBalance.com or 504309-0002.

tuesday

Young Yogis – 3:45-4:30pm. Fun, playful class for kids 4 to 8 years old to strengthen their bodies with yoga poses and learn to focus and center themselves with breathing and meditation. Music, games, and stories complete the mind-body connection. Led by Heidi, a certified Kidding Around yoga instructor and experienced elementary

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meat, bones, or dairy. Bring in a paper or compostable bag or a reusable container and freeze your scraps. Mid-City Library. Aerial Yoga: Power – 6-7pm. Get superhero strong in a fun, vibrant class that utilizes aerial hammocks to support and challenge you in traditional and unique yoga poses. Accessible to all fitness levels – even a true beginner. $15 drop-in. Transform NOLA. 8509 Oak St, New Orleans. 985-6402648. TransformNOLA.com

Yoga in the Cathedral – 5:306:30PM. Bring your own mat. Free (donations accepted.) Christ Church Cathedral, 2919 St. Charles Ave, New Orleans.

Beginners Karate Class – 5:306:15pm. Also Wednesday and Friday. First class free. LA Karate Association Dojo, 706C Phosphor Ave, Metairie. 504-835-6825. LKAKarate.com

Yogananda Studies – 9:30am. Free. Unity of New Orleans Spiritual Center, 3722 St Charles Ave, New Orleans. 504-899-3390. UnityNewOrleans.org.

Sunday Celebration Service – 11am. Unity of Metairie. 3939 Veterans Memorial Blvd, 504-8857575. UnityOfMetairie.com.

school teacher. $49/six classes; $10 drop-in. Transform NOLA. 8509 Oak St, New Orleans. 985-6402648. TransformNOLA.com

Prayer and Healing – 11am. Unity of New Orleans Spiritual Center, 3722 St Charles Ave. 504-8993390. UnityNewOrleans.org. Compost NOW – 12:30-2pm. Free. Accept fruits and vegetables scraps, coffee grounds, tea bags, eggshells, nut shells, seed shells, plain bread, grains, and rice. No meat, bones, or dairy. Bring in a paper or compostable bag or a reusable container and freeze your scraps. Behind Latter Library/ Friends of NOPL. Wellness Wednesdays: Ideal Protein – 5-5:30pm. Majoria Drug Store, 888 Terry Parkway, Terrytown. 504-392-1551. melissa@majoria.com. www.idealmajoria.com. Community Meditation – 6-7pm. Love Offering. Unity of Metairie, 3939 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Metairie. 504-885-7575. UnityOf Metairie.com. Compost NOW – 6-7:30pm. Free. Accept fruits and vegetables scraps, coffee grounds, tea bags, eggshells, nut shells, seed shells, plain bread, grains, and rice. No

Free Spirited Yoga – 6:30pm. Free. Join NOLA Tribe Yoga for Free Spirited Yoga every Wednesday night. Warm up 5K at 5:35pm. The Tchoup Yard, 405 Third St, New Orleans. Inner Flow Yoga – 6:30pm. Enhances lymphatic flow, digestion, immunity, balance, and relaxation. Great for beginners! $10. The Esplanade at City Park Yoga Studio, 3443 Esplanade Ave, 2nd Fl, New Orleans, LA. A Course in Miracles – 6:30pm. Facilitated by Mary Beth Ellis. Unity of New Orleans Spiritual Center, 3722 St Charles Ave, New Orleans. 504-899-3390. UnityNewOrleans.org. A Course in Miracles Discussion – 7pm. Join Rev Jack Fowler. Love offering. Unity of Metairie, 3939 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Metairie. 504-885-7575. UnityOfMetairie.com. Level Up! Intermediate Yoga – 7:30-8:30pm. A challenging practice to bring you to the next level! Arm balances. Backbends. Inversions. 95 degrees. Come be playful and learn to fall in style! Yes, Yoga. 8338 Oak St, New Orleans. YesYogaNOLA@gmail. com. YesYogaNOLA.co


thursday Uptown Hot Vinyasa – 9-10am. New class time! A dynamic, heated flow practice. Come sweat and move like you! All levels welcome. Yes, Yoga. 8338 Oak St, New Orleans. YesYogaNOLA@gmail. com. YesYogaNOLA.co Qigong/Dao-In – Noon. Tues & Thurs. Bring a mat. $5/class. New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St Claude Ave, 2nd Fl Upper, Ste. 220, New Orleans. 985-467-0900 or dc@affordablehealingarts.com. Vinyasa Flow Yoga –6-7:15pm. Free. Popp’s Bandstand, in front of Morning Call in City Park. 56 Dreyfous drive. Bring a mat, a water bottle, and a friend. Compost NOW – 6-7:30pm. Free. Accept fruits and vegetables scraps, coffee grounds, tea bags, eggshells, nut shells, seed shells, plain bread, grains, and rice. No meat, bones, or dairy. Bring in a paper or compostable bag or a reusable container and freeze your scraps. Alvar Library. Northshore Table Tennis Club – 6:30-9:30pm. $5 per session. Abita Recreation District #11. 22517 Hwy 36, Abita Springs. Peaceful Mamas Monthly Class for Busy Moms – 7:45-9:15pm. Wild Lotus Yoga Uptown. 504899-0047. TeamLotus@WildLotus Yoga.com. WildLotusYoga.com.

friday Tiny Trees – 10-10:30am. Simple, animated poses, games, music, breathing, and meditation are all a part of this sweet, fun, class designed especially for you and your child. One adult can attend with up to two children, ages 1 to 3. $49/six classes; $10 drop-in. Transform NOLA. 8509 Oak St, New Orleans. 985-640-2648. TransformNOLA.com Happier Hour Wine Tasting – 5-7pm. Free. Spirit Wine, 3500 Magazine St, New Orleans. Jammin’ Community Hot Quickie – 5:30-6:30pm. Bikramstyle class to music. Live DJ and Oak St. Happy Hour on the fourth Friday of every month! Donation suggested. Yes, Yoga. 8338 Oak St,

New Orleans. YesYogaNOLA@ gmail.com. YesYogaNOLA.co New Orleans Spiritual Awakening Group – 6-9pm. New Orleans Spiritual Awakening Group sponsored by Homeward Bound Services. May Wen. Broadmoor Arts and Wellness, 3900 General Taylor St., NOLA. facebook.com/ neworleansspiritualawakening. Beginners Yoga / Level 1 Vinyasa – 6-7pm. Free. Broadmoor Arts and Wellness Center, 3900 General Taylor. Bring a mat, a towel, and a water bottle along with any other props you wish to bring.

saturday Yoga on the Bayou – 8:30-9:30am. Yoga Lagniappe, 3700 Orleans Ave, New Orleans. YogaLagniappe.com Northshore Table Tennis Club – 9:30am-12:30pm. $5 per session. Abita Recreation District #11. 22517 Hwy 36, Abita Springs. Yoga and Guided Meditation –10-11:30am. Yoga nidra with Katrina Zech. $15 donation. Unity of New Orleans Spiritual Center, 3722 St Charles Ave, New Orleans. UnityNewOrleans.org. Inner Flow Yoga – 10am. Enhances lymphatic flow, digestion, immunity, balance, and relaxation. Great for beginners! $10. The Esplanade at City Park Yoga Studio, 3443 Esplanade Ave, 2nd Fl, New Orleans, LA. Compost NOW – 10:30-12pm. Free. Accept fruits and vegetables scraps, coffee grounds, tea bags, eggshells, nut shells, seed shells, plain bread, grains, and rice. No meat, bones, or dairy. Bring in a paper or compostable bag or a reusable container and freeze your scraps. Rosa Keller Library. Level Up Intermediate Yoga – 11am-12:15pm. A challenging practice to bring you to the next level! Arm balances. Backbends. Inversions. 95 degrees. Come be playful and learn to fall in style! Yes, Yoga. 8338 Oak St, New Orleans. YesYogaNOLA@gmail. com. YesYogaNOLA.co First Position Adult Beginners Class – 11:30am-12:30pm. Live Oak Dance, 8204 Oak St, New

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Journey to Wellness MIRACLE HEALINGS & INTUITIVE READING by Marcel Anton

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Be the ADVOCATE that your child needs bit.ly/specialed8

An advocate is a person who pleads on someone else’s behalf. I’m here to be an advocate and to motivate parents. We’re here to support you by empowering, elevating and encouraging you to be a voice for your child with special needs or severe disability.

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