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Nadia Perlepe M.Arch II - Harvard University GSD SEPT 07 - MAY 15

FW

*

04 Seasonal Housing for Fishermen, Unalask, AK Home Away from Home | Fall 14 Option Studio | Harvard GSD instr. OFIS arhitekti 12 Imprecise Tropics Coffee Lab Resort | Fall 15 Option Studio | Harvard GSD instr. Camilo Restrepo 20 The Calumet Collaborations Variations on Suburbia | Spring 15 Option Studio | Harvard GSD instr. Michael Sorkin 26 Alpine Shelter ARK. revisited | Fall 14 Option Studio Workshop Harvard GSD

* folio of work

32 Kifisos.2020 5 Cityscapes Renegotiated | Spring 12 Undergrad Thesis | University of Patras, GR adv. Yannis Aesopos 38 Themed Environments Research Thesis | Fall 11 University of Patras, GR 44 mobile Stockholm 5 Cityscapes Renegotiated | jan 13 Undergrad Thesis | University of Patras, GR adv. Yannis Aesopos 48 Tonder Radhus Open International Competition | Jan 14 | | OYO Architects | Designers: Nigel Jooren, Nadia Perlepe, Jorge Garcia


Nadia Perlepe | M.Arch II - Harvard University GSD


Folio of Work SEPT 07 - APR 16

04 Seasonal Housing for Fishermen, Unalask, AK Home Away from Home | Fall 14 Option Studio | Harvard GSD instr. OFIS arhitekti

32 Kifisos.2020 5 Cityscapes Renegotiated | Spring 12 Undergrad Thesis | University of Patras, GR adv. Yannis Aesopos

12 Imprecise Tropics Coffee Lab Resort | Fall 15 Option Studio | Harvard GSD instr. Camilo Restrepo

38 Themed Environments Research Thesis | Fall 11 University of Patras, GR

20 The Calumet Collaborations Variations on Suburbia | Spring 15 | Option Studio | Harvard GSD instr. Michael Sorkin 26 Alpine Shelter ARK. revisited | Fall 14 Option Studio Workshop Harvard GSD instr. OFIS arhitekti

44 mobile Stockholm 5 Cityscapes Renegotiated | jan 13 Undergrad Thesis | University of Patras, GR adv. Yannis Aesopos 48 Tonder Radhus Open International Competition | Jan 14 | | OYO Architects | Designers: Nigel Jooren, Nadia Perlepe, Jorge Garcia


folio of work

4 |5

Seasonal Housing for Fishermen Unalaska, AK SEPT 14 - DEC 14 Academic Project | Fall 14 | Harvard GSD | Option Studio | Supervisors: Spela Videcnik & Rok Oman | Students: Myrna Ayoub, Nadia Perlepe

DESCRIPTION | This project evolved from research about Alaska and its rich heritage of fishing; its effect on the growth of cities and the economy of the state. The proposed site of Unalaska and Dutch Harbor is the number one commercial fishing port in the nation. In a city with the population of 4,200 there is a total of 36,000 enplanements. Due to the constant large influx of seasonal workers during the fishery seasons, this project proposes a housing project that instills a new way of living for seasonal workers. CONTEXT | The city of Unalaska is currently undertaking a housing initiative and the need for increased quality and affordable housing is of utmost importance for the city. The goal of the proposal is to create a development that could be easily constructed and transported to such a remote location. The unit is adopted from the original bivak studies creating an amphitheatrical interior unit out of a half shipping container. Each container is connected by a joint, which acts as the communal space for the workers.

[ Left] Model of flat land aggregations

PROJECT | This system is explored in two developments: A sloped mountain overlooking Dutch Harbor and a flat site adjacent to the main city center. The aggregation of these joints and units explore spaces that provide a connection with nature through beautiful views and create courtyard pockets for various programs. These supplemental programs serve as spaces of interaction among the seasonal workers and locals as a means of blurring boundaries between the populations. These interactions promote communication, tolerance and an understanding of culture. The aim of this development is to create a home away from home for these often displaced seasonal workers; a home of comfort, quality and community.


SEASONAL HOUSING FOR FISHERMEN

mapping

BERING SEA | Volcanic Activity

ALASKA | Fishing Activity & Transportations

BERING SEA | Earthquakes

ALASKA | Seasonal Processing Workers

BERING SEA | Salmon Migration

concept CARGO STACKING | construction & transportation

CONTAINER TO UNIT | unit size & form

EXTREME FORCES | wind, sun, snow, views

UNIT + JOINT | home away from home

JOINT CATALOGUE


folio of work

6 |7

site analysis


SEASONAL HOUSING FOR FISHERMEN

aggregations

A. FLAT SITE

B. SLOPED SITE

unit design

CROSS SECTIONS

LONGTIDUNAL | CIRCULATION

PLAN

LONGTIDUNAL | SLEEPING AREA


8 |9

folio of work

JOINT | FLAT TERRAIN

2 UNITS | 4 WORKERS

3 UNITS | 6 WORKERS

3 UNITS | 6 WORKERS

4 UNITS |8 WORKERS

JOINT | SLOPED TERRAIN

2 UNITS | 4 WORKERS

3 UNITS | 6 WORKERS

3 UNITS | 6 WORKERS

4 UNITS |8 WORKERS

JOINT | INTERIOR


SEASONAL HOUSING FOR FISHERMEN

[ Top] Sloped site aggregation [ Middle ] View form the top towards Unalaska Harbor [ Bottom ] Flat Site in between space


folio of work

[ Top] Models on top view. Flat and slopped terrain [ Right ] The units aggregate in different ways depending on the site. On a slope they are placed in such a way to offer views and maximum sun exposure. On a flat site they gather creating

10 | 11


folio of work

12 | 13

Imprecise Tropics Coffee Lab Resort, Medellin, CO SEPT 15- DEC 15 Academic Project | Fall 15 | Harvard GSD | Option Studio | Supervisors: Camilo Restrepo

DESCRIPTION | The tropic is precise in its definition only when referred to it as latitude. It is imprecise in its architecture, in its spatial condition and in the experience of its everyday life, even when we try to define it for architectural purposes or to describe its conditions, specially because it becomes ambiguous and contradictory, sometimes ungraspable.Each student was asked to approach this notion of impreciseness of the tropics by proposing a 1,000 sq.m building in La Ceja, Antioquia in Colombia. Part of the building needed to propose a new program related to the coffee industry that benefits the community and the other half was left for the students to decide. CONCEPT | For this project special emphasis was given to tourism and the ways in which the tourism industry over the past century has defined our homogenous preconceived idea of what the tropics are. This project stems from the idea that;

“ While we cannot alter the expectations of a tourist in the tropics, we can transform the experience. ”

[ Left] Collage - Initial exploration of the tropical cliché [ Top] Tropical Hotel Typologies

PROGRAM | This project is proposing a Coffee Research Facility & a Coffee Resort. The aim is to create a space where a series of agents interact and benefit from each other; the local community ( access to new methods of coffee production), researchers & university students (access to informal knowledge provided to them by the locals) , the formal coffee industry ( Nespresso & Starbucks are heavily dependent on the region for coffee bean supply) and last the tourists.


IMPRECISE TROPICS

tropical cliché

bean to cup

program


folio of work

14 | 15

exploded tropics

Clad in fearful and wonderful garments, which they fondly imagined to be ordinary tropical clothing,... they came ashore in the spirit of explrorers and seemed quite disappointed to find we wore clothesand did not live in the jungle. O who would be a tourist And with the tourists stand, A guide book in his pocket, A Kodak in his hand! * “Our friends the Tourists,”


IMPRECISE TROPICS

plans

longitudinal section


folio of work

16 | 17

imprecise tourist

[ Top] coffee lodge, open courtyard with a view to the mountains and the community auditorium [ Middle] coffee lodge, rooms that open up completely to the exterior [ Bottom] infinity pool, with a view to the coffee plantation


IMPRECISE TROPICS


folio of work

[ Left] Interaction between tourists and locals. The contemporary tourist has evolved beyond recognition in the past decade. He is educated, afluent and seeks unique experiences. [ Right ] Wooden Model dim. 30’’ by 70’’

18 | 19


folio of work

20 | 21

The Calumet Collaborations Daniel Burnham Meets Andre Breton on the South Side of Chicago FEB 15 - MAY 15 Academic Project | Spring 15 | Harvard GSD | Option Studio | Supervisor: Michael Sorkin CONTEXT | The South Side is both rich and dangerous and a remarkable museum of city building in both its magnificence and catastrophe. Once bowered in luxury, it became the scene of a great American internal migration as industrial jobs attracted African Americans from the south to hoped-for opportunities. When the economy itself went south after the Second World War, the mismatch between population and prospect led to miseries of unemployment and decay. The usual solutions were applied - carceral housing projects, policing, neglect - with the usual results. TOPIC | The studio examined many strategies of combination, using individual designs and research to test and combine with the work of others pursuing work on both the same and different sites. Collectively, we pursued the kind of ambitious intervention that characterized the optimistic age of Burnham and the Columbian Exhibition while rejecting the idea of producing any strict singularity of vision.

[ Left ] The Fence. Appartment buildings sitting on the frontier of South Chicago, facing de-industrialized empty land still to be claimed by pioneer residences moving in the South. [ Above ] New bungalow typologies. They are prefabicrated on East Chicago.

PROJECT | The project is an experiment on the fundamental blocks of the American Suburbs. It takes as a starting point the Chicago bungalow, which through endless repetition is the necessary unit of the Chicago suburbs. It mutates the bungalow and creates five different types of residential units and blocks. What felt stagnant turns into a diverse suburban environment. The suburban cliches of the bungalow, the mall, the lawn, the car are all used but turned against themselves. Cars are stacked in parking towers and height is introduced. The inhabitants have the opportunity to abandon their home and their given a new residence. As a result the bungalows that are abandoned are substituted by another housing typology, which on its turn attracts new inhabitants on the neighborhood. The new suburb constists of the same elements as the old one but is fundamentaly different in its morphology and life.


THE CALUMET COLLABORATIONS

Block typologies

1

AGRARIAN 7671 sq.m 14 blocks 6 households/ block 84 households 31 7.8

2

/ ha / ha

12,1

/ ha / ha

BUILT=15%

/ sq.mi

12,698

/ sq.mi

3,174

/ sq.mi

COMMUNAL=50%

PEDESTRIAN=70%

PEDESTRIAN=35%

URBAN 32,000 sq.m 2 blocks 148 households/ block 196 households 187

/ ha

48,780

/ sq.mi

46

/ ha

12,195

/ sq.mi

BUILT=30%

4

/ sq.mi

2,068

BUILT=10% COMMUNAL=70% SUBURBAN 16,437 sq.m 9 blocks 20 households/ block 180 households 48

3

8,275

COMMUNAL=30%

PEDESTRIAN=40%

FENCE 16,000 sq.m 4 blocks 70 households/ block 280 apartments 175

/ ha

45,901

/ sq.mi

43

/ ha

11,475

/ sq.mi

BUILT=26%

COMMUNAL=30%

PEDESTRIAN=44%

SUPER BLOCK 36,000 sq.m 2 blocks 100 households/ block 200 apartments

5

111

/ ha

28,985

/ sq.mi

27

/ ha

7,246

/ sq.mi

BUILT=33%

COMMUNAL=22%

TOTAL UNITS 835 POPULATION 3,340 EMPLOYMENT 500

PEDESTRIAN=50%


folio of work

22 | 23

masterplan

[ Far Left] 5 new block typologies are created each one of them offering a different living experience. [ Right ] The new masterplan offers five different blocks - both in size and program - parking towers and biking paths, land to cultivate, parks


THE CALUMET COLLABORATIONS

superblock

[5] superblock

[1] agrarian

[1] agrarian

mall

[5] superblock


24 | 25

folio of work

neighborhood [Right ] the “fence� stands on the west frontier of the lot overlooking the industrial wasteland, protecting the neighborhoor form the de-industrialized wilderness, inspiring tales of suburban pioneers. [Left ] the superblock Mall, parking towers and adjacent agrarians blocks

[2] suburb

[3] urban

[4] fence

axonometric

[4] fence

[3] urban

[2] suburb


folio of work

26 | 27

Alpine Shelter ARK. revisited SEPT 14 Academic Project | Fall 14 | Harvard GSD | Option Studio | Supervisors: Spela Videcnik & Rok Oman Within a context of extreme risk to environmental forces, it is important to design buildings within the system that the surrounding environment has mandated. Responding to environmental conditions is not only a protective measure, but also benefits future generations. In the midst of dramatic climate shifts, housing design translates into a matter of immediate life safety for existing populations. In response to these deficiencies, the design of remote settlements in the North must be constructed in accordance with ideas of self-sufficiency and supplementary back-up energy systems. Many vernacular building traditions can serve as a reference for designing environments that are holistically sustainable within the extreme climatic conditions, challenging comfortable human habitation in the North. ALPINE SHELTER or NOAH’S ARK | This shelter is conceived as a solid, compact structure with the ability to sustain life in the most extreme of environments, not unlike an ark. This ark | shelter, situated on top of the Slovenian Alps, provides a safe haven during night or extreme environmental conditions to mountaineers.

[ Left ] The shelter, once placed on site, provides a safe haven during night or extreme environmental conditions to 8 mountaineers.

INTERIOR | The shelter is anchored on the mountain. The interior is organised in an amphitheatric way for two reasons. First, the amphitheater is a social space, where hikers sleep, store their belongings, eat and socialize. Second, the entire bivak is a windowa viewing point, and observation deck, that opens up to nature and offers views both towards the mountain and towards the sky. The shelter is a cantilever construction. The amphitheater hangs over the cliff. The separate parts are transported to the site by helicopter and assembled on site.


ALPINE SHELTER

shelter | design

PLAN

LONGTIDUNAL SECTION

FRONT ELEVATION

CROSS SECTION


folio of work

cladding variations

GREY CEMENT WOOD BOARDS

GREY CEMENT WOOD BOARDS

CHARRED WOOD

PLYWOOD

28 | 29

exploded axonometric


ALPINE SHELTER

exhibition


30 | 31

folio of work

publication [ Left] Exhibited at the Experiments Wall at GSD, Harvard University February 2, 2015–March 22, 2015 [ Bottom] Published by Harvard University - Graduate School of Design, May 2015 ISBN-13: 978-1934510483


folio of work

32 | 33

Kifisos 2020 | 5 cityscapes renegotiated Athens, GR FEB 12 - SEP 12 Design Thesis| Spring 12 | University of Patras, GR | Supervisor: Yannis Aesopos DESCRIPTION | Object of this diploma thesis is the river of Kifisos, which has a length of 20 km and runs through the Attica basin. In Kifisos one can observe all the phases of development of the urban landscape at the expense of the natural. The five regions that were studied specifically are indicative of these different phases. CONTEXT | The Kifissos is the main river of the Attica plain. The large main spring, the famous Kefalari in Kifissia produced 400 cubic metres of water per hour up until the 1950s. It no longer exists as such but spreads through the Midwestern part of the Athens River Basin. Just before the estuaries, the Kifissos takes in water from the other ancient river in Athens, the Ilisou and flows into the Ormo Phalirou at Nea Phaliron. A large section of the Kifissos River has suffered serious interventions such as fires, construction works, waste-dumping and public works. From Patission up to the estuary the watercourse has undergone major flood-prevention construction works. CONCEPT | The design of these 6 areas is organized according to a strategy in time. This strategy organizes the green, the aquatic element, the connections with the city and the programmatic redefinition of each region. Each phase of the redevelopment deals with one of these elements and is displayed throughout the city.As a result, the new river simultaneously emerges in 6 heterogenous and remote areas and sets the scene for a healthy development.However, this growth is not associated with a romantic return to nature, but instead it takes as given the pattern of the city in every region, reinterprets it and repeats it. The main question that this thesis attempts to approach is the following: human activity is responsible for the order of things, then is a “ When static architecture proposal capable of changing the image of the urban [ Left ] plexi models of the different areas of intervention

landscape; even more, is design really capable of changing the mentalities that created this city?

�


KIFISOS 2020 | 5 CITYSCAPES RENEGOTIATED

PHASE #1 | empower & engage

phase #2| restore & protect

4 programs 3 connections

phase #3 | reconnect & discover

2

TOP-DOWN restoring the riverbed

1

BOTTOM-UP protecting the river


folio of work

34 | 35

ADAMES | A NATIONAL PARK

1


KIFISOS 2020 | 5 CITYSCAPES RENEGOTIATED

ACHARNAI | AN URBAN WETLAND

2


folio of work

36 | 37

NEA FILADELFEIA | URBAN PARK

3


folio of work

38 | 39

Themed Environments | From Theme Parks to the architecture of the city SEP 11- DEC 11 Research Thesis| Fall 11 | University of Patras, GR | Supervisor: Yannis Aesopos | Hardcopy Publication | 170 pg | 42,000 words CONTEXT | The urban space of the contemporary capitalistic city is formed by several factors, the most important being the influx of private capital and the inevitable privatization of [the once] public space. Such phenomena, quite common in the USA during the late 80s and 90s, have been arising recently in the post- Olympics greek city. Indeed recent years have witnessed the emergence of a wholly new kind of a greek city, a city without a place attached to it. Three specific characteristics mark this city; The first is the dissipation of all stable relations to local physical and cultural geography, the loosening ties to any specific space. A second characteristic of this new city is its obsession with “security”, with rising levels of manipulation and surveillance over its citizenry and with a proliferation of new modes of segregation. Finally, this new realm is a city of simulations, television city, the city as a theme park. The historic has become the only complicit official urban value and the urban design is fully preoccupied with reproduction, with the creation of urban disguises. This new city in many ways resembles and follows the tactics of a theme park, its’ space embodies it all; the ageographia, the surveillance, the simulations without end. It’s a happy place, a familiar place. The visitors are requested to forget all about the real world and hapilly consume. The theme park is above all a safe place, a substitute for the democratic public realm, that is usually troubled by crime, poverty, dirt, power abuse. TOPIC | This research thesis is an attempt to describe the contemporary commodified urban environment and its relation to the theme park industry. From Connie Island to Anaheim, California, from Medieval Funfairs to Festival Marketplaces and last from the USA and China to Greece, this thesis investigates the society that would rather live in a themed environment, instead of a democratic public space. According to Michael Sorkin:

“ The effort to reclaim the city is the struggle of democracy itself. [ Left ] pages from the publication


folio of work

40 | 41

CONTENTS PART 1 | THEME PARKS 1.1 The road to theme parks 1.1.1 Europe; Medieval Fairs, Pleasure Gardens & World Exhibitions 1.1.2 USA; Trolley Parks, Atlantic CIty and Coney Island 1.2 Theme Parks 1.2.1 Definition 1.2.2 Characteristics 1.2.3 Concept and its’ use 1.2.4 The meaning of place 1.2.5 GlobaliZed Theme Park Industry 1.3 Case Study: Disneyland’s Magic Kingdom 1.3.1 Introduction 1.3.2 Creating Disneyland 1.3.3 The structure of the park 1.3.4 Analysis & critique to Walt’s vision 1.3.5 Disneyland and the society of the suburbs 1.4 Conclusion PART 2 | THEMED ENVIRONMENTS 2.1 The urbanization of private space 2.1.1 Themed Malls i. General ii. The road to themed malls iii. Megamalls iv. Case Study; WEM 2.1.2 Festival Marketplaces i. General ii. Urban and historic tableaux iii. Types of urban tableaux; structure and function iv. Case Study; South Street Seaport 2.2 Mallification; the privatization of urban space 2.2.1 City Museums i. General ii. Case Study; Venice iii. The tourist gaze & the consumption of space iv. Heritage issues 2.2.2 Gentrification i. General ii. The history of gentrification iii. The use of theme iv. Case Study; Tompkins Square v. Real Estate industry and the artist’s role 2.3 Disneyfication 2.3.1 Las Vegas 2.3.2 Dubai 2.3.3 One City Nine Towns 2.3.4 Celebration SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY BIBLIOGRAPHY | The American Amusement Park Industry A History of Technology and Thrills, Adams, J.A. [1991], Boston: Twayne Publishers | Las Vegas, the success of excess, Ardeton Frances, Chase John [1997], London: Ellipsis London Limited. |Dreamlands: Des Parcs d’Attraction aux Cites du Futur, Bajac, Quentin and Didier Ottinger [2010], Paris: Centre Georges Pompidou Service Commercial | The City of Collective Memory: Its Historical Imagery and Architectural Entertainments, Boyer, Christine [1996], Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. | Watermark, Brodsky, Joseph [1993], London: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. | Deconstructing Disney, Byrne, Eleanor and Martin McQuillan [1996], Lonson: Pluto Press. | The American City: From Civil War to the New Deal, Ciucci, Giorgio, Francesco Dal Co, Mario Manieri- Elia, Manfredo Tafuri [1983], Cambridge MA: The MIT Press | The Global Theme Park Industry, Clave, S. Anton [2007], Cambridge, MA: CABI. | La Societe du spectacle, Debord, G. [1967], Paris: Buchet-Chastel. | Travels in Hyperreality, Eco, Umberto [1990], USA: Mariner Books. | The Urban Condition: Space, Community and Self in the Contemporary Metropolis, Ghent Urban Studies Team [1999], Rotterdam, 010 Publishers. | The Theming of America, Gottdiener, Mark [2001], USA: Westview Press. | Heritage, Tourism and Society, Herbert, D. ,[1995], London: Pinte. | Dream Worlds: Architecture and Entertainment, Herwig, Oliver and Florian Holzherr [2006], Munich: Prestel. | The Mass Ornament: Weimar Essays, Kratcaur, Siegrfried [2005], Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. | Delirious New York: A Retroactive Manifesto for Manhattan, Koolhaas, Rem [1997], USA: The Monacelli Press. | Paradise News, Lodge, D. [1991] . Penguin Books, London. | The McConaldization of America, Ritzer, G. [1993], Newbury Park, CA: Pine Forge. | Home: A Short History of an Idea, Rybczynski, Witold [1986], New York: Viking Penguin. | Theme Park, Scott, A. Lukas [2008], London: Reaktion Books. | The New Urban Frontier, Gentrification and the revanchist city, Smith, Neil [1996], London: Routledge. | Variations on a Theme Park: The New American City and the End of Public Space, Sorkin, Michael [1992], USA: Hill and Wang. | Learning from Las Vegas, Venturi, R., D.S. Brown and S. Izenour [1972], Cambridge: MIT Press. | The Tourist Gaze: Leisure and Travel in Contemporary Societies, Urry, J., [1990], London: Sage. | The Cultures of Cities, Zukin, Sharon [1995], Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. | Naked City: The Death and Life of Authentic Urban Places, Zukin, Sharon [2010], New York: Oxford University Press.


professional projects SEPT 12 - JUNE 12

46 mobile Stockholm 5 Cityscapes Renegotiated | jan 13 Undergrad Thesis | University of Patras, GR adv. Yannis Aesopos 50 Tonder Radhus Open International Competition | Jan 14 | | OYO Architects | Designers: Nigel Jooren, Nadia Perlepe, Jorge Garcia


folio of work

44 | 45

mobile Stockholm | mobile pavilions for the City of Stockholm JAN 13 Professional Project | Jan 13 | Open International Competition | Organiser: Swedish Association of Architects | Architects: OYO architects, Nadia Perlepe, Jorge Garcia DESCRIPTION | This is a competition entry for the new street kiosks in Stockholm, Sweden. The idea was to design a new urban pavilion with a strong identity. It should be clearly identified as the “Stockholm Kiosk”. The pavillion would come in three different sizes, Mini, Midi, Maxi and should fit in three different urban conditions: in a sidewalk, a square and an urban beach. With our proposal for the mobile pavilions, we wanted to achieve maximum flexibility in terms of use and functionality. In addition, it has been our intention that the pavilions will create added value for residents and visitors in Stockholm. We chose to design a module that can be easily adapted or changed, by moving or sliding parts according to user preference. The City of Stockholm will be able to offer mobile platforms in the city, whether you are near a beach, square or street environment. Those who want to borrow or rent different types of modules will be able to do so from a directory that fits their future plans. As a result the user is in connection with a major urban context. We want to create a sense of belonging, and more importantly, the sense of belonging to a new urban typology which fits in Stockholm and at the same time is aesthetically pleasing. We provide natural and sustainable materials that give the module a long life and a clever mounting system makes it easy to customize it for different purposes.

[ Left ] In Strandvagen a “mini” version with 4 modules serves as a tram stop and has the ability to integrate a system of solar panels on the roof.

CONCEPT | In Strandvagen a “mini” version with 4 modules serves as a tram stop and has the ability to integrate a system of solar panels on the roof. In this way, the module can be self-sufficient as a secondary energy source is not necessary. In Östermalmstorg the principle of sliding elements in the module makes it possible for the owner to open his shop, presenting their goods and then simply push back some before closing. In this case, only the shop owner a key to unlock the sliding portion. On the way home, he can take a book from the library in one of the other modules on the platform which is public. Last on Lövsta Bad, we show how two “minis” are experienced in leisure environment. We create a long strip that defines a transition zone between the beach and nature.


MOBILE STOCKHOLM

platforms & modules

axonometrics 1. Strandvägen a “mini” version with 4 modules

1

2

3

2. Östermalmstorg a “midi” version with 5 modules

Lövsta Bad | urban beach

3. Lövsta Bad 1 mini + 2 modules

details The principle is partly based on a two-lane metal rails recessed into the bearing wood frames that make up the platform. In this way, the module can easily and safely slide in a horizontal position above the platform with the help of double wheels that are hidden in the design.


folio of work

section

46 | 47

construction detail

Ă–stermalmstorg | mobile market


folio of work

48 | 49

Tonder rådhus | Extension of the City Hall. Tønder FEB 13 Professional Project | Jan 14 | Open International Competition | Architect: OYO Architects, Ghent, Belgium | Designers: Nigel Jooren, Nadia Perlepe, Jorge Garcia DESCRIPTION | Tønder is a Danish town in the Region of Southern Denmark. With a population of 7,572 inhabitants it is the main town and the administrative seat of the Tønder Municipality.Prior to 1864, Tønder was situated in the Duchy of Schleswig, so its history is included in the contentious history of Schleswig-Holstein. In the 1920 Schleswig Plebiscite that incorporated Northern Schleswig as part of Denmark, 76.5% of Tønder’s inhabitants voted to remain part of Germany and 23.5% voted for the cession to Denmark. After the end of the German occupation in World War II, the political significance of the German population dwindled considerably. The border situation hindered the development of the city. CONTEXT | Today, Tonder is famous for its’ Tønder Festival, which offers visitors a wide variety of traditional and modern folk music. The existing town hall of Tønder is situated at the southern border of the city, where the characteristic landscape of the south danish marsh begin. The proposed extension of the town hall is placed south of the existing building, marking the edge of the city.

[ Left ] Entrance to the extension of the new city hall

PROPOSAL | It was decided that a modern town hall should generally be a house for the whole town with many diverse functions. It must be an open and welcoming place, a social gathering place for both young and old, for visitors and townspeople. It must simultaneously be a place which provides a special experience and which can be a cultural setting for various events and celebrations such as weddings. In addition, it should offer and accommodate a range of service facilities and act as a workplace for many city employees, with adjacent areas which are open to public use and in close contact with the surrounding nature. We saw the new City Hall as a cultural house with outward facing services, and as a modern workplace based on synergy and interdisciplinarity. City Hall is the city’s living common point - engaging and communicating in its architecture.


TONDER RADHUS

on the map

intervention site

concept

extension

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8


folio of work

50 | 51

masterplan


THE CALUMET COLLABORATIONS

atrium view from the cafeteria

sections


folio of work

52 | 53

ground plan


contact me Nadia Perlepe | M.Arch II - Harvard University GSD email; kperlepe@gsd.harvard.edu nadiaperlepes@gmail.com mobile; 617- 997-5021 web; nadiaperlepe.com


Graduate Portfolio | Nadia Perlepe | M.Arch II | Harvard GSD  
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