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Jayplay LIFE. AND HOW TO HAVE ONE.

February 2, 2012

SEEING RED ON THE ROAD the rising trend of traffic stress

more bang for your book are you ready for a digital overhaul?

Searching for Neverland Fighting Growing Up


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Inside this issue

{From the Editor }

I

’d like to say that I’m too mature for road rage, but that would be like saying I have never given the finger to a soccer mom driving a minivan that cut me off early one morning in elementary school traffic. And who hasn’t done that? Road rage has been a part of my life since my childhood. Watching my father say the darndest things to those inexcusable drivers who just don’t understand that signaling is in fact part of the driving process has provided me with some of the best material that I use to this day. It is automatic. I will be having a conversation with one of my friends one minute, and within a few seconds I can be slinging out threats of Africans (my

friends and family, of course) tracking them down and doing unmentionable things to every one of their family members. And that could simply be because someone chose to drive the speed limit that day. I can’t stand that. It’s hilarious to think about how personally I like to take others’ lack of driving skills. I find myself shouting out, “Oh you think you can do that to ME?!” as if they had woken up that day thinking, ‘please, oh please give me an opportunity to make Nadia upset today.’ Maybe it’s a pride thing, but I find myself needing to outdo them. I’ll be cruising, going 50 mph in a 40 down Bob Billings, and suddenly someone will pass me, just tempting me to get hostile. Before I know it, 60 never felt so good, and I am waving with that, that-was-cute-hun, smug smile that really ticks people off. Then I will glance out the rear view mirror to see if they have admitted defeat. Come to think of it, I don’t think how I act on the road should be called road rage. Webster better come up with something else to define this attitude.

NADIA IMAFIDON | EDITOR

What’s hot this week

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thursday FEB. 2

What: ELVIS LIVES When: 7:30 pm - 10 pm Where: Lied center, auditorium Why you care: because deep down, you can’t

help falling in love with Elvis all over again. $15 for student admission.

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friday feb. 3

What: on screen offspring When: 7:30 pm Where: Lawrence arts center, 940 new hampshire

Why you care: for all you theatrical folk -

enjoy an evening of one act plays that use elements of film production within the theatrical confines to dramatize the work.

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saturday feb. 4

What: bob marley birthday celebration When: 9:30 PM Where: granada Why you care: after a hard week of classes, all you want to know is every little thing’s gonna be alright.

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monday feb. 6

What: super bowl When: 5:30 pm CT Where: wherever the party’s at! Why you care: because not only do we love

football, we love snacks and entertaining commercials.

What: last day to cancel a class When: all day Where: strong hall Why you care: get out before it’s too late.

All in the family EDITOR sss NADIA IMAFIDON ASSOCIATE EDITOR sss LINDSEY DEITER DESIGNERS sss EMILY GRIGONE, ALLIE WELCH LOVE sss SASHA LUND, ALIZA CHUDNOW, RACHEL SCHWARTZ SCHOOL sss ALLISON BOND, MEGAN HINMAN CAMPUS + TOWN sss KELSEA ECKENROTH, JOHN GARFIELD, BRITTNEY HAYNES ENTERTAINMENT sss KELSEY CIPOLLA, RACHEL SCHULTZ, ALEX TRETBAR PLAY sss SARA SNEATH, RACHEL CHEON, LAUREN SHELLY CONTRIBUTORS sss Michelle Macbain, landon mcdonald, LIZZie MARX CREATIVE CONSULTANT sss CAROL HOLSTEAD 02 02 12

2

NATHAN E. PHOTOGRAPHY

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sunday feb. 5

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tuesday feb. 7

What: an evening with tim pawlenty When: 7:30 pm Where: dole institute of politics Why you care: an opportunity to hear

from a former minnesota governor and gop presidential candidate. be informed.

wednesday feb. 8 What: university career fair When: 2 pm - 6 pm Where: kansas union, level 4 Why you care: because in the real world, you are going to need a j-o-b.

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table of contents

4 5 10

love: Single or Spoken for: Make Valentine’s day count no matter how you spend it. love: Chef Celina Tio cooks up a recipe for success for that awkward first date.

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02 02 12


LOVE

Love is in the Air

Ways to celebrate Valentine’s Day //Aliza Chudnow

photo by morgan laforge

Q&A: Kristen Spacek, owner of Owens Flower Shop, 846 Indiana St. Q: What’s the most popular flower people order for Valentine’s Day? A: Typically, roses are the most popular but a lot of people are now starting to order the mixed assortment of flowers, which is really fun for all of the designers to put the arrangement together. Q: What percentage would you say sales increase this time of year? A: Typically during Valentine’s Day we have a whole month’s increase in sales. Q: During Valentines Day do you have to hire more workers? A: We hire more designers, more processors and more delivery help. Thankfully, we always have a few ladies who come in and volunteer their time to help out around Valentine’s Day. 02 02 12

4

Pink and red roses surround your bed, while a smoldering omelet and a perfectly mixed mimosa wait to be devoured at the foot of your bed. Sound nice? This is just the beginning. During the afternoon you are taken on a shopping spree down Mass Street, followed by a picnic in the park for lunch. The night will conclude with a movie of your choice while you enjoy a glass of bubbling champagne to top off the day’s festivities. Zach Finkelstein, a sophomore from Overland Park, not only planned this vision, but brought it to life on what some call the most romantic holiday of the year—Valentine’s Day. Zach did all this for his girlfriend Caitlin Doornbos, a sophomore from Hutchinson. The couple has been dating for three months, and Zach started planning his perfect Valentine’s Day midway through January. “Valentine’s Day is more than a day full of roses and chocolates,” Zach says. “More than anything else, it’s a time to show the ones in your life how much they mean to you.” With the start of February comes the start of grocery stores displaying an array of “Be Mine” Valentine’s Day cards, heart-shaped boxes filled with an assortment of chocolate and stuffed teddy bears or puppies with big eyes that scream those three little words. When strolling through Target, it’s unavoidable to run into pink and red hearts in the form of candy and cookies, while different flower shops begin to order quadruple the amount of flowers they would normally order. Kristen Spacek, owner of Owens Flower Shop, says last year Owens made about 450 flower deliveries on Valentine’s Day alone, proving that it’s the highest sales time of the year for the flower shop. While some couples like to go all-out for the holiday, others have a simpler approach. Morgan Hutcherson, a junior from St. Louis, Mo., always saw her friends getting chocolate and flowers for their boyfriends, so when she was in a relationship her senior year of high school, she also wanted to buy all the traditional merchandise that was sold for the

holiday. But as the years passed, Morgan spent less time worrying about the commercialized gifts and more time expressing how much she cared for her boyfriend by making him elaborate handmade cards. For couples, Valentine’s Day is all about showing your special someone how much you love or deeply care about them, but what about singles? As soon as February begins, singles are constantly reminded of the holiday. Even when watching TV, a sappy commercial will fill the screen displaying a couple kissing after the man slips a diamond necklace around the woman’s neck, ending with the sing-song voice clip “Every kiss begins with Kay.” For some singles, the holiday can be a harsh reminder that they don’t have someone to share it with. Kevin Kitsis, a junior from Minneapolis, spent the last two Valentine’s Days showering his girlfriend with elaborate gifts and wining and dining her at fancy restaurants, but this year he is single for the holiday. “It will not be the same because the remembrance of prior Valentine’s Days is a hard time,” Kevin says. “I’m a little down about it, but the great thing is when you wake up the next day it’s just another ordinary day.” Sometimes being single during Valentine’s Day isn’t all bad, as you still get the opportunity to show your family and friends how much they mean to you. Stephanie Higinbotham, a sophomore from Wichita, prefers to spend the holiday single because she doesn’t have to worry about anyone else and can do whatever she wants, or even hang out with the girls. “I’m just not a sappy person,” Stephanie says. “But it’s cute if you’re single and do little gestures for your friends to be festive.” With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, take this opportunity to really think about the people in life you care about. Regardless of your relationship status, this holiday should be about expressing your love and appreciation to those who have stuck by your side through the thick and thin, as well as the up’s and down’s life has thrown your way.


love

Celebrity Dish: Celina Tio

// Sasha Lund

What is the perfect meal to cook for a romantic evening?

I’m a no-frills kind of gal, so it’d be something homey. I’m a fan of soup; soup would definitely be on the menu. There’s certainly something sensual about soup. And dessert, of course. People say that the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach. Do you think this is true? contributed photo

Chef Celina Tio has made a name for herself in both the local and national culinary scene. She has been featured on both Food Network’s “The Next Iron Chef ” and Bravo’s “Top Chef Masters”. She also owns the Kansas City neighborhood restaurant Julian, where she describes the menu as “feel-good food”. What made you decide to get into the restaurant business?

I like people and I like watching people eat food. I strive to evoke and create memories. One of the best compliments is when someone says “I remember when I was a little girl and my grandma made this.” That’s the best compliment you can get. How is cooking on a television show different than cooking in real life?

Chefs are usually always in control. Rarely are we in a situation in our everyday lives where someone says ‘I need a four-course meal in an hour’. Before I was on “Top Chef Masters,” I had never cooked on an RV before. It always puts you out of your comfort zone.

Yes, I do believe that to be true. I’ve gotten many marriage proposals at the restaurant, even in front of their wives. Hopefully it coaxes them to bring their wives back over and over again. Where would you go on a first date with someone you want to impress?

I think if you’re going on a first date, lay it all on the table. Go where you eat meat on a bone or long pasta. If you can get through that date, and you’re not shy about it, the chances are good already. You have been very successful in your life. What advice would you give to students to achieve those same dreams?

When I first went on “The Next Iron Chef ”, people said ‘I could never do that’. If you keep putting yourself in comfortable situations, nothing will ever happen. It sounds cliché, but get out of your comfort zone if you want great things to happen. Any of the successful business people you can think of pushed the envelope and did crazy things and took chances. Just put yourself out there and have confidence that you’ll rise to the occasion.

Catch of the Week Turn ons: Someone who has confidence in her-

self. Someone who is sarcastic and has a good sense of humor. Somebody who is athletic because that means they take care of themselves. It’s fun to do athletic things with girls.

The Hookup

Dear Michelle, My wife and I recently had our second child. Our first was born four years ago. We are finding it very difficult with work and parenting obligations to engage in satisfying sex. Sex is rushed because of time constraints, and we are finding it very difficult to have any prolonged intimacy. We tried scheduling sex, but did not find that satisfying. Is there anything that we can do to recover the lost spark and heat of passion we had before our children? Needing That Old Heat Dear NTOH, The fact that you are open and willing to put forth the effort to maintain intimacy is the first step toward regaining that lost passion. Even though scheduling sex did not work, I will advise a similar solution. Instead of placing the pressure on having mind-blowing sex every Wednesday between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m., revisit the hot times you had before the kiddos and work. The initial encounters that a couple experiences during the courtship stages of the relationship will become faint nostalgia as the couple piles on more responsibilities and time consuming activities.

As you communicate with your wife regarding your desire to rekindle the flame, focus the discussion on recreating the hottest moments you shared as an early couple. Tell each other what you felt during the first kiss or during your first love-making moments. Set the scenario and devote one night a week to recreate these acts. Walk the street where you first pulled her in and shared your first kiss, return to the restaurant where you shared your first date, have sex in the backseat of your car (even if you never leave the garage). Since you already have emotion and passion associated with these events, you won’t stress yourselves by attempting to force any sexy or significant feelings. These milestones are the special experiences you shared to become the intimate partners and loving parents you are today. The children will eventually grow up and you will have an even stronger, more intimate relationship that will allow new memories to be made.

Michelle MacBain, Kansas City, is a graduate student in Communication Studies. She studied Psychology and Human Sexuality at KU and the University of Amsterdam.

// Rachel Schwartz

What is your favorite social media and why? Prob-

ably Twitter just because it’s the most up-todate and you get the most information out of it. And all the pictures that are worth looking at on Facebook end up on Twitter.

Turn offs: Girls that are stuck up or think they

are better than you. A girl that only follows that crowd.

Hobbies/Interests: Basketball, running, racquet-

ball, chess. I’m really involved in school, both in student organizations and with my class load.

������������

Favorite quote: “Don’t take life too seriously.

You’ll never get out alive.” –Van Wilder.

Why I’m a catch: I’m easy going. I’ve been told I’m funny. I’m a big believer in working hard; playing hard, so you know I have a good time. I’m tall, pale and handsome. I love to travel the world, and so, if you’re with me, you’re traveling the world. What is your ideal date? One date: dinner, movie,

party, chill.

contributed photo

Name: Jake Klenda From: Wichita Year: Junior Major: Chemical engineering Interested in: Women

6TH & MAINE, 23RD & OUSDAHL AND 23RD & HASKELL

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IBM survey indicates traffic spikes stress levels // MATT GALLOWAY

W 02 02 12

6

hen Drew Wallace gets irked at a fellow driver while he is behind the wheel, he stops short of pushing on the horn. But it isn't because he chooses not to. It's because he can't. Wallace, a sophomore from Olathe, drives a 1993 Ford Mustang. That year, the manufacturer decided to put everything on the steering wheel in button form, horn included. "The natural reaction on every other car is just to push the steering wheel," Wallace

photo by travis young

says. "I can't do that, so I've actually been able to stop myself. But if I were in any other car, I definitely would." What drives Wallace to that point is road rage, and a survey released by IBM in September indicates he’s part of a rapidly growing number of people worldwide partaking in the phenomenon of frustration. IBM, a multinational technology and consulting corporation, released their annual Commuter Pain Survey, speaking with more than 8,000 commuters in 20 cities on six different continents. The survey revealed that 12 of the 15 cities surveyed in both 2010 and 2011 reported significant


increases in the percentage of drivers who say roadway traffic has increased their stress levels. New York, for example, came in at 45 percent in 2011, compared to just 13 percent the previous year. Aaron Naparstek is the founder and former editor-in-chief of streetsblog.org, an online hub for everything transportationbased out of New York City. He says there is something inherent about the automobile that makes us angry at each other. "We're in these massive metal boxes, unable to communicate with each other, other than with these horn blasts," Naparstek says. "We're facing the same direction like we're in a race, competing with each other for precious, limited road space." Part of what increases anger among commuters in congested roadways is the personal, at-home feeling we have in our automobiles, Naparstek contends. "We think we're in the private realm because we're surrounded by multiple cup holders, sitting in a plush leather seat with our iPod," Naparstek says. "We have an illusion that we're in our own personal space– our own roaming living room– but we're actually in public space." IBM ranked the emotional and economic toll of communting with an index based on 10 issues, ranging from the amount of anger caused by driving to the belief that the price of gas is too high. Both of those are contributing reasons why Sarah Hicks, a senior from Bennington, admits to having road rage. "I would consider myself a bad driver," Hicks says. "I have road rage. I'm not very patient, especially when people are crossing. I'm just kind of annoyed." While she admits to having road rage, Hicks rarely lays on the horn, saying she prefers to just sing in her car and keep her anger bottled up internally. However, during a recent altercation on Iowa Street,

Aaron Naparstek’s Favorite Honkus

she became the victim of someone else’s rage. "Apparently we were going slow and this guy came up beside us, honking on his horn and flipping us off," Hicks says. "He pulled out in front of us and started going really slow. I was a little bit scared, but my friend kind of egged him on a bit." Some would use Hicks' experience as evidence that road rage is mostly a phenomenon among impatient young people. However, Josh Kellerman, a technical trooper for the Kansas Highway Patrol, says that is a common misconception. "I compare it to texting," Kellerman says. "It seems like a lot of people want to push that off on teens, but when I am patrolling on the road, I see a lot of adults doing the same thing. You can't really put an age on who is an aggressive driver or who is getting road rage." Kellerman says most incidents of road rage he sees occur as a response to someone else violating the law. While it may be difficult to shelve animosity toward someone who just put your life in danger, Kellerman says that is exactly the advice he gives frustrated drivers. "Put your pride in the back seat," Kellerman says. "If someone is being aggressive toward you,

don't challenge them." That advice may be needed most in cities outside of the United States. The Commuter Pain Survey found that many of the cities that ranked highest on the index were in developing countries. One of those cities is New Delhi, the capital of India, which is seventh on the list with a commuter pain index of 72, compared to the 28 measured for New York City, which ranked 15th. Denise Fernandes, a junior from Kuwait, was born in India and spends much of her time in the developing country. She says driving the roads there can be a terrifying experience. "It's kind of like dancing all over the place on the road," Fernandes says. "There's lots of traffic going on and there aren't traffic lights everywhere. You have to figure out where to go and show hand signs, and it's really frustrating." The combination of new drivers and an insufficient infrastructure makes driving in developing countries a highstakes game. Fernandes has spent a lot of time in the Indian college city of Manipal, where four of her very close friends died in motorbike accidents. Despite the personal toll poor driving has taken on Fernandes, she says she does not engage in road rage. "We all just have one life to live," Fernandes says. "If I'm not doing anything wrong and they're just in a hurry, then OK, they can go. If they want to die, they can die. I'm not going along with them." While most of his work centered around road rage in New York City, Naparstek occasionally heard from someone abroad who put things into perspective. "It's funny. When I was doing all the stuff on horn honking, people used to say, 'You think the horn honking is bad in Brooklyn? You should visit New Delhi," Naparstek says. "If those developing cities go in an American direction, which some of them are, the more cars they squeeze into a city,

Clueless motorhead You do not own the street. Pound! Pound! I flee by bike.

Terrorism is a Lincoln Continental leaning on the horn.

Did God cut you short, deprive you of something large, little man, big horn?

You pass through my hood blasting away on your horn you know it’s futile.

“ We have an illusion that we’re in our own personal space– our own roaming living room but we’re actually in public space. ”

the more road rage they're going to have." There is evidence that mobile devices and technological distractions are huge contributors to poor driving, especially in those developing countries. According to Sky News, accidents fell 20 percent in Dubai and 40 percent in Abu Dhabi during a three-day BlackBerry outage from Oct. 10-12. Naparstek does not think that’s a coincidence. "I think our mobile devices are making us less patient human beings outside of our cars," Naparstek says. "When we get inside our car and there is a whole new layer of distraction and responsibility, this mobile device is nagging away at you, making you more anxious and angry at the people in your way." To combat road rage, Naparstek came up with a unique way of dealing with stress on the road. It's called honku, and much like its haiku counterpart, it consists of three lines of five, seven and five syllables, respectively. In 2003, Naparstek released "Honku: The Zen Antidote to Road Rage," which is described as a collection of more than 100 very funny haikus that "shines its brights on the dark side of America's car culture." Naparstek says honku began as a way to deal with the non-stop honking outside of his New York apartment. "I actually had a near-death egg throwing experience with a motorist outside my window," Naparstek says. "He'd been honking for three minutes straight and so I hurled an egg at him, and he got pissed off." The best way to cope with road rage, Naparstek says, is deep breathing. It also helps to understand one's own role in the problem. "The traffic is not something outside of you. You are a part of it," Naparstek says. "You are imposing yourself on others, too. The only thing you can control in those situations is how you feel." Wallace, the Olathe sophomore, admits that he is just as much a part of the problem as the drivers he gets enraged with. But sometimes those situations are unavoidable, he says. "I have pulled out in front of people before, which is terrible, I know," Wallace says. "But you sit there long enough and you have to go. You can't just be there all day. You have to take a chance. But sometimes I cut it a little too close."

--honku.org

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DR. DOG

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entertainment

Funny Females We’ve come a long way since “I Love Lucy.”

After decades of being told they aren’t as funny as men, women are stepping into the limelight and showing just how funny they can be. John Belushi once famously stated that women aren’t funny. While it seems easy to write off as sexist, the notion that there is some innate difference in the humor of men and women has persisted for a disturbingly long time. A University of California San Diego study from last year titled “Who’s Funny: Gender Stereotypes, Humor Production, And Memory Bias” tested this claim by having people judge the quality of humor in cartoon captions, without knowing who wrote it. Researchers found that men were only slightly funnier than women, largely because other men found them funny. Men were also more likely to get credit for funny remarks and women more likely to get blamed for the bad jokes, perpetuating the stereotype. Fortunately, women aren’t letting that stop them from being funny as hell. Havana Mahoney was destined to be a comedian. The daughter of former members of a traveling improvisational group, she was always drawn to comedy. She started an improv comedy group at her high school in Manhattan and after coming to KU, she found Stitch Tactics. Now a senior, Mahoney says her style might not be lady-like in the traditional sense; she talks about poop and the pros and cons of having a penis, but she doesn’t think her gender should be an issue. “A lot of people have come up to me and been like, ‘You joke like a man,’” Mahoney says, affecting the accent of a crotchety old person. “No, I just joke, and you have horrible, stereotypical views of life.” After a couple years with Stitch Tactics, a KU student comedy group, Mahoney joined its more selective Kansas City branch, as well as an all-girl improv troupe in Lawrence, called Girlprov. “Inherently, just based on gender roles in our society as a whole, they would put us into subordinate roles where we’d be the wife or we’d be the submissive girlfriend, or the mom, or the annoying female friend,” Mahoney says of the Girlprov members’ experiences with men in comedy. “But it was never intentional.”

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//Kelsey Cipolla

Girlprov co-founder and University alum Jackie Koester says the group came together for a simpler reason— similar personalities and senses of humor that made for more cohesive and entertaining performances. Koester, who grew up in a small town, turned to women like Tina Fey and Amy Poehler for comedic inspiration and thinks the success of their shows, the Emmy-winning “30 Rock” and Emmynominated “Parks and Recreation,” help other women feel more confident pursuing comedy. The presence of women in media hasn’t always been so inspiring. For a long time, women on TV were mothers and wives and nothing else. Then, along came a famous redhead. “Lucille Ball in the 1950s was, as some people will call her, a pre-feminist,” says Dr. Lynn Spangler, an associate dean of liberal arts and sciences at the State University of New York at New Paltz and author of “Televison Women from Lucy to Friends: Fifty Years of Sitcoms and Feminism.” In a way, it all started with “I Love Lucy,” which showed the brazen title character as a mother and a wife but also being funny in a way that people still react to today. She was offered several jobs yet pursued her dreams of being an entertainer. More recently, Jennifer Anniston’s character Rachel Green on the ‘90s sitcom “Friends” showed a woman that could be funny, independent and career-oriented. Tina Fey’s Liz Lemon on “30 Rock” is a single woman leading a major network show’s writing staff. “One of the things feminists have been accused of is not having a sense of humor,” Spangler says. “Well, Tina definitely has a sense of humor.” Spangler points out that the more women we see being portrayed realistically as funny, capable, and flawed, the more accepting society becomes of women and women become of themselves. “With the right attitude, it doesn’t matter what gender you are. The audience is going to accept you as in control and give you the proper respect and attention.” Mahoney’s troupe Girlprov will perform Feb. 11 in Improv Thunderdome, a comedy troupe competition, at the Westport Flea Market in Kansas City, Mo.

contributed photo

The funny ladies of Girlprov act serious. (from left to right) Anna May Smith, Havana Mahoney, Julie Miller, Maggie Cargill, and Jackie Koester

flaunting the goods: top female faces of comedy Melissa McCarthy in “Bridesmaids” McCarthy received an Oscar nomination for her scene-stealing portrayal of Megan, a woman who proudly proclaims she’s going to climb a man like a tree and considers an all-girl fight club an appropriate bachelorette party activity. Amy Poehler in NBC’s “Parks and Recreation” As Leslie Knope, a loyal employee of the Pawnee, Indiana Parks and Recreation department with aspirations of a political career, Poehler manages to be hilarious, relateable and genuinely kind. Chelsea Handler in “Chelsea Lately” and “The Chelsea Handler Show” The only woman in the boy’s club of late night talk show hosts, Handler never shies away from being controversial or crass, makes an effort to include other funny ladies on the program and continually brings in more viewers than network hosts like Jimmy Kimmel.


entertainment Movie Review:

Get Some Culture:

"Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close” Expressing Emotion

//rachel schultz

//landon mcdonald

When the Oscar nominations were first announced, I was dismayed to find that the shamelessly cloying 9/11 melodrama “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close” had inexplicably wormed its way into the Best Picture race. Despite heaps of ham-fisted tear-jerking, Stephen Daldry’s newest film is the cinematic equivalent of gorging on rice cakes for two hours: flat, empty, tasteless and ultimately nauseating. Give “Extremely Loud” some credit; it does manage the difficult task of taking a gifted but troubled child whose father died on 9/11 and turning him into a thoroughly unsympathetic lead character. The over-indulged brat in question, played with abrasive brio by Thomas Horn, is one of those precocious movie waifs whose every pre-packaged quirk and foible is meant to come across as effortlessly endearing. Not so here. There’s nothing charming about compulsive lying, self-abuse or using autism and 9/11 as thematic crutches to make up for a lack of pathos in your screenplay. A year after the death of his idealized father (Tom Hanks), young Oskar rummages through his closet and finds a mysterious key in an envelope marked Black. To avoid confronting his harridan mother (Sandra Bullock)

and his own grief, the boy sets out to interview everyone in New York with the surname Black to see what catharsis the key can unlock. Many of the characters they run across deserve separate movies of their own, if only to let them escape from Oskar and his nails-on-achalkboard inquisitions. Make no mistake: great art can and has been made of the 9/11 attacks, like Paul Greengrass’ “United 93” and Spike Lee’s “25th Hour,” both of which worked hard to earn their audience’s trust and engagement. And if you’re simply craving a film about a boy struggling to reconnect with his dead father through a magic key, just see “Hugo” again and thank me later.

contributed photo

FINAL RATING:

“The Articulate Body” exhibit sheds a modern light on how body language and movement is a prominent source of communication, even in the changing technological world. Jennifer Crupi, the artist behind this exhibit at the Lawrence Art Center, is an associate professor at Kean University in New Jersey. She designed these wearable pieces to highlight guarded and unguarded gestures, as well as movements commonly used as stress relievers and to express annoyances. The media and materials that she uses make many of the pieces seem like medical or scientific devices, letting the viewer question whether the art is functional or representational, says Ben Ahlvers, exhibition program director for the Lawence Arts Center. “Her approach to the topic of body language and communication between humans is a very unique one,” Ahlvers says. “The quality and integrity of the pieces are astounding.” Her piece “Unguarded Gestures 2” loops around the neck and holds the wearer’s arms and hands in a shape as if his or her hands were on the hips. The pieces are mounted and displayed on Plexiglas and mirrors, without a

body form, to accentuate the body language she wishes to highlight. “I tried to go beyond simply making the piece by putting it in context or display that helps you understand what it is, without wearing it,” Crupi says. “The Articulate Body” exhibit is simplistic. All of the pieces are completely handmade, and Crupi hopes the exhibit will show the different ways our bodies speak for us. The exhibition is on display now until March 8 at the Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire St. Galleries are open Mon- Sat, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free.

contributed photo

“Unguarded Gestures #1” on display.

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school

campus & town

Better options for bad situations…

Napping

//allison bond

The years spent in college are infamously known as sleep-deprivation years. Whether it is due to pulling all-night cram sessions before a test, partying or the endless schedule to keep up with, college students are not getting enough sleep. “I don’t sleep a lot at all. I’m a really light sleeper and wake up often and easily,” says Lauren Hagg, a freshman from Wichita. “If I get three hours of sleep I can easily function throughout the day.” College students are now sleeping 1 to 1.6 hours less than they did a generation ago, according to a study at the University of Michigan. To help with our sleep deprivation in college we tend to take naps. While society often sees this as a sign of laziness, studies show that taking a 20 to 30 minute nap during the day actually increases mental judgment, reasoning and problem solving. “There is an art and science to napping,” says Dr. Edward Creagan from Mayo Clinic hospital in Rochester, Minn. Dr. Creagan says that a 20 minute nap between 2 and 3 p.m. is the most helpful to restoring energy and alertness. Taking longer naps makes us feel lethargic and “we lose that edge and sharp-

ness,” Dr. Creagan says. Annie Calvert, a freshman from Andover, sees this same result when she takes naps. “Naps give me more energy to finish out my day if I didn’t get a lot of sleep the night before,” Calvert says. Three helpful tips Dr. Creagan says can help people fall asleep are a cool, quiet environment, a consistent routine before going to sleep and the use of padded eye shades to help with complete darkness. So instead of pulling all-night study cram sessions, don’t be afraid to be more productive and take a nap first!

WESCOE WIT

//John garfield

“You’re different than, like, a boy I don’t know very well.” - girl “I woke up in Kansas City, threw up, then I woke up in my house.” - guy “You’re not supposed to text back right away. It’s like…a psychological thing.” - girl “You know pee farts that only happen when you’re trying to pee?” - girl “You spent that money on tea? That was my 40 money!” - guy “I’m not a slut! I’m single!” - girl “People are going to think you’re dating a retard”- girl 1 “We’ll I’m fucking that retard, so whatever.” - guy 1 “I don’t know what the stain is, but I’m going to wash my sheets.”- girl 1 “I think that’d be a good idea.” - girl 2 “You know how sometimes wounds just smell?” - girl

Photo by Allison Bond

BECOME A PART OF HISTORY Please submit at: gamedayposter@kansan.com or The KU Bookstore Submissions should include: Artwork or picture Slogan Submit by February 15th

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Description of poster Contact information

SUBMIT AN ORIGINAL POSTER FOR THE FINAL KU VS. MU GAME. WINNING DESIGN RECIEVES A NEW IPAD Any poster submitted becomes the intellectual property of the University Daily Kansan & can be reused & redistributed as we see fit.


CAMPUS & TOWN

The rise of the e-book

//Kelsea Eckenroth

E-books are shaking up the publishing industry, but how much are they changing the way students read?

I took an English class last semester and I’m pretty sure the book for my class weighed as much as an overweight lap dog. I was required to bring the book to every class meeting, which also happened to be near the end of the day. By the time I got home from school after walking around all day with that thing in my backpack, the only thing I wanted was a 30-minute massage to ease the pain. I never knew I could have so much hatred towards an inanimate object, but it was so much of an inconvenience for me to carry around a heavy book when I only needed 10 pages from it. Needless to say, selling that book at the end of the semester was very satisfying.

Times are changing

In the past, students have been forced to carry around multiple heavy books for classes. Lucky for us, technology has once again made our lives easier by introducing the e-reader. An e-reader is a digital reading device that is lighter and more portable than a regular printed book. It allows you to carry lots of books in your hand and in your backpack because they are all digitally stored on one device. Dani Costanza, a senior from Overland Park, joined the e-book revolution when she got an Amazon Kindle as a gift from her parents. She uses her Kindle 3-4 times a week for both school and her own reading pleasure. She has 50 to 60 books on her Kindle but only paid for four of them and downloaded the rest for free. “I have one poetry book for my English class that I am reading right now,” Costanza says. “I paid half the price of a regular book for my poetry book.”

For love of the printed book

Unlike Costanza, many students can’t give up loyalty to the printed book. Lottie Likens, the manager of University Book Shop, says she has had customers tell her that buying e-books makes them feel like they are spending money on nothing. It’s like paying a decent amount of money for

a non-tangible object. “You can’t beat having the book in your possession,” Likens says. Shannon Thompson, a junior from Overland Park, reads frequently and likes having a tangible book to write and take notes in. “There’s something therapeutic about having the book in your hand and turning pages,” she says. “You feel like you are going somewhere when you turn the pages and know how much you have read.” Alyson Lippert, a senior from Stilwell, usually reads one book every week. She prefers printed books, although she has a Kindle application on her iPad that allows her to download and read e-books. “Reading books on my iPad is convenient when I travel and when I go to class, but I like to have an actual book in my hand,” she says. Lippert has her books displayed on a bookshelf so she can go back and look at her accomplishments.

E-books and Classes

Many textbooks for classes are now offered in both printed and e-book form. E-books for science courses are usually more expensive than for English or history courses. The e-textbook for “College Chemistry” costs $114.74 from Kindle, and the e-textbook for most Shakespeare English courses costs 99 cents in Kindle format. The KU Bookstore price for a used “College Chemistry” textbook is $129.25 and a used Shakespeare book is $75. Despite having the option to choose between the two formats, the majority of students still seem to prefer regular textbooks. E-books can’t be sold back after the semester’s end, but they will always belong to the person who bought it. Likens says it is hard to judge how e-books will affect the future, but the University Book Shop is adjusting its game plan a little bit to try and meet with the growing e-book trend. Likens says that the store is also offering the cheapest textbook prices she has ever seen. “There’s a book that was $110 to rent and now it’s $10 to rent,” she says.

photo by morgan laforge

Comparing the features of the Amazon Kindle Touch and Barnes and Noble NOOK Simple Touch:

Kindle Touch: Price: $99 on Amazon.com Weight: About 7.5 ounces Battery life can last up to two months depending on use Wi-Fi Has 4GB and holds up to 3,000 books plus free Cloud storage for Amazon content Multi-touch screen with adjustable font size and three font choices NOOK Simple Touch: Price: $99 on BN.com Weight: About 7.48 ounces Battery life lasts over two months depending on use Wi-Fi Has 2GB and holds up to 1,000 books Touch Screen with adjustable font size and six font choices NOOK Reading App Information from amazon.com and barnesandnoble.com

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PLAY Wear this...

Fitness Fashion

//Lizzie Marx

It is almost a month into the new year so the time has come to check up on your resolutions for 2012. Stick to your goal of working out and getting fit by wearing these fashionable finds to your next trip to the gym. When the New Year arrives, many people make working out one of their top priorities, which may be why the student recreation center has been so crowded these past few weeks.

Unfortunately, after a couple of weeks of heart pumping workouts, many fall off the treadmill and quit their resolutions. In order to not let that happen to you, update your workout apparel with some of these great items. With this unusual spring-like weather, this Nike sky-blue pullover ($41) will be a perfect piece of outerwear when paired with the breezy running shorts ($45) for your next

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outdoor jog. If you are hitting the Rec before class, sport these Nike leggings ($65) with a vibrant orange long-sleeved top ($30) to fashionably transition from working your body to your brain. Don’t forget the most important item, the socks. Thorlo socks($15) not only wick away moisture and provide extra comfort, but they add the perfect pop of color to any workout ensemble. With one of these pairs of electriccolored neon socks, it really will look like you are running lightning fast. All of these workout essentials can be purchased at Gary Gribbles Running Sports located at 839 Massachusetts St. It is easy to forget about your resolutions after a month, but with these fresh additions to your workout wardrobe, you will have some extra motivation to get to the gym.

photo by lizzie marx

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FEBRUARY 2-4

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Do this...

Swing Dancing The dance lesson starts in five minutes, but everyone appears comfortable sitting in the plastic chairs pushed to the outskirts of the wooden floor. Shortly after I sit down, a babyfaced woman with long brown hair reaches over an empty seat next to me and introduces herself. “Is this your first time?” asks Katie Scrivo, a sophomore at Johnson County Community College. She began attending the Tuesday night swing dance lesson when a friend invited her over winter break. At 8 p.m., class begins. Men are told to line up on one side of the room, women the other. There are about 30 women and 25 men. The KU Swing Society president, Brad Anderson, and treasurer, Maureen Mulvihill, introduce the Lindy Hop, an 8-count dance performed with bent knees and relaxed partner connection. There is no music; our feet drum the beat on the floor. The rhythm is retained until turns and quicksteps are added, at which point Mulvihill, a senior from Perry, says, “There are no mistakes in swing dancing, only variations.” After we learn our individual steps, leads and follows are paired. The pressure builds when I partner with Igor Zheldakov, a postdoctoral student from St. Petersburg, Russia. Zheldakov has attended multiple lessons, which is helpful when the dance becomes more complex. The class can be likened to speed dating; within 20 minutes I dance with eight partners. By 9 p.m., I’ve met a dozen people and can perform all eight counts of the Lindy Hop with

//Sara Sneath a partner. The only drawback I find comes from Rachel Brown, a sophomore from Lenexa with a background in dancing. The lessons are great for beginners, she says, but there is a limit to how much the lessons teach. Brown says if you are a more seasoned dancer it is best to come after 9 p.m., when the class ends and the floor is available for open dance. The entire event is free and lasts from 8 to 11 p.m.

photo by chris bronson


Speak

Mama’s Princess

When Bailey’s mother moved from Kansas City to Indianapolis last year, not only was she gone, but so was her nuturing umbrella. // Bailey Atkinson

contributed photo

Bailey wears her Cinderella princess dress.

I

remember my old room perfectly. The walls neon green, so bright that even in the darkest of the night the room glowed. Outlining the room was a bright pink strip of crown modeling sandwiched between its neon green walls and white ceiling. This room fit me; even at 22 years old, I’d feel completely comfortable in it. But this room doesn’t exist anymore. Last time I saw it the green walls were white and bare. The pink crowning blended in an all-white sandwich. The reason for making such a bright room so depressingly boring? My family moved. The move started this past summer, after my mother’s job relocated her and a few hundred others from Kansas City to Indianapolis. So over summer break I packed up my things and left them in a storage unit in Overland Park, where most of the items still live. My mother’s things were

shipped away along with us. It was weird saying goodbye to a home that I lived in my entire life. I can still remember everything about that house: the Mayberry tree, affectionately named May by my mom, that we planted in the front yard was just starting its life; the nearly floor-length windows we used to lay in front of and watch snowstorms whenever the power went out until the wee hours of the morning; the trail of paw prints on the basement floor leading from the red room into the yellow room, from when my cat walked on the still-wet paint over seven years ago. While these memories still linger, I can’t even predict what my future memories will be. My mother goes crazy for Christmas; the elves have nothing on her. When moving we kept 15 huge crates of holiday and house decorations. I only wish this was an exaggeration. Somehow all these decorations fit in our home the same way every year. My mother decided that since she came back to Kansas for the holidays she wasn’t even going to decorate in Indianapolis. So the boxes remain, in the storage unit with the rest of our old life.

duffles. I slept in the ‘guest bedroom’ of my mother’s new home. While she does have a second bedroom, it’s shared between my brother, my mother’s dozen guests who visit throughout the year, and myself. All that I left there was an extra pair of clothes, flip-flops and an old pair of tennis shoes-- life’s essentials when going “home” for the weekend. Although I will never admit it to my mother, her being away is pretty difficult. My mom is my best friend; we have one of those weird Gilmore Girls types of relationship. You know, the “tell each other everything, finish each others’ thoughts and generally have an identical opinion on every topic” sort. Before the move I would go home more than I should-whenever I was upset about something, needed someone to vent to, or just to take a break from life. I don’t have that opportunity anymore. It’s weird not being able to be cradled in her lap as she sings my song, Bailey, Bailey, oh how your eyes are blue, I am half crazy, all for the love of you (Yes, this still happens occasionally). We still make time to talk though. Al-

though we have two completely opposite schedules, we find time to talk at least a half hour a day. But it’s not enough. To me, this seems like child neglect. I guess if I had to decide what was the hardest part of the move, it would have to be being forced to grow up. Ask any of my friends, I don’t know my age. My room has a Cinderella rug, Tinkerbell shower curtain and plenty of pink. (That’s kind of embarrassing to admit publicly.) Not to mention I get scared so easily. Every noise makes me jump, and the last scary movie I saw was ET. Does this seem like someone who’s ready to be an adult? I know that going to college was supposed to make me more responsible and mature, which I think I am. But still wanting to be a mama’s girl and to spend as much time at home as I can, while I can, doesn’t seem that ridiculous to me. So I am at a crossroads, fighting to grow up. Behind me, a Cinderella dress hangs in my closest and on the desk next to me, the water bill: two items that should never be kept together in one girl’s room.

“The weirdest part of the move is the fact that I no longer have a place to call home.”

The weirdest part of the move is the fact that I no longer have a place to call home. To finish off my summer in Indianapolis, I took two large Vera Bradley

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Jayplay (2-2-12)