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HEALTHY LIVING HEALTHY PLANET feel good live simply laugh more

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PET CARE natural approaches for health & well-being

LOWERING

CHOLESTEROL 10 natural keys to heart health

MARCH 2009

local Morgan’s educates with

COSTA RICAN ECO-LODGE

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FREEDOM liberate yourself

Judith Orloff

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inside this issue PG. 10

Morgan’s Canoe & Outdoor Adventures

healingways 12

Creating a Costa Rican classroom by Beth Davis

wisewords 14

When Pets Go Natural by Victoria L. Freeman

inspiration 15 naturalpet 20

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The Shape of a Diet Feeding pets for wellness by Dr. Matthew J. Heller PG. 16

Finding Deeper Meaning in Obesity

consciouseating 24

16 20 22

by Victoria Smith, HT

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Keys to Heart Health PG. 20

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Ten ways to lower cholesterol naturally . by Janet Bond Brill

How to Advertise To advertise with Natural Awakenings or request a media kit, please contact us at 513-259-3090 or email Sales@nacincin.com. Deadline for ads: the 1st of the month prior to the month of publication. submissions Email articles, news items and ideas to: Editor@nacincin.com. Deadline for editorial: the 1st of the month prior to the month of publication. Email Calendar Events to: Calendar@nacincin.com Deadline for calendar: the 1st of the month prior to the month of publication. regional markets Advertise your products or services in multiple markets! Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp. is a growing franchised family of locally owned magazines serving communities since 1994. To place your ad in other markets call 513-259-3090.

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letterfrompublisher In some relationships, words are a garnish—even the subtlest of connections are intuitive, the most mundane ideas harmonious, the slightest breath or glance understood. Our patterns resonate with the other’s to blur the lines of individual identity, leaving us with a sense of understanding far deeper than that of our usual mental machinations. Sure, you might have this experience with a “soul mate,” spouse or life partner. You might also have it with a special group, a handful of friends or at a large gathering of folks you’ve never actually met. Some of us experience this sense of unity with Nature. Ancient cultures seem to have had this sense of sensitivity to the external world embedded within them; they knew of their kinship and deep connection to plants, animals and the earth at a level many today pass on by. There are those today who—like our own local Gary Morgan, featured in this month’s Community Spotlight—plug us directly into natural adventures such as plunging through the rain forest jungles of Costa Rica, where the voice of Nature is a veritable symphony impossible to ignore. Perhaps you have found yourself in the mind of a panther? I have, because I’m often around one. (Perhaps not what you are thinking, I’m single… and no, I didn’t mean our dear managing editor, Kristin DeMint.) I was referring to a certain house-cat friend who thinks he’s a panther. (Maybe you know one, too?) It is also possible to have such a deep connection with animals (especially pets) that they know our patterns like clockwork (and we theirs) quite often better than people in our lives. We can sense their perceptions, feelings, and desires, with nary a word expressed (but maybe a meow or a grrr). The health of our own whole selves as humans has many parallels to the holistic health of our pets. By being in tune with our animal friendspets, we become one with ourselves and with the mysteriously hidden world all around us. As a youth, one way I became aware of this loving spiritual connection, was via cousin Bernard who had some unusual “friends”, including a huge iguana, and a skunk with its scent sack intact. The awareness still comes in surprises, last week, car stuck in ice, 2 of us pushing in futility, a strategic bark from a new dog friend by the name of Josie, magically seemed to release the car from winter’s grasp. As we awaken to the unity we have with all the life in this universe during this time of year, many of us will start thinking about our hibernating gardens and the new life that will soon emerge as this fabulous year of new possibility begins to bloom. We hope you enjoy this month’s path to healthy, happy living. As always, it’s a pleasure bringing you the best of Healthy Living advice and options for involvement right here in our local community. A world of thanks for your support,

contact us Local Owner & Publisher Curt Hawley Publisher@nacincin.com

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We give 10% of our profits to Local Charities. ©2009 by Natural Awakenings. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reproduced and reprinted, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing. Natural Awakenings is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. It is available in selected stores, health and education centers, healing centers, public libraries and wherever free publications are generally seen. Please call for a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business. We do not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the articles and advertisements, nor are we responsible for the products and services advertised. We welcome your ideas, articles and feedback.

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newsbriefs

Crazy Race

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2009 Everything Pets Expo

n Mar. 7, at 12:30pm the 2nd Annual Cinciditarod race takes place beginning and ending on Fountain Square.  Cinciditarod is named for, and a tribute to, the Iditarod, a brutal 1,000 mile dog-sled race in Alaska. However, in Cincinnati not dogs, but people will race with decorated shopping carts instead of sleds. While physically attached to their grocery carts, teams of five will push through a nearly five-mile course over the streets of downtown, Over-theRhine, Newport and Covington, picking up items on a grocery list and stopping at five mandatory check points. The race benefits the Freestore Foodbank.  

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verything Pets is a family oriented, highly interactive show drawing attendees directly into the world of responsible pet ownership and care through a combination of entertainment, education, demonstrations, seminars, and hands-on fun. The expo features manufacturers, retailers, groomers, veterinarians, hobbyist groups, humane rescue organizations, boutiques, bakeries, behavior specialist and training, pet food, boarding and day care, aquariums, cages, bedding, and much more. Exhibits include educational live animal demonstrations, a children’s area, entertainment stages, and a pet adoption center. The expo opens its doors on Mar. 27 from 2 to 7 p.m., Mar. 28 from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Mar. 29 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Duke Energy Center, located at the corner of Fifth and Elm Street in downtown Cincinnati. Tickets cost $12; children ages 8 to 13 pay $8 and children under 8 are free.

For more information, visit MyFountainSquare.com

For more information, visit EverythingPets.org

New Yoga Class at Lloyd House

Presence through Absence

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llen Bierhorst, owner of the Historic Lloyd House, 3901 Clifton Ave. in Clifton, has opened its doors to a new yoga class. “A Morning Cup of Yoga” meets every Friday from 9 to 10:30 a.m. in the beautiful 3rd floor Zendo. The Zendo, with its wood floors, natural lighting and warm atmosphere, has been home to a wide variety of health and spiritual modalities for over a decade. Instructor Phoenix Wilson has been jumpstarting Friday mornings since February. Phoenix is a certified Yoga and Tai Chi instructor with eight years of teaching experience in the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky area. While primarily a student of Iyengar and Anusara Yoga, Phoenix brings a variety of experience and styles to her class. Her goal is to blend what she has learned into a fully integrated practice to present to her students, who will start their day, and weekend, with a clear mind, invigorated body and renewed spirit.

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tewart Goldman’s Presence through Absence is now on display at the Vance Waddell Gallery in the Cincinnati Art Museum, located at 953 Eden Park Dr in Cincinnati. Running through May 10, this exhibition offers an overview of works from 1971 to the present, documenting the development of Goldman’s work. Born in Philadelphia, Stewart Goldman moved to Cincinnati to join the faculty at the Art Academy in 1968. Through thirty-three years of teaching, he has influenced countless local artists and has become a significant figure in the local art scene himself. Like many For more information, contact Phoenix at (859) 1st Lesson artists who studied during the 1950s, for the 341-9642 or PhoenixWilson@mac.com HEALThe rebelled against the prevalent style H of it! of abstraction and focused on figurative •••••• an 1stDL csinog doe painting. Images of hauntingly empty e • Great fo s s a body r the Min n gooonly d and So • Develo with of human d • •the ul rooms p a more • •suggestion • • focused studies • Beginn Agile Bo er’s class developed into dy •figures es Improve Cspaces. ardio funHis illustrations for Dr. of vacant Put Fun ction for the HEALTH of it! and Health in your Anna Ornstein’s My Mother’s Eyes: Holife thro ugh Da of a Young Girl further locaust Memories ncing! • • • • • • Dancing does a body good • • • • • • MONTGOMER developed of images. Y these (513) 48types www.arthclasses 9-7305 D • Great for the Mind and Soul • Beginner’s OWNTOWN urmurray tristate.c The Cincinnati Art (5 13 ) 241-7308 Museum is open • Develop a more Agile Body • Improve Cardio function om TRI-COUNTY (513) 771-67 Tuesday to Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 70 and Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Put Fun and Health in your life through Dancing! The general admission is free.

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MONTGOMERY DOWNTOWN TRI-COUNTY

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For more information, visit CincinnatiArtMuseum.org

March 2009

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newsbriefs

The Curious Mr. Catesby

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hio’s first USDA Certified Organic Restaurant has opened its doors in Mason. Basilico Organic provides high quality organic food and products with great culinary taste to insure the health, vitality of their guests and future generations. The Italian and Intercontinental Restaurant features many vegan and vegetarian options. Basilico Organic’s menu offers a selection of USDA certified organic meals and beverages, including sushi made with wild catch seafood, USDA certified organic kids meals, USDA certified organic bakery, organic beer and organic wine. The restaurant manufactures a variety of its own every day fresh USDA certified organic products such as; fresh pasta, fresh ravioli, fresh gnocchi, tomato sauce, coffee, and sotoilio.

he Lloyd Library and Museum, located at 917 Plum Street in downtown Cincinnati, is currently featuring the works of the little-known 18th century English naturalist and artist Mark Catesby. After visiting the New World twice and beginning publication in 1729, Catesby took eighteen years to finish the first fully illustrated study of North American flora and fauna. The exhibition presents images of his art and provides the context and history surrounding this fascinating period in both scientific and United States history. Visitors will have the chance to see rare first editions of Catesby’s work. Until Mar. 27 this free exhibit is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday as well as on Saturday, Mar. 21. It runs in conjunction with a film screening of “The Curious Mr. Catesby” held on Feb. 28 at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden, a co-sponsor of the event. CET will also air the documentary on April 19. The book exhibit at the Lloyd provides a wonderful addition to the film.

Basilico Organic is located at 6176 Tylersville Road in Mason, Ohio. For more information, call (513) 492-9519

For further information, visit LloydLibrary.org

Spring Weight-loss Group

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ictoria Smith, board certified holistic practitioner, is holding an introduction to a spring weigh-loss group on Mar. 17, from 7 to 8 p.m. Participants will learn about Dr. Simeon’s weight-loss method and hear about its positive results from first-hand experience. Utilizing Dr. Simeon’s protocol for all of 2008, Smith has lost 30lb and maintained her new weight. Reservation is required as space is limited. The prepaid admission is $10. Weekly meetings may follow. Victoria Smith is also offering consulting services, which include Fibromyalgia, Diabetes, Heavy Metal Toxicity, Cleanses, Candida Yeast overgrowth, and more. For more information and to register, call Victoria Smith at (859)648-0905. See article on page 22.

Basilico Organic Now Open

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Coming in April DISCOVER

the new GREEN

Economy

6

how the green economy is taking shape and where to find great green jobs in this special edition of Natural Awakenings. For more information about advertising and how you can participate, call

Greater Cincinnati Edition / nacincin.com

513-259-3090


Paradise Found’s Living Foods Life Style Center

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aradise Found is planning a Local Living Foods Community Sustainability Center, located in the former Kennedy Heights Kroger building at the corner of Kennedy and Montgomery Roads. Local shoppers will enjoy a 24/7 farmer’s-like market utilizing the front space in the store building. Green energy, clothing, body care and other green businesses would also be attracted to the center. Additional distribution sites will be established around the Cincinnati Metro area as supply and demand grow. Paradise Found will create a website, which will be functioning as a virtual warehouse for local food availability. All local growers can enter the quantity, date available for harvest, cost, quality, and description of all their items into the data base. This becomes the inventory of available local produce and prepared foods that local consumers can then order from – to be either personally picked up at their closest distribution center or conveniently delivered directly to their homes (perhaps by neighborhood bicycle delivery services). This distribution system will also incorporate recycling of both wasted food and compost back to the local farms and gardens creating a circular, sustainable, constantly replenished mineral and nutrient system. The center will also be the natural neighborhood site for traditional recycling, such as paper, plastic, metal, toxic chemicals and electronics. Although Paradise Found has made great progress in turning its vision into reality, the program is still looking for more community support. For more information, contact Randall Ball at (513) 543-8294 or e-mail ParadiseFoundLLC@Yahoo.com

New Women’s Cancer Support Group

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our of the area’s leading cancer support organizations are joining forces to offer a weekly support group in centrally located Avondale for women fighting cancer. The Wellness Community (TWC) and the UC Barrett Cancer Center provide the professional facilitators, the American Cancer Society ensures the location, and the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Greater Cincinnati Affiliate makes the funding for the weekly Women’s Cancer Support Group available. The support group is meeting at the Musekamp Family Lodge, located at 2806 Reading Road in Cincinnati, every Friday afternoon from 1:00 to 2:30. The group sessions free of charge and are open to women with any type of cancer at any stage. Preregistration is not requied, but women are encouraged to contact The Wellness Community at 514-791-4060 prior to attending. Assistance with transportation is also available by calling TWC. For more information, visit TheWellnessCommunity.org

S IGNIFICANT H EALING

Holistic Practice

Expect Results! A holistic practice specializing in Foundational HealthTM with a focus on addressing the cause and rebuilding the body to restore vibrancy. Victoria Smith

Holistic Practitioner, Board Certified 10 Girard Street . Florence, KY 41042

859.648.0905 www.SignificantHealing.com

March 2009

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newsbriefs

coverartist

Healing Yoga Workshop

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ogahOMe Bellevue, located at 715 Fairfield Ave in Bellevue, KY, is hosting a 2-day workshop with Laura Jane Mellencamp, M.A. RYT500hr., director and founder of “Yoga Among Friends” in Downers Grove, IL. This workshop is designed for teachers, students, and individuals who want to teach, use or share techniques that heal the mind. The classes will focus on concepts, ideas and techniques designed to transform from confusion to clarity, from suffering to joy and from the ordinary to the extraordinary. These changes that result in the release of anxiety and depression of the mind are neither accidental nor mysterious; they are the benefit of using the deeper tools of yoga. Classes will be held on Mar. 7, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. “Yoga for Depression” and 2 to 5 p.m. “Yoga for Anxiety”, as well as on Mar. 8, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. “Yoga for Attachment”. The cost is $65 per session or $175 for all three workshops. Call (513) 774-YOGA (9642) for pre-registration. For further information, visit YogahOMe.net

Spring into Spring with Spring Salad

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n Mar. 14 at 11 a.m. Park and Vine, located at 1109 Vine Street in Cincinnati, is hosting a class on how to grow delicious organic salads. All the seeds and plants needed for growing will be available from Greensleeves Farm. Students attending this hands-on workshop can choose from a selection of containers and soils from City Roots and Outside. Cost ranges from $20 to $40, depending on container size and number of plants selected. Pre-registration is required as space is limited to 10 participants. To register, e-mail Gretchen Vaughn at GreensleevesFarm@gmail. com before March 6.

For more information, visit ParkAndVine.com

Kerri Schmidt (Independent Consultant) phone: (513)737-4401 email: kerriaschmidt@aol.com Eden Spaulding (Independent Consultant) phone: (513)693-7841 email: EdenTreats@Yahoo.com web: Edenyouth.MyArbonne.com

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Greater Cincinnati Edition / nacincin.com

Chihuahua in Green Ron Krajewski

Soulful eyes set against broad brushstrokes of vibrant color reach out and connect with everyone who views the art of Ron Krajewski. “I like to break away from the traditional pet portrait, through using off-center composition and bold colors,” explains the self-taught artist. “The result is a bright and upbeat contemporary portrait that captures the personality of the pet.” Krajewski usually renders his four-legged subjects in watercolors or acrylics, employing an imaginative palette and deft details to impart each animal’s lively intelligence and loving trust. The artist notes that all of his early paintings “just went into a drawer somewhere,” until his wife urged him to try to sell one on eBay. Today, his art hangs in private collections in all 50 states, as well as abroad. Krajewski also has become involved with several pet rescue organizations. As an example, he created the poster and playbill art for Broadway Barks, a charity of Bernadette Peters and Mary Tyler Moore that benefits New York area animal rescues. View the artist’s portfolio at DogArtStudio.Etsy.com; private commissions are available through RonKrajewski.com. Gallery 30, in Gettysburg, PA and Good Dog! Gallery, in Rockport, MA also carry his paintings.


Open Invitation to 2nd Natural Networking Event at the Historic Lloyd House

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atural Awakenings magazine and co-sponsors are inviting you to the second Natural Networking Event. Co-sponsors are ellen Bierhorst, Ph.D. Clinical Psychologist; Jen Dusold, Freelance Trend Consultant & Designer; Certified Yoga Instructor Phoenix Wilson, RYT; Massage Pro Jim Viles, LMT; Victoria Smith, Significant Healing Holistic Practice; and the award-winning, eclectic Melt Restaurant. Come to this warm and friendly community open house at the Lloyd House for healthy explorations, cheer, networking opportunities or just to relax. Join us and bring a friend on Tuesday, April 7 from 4-8 p.m. For more information, contact Curt Hawley at (513)259-3090 or Publisher@NAcincin.com (See ad on back cover for address and other details.)

Earth Hour 2009

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n 2007, 2.2 million people took part in the world’s first Earth Hour in Sydney Australia. Just one year later, 50 million people in 370 cities and towns, in more than 35 countries worldwide switched off their lights for Earth Hour. Earth Hour 2009 aims to reach more than one billion people in 1000 cities around the world, inviting communities, business and governments to switch off lights for one hour at 8:30 p.m. on Mar. 28 and sending a powerful global message that we care enough about climate change to take action. “As lights go out in cities around the U.S. and the world on March 28th, Earth Hour will provide world leaders with an unmistakable mandate to negotiate a new international climate change agreement,” said WWF President and CEO Carter Roberts. “The climate crisis threatens the ability of our planet to support its inhabitants, and it has never been more urgent that the voice of the people be heard on this issue. Earth Hour not only focuses global attention on the need to find solutions to climate change, but demonstrates the power that each of us has to make a difference in the future of our planet.” Join us for Earth Hour at 8:30pm on Saturday, Mar. 28, 2009! For more information, visit EarthHour.org

“Be

Tas te

Awa

Medal Ball at Arthur Murray

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n March 14, Arthur Murray Dance Studios invites everyone to come celebrate their students’ accomplishments. An Arthur Murray Medal Ball is a gala dance honoring students wh o g ra d u a t e from one level of their dance program to the next. Medal Ball gives students the opportunity to enjoy dancing with all their fellow Arthur Murray friends and family in a fun and elegant setting while showing off their skills. In the Tri-State area, Arthur Murray Dance Studios can be found in downtown Cincinnati, Montgomery, Springdale and Florence, KY. The Arthur Murray dance program teaches various Latin and ballroom styles, and ranges from basic introductions to very advanced skills at a competitive level. Private and group lessons and weekly practice parties are offered at all locations. For more information, call Arthur Murray Downtown Cincinnati at (513)241-7308 and visit ArthurMurrayTriState.com

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Life is a pure flame, and we live by an invisible sun within us.

Ft. Mitchell

Hyde Park

Sir Thomas Brown

2053 Dixie Hwy. Ft. Mitchell, KY

2637 Erie Ave. Cincinnati, OH

(859) 331-4339

(513) 321-9952

Casual Gourmet Cafe

MyIndigoGrill.com

March 2009

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communityspotlight

Morgan’s Canoe & Outdoor Adventures Creating a Costa Rican Classroom by Beth Davis

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or over 50 years, the Morgan family, Greater Cincinnati locals, have been sharing their love of nature and the environment by offering unforgettable experiences in some of the most beautiful destinations, from the pristine Ft. Ancient Gorge of the Little Miami River to the Whitewater River in Brookville, Ind., to the picturesque rainforest of Central America. Pioneers of the canoeing industry in the Southwestern Ohio and Southeastern Indiana regions, the Morgan family takes great pride in upholding tradition and treating each and every customer like family. Owned by the Morgan brothers—Gary, Greg, Dirk, Rob and Randy—Morgan’s Canoe & Outdoor Adventures encompasses the original Morgan’s Ft. Ancient Canoe Livery on the Little Miami River, Morgan’s Brookville Canoe Livery and Morgan’s Jungle Lodge and Center for Rain Forest Education. Located in Costa Rica, Morgan’s Jungle Lodge was established 13 years ago. The family first became interested in the area in the mid 1980’s after Gary Morgan spent a year guiding white water rafts for Costa Rica Expeditions. Later, the family purchased the lodge, which sits on 20 acres on the beach, in the middle of a coastal secondary rainforest. The facility accommodates about 20 people and is located near Corcovado National Park, eight miles outside of the town of Puerto Jimenez on the Osa Peninsula. The Jungle Lodge is an eco-lodge designed for those with a deep appreciation of nature and the beauty of the outdoors. Although open to the public, the lodge specializes in introducing school students to the lush tropical surroundings of this magnificent area of Costa Rica.

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Greater Cincinnati Edition / nacincin.com


Morgan’s Jungle Lodge is an eco-lodge designed for those with a deep appreciation of nature and the beauty of the outdoors.

According to Gary Morgan, an owner as well as educational director for the Jungle Lodge, it starts with educating people about the river environment in an eco-friendly, high quality and professional manner. It is an important aspect the Morgan family takes seriously, and one that extends to other regions as well. “Studying the river and lake ecosystems and monitoring the stream quality helps students see the overall big picture,” explains Morgan. “It is important to evaluate how water is used, how it’s being treated and the way it goes back in the system.” Students can take what they’ve learned here and apply it to the areas of Costa Rica. For the third consecutive year, Cincinnati’s St. Mary School will embark on a trip to Morgan’s Jungle Lodge with 17 of its 8th grade students and seven chaperones. Gary Morgan, also known as “Captain Morgan,” is the overall leader of the expedition. Sean Laudeman, who teaches 6th grade science, 7th grade social studies, and 8th grade religion at St. Mary’s, is one of the chaperones on the trip, as well as the education coordinator. According to Laudeman, students do research projects on Costa Rica and the region surrounding to evaluate their preparedness to go on the trip. All 48 of the 8th grade students are required to do the project but only 17 are chosen. After the selection process the students will be involved with an elective class that takes place twice a week for the nine weeks leading up to the trip. The students study everything from Costa Rica’s vast environment to cultural norms, even the ins and outs of international travel. “I will get the kids prepared as best as possible to travel internationally and have a well-rounded, science-based education of the region,” says Laudeman. “As their teacher, I will also have the pleasure of keeping the students focused for homework time at the lodge after a long day of adventure and field research.” Morgan says the group will spend eight days and nights at the lodge doing activities including snorkeling, fishing, survival skill training, zip lining/canopy tour, horseback riding in the rainforest, waterfall jumping and creek hiking. Because education is such a crucial part of the trip, students will also partake in daily science projects such as beach erosion surveys, primate identification, birding taxonomy and much more. One of the best things about the trip is that students get

to experience science outside of the classroom and take those lessons and incorporate them into a real life situation. “It brings the classroom alive and shows the kids that science does not always happen in a lab,” explains Laudeman. “It is a real hands-on experience that will enrich and enhance the lessons learned in the classroom.” For Connor Judd and Joseph Keating, 8th graders at St. Mary’s, the trip is a chance to travel out of the country, something neither had done before. “I’m excited to see the rainforest and see in person all of the things we have been studying,” comments Judd. Keating agrees, adding that, “I am most excited about seeing the different animals.” Morgan also hopes to be able to transmit a “live from the rainforest” computer cast back to area schools, providing other students the opportunity to experience the beauty of nature. “I want them to see what we see each day – the iguanas, ant eaters and monkeys that meander through the grounds, or just the beauty of our surroundings.” Funds required for the necessary equipment have not yet been secured, but Morgan stays hopeful. “We are exposing people to precious resources,” he says. “Combining recreation with education creates a respect for the environment from a whole new generation.” For more information, call 513-932-7658 or 800-WECANOE, email FtAncient@MorgansCanoe.com or visit MorgansCanoe.com. To contact Gary Morgan directly, call (513) 321-3123.

Searching for Information on Alternative, Wholistic, Eclectic Living? Find it downtown at the

Lloyd Library and Museum Through its world class research collections in historic and contemporary botany, pharmacy, ethnobotany, herbal and alternative medicine, natural product development, folk medicine, book and art exhibitions, lectures, and more! 917 Plum Street Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 513-721-3707

Check us out on the web:

www.lloydlibrary.org

Bringing Science, History, and Art to Life March 2009

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healingways

Hypnotherapy Subconscious Beliefs Rule by Brigit Ingram

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he 1984 Olympic Games made Mary Lou Retton’s name a household word, as the first American woman to ever win a gold medal in gymnastics. Afterwards, the diminutive champion surprised many Time readers by sharing one of her secrets in a magazine interview. During the nights leading up to her win, she lay in bed, mentally rehearsing her routine hundreds of times, visualizing a perfect performance down to every minute detail. In effect, she was practicing self-hypnosis.

Practitioners explain that hypnotherapy can help an individual access their belief system anchored in the subconscious, a storehouse of memories, habitual self-talk and negative messages. Then, guided by professional counsel, the person is able to create new behavior patterns that help them reach their fullest potential.

The gold medalist believed in the process of mental conditioning and affirmation. “Since the mind doesn’t know the difference between fantasy and reality, Retton’s self-hypnosis helped her to do more effectively what she was already good at,” says Master Hypnotist George Bien, a nationally recognized professional hypnotherapist, with a doctorate in educational psychology and communications. “Often the best candidates for hypnosis are highly motivated and intelligent people like Retton, because of their ability to focus and concentrate.” Since the introduction of hypnosis in the 18th century, outdated images of a hypnotic trance-like state, induced by swinging watches and spiraling devices,

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Greater Cincinnati Edition / nacincin.com

have been replaced with the concept of concentrated focus and visualization techniques. The belief that the unconscious mind was creative and solution-generating led Milton H. Erickson (1901-1980), an American psychiatrist and author, to elevate the use of hypnosis in his practice; he became known as the father of modern hypnotherapy. By 1958, the American Medical Association approved and endorsed the use of hypnosis in tandem with medicine, with the American Psychological Association following suit in 1960. Since 1995, the National Institutes of Health have recommended hypnotherapy as a treatment for chronic pain. Many dentists also use it to reduce the fear and anxiety that accompany uncomfortable procedures. Today, this natural state of heightened awareness, in which an individual easily relaxes, accepts suggestions and listens to the profound guidance of their own inner wisdom, is used as a powerful tool by practitioners of healing arts. Local Hypnotherapist Mary Ellen Moore of Synergy Holistic Health Center in Northern Kentucky points out that, “Many people have heard of using hypnosis to help with weight loss, smoking cessation, stress reduction, and pain management. What most people do not know is that you can use hypnotherapy and even learn self-hypnosis to improve attitudes and relationships. Some of my most successful outcomes are with clients who became committed to learning self-hypnosis to improve their lives, their relationships, reach their highest potential, or work towards simply being happy. We not only help athletes like Mary Lou Retton, we help individuals in everyday situations and life.”  “Hypnotherapy is based on accessing the subconscious mind and utilizing the mind-body connection: the concept that the mind, body and emotions are all part of one whole, integrated system that constantly communicates,” says Moore. As a clinical hypnotherapist Moore guides clients to find or


“Using the subconscious mind’s creativity and wisdom, a person can re-script and transform past unpleasant or incomplete experiences.” - Bill Bulloch, Alchemical Hypnotherapist, Stillpoint Center remember what is, was, or wants to be healthier; then builds on that, assisting communication between their unconscious mind and conscious mind so they can think and act in new ways to achieve their desires. Moore states that, “This creates a more dynamic balance between whom and what they want for themselves, as well as the actions taken to reach and maintain their goals.” According to Bill Bulloch, a local Alchemical Hypnotherapist and staff member at the Stillpoint Center collective in Blue Ash, OH, “One of the more innovative advancements in the use of this tool is Alchemical Hypnotherapy created by David Quigley. Using the subconscious mind’s creativity and wisdom, a person can re-script and transform past unpleasant or incomplete experiences. The same capacity the mind has to rehearse events in the future is used to dynamically edit, correct, and re-experience events from the past. As Quigley is fond of saying, ‘It’s never too late to have a happy childhood.”’ “Alchemical Hypnotherapy can be used to re-parent a client by developing an active relationship with their Inner Child. Unfinished business with departed or unavailable family members can be completed in the virtual reality of the hypnotic state. Conflicts between opposing sub-personalities, such as the Inner Judge and Inner Rebel, can be resolved creatively at an imagined meeting in the theater of a person’s subconscious mind. Someone can literally change an unpleasant past experience in their life as though they are watching and editing a video,” affirms Bulloch. Bulloch also contends that, ”One of the greatest strengths of Alchemical Hypnotherapy is that the solutions arise from the client’s own inner wisdom. The hypnotherapist functions more as a facilitator of the process, not as a provider of solutions. The result is a more empowered client.”

Practitioners explain that hypnotherapy can help an individual access their belief system anchored in the subconscious, a storehouse of memories, habitual self-talk and negative messages. Then, guided by professional counsel, the person is able to create new behavior patterns that help them reach their fullest potential. Hypnosis cannot negate a person’s principles or moral convictions, the experts assure us, nor does it put an individual to sleep. Rather, it creates a deep state of relaxation, allowing the subconscious mind to accomplish permanent change. Willpower is only good for the short term. Old habit programming always wins out, unless it is replaced with a new suggestion to the subconscious. Accessing the power of this subconscious core can certainly create positive outcomes. Just ask a certain 1984 gold medalist. For more information or to find a local hypnotherapist, visit the National Guild of Hypnotists, Inc. at ngh.net

Pets are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole. — Author unknown

Connect with George Bien at GeorgeBien.com Reach Bill Bulloch through the Stillpoint Center at 513-489-5302, visit stillpointtherapy.com or connect with Bill on his confidential therapy line, 513-322-4807.

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Connect with David Quigley, at The Alchemy Institute of Hypnosis, 567-A Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95405, (707) 537-0495, FAX: (707) 537-0496, or visit alchemyinstitute.com Contact Mary Ellen Moore, CCHt (Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist)at Synergy Holistic Health Center, 859-525-5000, email her at synergy1@fuse.net or visit synergyholistichealth.com

March 2009

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wisewords A Conversation with

Dr. Judith Orloff Integrated physician and wellness advocate by Barbara Stahura Judith Orloff, a medical doctor, psychiatrist, intuitive and bestselling author, synthesizes the pearls of traditional medicine with cutting-edge knowledge of intuition, energy and spirituality to create a new blend of healing wisdom. She believes that the future of medicine depends upon integrating all these elements to achieve emotional freedom and total wellness. Her new book, Emotional Freedom: Liberate Yourself from Negative Emotions and Transform Your Life, is due out this month.

What is emotional freedom? Emotional freedom is your ability to love by cultivating positive emotions and being able to compassionately witness and transform negative ones, whether they’re yours or another’s. This skill liberates you from fear and lets you navigate adversity without attacking someone, losing your cool or being derailed by negativity. With emotional freedom, you can choose to react constructively, rather than relinquishing command of the situation when your buttons get pushed. If you get mired in the muck of negativity, you can’t lead a liberated, happy life. My spiritual teacher says we make progress on the spiritual path by beating ourselves up a little bit less each day. I believe that. It’s about baby steps.

Why do individuals respond to situations in such radically different ways? I’ve defined four emotional types: the intellectual, the empath, the gusher and the rock. These are the filters through which you see the world—the default setting of your personality to which you revert, especially under stress. Each type is determined by inborn temperament, upbringing and perhaps, karma. Because emotional freedom means being able to remain sensitive, but centered, in an overwhelming world, it’s essential to know your emotional type. Without this knowledge, many people dysfunctionally hunker down in their type for decades, without examining which aspects do and don’t serve them.

What tips us off that we are absorbing others’ negative emotions? Many sensitive people come to me as patients and in workshops, who have been labeled “overly sensitive.” Like me, these people are what I call emotional empaths. Because we are so sensitive, we absorb the energy of others. We sense their fear, anxiety and stress and sometimes take them into our bodies. Then, we get exhausted or feel ill. People on a spiritual path tend to gain more sensitivity as they develop and need to learn how to stay centered and be compassionate without becoming an emotional sponge.

How can we calmly refrain from retaliating when attacked by a difficult personality? “Emotional vampires,” is my term for many difficult people such as criticizers, victims, narcissists or controllers. I say let them be our teachers, rather than tormentors.

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We must ask ourselves: “How do they teach us to communicate with more heart and better boundaries? How can we deal differently with feeling irritated, controlled or insulted?” The old way is to get nasty or withdraw. The new way is to not simply react when your buttons get pushed—a behavior that perpetuates war. Practice what I call the namaste effect, which is, “I respect the spirit within you, even if I don’t like what you’re doing.”

Can emotions serve as a path to spiritual awakenings? It’s necessary to understand these four basic components of emotion; their biology, spirituality, energy and psychology. My book teaches the tools you need to proactively shift your biochemistry, as well as your energy, and to see the spiritual and psychological meaning of what you’re going through. I see difficult emotions as a laboratory for spiritual growth, whereas traditional psychiatry often views them more as tormentors; something to get rid of. Each emotion is a prompt for you to get more in touch with your heart and expand your light. This perspective changes how you deal with all emotional challenges.

What does it take to overcome fear in times of terrorism, economic turmoil and natural disasters? Part of emotional freedom is making a vow not to lead a fear-driven life. That must be a deep desire in your heart. Then, do everything possible to overcome fear and worry with faith in goodness, trying to stay in the moment, rather than catastrophizing the future. Courage or fear is a choice; it’s not something that just happens to you. Emotional freedom is an inner peace movement. Judith Orloff, MD, is an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at University of California, Los Angeles. To purchase her book and for information on a free video class on emotional freedom and intuition, visit DrJudithOrloff.com Barbara Stahura, a freelance writer in Tucson, AZ, has interviewed many major transformative individuals of our time. She may be reached at BarbaraStahura.com.


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Rules for Kindness by Sharon Salzberg

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was leading a meditation group in the Washington, D.C. area, and we had rented an elementary school auditorium for the day. All along the walls of the corridors were posted rules for being kind. During the breaks in the day, I would just stand and read them, again and again. The rules posted there rest upon principles like dissolving the rigid boundaries we hold between ourselves and others, including rather than excluding, recognizing that our actions and words are consequential, and being thoughtful. They seemed so simple, yet like many simple truths, if we were to live them, rather than merely admire them, they could change our life, whatever our age. One of the most provocative and poignant of these rules for me was “everyone can play.” As I practiced this tenet, I noticed more hints of loneliness in those I encountered than I had seen before, more subtle echoes of that forlorn child than I expected. Including others was often like watching something unfurl and begin to flower. In making a point of including others in conversation, with real regard, in a fullness of attention, I felt some subtle walls within me dissolve, as well. There was a growing sense of rightness, of balance, because after all, everyone should get to play. Each of us will do well to experiment with these rules, perhaps one a week or one a month, to emphasize them. Even if you already live your life according to these tenets, consciously choosing to focus on them can be enlivening, opening and, at times, surprising. Adapted excerpt from The Kindness Handbook by Sharon Salzberg. Connect at SharonSalzberg.com.

Carderock Elementary School Rules for Being Kind • Treat people the way you would like to be treated. • Play fair. • Respect everyone—other students and all staff. • Everyone can play. • Help others when they need help. • Don’t hurt others on the inside or the outside. • Honor all of the pillars of ethics.

March 2009

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Y

by Victoria L. Freeman

When Pets Go The alternative and complementary therapies that work so well in humans can also have value for your animal companion. 16

Greater Cincinnati Edition / nacincin.com

ou’d have thought she was a model coming straight from a photographer’s studio. “Strike a pose,” Dan Mullaney would tell Tiffany, and she’d move into position for the camera, ready for the perfect photo. “There was no doubt she knew exactly what she was doing,” Mullaney says. Tiffany Louise, a most precocious sable Pomeranian, was quite the little lady. So when Tiffany’s fur started falling out and she began having seizures, Mullaney and his wife Teri launched a desperate crusade to help their beloved pet. Her doctor, a respected conventional veterinarian, ran tests and diagnosed Tiffany with liver failure. Her prognosis: two months to live. The vet suggested that the Mullaneys give their dog milk thistle (Silybum marianum) and a commonly prescribed pharmaceutical drug that the Mullaneys quickly had to discontinue, because it made Tiffany even sicker. Unwilling to accept the finality of their vet’s report, the Mullaneys sought a second opinion. Their search led them to Shawn Messonnier, doctor of veterinary medicine, a holistic veterinarian near their home in Plano, Texas. Based on details in Tiffany’s blood work, Messonnier, author of The Natural Health Bible for Dogs & Cats and The Natural Vet’s Guide to Preventing and Treating Cancer in Dogs, arrived at a different diagnosis: Cushing’s disease, a glandular disorder that causes overproduction of the hormone cortisol and, consequently, obesity, muscle weakness, osteoporosis and other conditions. “Many vets mistake Cushing’s for liver disease,” says Messonnier, “because there are similarities in blood test results.” He suggested several natural therapies, such as a whole-foods diet, a multivitamin supplement, an herbal supplement and a glandular support formula. Cushing’s can be fatal on its own or can lead to other life-threatening conditions, such as diabetes, liver or kidney failure and congestive heart failure, but Tiffany rallied on the holistic treatments. And, even though the Mullaneys had to say a tearful good-bye to Tiffany just before her 14th birthday, Mullaney says, “I don’t have any scientific proof, but I believe the


Today, more vets than ever are answering public demand for alternative care for all types of pets, including birds and exotic animals. holistic approach bought us another two-and-a-half wonderful years with Tiffany—and that’s a lot better than two months.”

Complementary Avenues for Healing Over the last decade, the U.S. medical community has slowly begun to recognize the importance of alternative and complementary therapies. Now, the same process is under way in veterinary healthcare, explains Allen Schoen, a doctor of veterinary medicine and pioneer in integrative veterinary medicine, who has authored Kindred Spirits: How the Remarkable Bond Between Humans and Animals Can Change the Way We Live. Veterinary medicine looks very different than it did in 1982, when Carvel Tiekert, a doctor of veterinary medicine, founded the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA). Today, more vets than ever are answering public demand for alternative care for all types of pets, including birds and exotic animals. “Membership in AHVMA has increased 35 percent in the last 10 years,” says Tiekert, now the organization’s executive director. He adds that AHVMA has spawned a number of medical specialty groups, such as the Academy of Veterinary Homeopathy, the American Veterinary Chiropractic Association and the Veterinary Botanical Medicine Association. So, what’s driving the increased acceptance of complementary approaches to pet care? As is true for people, sometimes no conventional treatments exist for an animal’s condition. For example, explains Messonnier, he and others have found that leaky gut syndrome, which is common, but not often

Veterinary Alternatives for Common Conditions “Some of the most common life-threatening ailments for dogs and cats include kidney disease, heart disease and cancer,” explains Holistic Veterinarian Shawn Messonnier, a doctor of veterinary medicine in Plano, Texas. Like their human physician counterparts, holistic vets are finding that natural modalities are important tools in treating these conditions. Consider the following comparisons.

Cancer

Conventional medicine. Depending on the type of cancer and its location, surgery may or may not be used to remove the tumor(s). Radiation, chemotherapy or both may also be included. Holistic medicine. The best defense against most types of cancer is a strong immune system. However, depending on the type and location of the cancer, as well as the animal’s general condition, surgery, radiation or chemotherapy may or may not be used initially to remove or kill cancerous cells. Regardless, nutritional changes offer additional support. For example, decreasing carbohydrates can “starve” cancer cells (glucose is a cancer cell’s favorite fuel) and increasing omega-3 fatty acids can inhibit the formation and spread of cancers and guard against wasting. Antioxidants and immune system-enhancing herbs, such as the antimicrobials garlic (Allium sativum) and goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) are other options for ongoing treatment and protection against the toxic effects of conventional treatments.

Kidney Disease

Conventional medicine. Treatment generally consists of dietary changes, such as reducing protein, phosphorus and sodium, while increasing B vitamins and omega-3 fatty acids. Additional options include increasing subcutaneous or intravenous fluids, as well as pharmaceuticals to relieve vomiting from uremic toxin overload. Holistic medicine. Dietary changes and additional fluids form the treatment base, but many alternative therapies also may help, such as the herbs astragalus (Astragalus membranaceus) to improve kidney circulation; dandelion leaf (Taraxacum officinale) for anti-inflammatory activity and waste elimination; echinacea (Echinacea purpurea) for its immune-stimulating and antimicrobial effects; and garlic (Allium sativum) to increase detoxification enzymes and for its antimicrobial activity. Homeopathic remedies such as Silicea to boost stamina or Thuja occidentalis for urinary tract infections may offer additional support.

Heart Disease

Conventional medicine. Besides dietary recommendations and exercise, there’s virtually nothing in conventional veterinary medicine to address heart disease. It’s not until the condition progresses to heart failure that conventional drugs such as ACE inhibitors, beta blockers, diuretics and calcium channel blockers become helpful. Holistic medicine. In contrast, earlier is better for treating heart disease with alternative therapies such as the herb, hawthorn (Crataegus oxyacantha), shown to both strengthen the heart and stabilize it against arrhythmias. Other homeopathic remedies include Adonis vernalis to strengthen heart contractions and Strophanthus hispidus to tone heart muscle (both remedies are purported to help remove excess fluid, as well). Carnitine and taurine amino acid supplements also may be beneficial, because deficiencies of both have been linked to dilated cardiomyopathy (congestive heart failure). Sources: Shawn Messonnier, doctor of veterinary medicine; and The Natural Health Bible for Dogs and Cats: Your A-Z Guide to Over 200 Conditions, Herbs, Vitamins and Supplements by Shawn Messonnier. Adapted with the author’s permission.

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“Birds are very sensitive and emotional, so it’s not surprising that up to 80 percent of the health conditions I see are behaviorally or emotionally based.” diagnosed by conventional veterinarians, responds well to probiotics and the amino acid glutamine—just as it does for humans. Many consumers also believe that natural therapies are safer for their animal companions than conventional ones. Consider the first-line conventional treatments for osteo-arthritis, a condition that usually affects older animals and often manifests as stiffness, limping or difficulty rising or lying down. Vets often prescribe corticosteroids and anti-inflammatories. Based on his experience, Messonnier cautions that both can have potentially nasty side effects, such as diabetes, Cushing’s disease, liver and kidney disease and gastrointestinal ulcers. On the other hand, he notes, glucosamine hydrochloride and chondroitin sulfate are research-supported and can offer effective and safe natural alternatives for pets, as well as people. But in opting for alternatives, don’t throw the puppy out with the bathwater. If an animal has been hit by a car or faces some other emergency, conventional medicine is still your best bet, says Integrative Veterinarian Robert Silver, a doctor of veterinary medicine and founder and medical director of Boulder’s Natural Animal, in Boulder, Colorado. “You determine the most important thing to do first, but then reassess as you go along. Often, that means using conventional treatment to get through the emergency, and then including natural therapies for long-term support and recovery,” Silver advises. For example, surgery may be required to repair a fracture or a large laceration, but once the immediate crisis is over, alternative treatments, such as acupuncture for pain management or herbs to reduce inflammation can be effective.

A Cockatoo Named Jaffa Birds and other more exotic pets can benefit from natural therapies, too. In 1995, when Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Cynthia Lankenau first met Jaffa, a sulfur-crested cockatoo, she was deeply saddened by the bird’s condition.

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Jaffa’s grief over the death of her first human companion had led to serious feather picking and self-mutilation. “Birds are very sensitive and emotional, so it’s not surprising that up to 80 percent of the health conditions I see are behaviorally or emotionally based,” explains Lankenau, from her clinic in Colden, New York. In Jaffa’s case, too many hours left alone, too many emotional upheavals and an undetected food allergy had caused the bird to pluck out many of her own feathers and tear at her flesh, resulting in a crusty sore that covered her entire chest. Her new caretaker did her best to help, using many conventional treatments, such as antibiotics and a cone over Jaffa’s head, but all had dismal results. Lankenau first treated Jaffa with acupuncture (birds respond especially well to acupuncture, she says) and the homeopathic remedies Pulsatilla and Natrum muriaticum. Just a few months later, Jaffa had allowed her feathers to fill in and her chest ulcer had shrunk to the size of a nickel. Unfortunately, Lankenau didn’t see Jaffa again for nine years. This time, she was in even worse shape and was scheduled to be put down. Her whole chest was once again an open sore and she had plucked out all of her vent and flight feathers. “Her owner had many emotional traumas in her life and very little time to devote to Jaffa,” Lankenau explains, “so we decided Jaffa should come live with me.” After more homeopathy, nutritional supplements and dietary changes to address her allergy, Jaffa became a brand-new bird, contentedly spending her days either riding around on Lankenau’s shoulder during veterinary client visits or chatting with office staff. “It’s a big commitment to care for one of these birds,” Lankenau says. “These creatures are worth the effort, though,” she adds. “Even when things were the worst, Jaffa was always very kind and loving. She gave great bird hugs. “When I first met Jaffa, I was told she was in her 20s,” Lankenau continues. “Actually, she was in her 60s. She had a stroke in December 2007 and was really doing an incredible job of healing, but she was very old and did finally pass on. I am amazed at how well she did heal, considering her age, and am grateful that during her remaining years with me, she enjoyed a healthy and contented quality of life.”

Two Paws Up for Holistic Approach Many pet lovers can be classified as either dog people or cat people. Ann Huey definitely falls in the cat-loving category and feels she owes a great deal to holistic vet care. Huey’s gentle, 3-year-old tortoiseshell-and-tabby cat, Deluxie, became a running, jumping testament to the value of integrative medicine. But, she wasn’t always this healthy and active. Diagnosed in 2003 with polyarthritis (arthritis occurring in multiple joints), Deluxie nearly died a year later from her high daily dose of prednisolone, a steroid prescribed by her veterinarian. Intended to address the pain and inflammation associated with her condition, the drug initially gave Deluxie a much-needed reprieve, Huey says. Yet, after a few short months, low dosages were no longer helping and the increasing dosages took their toll.


In horror, Huey watched as Deluxie found it harder and harder to move. Then, her previously alert ears started drooping, a sign that the steroid was causing the cat’s tissues to degenerate. When a veterinary technician picked Deluxie up to do a routine blood draw, her skin literally ripped.

Huey knew something had to change, and fast. They tried taking Deluxie completely off the prednisolone on numerous occasions, but her condition immediately deteriorated each time. What they ended up with, Huey explains, was a plan that combined a greatly reduced dose of prednisolone with natural therapies such as a more wholesome diet, an antioxidant supplement and various homeopathic remedies directed at treating Deluxie’s arthritis and supporting her immune system. Did the holistic plan work? Huey says yes. “In only a few weeks, we got to watch Deluxie run again. She started climbing trees and was even up on the roof of our storage shed.� Victoria Freeman, Ph.D., is a freelance writer in Goodland, KS. Connect at VictoriaFreeman.com.

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naturalpet

The Shape of a Diet: Feeding Pets for Wellness by Dr. Matthew J. Heller

As pet owners, one of the best preventative measures we can provide our furry companions is a sound nutritional foundation. The old adage, “you are what you eat,” holds true even for “man’s best friend.”

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roviding a strong nutritional basis for your pet is the first line of defense against illness; many times, the root of animals’ health problems is dietary. A well-balanced diet is the foundation for a healthy heart, proper digestion, increased vitality, lush/glossy coat, healthy skin, lean muscle tone and strong bones

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and teeth—in addition to a strong immune system. The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) has established a baseline for the nutritional content of pet food based on protein, fat, fat- and water-soluble vitamins and mineral content. In order to be advertised as “complete and balanced,” a food must satisfy these minimum standards. Despite the minimum requirements, however, most holistic veterinarians would agree that there is a vast difference between meeting minimum levels and promoting wellness. In regard to promoting wellness, the type of diet you feed your pet is a personal decision. You have many options to choose from, and each has its own benefits and detractions. The table (at right) provides a brief overview of the most common types. In my opinion, there is no “best” diet for all pets. Rather, the answer you seek depends on what works best for your lifestyle (i.e., preparation, cost, convenience, etc.).

Greater Cincinnati Edition / nacincin.com

It is also important to select foods that your pet is willing to eat. While many advocates of the raw food diets will argue that raw fruits and vegetables are what nature intended our domesticated companions to consume—that animals are genetically engineered to thrive on raw foods—if your pet refuses to consume it, then the nutritional value of that food is a moot point. Before you alter your pet’s diet, be sure to check with your veterinarian, especially when underlying health conditions are present. Not only do you need to select a diet that optimizes your pet’s health and well-being, but also you need to transition carefully between diets; transitions should be gradual, usually rotating in the new food over a 10–14-day period. Dr. Matthew J. Heller is a local Holistic Veterinarian. Contact him at (513)4241626 or visit AllAboutPetCare.com and MonroeFamilyPetHospital.com


Type of Diet Home-cooked Meals

Raw Foods

Commercially Prepared

Pros • Most pets love them. • A variety of balanced recipes are available, with calculations of the amount of food required by pet’s weight. (I recommend Dr. Pitcairn’s Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs and Cats by Richard and Susan Pitcairn, and The Whole Dog Journal monthly magazine as sources.) • Provides the ability to rotate a pet’s diet by changing food groups and contents, which nutritionists agree is key (i.e., protein sources can be varied—fish, chicken, beef, turkey). • The proteins, vitamins and minerals present in raw foods are bio-available, which means your pet’s digestive system can process them more readily than processed commercial foods. (Dogs and cats digest their food much more rapidly than people, so any naturally occurring bacteria in raw foods should not pose a risk to the pet.) • Typically, owners who feed raw foods report that pets experience fewer skin allergies. • Several companies produce raw food diets available in convenient medallions, patties or chubs, which are formulated to satisfy your pet’s nutritional intake. You can get these foods at your local holistic veterinarian’s office. • Produce firmer, smaller stools (which means easier backyard cleanups!) • More convenient than all other diet types • More economical (saves more time and money) than all other diet types • Has some of the same benefits as homecooked or raw food diets, such as grain-free alternatives in dry foods • Not all commercially prepared diets are poor quality; The Whole Dog Journal reviews commercially prepared dog and cat foods each year in their February edition, which is an excellent source of research. Also, Whole Food Vitamin and Mineral Supplementation may be beneficial make up for the nutritional deficits in the diets—discuss with your veterinarian.

Cons • Preparation is time-consuming. • Cost varies depending on size of pet (i.e., home-cooking for a large is the equivalent of feeding another person) • Heightened responsibility of the owner to ensure meal is balanced in terms of protein, fat, carbohydrates and vitamin/mineral supplementation • May produce looser stools often resulting in more frequent backyard visits (and messier cleanups!) • Some cats and dogs are not receptive to raw foods. • For larger dogs, feeding raw food diets is expensive. • Increased responsibility for pet owner to properly handle the raw foods—always washing hands, surfaces and food dishes. This aspect may be drawback for families with young children or immunecompromised members. • Difficult for some pet owners to move beyond their own repulsion of feeding a raw food diet to their pet, even if the pet enjoys it.

• Concern about quality as a result of the recalls over the last year • Increased sensitivity and skin allergies as a result of highly processed diets • Pet owners need to know how to evaluate ingredient labels since almost all pet foods on the market will meet the AAFCO minimum requirements. The first ingredients should be the main meat or fish protein (e.g., chicken, turkey, lamb, beef, salmon, herring, etc.) and concentrated meat proteins (“meals”); whole grains and starches (i.e., brown rice or sweet potatoes), as well as fresh fruits and vegetables (i.e., carrots, apples, bananas); fats like sunflower oil; antioxidants (such as vitamins C and E) and minerals. Owners also need to beware fillers, such as excessive corn and wheat content. (Long-term consumption of these fillers has been linked to food allergies and obesity in our pets.) For more information, visit these helpful websites: www.thehonestkitchen.com and www.evopet.com.

March 2009

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Finding Deeper Meaning in Obesity by Victoria Smith, HT

F

or decades, the medical world has greatly disputed the nature of obesity despite the astronomical amount of money spent in the pursuit of losing weight. The medical community has confessed that the tendency to gain an abnormal amount of waeight is a very definite metabolic disorder, much like diabetes. Although many scientists have theorized about the cause of obesity, every new approach seems to lead to a temporary solution, where some weight is lost and even more regained. With any challenge in life—including the pursuit of weight loss—it is vital to understand the root of the problem before moving on to the solution. In the past, many doctors and practitioners blamed excessive eating and insufficient exercise for the obesity epidemic. However, a person suffer-

Diet and exercise may play a role, but neither nor both of these factors comprise the whole truth or the last word in the matter. ing from obesity knows intuitively that the causes run much deeper—a metabolic, physical contributing factor has not yet been uncovered for them. Diet and exercise may play a role, but neither nor both of these factors comprise the whole truth or the last word in the matter. Five decades ago, Dr. Albert Theodore William Simeon hypothesized that obesity is caused by a physical malfunction, not the inability to practice self-control or maintain determination to lose extra pounds. For research, Simeon traveled to third-world countries plagued by starvation. He noted that babies were still being born with normal weight despite inadequate nutritional support from the mothers. This observation prompted him to search for a logical explanation, which led to his discovery of a hormone that mobilizes nutrition stored within the body’s fat. For decades, Dr. Simeon treated the rich and famous for obesity using a protocol that was developed as a result of this research.

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Greater Cincinnati Edition / nacincin.com

When Dr. Simeon began to feel overwhelmed with individual requests, he wrote a manuscript as a tool to share his protocol with both patients and doctors worldwide. In this manuscript, Simeon explains that a damaged hypothalamus gland—the gland responsible for regulating all hormoneproducing glands in the body—may produce uncontrollable appetites and metabolic changes resulting in rapid weight gain. This reveals another dimension of the disorder, putting diet and exercise into a much broader perspective. Many people facing the frustrations of obesity are exhilarated when they learn that an underlying chemical imbalance is the cause of their unhealthy and uncontrollable appetites, rather than the other way around. The focus on changing eating and exercise habits without addressing physical imbalances has proven time and again to be an ineffective long-term solution. Dr. Simeon’s manuscript states, “As a basis for our discussion, we postulate that obesity in all its many forms is due to an abnormal functioning of some part of the body and that every ounce of abnormally accumulated fat is always the result of the same disorder of certain regulatory mechanisms.” He further goes on to explain that people who suffer from obesity gain weight regardless of their eating habits, whereas a patient without obesity can overeat without gaining weight. Because obese people can gain weight even after reducing their caloric intake, as noted by Simeon, it stands to reason that some other mechanism is at work. A damaged endocrine system may have many contributing factors other than genetic predispositions. Among the factors that may impact endocrine function are chemical food additives, a high sugar diet, certain prescription medications, heavy metal toxicity, stress and trauma. If you’re interested in finding out more about this medical condition, you can read Dr. Simeon’s manuscript in full at www.significanthealing. com/hgcdiet.htm. Victoria Smith is a board-certified holistic practitioner in Florence, Kentucky. She can be reached at (859)648-0905 or visit SignificantHealing.com


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consciouseating

Keys to Heart Health Ten Ways to Lower Cholesterol Naturally by Janet Bond Brill

C

ardiovascular disease, manifested primarily as heart attacks and stroke, is America’s number one killer, dwarfing all other causes of death, including cancer and diabetes. More than 107 million of us have an unhealthy level of cholesterol, a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. But, there are easy ways we can take charge of our heart health. The secret is to simply add in eight foods, a fiber supplement and a short walk to our daily routine. Together, they can significantly and quickly lower bad LDL cholesterol levels and decrease risk of developing heart disease. Here’s how:

Eat Oatmeal – Oats are a highly nutritious whole grain filled with a special type of cholesterol-lowering, soluble fiber called beta-glucan, which soaks up cholesterol and pushes it through the digestive system so that it is not absorbed. The fiber in oats also binds up bile acids in the intestine so that they are excreted. This forces the liver to make more bile acids to replenish the lost supply, which leads to lower LDL cholesterol. They also contain a powerful, unique antioxidant, which counteracts the destructive and atherosclerosisinducing damage of unstable free-radicals. Eat Almonds – Almonds are chockablock with heart-healthy ingredients such as monounsaturated fat (like olive oil) and fiber. They are one of the best sources of Vitamin E, a potent antioxidant that blocks the toxic changes to LDL and helps keep cholesterol from building up in plaque. But, only eat a handful of almonds or any nuts daily, because they are high in calories. Eat Flaxseeds – Flaxseeds are a wonderful plant source of omega-3 anti-inflammatory fats, a plus in countering the

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Greater Cincinnati Edition / nacincin.com

inflammatory disorder atherosclerosis. Two other components of flaxseeds actually target LDL cholesterol: lignan and fiber. Lignans are hormone-like plant chemicals that function as powerful antioxidants and dampen the actions of two key cholesterol-producing enzymes. Be sure to eat only ground flaxseeds, or else their thick coating inhibits digestion. Eat Beans – A delicious, low fat source of protein, beans are full of heart healthy vitamins and minerals and are one of the richest sources of cholesterol-lowering soluble fiber. Legumes such as beans, peas and lentils reduce LDL by promoting healthy populations of friendly bacteria in the colon, which ferment the beans, releasing healthful byproducts that travel to the liver and squelch production of cholesterol. Eat Apples – An apple a day keeps the cardiologist away. They serve up a cholesterol-lowering fiber called pectin. Another ingredient in apples, called polyphenols, functions as a strong antioxidant and prompts the liver to clear LDL cholesterol. Eating the apple skin ensures the highest level of antioxidant intake. Eat or take Phytosterols – Phytosterols, a plant’s version of cholesterol, are a highly effective means of reducing LDL because they masquerade as cholesterol and are absorbed into the intestinal cells in lieu of cholesterol. Phytosterolfortified products on the market, which have an excellent safety record, range from orange juice to yogurt. One favored phytosterol supplement is Cholest-Off. The single caveat: Absorption of fat-soluble vitamins may decrease with phytosterol intake. Following the government-advocated “5-a-day” intake of fruits and vegetables offsets this. Eat Soy Protein – Soy foods are low in saturated fat, cholesterol-free and packed with vitamins, minerals and fiber. Soy is a near-perfect protein choice instead of animal protein. Soy contains isoflavones, hormone-like substances that lower LDL by promoting an increase in uptake of LDL by the liver. Soy also exhibits a strong antioxidant capacity, linked with decreased inflammation of the arteries. Don’t be misled by the bad press soy has received lately. The U.S. government


has given soy its stamp of approval as a safe food to help prevent heart disease. Soy is not only a heart-healthy food, it is also associated with reduced risk of cancers. Two thirds of the world’s population eats soy. Eat Garlic – Garlic is a regular chemical factory, with lots of active ingredients that not only lower LDL, but also function as powerful antioxidants and blood thinners. Garlic lowers LDL by dampening the activity of the main cholesterol-producing enzyme in the liver. Eating as little as a clove a day has been shown to rev up the body’s ability to dissolve blood clots, which can precipitate a heart attack by sealing off plaque-filled arteries. Take Metamucil – When people think of laxatives, they think about regularity. But the psyllium seed husk fiber in Metamucil is one of nature’s most potent cholesterol-lowering agents. It lowers LDL by promoting bile acid excretion (somewhat like oats) and by preventing the absorption of cholesterol into the body. A healthy digestive tract is a bonus. Walk – Walking is one of the simplest, safest and least expensive LDL-lowering strategies. Walking just 30 minutes a day protects the heart by increasing the size of LDL particles (bigger is better), decreasing inflammation and targeting dangerous belly fat. Just remember to pick up the pace, because faster is better for health and longevity. Adopting these 10 simple steps into our day is a proven, effective alternative or complement to prescription medications for lowering cholesterol and preventing heart disease. As Hippocrates counseled long ago, “Let food be thy medicine and let thy medicine be thy food.” Janet Bond Brill, Ph.D., is a registered dietitian, licensed dietitian/nutritionist and author of Cholesterol Down: 10 simple steps to lower your cholesterol in 4 weeks—without prescription drugs. She’s a nationally recognized nutrition, health and fitness expert, specializing in cardiovascular disease prevention. Visit CholesterolDownBook.com or DrJanet.com.

Local Organic Food Sources Clifton Natural Foods 169 W. McMillan St Cincinnati, OH 45219 (513) 961-6111 Organic items and produce, bulk grains, beans, nuts/seeds, herbs, vitamins, meat and dairy alternatives, cruelty-free cleaning products, and more. Clifton Natural Foods also sells smoothies and many vegan baked items. 10% discount on produce on Thursdays. Healthy Alternative Natural Food 7570 Burlington Pike Florence, KY 41042 (859) 282-5888 HealthyAlternative.biz Healthy Alternative Natural Food offers organic items and produce, bulk grains, beans, nuts/seeds, herbs, meat and dairy alternatives, gluten-free products, health/body care and cruelty-free products, vitamins, and more. Natural Life Nutrition Shops 2946 Wasson Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45209 (513) 631-0300 Organic items and produce, grains, beans, nuts/seeds, herbs, meat and dairy alternatives, medicinal products, vitamins, cruelty-free cleaning products, and more. Paradise Found LLC Randall T. Ball (513) 834-9922 ParadiseFoundLLC@yahoo.com Paradise Found’s Local/Organic Produce Home Delivery Service delivers fresh, affordable, local and organic produce to consumers in the greater Cincinnati area. 

Susan’s Natural World 8315 Beechmont Ave. Cincinnati, OH 45255 (513) 474-4990 SusansNaturalWorld.com Organic produce, vegetarian/vegan foods, meat and dairy alternatives, vitamins, health/body care and cruelty-free cleaning products, herbal/homeopathic remedies, bulk items, and vegetarian dog food. Deli and smoothie bar offers soups, sandwiches, and salads. Spatz Natural Life Health Foods 607 Main St. (Downtown) Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513) 621-0347 The Spatz health food store first opened in 1931. It offers a large assortment of vitamins, organic items, frozen organic items, meat and dairy alternatives, health & body care products, and crueltyfree cleaning products. Toomey Natural Foods 914 Lila Ave Milford, OH 45150 (513) 831-4771 ToomeyNaturalFoods.com Serving their customers’ nutritional needs since 1975, Toomey Natural Foods has a large selection of vitamins, herbs, homeopathy and natural foods. Store is open Monday through Saturday. Whole Foods Market 2693 Edmondson Rd Cincinnati, OH 45209 (513) 531-8015 5805 Deerfield Blvd. Mason, OH 45040 (513)398-9358 WholeFoodsMarket.com Offering a large selection of brand name products, Whole Foods is the world’s leader in natural and organic foods, with more than 270 stores in North America and the United Kingdom.

March 2009

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Healthy Dining Directory fitbody

AMMA’S KITCHEN 7633 Reading Road Cincinnati, OH 45237 (513) 821-2021 AmmasKitchen.us 

Amma’s Kitchen (“Mother’s Kitchen” in Hindi) features creative and traditional vegetarian Indian cuisine. Vegan Hot Buffet is prepared every Wednesday. BASILICO ORGANIC 6176 Tylersville Road Mason, OH 45040 (513) 490-9519 Basilico-organic.com Offering a variety of Italian Intercontinental organic dishes, including pastas, soups, sushi, paninis and pizza. The artisan bakery offers homemade pastries, which can be accompanied by the restraurant’s organic coffees. 100% USDA certified organic. INDIGO 2637 Erie Ave Cincinnati, OH 45208 (513) 321-9952 2053 Dixie Highway Ft. Mitchell, KY 41011 (859) 331-4339 MyIndigoGrill.com Indigo is great for the vegetarian that is eating out with someone who is not. Dishes range from a vegetarian foccocia bowl salad to grilled steak with harissa sauce, to shrimp alfredo. Indigo also offers vegan selections. Awesome award winning and build your own salads. Indoor/Outdoor seating is available at both locations.   

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MELT 4165 Hamilton Ave. Cincinnati, OH 45223 (513) 681-6358 MeltNorthside.com Melt is an eclectic deli featuring a health-conscious, vegetarian-friendly menu. Melt’s sandwiches are made on preservative-free, vegan bread. And dressings, soups, pesto and hummus are made in-store. All poultry used is antibiotic- and hormone-free. Indoor and outdoor seating is available. MYRA’S DIONYSUS 121 Calhoun St. Cincinnati, OH 45219 (513) 961-1578 MyrasRestaurant.com Myra’s Dionysus features Greek food and also offers dishes from around the world. Unique fare such as Aji de Gallina Peru, Mole from Mexico, Flan from Cuba as well as vegetarian and vegan soups offered daily. Intimate, cozy dining atmosphere.

Greater Cincinnati Edition / nacincin.com

THE PEAPOD CAFÉ 6227 Montgomery Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45213 (513) 351-2460 ThePeaodCafe.com The Peapod Café is a local-community oriented café that offers organic and vegetarian foods like salads, wraps, soups, quiches and sweets; fair trade and organic whole leaf teas and organic raw fruit smoothies. UPPER CRUST CATERING COMPANY Sharon Espy, Owner 643 Stevenson Road Erlanger, KY 41018 (859) 342-5073 Emily Wagner, Sales & Ordering (513) 615-4618 UpperCrustCateringCo.com The Upper Crust Catering Co. offers unique and affordable fresh catering for all types of occasions. Box lunches for corporate events, innovative appetizrs, weddings, breakfast meetings, family and holiday gatherings. Menus can be personalized; excellent service staff available.


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SUNDAY, MARCH 1

Southwestern Ohio High School Jazz Festival – 7:30pm. Directed by Hal Melia Miami. Jazz Ensemble with special guests Lee Konitz, John Fedchock, Phil DeGreg, and Ed Felson. Free. GatesAbegglen Theatre, Miami University Center for Performing Arts. Oxford, OH. 513-529-3014 FNA.MUOhio.edu/Music/

MONDAY, MARCH 2

Year Round Gardening - Tips for the Thrifty Gardener – 6:30pm. How to have a fabulous garden in half the time on half the budget with White Oak Garden Center. Free. Monfort Heights Branch Library. 3825 West Fork Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513369-4472 CincinnatiLibrary.org

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TUESDAY, MARCH 3

Guest Artist Recital – 8pm. Jeri-Mae G. Astolfi, pianist from University of Wisconsin at Oskosh, featuring James Sheppard’s Blue River. Free. Souers Recital Hall, Miami University. Oxford, OH. 513529-3014 FNA.MUOhio.edu/Music/

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Cincinnati Historic Dance Society – 7:30pm. Society performs 19th century ballroom dances including the waltz, polka, schottische and figured dances. In celebration of the Abraham Lincoln

2009 Cincy Idol Karaoke Contest – 8pm. Participants are asked to pick one song from karaoke list. Three contestants chosen to be in finals on March 11. Door prizes. Free. Black Sheep Bar & Grill. 3807 North Bend Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-481-6300

THURSDAY, MARCH 5 How to Be Environmentally Friendly Inside and Outside the Home – 9:30am. Includes ten tips. Free. Boone County Cooperative Extension Service. 6028 Camp Ernst Rd, Burlington, KY. 859-586-6101 CES.CA.UKY.edu/Boone/ Health Briefing Dinner – 6pm. Health briefing presented by Dr. Matt Finke. Dinner provided. Free. Ferrari’s Little Italy Restaurant. 7677 Goff Terrace, Madeira,  OH. 513-272-9200 FinkeFamilyChiropractic.com

Cook It Fast, Cook It Slow – 6:30pm. Explore slow and pressure cookers and discuss pros and cons of each. Free. Boone County Cooperative Extension Service. 6028 Camp Ernst Rd, Burlington, KY. 859586-6101 CES.CA.UKY.edu/Boone/

FRIDAY, MARCH 6

Spring Salad – 11am. Workshop on how to grow delicious organic salads. Seeds and plants available for purchase from Greensleeves Farm. Park and Vine. 1109 Vine St, Cincinnati, OH. RSVP Gretchen Vaughn: GreensleevesFarm@gmail.com ParkAndVine.com Effective Job Search Techniques – 1pm. Workshop

S IGNIFICANT H EALING Your health care professional should be your partner in maintaining and improving your health. Someone who listens to you and respects your self-knowledge and provides you with expert advice and options.

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4

Chamber Winds & Symphony Band – 8pm. Conducted by Gary A. Speck. Music faculty joins students to perform chamber music. Free. Hall Auditorium, Miami University. Oxford,  OH. 513529-3014 FNA.MUOhio.edu/Music/

Holistic Practice

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UC Men’s and Women’s Choruses and Cabaret Singers – 8pm. Brandon Dean, Jeremy Jones and Tim Unger, conductors UC Choruses present a choral masterpiece with orchestra and soloists, as well as a wide selection of genres, including vocal jazz and pop music. $10 general admission/ $5 non-UC students/ Free for UC students. Corbett Auditorium, CCPA 3370 (Corbett Center for the Performing Arts). 2624 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-556-4183 CCM.UC.edu

Bicentennial. Free. Ascension and Holy Trinity Episcopal Church. 334 Burns Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-821-1361

FREE

Victoria Smith

Holistic Practitioner, Board Certified 10 Girard Street . Florence, KY 41042 www.SignificantHealing.com

859.648.0905

March 2009

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on structuring time and looking for job leads. Free. Deer Park Branch Library. 3970 E. Galbraith Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-369-4450 CincinnatiLibrary.org

Curves - Miami Heights/Cleves. 3797 Shady Ln, North Bend,  OH. 513-467-1189 MiamiHeightsCurves.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 7

CCM Philharmonia & CCM Concert Orchestra – 8pm. Mark Gibson & Annunziata Tomaro, music directors “Dance Fever” Borodin: Polovstian Dances from Prince Igor Copland: Appalachian Spring Smetana: Overture and Three Dances from The Bartered Bride Bernstein: Symphonic Dances from West Side Story. $10 general admission/ $5 non-UC students/ Free for UC students. Corbett Auditorium, CCPA 3370 (Corbett Center for the Performing Arts). 2624 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-556-4183 CCM.UC.edu

Effective Job Search Techniques – 6:45pm. Workshop on structuring time and looking for job leads. Free. Loveland Branch Library. 649 Loveland-Madeira Rd, Loveland,  OH. 513-3694476 CincinnatiLibrary.org

Art of Food – 6pm. $25. The Carnegie – visual and performing arts center. Otto M Budig Theatre, 1028 Scott Boulevard, Covington, KY. TheCarnegie.com

Healing Yoga with Laura Jane Mellencamp: 2 days – 9am. Three Yoga Therapy workshops with Laura Jane Mellencamp, M.A. RYT500hr., director and founder of Yoga Among Friends in Downers Grove, IL. $65 per session/$175 for all 3 sessions. YogahOMe Bellevue. 715 Fairfield Ave, Bellevue, KY. 859-655-9642 YogaHome.net

Memoirs Club – 10am. Participants will share ideas and techniques to make their memoirs come alive. Free. Monfort Heights Branch Library. 3825 West Fork Rd. Cincinnati, OH. 513-369-4472 CincinnatiLibrary.org Cinciditarod – 12:30pm. 5-mile crazy team race with decorated shopping carts. Fountain Square. downtown Cincinnati, OH. MyFountainSquare.com

Frank Vincent Trio with Lynne Scott – 8:30pm. Jazz Music. Free. Celestial Restaurant. 1071 Celestial St, Cincinnati, OH. 513-241-4455

SUNDAY, MARCH 8

Chamber Music Series – 2:30pm. 56th annual Chamber Music Series, featuring the region’s fine professional musicians. Free. Taft Museum of Art. 316 Pike Street Cincinnati, OH. 513-684-4515 TaftMuseum.org

Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Lab Band – 4pm. Rick VanMatre and Paul Piller, conductors. An afternoon of Jazz Royalty-The Duke, The Count and The King of Swing. College – Conservatory of Music (CCM) salutes swing era masters Duke Ellington, Count Basie and Benny Goodman. Free. Corbett Auditorium. CCPA 3370 (Corbett Center for the Performing Arts). 2624 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-556-4183 CCM.UC.edu Piotr Szewczyk Performance and Master Class – 6pm. Violinist and composer with the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra. Free. Greaves Concert Hall, Northern Kentucky University. Nunn Drive, Highland Heights, KY. 859-572-6399 Music.NKU.edu

MONDAY, MARCH 9 MamLuft&Co. Dance at CAC 44: Review and Preview – 12pm. Lunch, revisit prior works and preview new work to premiere in April. Free with daily admission. $7.50/ $6.50 seniors/ $5.50 students. Contemporary Arts Center. 44 E. Sixth St, Cincinnati,  OH. 513-437-0041 MamLuftCoDance.com

Effective Job Search Techniques – 1pm. Workshop on structuring time and looking for job leads. Free. Avondale Branch Library. 3566 Reading Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-369-4440 CincinnatiLibrary.org

TUESDAY, MARCH 10 Tri State County Animal Response Team Meeting and Training – 6pm. Volunteer meeting and disaster preparedness training for animal rescue.

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Topic: Understanding Dog Body Language (as it applies to working with dogs in a temp shelter and disaster situation). Free. Best Friends Pet Care. 11216 Gideon Ln, Cincinnati, OH. 513-702-8373 TriStateCART.com

Native Plants for the Home Landscape – 7-8:30pm. With over 30 years experience growing native flora, Brian Jorg has gained “hands on” knowledge of horticulture. Free. Delhi Township Branch Library. 5095 Foley Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-369-6019 CincinnatiLibrary.org

Wind Symphony and Wind Ensemble – 8pm. Directors Rodney Winther and Terrence Milligan are featuring the winner of the CCM Tuba Studio Competition Gregson: Concerto for Tuba. Free. Corbett Auditorium, CCPA 3370 (Corbett Center for the Performing Arts). 2624 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-556-4183 CCM.UC.edu

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11

Living Our Green Life – 6pm. Participants will learn about how to make their garden green. Free. Krohn Conservatory. 1501 Eden Park Dr, Cincinnati, OH. 513-352-4080 CincinnatiParks.com Mercy Healthy Weight Solutions Information Session – 6pm. Information session about medical and surgical weight loss options. Coverage, procedures, cost, fitness and more discussed. Free. Mercy HealthPlex Fairfield. 3050 Mack Rd, Fairfield, OH. 513-603-1441 MercyHealthyWeight.com ANEW (A New Earth Works) – 7-8:30pm. ANEW psychotherapy group  based on Eckhart Tolle’s book A New Earth is forming.   Sophia Paparodis, LPCC offers this group to heal chronic conditions. Initial interview required. Ongoing group will meet every Wednesday. RSVP 513-9368444 AwareWithin@Mac.com

Faculty Artist Series: Gardner/Dugger – 8pm. Two legendary hornists join CCM faculty members for a very special recital. New York Philharmonic hornists Philip Myers and Howard Wall will perform a varied program of solo and duo repertoire with pianist Sandra Rivers. Randy Gardner and Duane Dugger will join our guests to perform a quartet. Free. Corbett Auditorium, CCPA 3370 (Corbett Center for the Performing Arts). 2624 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-556-4183 CCM.UC.edu

THURSDAY, MARCH 12

Weight Management Class – 12pm. Free.

Greater Cincinnati Edition / nacincin.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 13

Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras:  The Yamas & the World Peace Diet – 6-7:30pm. Exploring the Yamas, the first steps in the eight-limb path to enlightenment laid out in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali and how it relates to our food choices and attaining a state of liberation, peace and bliss through direct action. Week 5: Aparigraha: Greedlessness. Required Book:  Any Yoga Sutra Translation. $15. 3978 Ardmore Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 888-899-9642 GratitudeInMotion.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 14

Garden Site Visits – 10am-1pm. Class will visit garden sites to be developed by CGDT participants, in addition to an established community garden. Free. Civic Garden Center. 2715 Reading Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-221-0981 x 18. CivicGardenCenter.org

Nature Story Time – 10:30-11:30am. Join an Imago Earth Center naturalist for an exciting hour about Native Americans! We will read stories and provide various hands-on learning experiences. All ages. Free. Blue Manatee Bookstore. 3054 Madison Rd, Cincinnati, OH. BlueManateeBooks.com

Spring Salad – 11am. Class on how to grow delicious organic salads. Seeds and plants available from Greensleeves Farm. $20-$40. Park + Vine. 1109 Vine St, Cincinnati, OH. RSVP Gretchen Vaughn: GreensleevesFarm@gmail.com ParkAndVine.com Chamber Choir and Chorale – 8pm. Chamber Choir: Earl Rivers, conductor Chorale: Brett Scott, conductor R. Murray Schafer, visiting composer Brahms: Fünf Gesänge, Op. 104 Grieg: Four Psalms Poulenc: Mass in G R. Murray Schafer: Make Way for God (World Premiere) Commissioned by CCM’s Tangeman Sacred Music Center. Free. Corbett Auditorium, CCPA 3370 (Corbett Center for the Performing Arts). 2624 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-556-4183 CCM.UC.edu

MONDAY, MARCH 16

Sublime for 2009 – 6:30pm. New plants, shrubs and products for the new year with the White Oak Garden Center. Free. Monfort Heights Branch Library. 3825 West Fork Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513369-4472 CincinnatiLibrary.org


TUESDAY, MARCH 17

Rain Gardens for the Homeowner – 10am-12pm. Participants will learn how to take a troubled spot in their yard and transform it into a beautiful garden; conserving water and money at the same time. Following the indoor portion, we’ll visit our own rain garden to see one in action. Free. Boone County Cooperative Extension Service. 6028 Camp Ernst Rd, Burlington,  KY. RSVP 859-586-6101 CES.CA.UKY.edu/Boone/ Ariadne auf Naxos – 2:30pm (Mar 6, 7), 8pm (Mar 8). Opera performed by the College – Conservatory of Music (CCM). Tickets become available Mar 2 (limited 2 per order). Free. Cohen Family Studio Theatre, CCPA 3330 (Corbett Center for the Performing Arts). 2624 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-556-4183 CCM.UC.edu The Dr. Simeon Protocol Revealed – 7-8pm. An introduction to Dr. Simeon’s weight loss method. Weekly meetings may follow. $10. RSVP Victoria Smith: 859-648-0905

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18

Senior Laughing Club – 10am. Enjoy breathing and stretching exercises with lots of laughing. Wear comfortable clothing and sturdy shoes. Free. Greenhills Branch Library. 7 Endicott St, Cincinnati, OH. 513-369-4441 CincinnatiLibrary.org

THURSDAY, MARCH 19

Gardening as a Healing Art – 12-1pm. This presentation will discuss the curative properties of gardening and how they can be used as an integrated therapeutic practice when working with children, adults and persons with special needs. Free. Civic Garden Center. 2715 Reading Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-221-0981 x 18 CivicGardenCenter.org Pocket Pet Potpourri – 6:30pm. Proper diet, care and common medical problems of pets including rabbits, guinea pigs, ferrets, gerbils, hamsters, mice and rats. Free. Monfort Heights Branch Library. 3825 West Fork R, Cincinnati, OH. 513-662-0224 GlenwayAnimalHospital.com Health Workshop on Allergies and Asthma – 7-8pm. Naturopath Dr. Lawrence Blanchard discusses natural health. Free. LaQuinta Inn and Suites conference room. 350 Meijer Dr, Florence, KY (behind Best Buy on Houston). RSVP 859653-4923 Quarter Night Out – 7pm. Prizes for quarters. More than a dozen companies represented. Freebies and door prizes. Family friendly. Free. Alexandria Firehouse. 7951 Alexandria Pk, Alexandria, KY. 859-957-3713

FRIDAY, MARCH 20 Library Book Sale. Hosted by The Friends of the Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. Northside Branch Sale, 4209 Hamilton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-369-6035 Friends.CincinnatiLibrary.org

Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras:  The Yamas & the World Peace Diet – 6-7:30pm. Exploring the Yamas, the first steps in the eight-limb path to enlightenment laid out in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali and how it relates to our food choices and attaining a state of liberation, peace and bliss through direct action.

Week 6: Yamas in Action & Potluck Celebration. Required Book: Any Yoga Sutra Translation. $15. 3978 Ardmore Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 888-899-9642 GratitudeInMotion.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 21 Library Book Sale. Hosted by The Friends of the Library of Cincinnati & Hamilton County. Northside Branch Sale, 4209 Hamilton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-369-6035 Friends.CincinnatiLibrary.org

Spanish Story Time – 10:30-11am. All ages. Free. Blue Manatee Bookstore. 3054 Madison Rd, Cincinnati, OH. BlueManateeBooks.com

Medical School. $50. The Carnegie – visual and performing arts center. Otto M Budig Theatre, 1028 Scott Boulevard, Covington, KY. TheCarnegie.com

MONDAY, MARCH 23 Starting a Vegetable Garden – 6:30pm. Learn the basics of backyard gardening with OSU’s Hamilton County Extension. Free. Mariemont Branch Library. 3810 Pocahontas Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-369-4467 CincinnatiLibrary.org

TUESDAY, MARCH 24

Celtic Arts Festival – 12-5pm. Celtic music and activities for families. Featuring Harper’s Robin and the Highland Pipe & Drum of Miami, and Cindy Matyi. Free. Fairfield Community Arts Center. 411 Wessel Dr, Fairfield,  OH. 513-8675348 Fairfield-City.org

Mercy Healthy Weight Solutions Information Session – 6:30pm. Information session about medical and surgical weight loss options. Coverage, procedures, cost, fitness and more discussed. Free. Mercy HealthPlex Fairfield. 3050 Mack Rd, Fairfield, OH. 513-603-1441 MercyHealthyWeight.com

Cincinnati Children’s Choir – 4pm. Robyn Lana, director “Celebration in Song” 250 children in CCM’s resident children’s choir celebrate youth and hope through classical and world music. Highlights include the premiere of two commissioned works and the premiere of the program’s 2008 National Composition Competition winner. $10 general admission/ $5 non-UC students/ Free for UC students. Corbett Auditorium, CCPA 3370 (Corbett Center for the Performing Arts). 2624 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-556-4183 CCM.UC.edu

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25

Cincinnati Wild! Art Show – 2-5pm. Calling all Nature Artists: Deadline for entries is March 13. Anyone who enjoys capturing nature on canvas or with a camera is invited to share their work with other nature enthusiasts at the Art show. Free. LaBoiteaux Woods. 5400 Lanius Ln, Cincinnati, OH. For an entry form, call 513-542-2909 or download a form at CincinnatiParks.com

Carnegie in Concert: Richard Kogan, Piano – 7:30pm. World-renowned concert pianist and psychiatrist Richard Kogan performs the cherished works of George Gershwin. Praised by the New York Times for his “eloquent, compelling, and exquisite playing,” Kogan is a frequent performer with cellist Yo-Yo Ma and a graduate of both Julliard and Harvard

Parrots make great pets. They have more personality than goldfish. — Chevy Chase

Annual Choral All-Sing Invitational – 7pm. Featuring the NKU Chamber Choir, and choirs from Conner, Dixie Heights, Campbell County and Hillsboro High Schools. Dr. Randy Pennington, Conductor. Free, donations accepted. Lakeside Presbyterian Church. 2690 Dixie Hwy, Lakeside Park, KY. Music.NKU.edu

Designing Your Community Gardening Project – 6-8:30pm. In this session we will do a hands on design of CGDT participants’ sites. Free. Civic Garden Center. 2715 Reading Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-221-0981 x 18. CivicGardenCenter.org

FRIDAY, MARCH 27 Tree Seedling Giveaway. Receive a Northern Red Oak seedling with any checkout at any Library location in honor of “going green.” Good while supplies last. Free. The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. All locations. CincinnatiLibrary.org

SATURDAY, MARCH 28 Future Authors – 10:30am. Share writing and publishing advice with other writers. Free. Greenhills Branch Library. 7 Endicott St, Cincinnati, OH. 513369-4441 CincinnatiLibrary.org

TUESDAY, MARCH 31 Convection and Induction Cooking for Today’s Kitchen – 6:30pm. Learn about pros and cons of induction cook tops and tips for using convection oven effectively. Free. Campbell County Extension Center. 3500 Alexandria Pk, Highland Heights, KY. 859-572-2600 CES.CA.UKY.edu/Campbell/ Cincinnati Wildflowers – 7pm. Learn how to identify wildflowers in the Cincinnati area with naturalist Sophia Cifuentes from Hamilton County Parks. Free. Madeira Branch Library, 7200 Miami Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-369-6028 CincinnatiLibrary.org

Green University – 7-9pm. Participants will learn tips and techniques for making their lives and homes more environmentally friendly. With Carolyn Rolfes of Potterhill Homes, Popular Library. Free. Main Library. 800 Vine St, Cincinnati, OH. 513-369-6900 CincinnatiLibrary.org

March 2009

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THURSDAY, APRIL 2

Simply Vegetarian – 6:30pm. Basics of vegetarianism, what nutrients might be challenging and what health benefits might be found. Free. Boone County Cooperative Extension Service. 6028 Camp Ernst Rd, Burlington, KY. 859-586-6101 CES.CA.UKY.edu/Boone/

TUESDAY, APRIL 7

2nd Natural Networking Event – 4-8pm. Explore great opportunities and connect with other people. Everyone is welcome, bring a friend! No RSVP necessary. Parking is available on Lafayette Ave. Donations requested for the Lloyd House. Lloyd House. 3901 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-2593090 Publisher@NACinCin.com

Overeaters Anonymous – 10-11:15am. Free. Hyde Park Community United Methodist Church, Room G-206. 1345 Grace Ave, Cincinnati, OH. Contact Ellen Bierhorst: 513-221-1289 HydeParkChurch.com Preschool Story Time – 10am. Stories, songs and crafts. Ages 4-5. Free. Newport Branch Library. 901 E. Sixth St, Newport,  KY. 859-572-5035 CC-PL.org

Meditative Yoga Therapy –11:30am-12:15pm. This class focuses on different styles of meditation through yoga, breathing, and guided meditation. $35 for four classes. Venus - A Fitness Studio For Her. 7795 Cooper Rd, Montgomery, Ohio.  513-984-4437 Venus4Her.com

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8

Yoga – 1:30-2:30pm. For people affected by cancer. Free. The Wellness Community, Room 310. 1717 Dixie Highway Suite 160, Ft. Wright, KY. 513-7914060 TheWellnessCommunity.org/Cincinnati

SATURDAY, APRIL 11

Talking Cents – 6pm. Every second Monday of each month. Discuss basic money and money management issues. Free. Boone County Cooperative Extension Service. 6028 Camp Ernst Rd, Burlington, KY. 859-586-6101 CES.CA.UKY.edu/Boone/

Living Our Green Life – 6-8pm. Talk about Sustainable Transportation. Presented by Toyota. Seating is limited. Free. Krohn Conservatory. Eden Park, 1501 Eden Park Dr, Cincinnati, OH. RSVP 513-352-4080 CincinnatiParks.com

The Sixth Annual Health Expo. Duke Energy Convention Center. 525 Elm St, Cincinnati, OH. ClosingTheHealthGap.org

SUNDAY, APRIL 12

NKU Guitar Ensemble – 3pm. Andrew Winner, director. Free. Greaves Concert Hall, Northern Kentucky University. Highland Heights, KY. 859-572-6399 Music.NKU.edu

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22

Celebrate Mother Earth with Mandala Meditation – 7:30pm. Artist, writer and spiritualist Rex Oxley talks about his natural mandala as part of Earth Day celebration. Free, donations excepted. Beacon of Life. 5701 Murray Ave, Cincinnati,  OH. 513-218-2128 BeaconOfLife.org

FRIDAY, APRIL 24

A weekend with Byron Katie: 3 days. Apr 24-26. Bestselling author and founder of The Work, Byron Katie, will be offering workshops, free public talks and book signing. 2-day workshop $155 in advance/ $195 after Apr. 2. Duke Energy Convention Center. 525 Elm St, Cincinnati, OH. RSVP C i n c y Wo r k @ M e . c o m 5 1 3 - 7 6 6 - 8 5 3 5 CincyWork.com

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Yoga – 5:30-6:20pm. For people affected by cancer. Free. The Wellness Community. 4918 Cooper Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-791-4060 TheWellnessCommunity.org/Cincinnati

Faux Frenchmen – 6:30pm. Jazz music. Free. Tink’s Café. 3410 Telford Ave, Cincinnati,  OH. 513-961-6500

Historical/Horror Film Series – 6:30-10:30pm. Every second Monday of each month. Through March. The series includes ten films over the course of five months. $7.50/ $6.50 seniors/ $5.50 students/ members free. Lois & Richard Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Art. 44 E 6th St, Cincinnati, OH. 513345-8400 ContemporaryArtsCenter.org

Master Composter Training – 6:30pm. Mar 16, 23, 30. Seminar about composting. A vermi-composting system will be available to participants for a nominal fee.  Students are asked to pass on what is learned. To complete the course and earn a certificate, fifteen hours of volunteer service are to be completed within one year from the last class. Many volunteer options are available to fulfill this requirement. Civic Garden Center. 2715 Reading Rd, Cincinnati, OH. RSVP 513-221-0981 x 18 CivicGardenCenter.org Welcome to Wellness – 6:30-8pm. Informal dropin sessions led by a person who has recovered from cancer. They provide a detailed description of our program, information on how to get involved and a tour of our facilities. For people affected by cancer. Free. The Wellness Community. 1717 Dixie Highway Suite 160, Ft. Wright, KY. 513-791-4060 TheWellnessCommunity.org/Cincinnati A Course in Miracles – 7pm-8:30pm. Study group for “A Course in Miracles” by Foundation for Inner Peace. With Ken Obermeyer. New-comers welcome. Free, donation accepted. Alliance Healing Center. 3484 Irwin Simpson Rd, Mason, OH. 513-204-0091 AllianceHealingCenter.com

Greater Cincinnati Edition / nacincin.com

Meditation & Guided Imagery – 7pm. Every first Monday of each month. Free. Synergy Holistic Health Center. 7413 US 42 Ste 3, Florence, KY. 859-525-5000 SynergyHolisticHealth.com

Zen Practice – 7-8pm. Sitting, walking, bowing and chanting meditation. Please arrive 10 minutes early, since we lock the doors to maintain privacy and security promptly at the start times. Dress is casual and comfortable. Northern Hills United Methodist Church, Northern Hills UMC. 6700 Winton Road, Cincinnati, OH 513-542-4010 HamiltonZenCenter.com

Mixed Level Yoga – 7:30-8:45pm. Stretch the body, mind and spirit into the new week! Yoga poses both invigorating and soothing. Breathing techniques and guided relaxation. $12ea./ $66 for 6 week session. Instructor, Phoenix Wilson, RYT. Kula Center for Movement Arts. 110 East 8th St, Newport, KY. RSVP 859-341-9642 KulaCenterKy.com The World Peace Diet Study Group, Recipe Exchange & Potluck – 7:30-9:00pm. Mar 9, 32, 30. Share a delicious meal together.  Participants will try out tasty vegan dishes; recipes will be shared and discussed, along with food replacement ideas. In each class we will discuss a chapter of the book, preview films/documentaries, and explore how to make changes in our eating habits. Required Book: The World Peace Diet by Will Tuttle. $9 or bring a vegan dish. Gratitude In Motion Studio. 268 Ludlow Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 888-899-9642 GratitudeInMotion.com In Haus Comedy Night – 8pm. Every 1st and 3rd Monday of each month. Listen, laugh and have a great cup of coffee as local comedians share their talent with us. Free. Bean Haus. 640 Main St, Covington, KY. 859-431-BEAN BeanHaus.com

Baby Time – 9:30 and 10:30am. Clap, sing and bounce with your child. Birth to age 2. Free. Newport Branch Library. 901 E. Sixth St, Newport, KY. 859-572-5035 CC-PL.org Open Yoga Practice – 9:30am. Free. Yoga Ah! Studio. 4046 Hamilton Ave, 2nd Floor, Cincinnati, OH. 513-542-9642 YogaAhStudio.com Clutterbugs United – 10am. Every last Tuesday of each month. Group explores different aspects of clutter. Free. Boone County Cooperative Extension Service. 6028 Camp Ernst Rd, Burlington, KY. 859586-6101 CES.CA.UKY.edu/Boone/ Overeaters Anonymous – 10-11:30am. Free. Hyde Park Community United Methodist Church, Room G-206. 1345 Grace Ave, Cincinnati, OH. Contact Ellen Bierhorst: 513-221-1289 HydeParkChurch.com Tai Chi at The Christ Hospital – 12-1pm. Exclusively for cancer patients, survivors and their loved ones. RalphDehner, instructor. Free. Christ Hospital Cancer Center, Level D. 2139 Auburn Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-585-2023 TheChristHospital.com/CancerCenter Guided Meditation – 12:30pm & 6 pm. Free.


Angelic Whispers Holistic Center. 11465 Springfield Pike, Cincinnati, OH. 513-782-0101 AngelicWhispers.com Textile Craft Group Meeting – 1pm. Every second and fourth Tuesday of the month. Foster learning and practice of textile crafts in community setting. Free. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library. 1000 Highland Ave, Fort Thomas,  KY. 859-572-5033 CC-PL.org Tai Chi ­– 2-3pm. Tai Chi for Better Health. Six classes for $60. Synergy Holistic Health Center. 7413 US 42 Ste 3, Florence, KY. 859-525-5000 SynergyHolisticHealth.com Relaxation & Guided Imagery – 5:15-6:15pm. Guided Imagery is a popular form of “directed daydreaming” designed to help cancer patients positively envision their body fighting cancer and healing. Research shows that Guided Imagery not only works to relax, calm, and elevate mood, but also helps to elevate immune functioning, reduce pain and headaches, enhance intuition and creativity, and lower anxiety and depression. For people affected by cancer. Free. The Wellness Community. 4918 Cooper Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-791-4060 TheWellnessCommunity.org/Cincinnati The Kitchen Korner – 6pm. Participants will take a new look at healthy eating, stretching food dollars, food safety and meal planning. They will taste-test a new recipe and improve their health with OSU Extension’s Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP). Free. Avondale Branch Library. 3566 Reading Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-369-4440 CincinnatiLibrary.org Vital Mix – 6pm. $13. The Cincinnati Yoga School. 6125 Ridge Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-247-9642 Cincyoga.com Welcome to Wellness – 6:30-7:30pm. Informal drop-in sessions led by a person who has recovered from cancer. They provide a detailed description of our program, information on how to get involved and a tour of our facilities. For people affected by cancer. Free. The Wellness Community. 4918 Cooper Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-791-4060 TheWellnessCommunity.org/Cincinnati Yoga – 6:30-7:30pm. For people affected by cancer. Free. The Wellness Community, Room 310. 1717 Dixie Highway Suite 160, Ft. Wright, KY. 513-7914060 TheWellnessCommunity.org/Cincinnati Yoga, Kripalu – 6:30-7:45pm. Kripalu style yoga focuses on gentle, slow postures, breathing, and relaxation techniques. Six classes for $60. Synergy Holistic Health Center. 7413 US 42 Ste 3, Florence, KY. 859-525-5000 SynergyHolisticHealth.com Energy Healing Circles – 7-8:30pm. Every second Tuesday of each month. Experience energy healing. David and Deborah will offer several modalities of energy healing depending on what is needed. Free, donation accepted. Alliance Healing Center. 3484 Irwin Simpson Rd, Mason,  OH. RSVP 513-2040091 AllianceHealingCenter.com Holistic Health and Wellness Seminar – 7pm. Mar 17, 24, 31 & Apr 7, 14, 21. Learn simple and effective self-care techniques. Dress comfortably for gentle movement. Free. Family Life Center. 703 Compton Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-931-5777 Open Grief Support Group – 7-9pm. Every second and fourth Tuesday of each month. Parent, Sibling and Friend welcome. Free. St. Maximilian Kolbe Church, Hospitality Room. 5720 HamiltonMason Rd, Liberty Township, OH. 513-870-9108 CompanionsOnAJourney.org

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Sometimes we stare so long at a door that is

closing,

that we see too late the one that is

open.

- Alexander Graham Bell March 2009

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Pyjama Story Time – 7pm. Ages 3 and up. Free. Newport Branch Library. 901 E. Sixth St, Newport, KY. 859-572-5035 CC-PL.org

guided relaxation. $12ea./ $66 for 6 week session. Instructor, Phoenix Wilson, RYT. Kula Center for Movement Arts. 110 East 8th St, Newport, KY. RSVP 859-341-9642 KulaCenterKy.com

Moving On After Job Loss – 8:30pm. For those who have experienced job loss. Bring resume. Business casual dress. Free. Kenwood Baptist Church, Room 101. 8341 Kenwood Rd, Cincinnati,  OH. 513-300-0285 KenwoodBaptist.org

Community Yoga Classes – 9am-10am. Bring a mat and drop in. No yoga experience necessary. Free. Richwood Presbyterian Church. 1070 Richwood Rd, Boone County, KY. 859-485-1238 RadiantFitness.com Lap Time – 9:30am. Quiet rhymes, bounces, lullabies and books with your baby. Ages birth to walkers. Free. Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library. 1000 Highland Ave, Fort Thomas,  KY. 859-5725033 CC-PL.org Harriet Tubman Travels – 10am-12pm. Artist Raymond Lane Jr.’s sculptures feature Harriet Tubman and events from the Underground Railroad. Free. Harriet Beecher Stowe House. 2950 Gilbert Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-632-5100

Internet Basics – 10am. Every second Wednesday of each month. Learn skills and concepts to use. Free. Cold Spring Branch Library. 3920 Alexandria Pk, Cold Spring, KY. 859-781-6166 CC-PL.org

Welcome to Wellness – 10-11am. Informal drop-in sessions led by a person who has recovered from cancer. They provide a detailed description of our program, information on how to get involved and a tour of our facilities. For people affected by cancer. Free. The Wellness Community. 4918 Cooper Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-791-4060 TheWellnessCommunity.org/Cincinnati Zumba Class – 10-11am. Come workout to a fusion of Latin and International music that creates a dynamic, exciting, and effective fitness system. Free. Norwood Recreation Commission. 1810 Courtland Ave, Norwood, OH. 513-585-9872 ClosingTheHealthGap.org Weight Loss Hypnosis – 10:15-11:45am. Mar 4, 11, 18, 25. $100 for 4 weeks. Synergy Holistic Health Center. 7413 US 42 Ste 3, Florence, KY. RSVP 859525-5000 SynergyHolisticHealth.com Mom-to-Mom – 10:30am. Every first Wednesday of each month. Support group for new parents. Free. Cincinnati Family Enrichment Center. 4244 Hamilton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. RSVP 513-591-2332 ThePlaceForFamilies.com

Preschool Story Time with Miss Gail – 10:3011am. Get ready for finger puppet fun, as well as other pleasant surprises with Miss Gail. Free. Blue Manatee Bookstore. 3054 Madison Rd, Cincinnati, OH. BlueManateeBooks.com Yoga, Kripalu – 12:15-1:15pm, 6:15-7:30pm. Kripalu style yoga focuses on gentle, slow postures, breathing, and relaxation techniques. Six classes for $60. Synergy Holistic Health Center. 7413 US 42 Ste 3, Florence, KY. 859-525-5000 SynergyHolisticHealth.com

Yoga at Dunham Rec. Center – 1-2pm. For people affected by cancer. Free. Dunham Recreation Center. 4356 Dunham Lane (of

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Computer Basics – 10am. Every first Thursday of each month. Adults only. Learn skills and concepts to use. Free. Cold Spring Branch Library. 3920 Alexandria Pk, Cold Spring,  KY. 859-781-6166 CC-PL.org

Meditative Yoga Therapy – 10-10:45am. This class focuses on different styles of meditation through yoga, breathing, and guided meditation. $35 for four classes. Venus - A Fitness Studio For Her. 7795 Cooper Rd, Montgomery, Ohio.  513-984-4437 Venus4Her.com

Guerley Road), Cincinnati, OH. 513-791-4060 TheWellnessCommunity.org/Cincinnati Down Syndrome Ballroom Dance Class – 6-7pm. No class the last Wednesday of the month. Free. A-Marika Dance Company. 10831 Sharondale Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-769-0409 A-Marika.com Artist File – 7pm. Every second Wednesday of each month. Enjoy a monthly discussion of artists featured in the Cincinnati Art Museum’s collection. No reservation required. Free. Cincinnati Art Museum. 953 Eden Park Dr, Cincinnati, OH. CincinnatiArtMuseum.org

Child Loss Support Group – 7-9pm. Every first and third Wednesday of each month. Free. St. Maximilian Kolbe Church, Hospitality Room. 5720 Hamilton-Mason Rd, Liberty Township, OH. 513870-9108 CompanionsOnAJourney.org Herpetology Programs at Rowe Woods – 7-9pm. Every first Wednesday of each month. Light refreshments will be served. Members free/Non-members daily admission. Rowe Woods Auditorium. 4949 Tealtown Rd Milford, OH. Bill Creasey 513-8311711 x125 CincyHerps.com Running Word Wednesday – 7pm. Every 2nd and 4th Wednesday of each month. All artists are encouraged to perform their self-created work, and bring the fire to the mantel. That includes Poetry, Short story, Novel excerpts, Music, and Dialogues. Free. Bean Haus. 640 Main St, Covington, KY. 859-431-BEAN BeanHaus.com

Widowed Grief Group – 7-9pm. Every second and fourth Wednesday of each month. Free. St. Maximilian Kolbe Church, Hospitality Room. 5720 Hamilton-Mason Rd, Liberty Township, OH. 513870-9108 CompanionsOnAJourney.org

Zen Practice ­– 7-8:30pm. First-time visitor will be provided with some basic instruction on the meditation forms we use: sitting, walking, bowing and chanting. Please arrive 10 minutes early, since we lock the doors to maintain privacy and security promptly at the start times. Dress is casual and comfortable. Hamilton Zen Center. 114 Main St, Hamilton, OH. 513-623-6495 HamiltonZenCenter.com

Overeaters Anonymous – 10-11:30am. Free. Hyde Park Community United Methodist Church, Room G-206. 1345 Grace Ave, Cincinnati, OH. Contact Ellen Bierhorst: 513-221-1289 HydeParkChurch.com Signing Safari – 11am. Mar 5, 12, 19, 26 and Apr 2. Participants will join their child in singing, signing, playing, and rhyming during this five-week series of 45-minute play classes. $75. Park and Vine. 1109 Vine St, Cincinnati, OH. RSVP SigningSafari.com Toddler Story Time – 11am. Ages 3-6. Free. Amelia Branch Library. 58 Maple St, Amelia, OH. 513-7525580 Clermont.Lib.OH.us

Yo g a – 2 - 3 p m . F o r p e o p l e a ff e c t e d b y cancer. Free. The Wellness Community. 4918 Cooper Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-791-4060 TheWellnessCommunity.org/Cincinnati

Yoga 2009 Winter Wake Up! – 5:45-7:15pm.  Through Mar 12. All level of students welcome. Participants will get a fresh start on the New Year by clearing out their inner clutter. Yoga poses both invigorating and soothing. Breathing techniques and guided relaxation. $14ea./ $84 for 7 week session. Instructor, Phoenix Wilson, RYT. Stillpoint Center for Healing Arts. 11223 Cornell Park Dr. Suite 302 Cincinnati (Blue Ash), OH. RSVP 859-341-9643 PhoenixWilson@mac.com

Nia – 6-7:15pm. $11. Kula Center. 110 East 8th St, Newport, KY. KulaCenterKy.com

Meditation – 7-8:30pm. Every 2nd Thursday of each month. With Gary Matthews. $20. Stillpoint Center for Healing Arts. 11223 Cornell Park Dr, Suite 302 in Cincinnati. 513-489-5302 StillpointTherapy.com

Writing Group – 7pm. Every second Thursday of each month. Writing in the company of one another, we will provide the mutual support that will enable us to enhance our skills. Free. Carrico/Ft. Thomas Branch Library. 1000 Highland Ave, Fort Thomas, KY. 859-572-5033 CC-PL.org

Zen Practice – 7-8:15pm. Sitting, walking, bowing and chanting meditation. Please arrive 10 minutes early, since we lock the doors to maintain privacy and security promptly at the start times. Dress is casual and comfortable. Cincinnati Zen Center. 3647 West 8th St, Cincinnati, OH. 513-684-4216 HamiltonZenCenter.com Del Salsa – 7:30pm. $13. The Cincinnati Yoga School. 6125 Ridge Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-2479642 Cincyoga.com

Mixed Level Yoga – 9:30-11am. Stretch the body, mind and spirit into the new week! Yoga poses both invigorating and soothing. Breathing techniques and

Greater Cincinnati Edition / nacincin.com

Tai-Chi – 7:30-8:30pm. For people affected by cancer. Free. The Wellness Community, Room 310. 1717 Dixie Highway Suite 160, Ft. Wright, KY. 513791-4060 TheWellnessCommunity.org/Cincinnati


Harriet Beecher Stowe House. 2950 Gilbert Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-632-5100

A Morning Cup of Yoga – 9-10:30am. Start the day and weekend with a clear mind, invigorated body and renewed spirit. Open to new and experienced students. Instructor, Phoenix Wilson, RYT. Lloyd House. 3901 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. RSVP 859-541-9642 PhoenixWilson@mac.com Health Screenings – 9am. Blood pressure, weight, foot and spinal screenings. Free. Owens Chiropractic and Rehabilitation Center. 7319 Montgomery Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-784-0084

Yoga at Christ Hospital – 11am-12pm. Exclusively for cancer patients, survivors and their loved ones. Free. Christ Hospital Cancer Center, Level D. 2139 Auburn Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-585-2023 TheChristHospital.com/CancerCenter

Overeaters Anonymous – 12-1:30pm. Free. Hyde Park Community United Methodist Church, Room G-206. 1345 Grace Ave, Cincinnati, OH. Contact Kate Kushman: 513-546-5429 HydeParkChurch.com Friday’s 5 after 5 – 5-7pm. 5 wines and 5 foods for $5. Whole Foods Market. 2693 Edmondson Rd, Cincinnati, OH. RSVP 513-531-8015 WholeFoodsMarket.com Friday’s 5 after 5 – 6-8pm. 5 wines and 5 foods for $5. Whole Foods Market. 5805 Deerfield Blvd, Mason, OH. RSVP 513-398-9358 WholeFoodsMarket.com Shamanic Journey – 7-8:30pm. Every 2nd Friday of each month. With Gary Matthews. Participants should wear loose comfortable clothing and maybe bring a journal. $20. Stillpoint Center for Healing Arts. 11223 Cornell Park Dr, Suite 302 in Cincinnati. 513-489-5302 StillpointTherapy.com Vajrasattva Practice ­– 7pm. Chanting practice done in Tibetan. An English translation is available for participants. GSL Monastery. 3046 Pavlova Dr, Cincinnati. 513-385-7116 GadenUSA.org

Yoga, Kripalu – 9-10am. Kripalu style yoga focuses on gentle, slow postures, breathing, and relaxation techniques. Beginner class. Six classes for $60. Synergy Holistic Health Center. 7413 US 42 Ste 3, Florence, KY. 859-525-5000 SynergyHolisticHealth.com

Tai-Chi – 9:30-10:30am. For people affected by cancer. Free. The Wellness Community. 4918 Cooper Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-791-4060 TheWellnessCommunity.org/Cincinnati Dharma Teachings – 10am. GSL Monastery. 3046 Pavlova Dr, Cincinnati. 513-385-7116 GadenUSA.org Farmers Market – 10am-12pm. Patty and Jim Schwartz of Back Acres will be selling their wares. Their animals range freely; so their chickens, eggs, beef, pork, lamb, cheese and produce in season are high quality food. The Peapod Cafe. 6227 Montgomery Rd, Cincinnati, OH. Melanie@ThePeapodCafe. com 513-351-2460 ThePeapodCafe.com

Harriet Tubman Travels – 10am-2pm. Artist Raymond Lane Jr.’s sculptures feature Harriet Tubman and events from the Underground Railroad. Free.

Nia – 10-11:15am. $11. Kula Center. 110 East 8th St, Newport, KY. KulaCenterKy.com Mom-to-Mom – 10:30am. Every third Saturday of each month. Support group for new parents. Free. Cincinnati Family Enrichment Center. 4244 Hamilton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. RSVP 513-591-2332 ThePlaceForFamilies.com Weight Loss Hypnosis – 10:30am-12pm. Mar 21, 28. $50 for 2 weeks. Synergy Holistic Health Center. 7413 US 42 Ste 3, Florence, KY. RSVP 859-5255000 SynergyHolisticHealth.com Yoga Intro – 11am-12pm. Free. The Edge Yoga Studio. 1507 Springfield Pike, Wyoming, OH. 513821-9642 YogaEdge.net

Creative Writing Sampler Classes – 1-2:30pm. Every second Saturday of each month. No previous experience is necessary. All supplies are provided. Open to Women and Men. Free. Women Writing for (a) Change. 6906 Plainfield Rd, Cincinnati, OH. RSVP 513-272-1171 WomenWriting.org

Family ARTventures – 1pm. An interactive tour of the galleries for the entire family including hands-on elements for everyone to touch and see up close. Meet docent in the main lobby. Free. Cincinnati Art Museum. 953 Eden Park Dr, Cincinnati, OH. CincinnatiArtMuseum.org Family First Saturday – 1–4pm. First Saturday of each month. Frolic through the collection with a different theme each month September through May. Enjoy performances, demonstrating artists, scavenger hunts, tours, and hands-on art activities. No reservations required. Free. Cincinnati Art Museum. 953 Eden Park Dr, Cincinnati, OH. 513-721-ARTS CincinnatiArtMuseum.org Fibro Hope Support Group ­– 1-3pm. Every second Saturday of each month. A healing, positive and supportive environment for former and current patients of fibromyalgia. There will be a guest speaker and refreshments at each meeting. Dinn Chiropractic. 284 Main St, Florence, KY. Contact Leah McCullough: Info@FibroHopeSupport.org 859-380-9737 FibroHopeSupport.org

In Store Tastings – 1-3pm. Whole Foods Market wants their customers to be confident that they can select from the freshest, tastiest, healthiest foods available, while staying within their budgets.  Every Saturday explore great tastes of our 365 Every Day Value and 365 Organic private brand products along with some of the hottest sale items in town. Enjoy the

taste, quality and especially the price. Free. Whole Foods Market. 2693 Edmondson Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-531-8015 WholeFoodsMarket.com

Savor the Flavors of Whole Foods Market ­– 1-3pm. Whole Foods Market wants their customers to be confident that they can select from the freshest, tastiest, healthiest foods available, while staying within their budgets.  Every Saturday explore great tastes of our 365 Every Day Value and 365 Organic private brand products along with some of the hottest sale items in town. Enjoy the taste, quality and especially the price. Free. Whole Foods Market. 5805 Deerfield Blvd, Mason, OH. 513-398-9358 WholeFoodsMarket.com

Introductory Course on Buddhism – 2pm. GSL Monastery. 3046 Pavlova Dr, Cincinnati. 513-3857116 GadenUSA.org Addictions Program – 7pm. Faith based addiction program. Childcare provided. Entire family welcome. Free. First Baptist Church of Milford. 1367 Woodville Pike, Milford, OH. 513-256-3129

Powerhouse Band – 9pm. Mar 14, 21, 28. Rhythm and Blues. Free. Mesh. 6200 Muhlhauser Rd, West Chester, OH. 513-777-7177 MeshRestaurant.com

Sunday Zen Practice ­– 8-10:30am. First-time visitor will be provided with some basic instruction on the meditation forms we use: sitting, walking, bowing and chanting. Please arrive 10 minutes early, since we lock the doors to maintain privacy and security promptly at the start times. Dress is casual and comfortable. Hamilton Zen Center. 114 Main St, Hamilton,  OH . 513-623-6495 HamiltonZenCenter.com Mysore Style – 9am. Free. The Cincinnati Yoga School. 6125 Ridge Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513-2479642 Cincyoga.com

Zen Practice – 9-10:30am. Sitting, walking, bowing and chanting meditation. Please arrive 10 minutes early, since we lock the doors to maintain privacy and security promptly at the start times. Dress is casual and comfortable. Cincinnati Zen Center. 3647 West 8th St, Cincinnati, OH. 513-684-4216 HamiltonZenCenter.com Life as Meditation – 10am. Free. The Cincinnati Yoga School. 6125 Ridge Rd, Cincinnati, OH. 513247-9642 Cincyoga.com

World Peace Yoga – 12:30-1:45pm. Every first Sunday of each month. Free. Gratitude In Motion Studio. 268 Ludlow Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 888-8999642 GratitudeInMotion.com

Studio Sunday – 1-5pm. Sketch a work in the collection on the third Sunday of each month. We provide the drawing materials and instructor, just drop in and look for the Studio Sunday Cart in a different gallery each month! Free. Cincinnati Art Museum. 953 Eden Park Dr, Cincinnati, OH. CincinnatiArtMuseum.org

Cloth Diapering Cuteness – 2pm. Every first Sunday of each month. Park + Vine hosts an informal class on all aspects of cloth diapering. Our two in-house mamas tailor each discussion to the specific questions of present parents. Afterward, browse the best selection of cloth diapers in Cincinnati and take advantage of Park + Vine’s

March 2009

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package discounts. Park + Vine. 1109 Vine St, Cincinnati, OH. ParkAndVine.com

Art Gallery. 898 Walnut St, Cincinnati, OH. 513241-7090 YWCA.org

Family ARTventures – 3pm. An interactive tour of the galleries for the entire family including hands-on elements for everyone to touch and see up close. Meet docent in the main lobby. Free. Cincinnati Art Museum. 953 Eden Park Dr, Cincinnati, OH. CincinnatiArtMuseum.org

Reiki Share Group – 3-5pm. Every second Sunday of each month. Experience Reiki healing with Mike Perry. $5 suggested donation. Alliance Healing Center. 3484 Irwin Simpson Rd, Mason, OH. RSVP 513-204-0091 AllianceHealingCenter.com

A Revision of Idealism - 7-10pm (Mon-Thu), 7pm-12am (Fri,Sat). Group exhibit, curated by Xavier University’s Brett Sutton. Free. Upstairs at the Greenwich. 2442 Gilbert Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-221-1151

Ariadne auf Naxos – 2:30pm (Mar 8), 8pm (Mar 6,7). Comedic opera composed by Richard Strauss, performed by the College – Conservatory of Music (CCM). Tickets become available Mar 2 (limited 2 per order). Free. Cohen Family Studio Theatre, CCPA 3330 (Corbett Center for the Performing Arts). 2624 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-5564183 CCM.UC.edu

Donald Sultan: The First Decade. Feb 7 through May 17. First exhibition of Sultan’s early linoleum paintings. Lois & Richard Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Art. 44 E 6th St, Cincinnati, OH. 513-345-8400 ContemporaryArtsCenter.org

Everything Pets Expo. Mar 27-29. Featuring exhibitors, including live animal demonstrations, a children’s area, entertainment stages and a pet adoption center. $12/ $8 children ages 8-13/ Free children under 8. Duke Energy Center. Fifth & Elm St, Downtown Cincinnati, OH. 513-421-PETS EverythingPets.org

Fashion in Film: Period Costumes for the Screen. Through Apr 26. The sumptuous costumes in this exhibition span four centuries of clothing design and four decades of filmmaking. The represented films include Titanic, Evita, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, and Ever After, among others. Free on Wednesdays. Taft Museum of Art. 316 Pike Street Cincinnati, OH. 513-684-4515 TaftMuseum.org Finding Our Garden – 10am-5pm. Through Mar 15. Early Spring Floral Show. Free. Krohn Conservatory. Eden Park, 1501 Eden Park Dr, Cincinnati, OH. CincinnatiParks.com

Grass Roots: African Origins of an American Art – 11am-5pm. Open Tue – Sat. Feb 12 through Apr 20. Exhibition explores the history of the southeastern United States, featuring over two hundred objects. $12 /$10 seniors (60+), students and teachers with ID /$8 children 6-12 /free children under 6. National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. 50 East Freedom Way, Cincinnati, OH. 513333-7500 FreedomCenter.org Hiking Club – 8-9:30am (Sat, Sun), 4-5pm (Wed). Easy to Moderate Trail. All hikes start and finish at the Treehouse in Mt. Airy Forest. Come prepared with water, hiking shoes and walking sticks (optional). Free. Mt. Airy Forest. 5083

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The Curious Mr. Catesby – 8:30am-4pm (MonFr and Sat, Mar 21). Through Mar 27. Exhibition featuring the works of the English naturalist and artist Mark Catesby. Free. Lloyd Library and Museum. 917 Plum St, Cincinnati, OH. 513-7213707 LloydLibrary.org Colerain Ave, Cincinnati, OH. Contact Peggy: BackstStudio@Cinci.rr.com CincinnatiParks.com

Identity. Through Mar 30. Art Exhibition. David Collins, Kim Curinga, Cristin Millett and Amy Rich address the question “Who am I?” Free. Fitton Center for Creative Arts. 101 S. Monument Ave, Hamilton, OH. 513-863-8873 FittonCenter.org

Insider / Outsider Art from the Robert A. Lewis Collection. Through Apr 26. This collection includes over 400 paintings, sculpture, and drawings spanning the 1960s to the present and features works by both self-taught artists and those trained in the academies seeking alternatives to convention. This exhibition showcases more than 100 works drawn from this unusual and intriguing collection. Free. Cincinnati Art Museum. 953 Eden Park Dr, Cincinnati, OH. CincinnatiArtMuseum.org

Luminous Paintings – 10am-5:30pm (Tue-Sat), 12-5pm (Sun). Through Mar 21. Works by Tom Bacher. Suggested admission is $1. Weston Art Gallery (located in the the Aronoff Center for the Arts). 650 Walnut St, Cincinnati, OH. 513-977-4165 CincinnatiArts.org/Weston

Peaceful Spring – 10am-5pm. Mar 28 through Apr 12. Spring Floral Show. Free. Krohn Conservatory. Eden Park, 1501 Eden Park Dr, Cincinnati, OH. CincinnatiParks.com Promises Kept. Mar 1 through 31. Multi Media art exhibition. Jennifer Bortz Schneider gathers objects, images and test from her daily life and combines them with handmade paper and printed elements that are sealed with beeswax. Lobby of the Civic Garden Center. 2715 Reading Rd, Cincinnati, OH. CivicGardenCenter.org

Stewart Goldman: Presence through Absence. Feb 28 through May 10. The exhibition offers an overview of works from 1971 to the present, documenting the development of Goldman’s work. Free. Vance Waddell Gallery, Cincinnati Art Museum. 953 Eden Park Dr, Cincinnati, OH. CincinnatiArtMuseum.org Surrealism and Beyond in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem. Feb 15 through May 17. Making its only U.S. appearance at the Cincinnati Art Museum, this exhibition uncovers the Dada and Surrealist movements through artworks by some of greatest masters including DuChamp, Picasso, Miró, and Dali. Visitors will explore these two seminal movements through more than 200 drawings, paintings, collages and ready-mades. Organized by the Israel Museum, Jerusalem. Free. Cincinnati Art Museum. 953 Eden Park Dr, Cincinnati, OH. CincinnatiArtMuseum.org

Tara Donovan. Feb 7 through May 3. Stunning sculptural objects made from mass-produced items. Lois & Richard Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Art. 44 E 6th St, Cincinnati, OH. 513-345-8400 ContemporaryArtsCenter.org Textual Expressions: Fabric Art – 8am-6pm (MonSat). Through Apr 3. Works by Patricia ColemanCobb and Cynthia Lockhart. Free. YWCA Women’s

Greater Cincinnati Edition / nacincin.com

The Face of a Hero – 10am-4pm (Tue-Fr), 12-4pm (Sat,Sun). Through Apr 30. Photos, memorabilia and videos celebrating Oscar Armstrong III, Robin Zang Broxterman, William “Doc” Ellison and Brian Schira who were all lost in the line of duty. Free with museum admission $7 Adults/ $6 Seniors/ $5 Children (6 -17)/ free for children under 5. Cincinnati Fire Museum. 315 W. Court St, Cincinnati, OH. 513621-5553 CincyFireMuseum.com The Gathering of The Peacemakers: Getting Ready for the Changes. Black Mountain, NC (Apr 9-13; Aug 30-Sep 5), Conway, NH (June 11-14), Woodstock, NY (June 18-21). Mountain Retreat with daily workshops including solar and wind energy, living off-the-grid, organic gardening, holistic health, voluntary simplicity, wilderness survival, staying awake in a sleeping world, living-on-less, handling money wisely, creating loving unions, finding mission in life, creating visionary events, etc. Each gathering will host a Native American “Elder-in-Residence” and evening concerts include recording artist. Camping, private cabins and lodge rooms and vegetarian gourmet meals are available at each gathering. Weekend $145/ week-long $275, half price for children under 12. RSVP Roskind@ Boone.net 828-295-4610 OneLovePress.com Thoroughly Modern Millie, Jr. – 2:30pm (Mar 21, 22), 7:30pm Mar 20, 21). New music by Jeanine Tesori. New lyrics by Dick Scanlan. Book by Richard Morris & Dick Scanlan. Dee Ann Bryll, director Rebecca Childs, music director Lezlie Christian, choreographer. $10 adults, $8 children. Patricia Corbett Theater, CCPA 3550 (Corbett Center for the Performing Arts). 2624 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-556-4183 CCM.UC.edu Two Gentlemen of Verona – 2:30pm (Sat&Sun), 8pm (Thu-Sat). Feb 26 through Mar 8. Based on the Bard’s whimsical comedy, the Tony Award-winning 1971 rock musical Two Gentlemen of Verona is a frothy celebration of young love from the composer of Hair. $15-28. Patricia Corbett Theater, CCPA 3550 (Corbett Center for the Performing Arts). 2624 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-556-4183 CCM.UC.edu

Winter Dance Concert – 2:30pm (Mar 14, 15), 8pm (Mar 14). Shellie Cash, director “Choreographers’ Showcase”. Featuring original works choreographed by CCM dance majors. In addition, guest choreographer and master of Butoh Maureen Fleming restages a CCM premiere of Immortal Rose, a spellbinding multi-media piece that integrates dance with three-dimensional video projections and still photography. Free. Patricia Corbett Theater, CCPA 3550 (Corbett Center for the Performing Arts). 2624 Clifton Ave, Cincinnati, OH. 513-556-4183 CCM.UC.edu

Zen Practice – 7-8:15pm (Mon, Tue), 7-9pm (Fr, Sat). Sitting, walking, bowing and chanting meditation. Please arrive 10 minutes early, since we lock the doors to maintain privacy and security promptly at the start times. Dress is casual and comfortable. Free. Northern Kentucky Zen Center. 443 Center St, Erlanger, KY. 895-653-9107 HamiltonZenCenter.com


communityresourceguide Connecting you to the leaders in natural healthcare and green living in our community. Listings in the Community Resource Guide start at $49 per month. To find out how you can be included in the Community Resource Guide, visit Nacincin.com and click on Advertise to learn about rates.

CHIROPRACTIC

HOLISTIC AND INTEGRATIVE VETERINARY CARE

ProWellness Chiropractic Dr. Mark Johnson (859) 282-9835 ProWellnessChiropractic.com 6052 Ridge Rd. in Florence, KY

Dr. Matthew J Heller

Using traditional and modern chiropractic techniques as well as active rehab and nutritional guidance to promote overall wellness. Space certified technology is used to locate where stress has settled into the muscles. Once the location is found, work begins to unwind the stress patterns and rebuild the body’s ability to adapt to outside stressors more effectively.

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine All about Pet Care in Middletown 513-424-1626 Monroe Family Pet Hospital in Monroe 513-539-8737 AllAboutPetCare.com & MonroeFamilyPetHospital.com Dr. Heller utilizes the modalities of acupuncture, homotoxicology, Chinese herbs, flower essences and nutritional counseling to optimize your pet’s health and well being.

Gary Matthews

ShamanicCounselor.com 513-722-1917 Gary@ShamanicCounselor.com Ordained Transformational Counselor using earth-based self-realization to heal body, mind and spirit. Call for information or to schedule an appointment.

VIDEO PRODUCTION SERVICES Seven / Seventy-Nine, LTD.

HOLISTIC PRACTITIONERS

HEALTHIER SKIN CARE/ DETOXIFICATION

SHAMANIC COUNSELOR

Significant Healing

513-236-1872 Drew@779LTD.com 779LTD.com

Television commercials, music videos, training videos, product demonstrations - any special moment you want to document, we make it possible. Call today for an affordable quote!

Victoria Smith, Board Certified Holistic Practitioner 859-648-0905 SignificantHealing.com 10 Girard Street, Florence, KY 41042

Arbonne International Eden Spaulding Independent Consultant 513-693-7841 EdenYouth.MyArbonne.com

By harvesting Sea derived botanicals and blending them with patented marine technologies, SeaSource formulas bring you the pure therapeutic power of the ocean to help stimulate, strengthen and support detoxification. See ad on page 8.

Your health care professional should be your partner in maintaining and improving your health.  Someone who listens to you and respects your selfknowledge and provides you with expert advice and options

THAI YOGA MASSAGE

YOGA INSTRUCTION Phoenix Wilson

Registered Yoga Teacher 859-341-9642 PhoenixWilson@mac.com Yo g a a s a p a t h w a y f o r transformation - helping us release old patterns and awaken to our present body, heart and spirit. Classes, workshops or individual instruction.

SEVA YOGA GARDEN

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Sevika Kathie Radecki, Practitioner 513-328-2250 northsideyoga@gmail.com www.northsideyoga.org

Dr. Will Sawyer

Henry the Hand Foundation 513-769-3660 HenryTheHand.com Dr.Will@HenryTheHand.com Dr. William Sawyer is changing the way the world thinks about hand hygiene and respiratory etiquette with his educational program featuring Henry the Hand Champion Handwasher.

Based on yoga and Ayurveda, Thai Yoga Massage is a comprehensive full body treatment that relieves muscular tension, improves circulation, boosts the immune system and balances the body energetically. Prenatal Thai Massage also available. Please call today to book an appointment for this unique healing system!

Reach local readers who are interested in health & wellness. To place a listing in our Community Resource Guide section, send an email to:

Publisher@nacincin.com

WHAT SERVICE ARE YOU LOOKING FOR? i CAN’T FIND?

His/Her Name is: Independent Consultant His/Her Phone # is: email@WhyAren’tTheyHere.com

?

March 2009

If you use a practitioner or service that YOU think would be a valuable asset to our Community Resource Guide, LET THEM KNOW about us. Natural Awakenings offers terrific advertising rates and provides a great community service.

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JOIN US FOR

Cincinnati’s 2nd Natural Awakenings’

Natural Networking Event

4-8 pm Tuesday, April 7

FREE The Lloyd House 3901 Clifton Ave. Cincinnati (parking on Lafayette Ave.)

Featuring: • Iridology • Chair Massages • Mini Yoga & Meditation Sessions • The Alexander Technique • Tasty Vegetarian Treats from Melt Eclectic Deli • Prizes and more.... Kindly remove shoes upon entering the Lloyd House. Suggested donations go to the Lloyd House. Brought to you by

Sponsored by:

Jim Phoenix Viles Wilson LMT

Cincinnati For additional information, contact Curt Hawley 513.259.3090 or Publisher@NACinCin.com

RYT

Jen Dusold

Ellen Bierhorst

Victoria Smith

Freelance Trend Consultant & Designer

Ph.D. Clinical Psychologist

Significant Healing Holistic Practice


MAR2009