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letterfrompublisher Welcome to the October “Transformative Travel/Chiropractic” issue of Natural Awakenings Central Ohio.

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ulitzer Prize-nominated writer Andrew Solomon remarks, “Travel is both a mirror and a window.” When we travel, we get a glimpse into how other cultures and countries operate, but the journey also affords us the opportunity to turn inward and examine our own practices and traditions. Often times such profound self-reflection is only fully realized when we are able to extract ourselves from a familiar setting or comfortable surroundings. In early 1999, I purposefully chose such a path when I made the decision to study in South Africa during the spring semester of my senior year of college. I wanted to bear witness to the tremendous societal change taking place in that nation after the recent end of a decades-long program of systemic racial oppression known as apartheid, a social hierarchy where skin color determined social standing - the darker the hue of a person’s skin, the lower their status in society. Nelson Mandela, a political prisoner for 27 years because of the cultural impact and influence he made through a movement of nonviolent resistance inspired by Mahatma Gandhi, was nearing the end of his first and only five-year presidential term. I was excited not only to see the country transition to a new social dynamic, but also to observe firsthand their election process. I also had the opportunity to help build a library for an elementary school in one of the townships, ghettoes where black people were rounded up and forced to live. I spent time driving through the rural countryside and saw what day-to-day life was like. The people I met and the experiences I accrued were life changing. I reaped the benefits that travel offers at a personal level, but Solomon also reflects on how it can positively affect societal change and stave off insularity. “Travel is a moral imperative to combat xenophobia,” he posits. “People have a difficult time making sense of countries they have never visited.” The strategy he offers as a potential solution is to compel every young person in the world to spend two weeks in a foreign country before reaching full adulthood. He clarifies that it does not matter where they go or what they do there. His reasoning as to why that would be effective is “people will then begin to understand what is specific to their own culture versus what is universal.” He even goes so far as to suggest that as much as half of the diplomatic problems in the world would disappear due to an increased understanding between countries brought about through this shared exchange of young minds. We all cohabitate together in this global community. By exploring and taking lessons from it, we can enhance personal development and deepen cross-cultural relations and understanding.

contact us Publisher Sean Peterson Editor Jim Froehlich Design & Production Patrick Floresca Ad Design Charles Erickson Jenny Kline Ad Sales Liz Jaggers Franchise Sales Anna Romano 239-530-1377

Natural Awakenings Central Ohio PO Box 4056 Dublin, OH 43016 Phone: 614-427-3260 Fax: 614-455-0281 Publisher@NACentralOhio.com www.NACentralOhio.com © 2017 by Natural Awakenings. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reproduced and reprinted, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing. Natural Awakenings is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. It is available in selected stores, health and education centers, healing centers, public libraries and wherever free publications are generally seen. Please call to find a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business. We do not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the articles and advertisements, nor are we responsible for the products and services advertised. We welcome your ideas, articles and feedback.

SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscriptions are available by sending $24 (for 12 issues) to the above address. Natural Awakenings is printed on recycled newsprint with soybased ink.

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contents 6

6 newsbriefs 6 ecotip

Natural Awakenings is your guide to a healthier, more balanced life. In each issue readers find cutting-edge information on natural health, nutrition, fitness, personal growth, green living, creative expression and the products and services that support a healthy lifestyle.

8 globalbriefs 10 healthtip 12 healthbriefs

20 fitbody 22 healthykids

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24 greenliving 26 healingways 27 consciouseating

16 TRANSFORMATIVE TRAVEL

Outer Adventures, Inner Journeys by April Thompson

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20 BUILDING

BETTER BONES

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The Right Moves Strengthen Bones at Any Age by Kathleen Barnes

32 wisewords 30 calendar

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34 classifieds 36 naturaldirectory

advertising & submissions

22 OM-SCHOOLED KIDS

Learning Meditation Calms Students by April Thompson

24 CREATING

COMMUNITY

15 Ways to Connect HOW TO ADVERTISE To advertise with Natural Awakenings or request a media kit, please contact us at 614-427-3260 or email Publisher@NACentralOhio.com. Deadline for ads: the 13th of the month. EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS Email articles, news items and ideas to: Publisher@NACentralOhio.com. Deadline for editorial: the 13th of the month.

by Linda Buzzell

26 CHOOSING A

CHIROPRACTOR How to Find the Right One by Marlaina Donato

27 FERMENTED

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FOODS REVIVAL CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS Email Calendar Events to: Publisher@NACentralOhio.com Rediscover Probiotic-Rich Foods or fax to 614-455-0281. Deadline for calendar: the 13th of by Judith Fertig the month. REGIONAL MARKETS Advertise your products or services in multiple markets! Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp. is a growing franchised family of locally owned magazines serving communities since 1994. To place your ad in other markets call 239-449-8309. For franchising opportunities call 239-530-1377 or visit NaturalAwakeningsMag.com.

27 29 DIGESTION AND THE FIVE SENSES FROM THE AYURVEDIC PERSPECTIVE

by Wendy Kendall

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newsbriefs

ecotip

Integrative Wellness Center Welcomes Nutrition Counselor

Mold Gold

mily Bailey is a registered and licensed dietitian as well as a board-certified specialist in sports nutrition. She is also the newest member of the team at Leaves of Life in Columbus. She draws on 14 years of nutrition counseling experience to help clients achieve an individualized healthy eating and fitness-based approach to enhance mental, emotional and physical health. “Because nutrition information is everywhere and can often be contradictory, many people are uncertain about which approach makes the most sense for them,” says Bailey. “Then, the even bigger task is implementing new habits amidst a sea of advertising, peer pressure, busy schedules, fatigue and other barriers to change.” Bailey earned her Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics from Saint Louis University in 2002, and she completed a post-graduate dietetic internship the following year. “Many years of experience coupled with a thorough history and cutting-edge laboratory testing help me provide education and support that is tailored to each patient’s healthy history, goals, food intolerance, preferences and schedule,” says Bailey. Bailey shares patients with Patty Shipley, naturopath and Leaves of Life owner, and Bob Wood, a compounding pharmacist and hormone specialist. She co-practices with Francie Silverman, who has a Master of Science in Nutrition. Location: 7720 Rivers Edge Dr, Ste 221. For more information, call 614-8884372 or visit LeavesOfLife.com. See ad, page 25.

Ayurvedic Medicine Practice Opens in Columbus

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endy Kendall, an Ayurvedic Health Educator (AHE) and reiki practitioner, now offers Ayurvedic medicine consultations at Ayurveda Wellness Ohio. “Some of the more common issues that we help treat are insomnia, digestive problems, weight loss, anxiety, fatigue and depression,” says Kendall. “One small change in a person’s daily routine can have a profound impact on their overall health and well-being.” Ayurveda means “life knowledge” or “the science of life”. This medical system began 5,000 years ago in northern India. Ayurveda practitioners incorporate diet, herbs, breathing techniques, meditation, yoga and color therapy in addition to a variety of plant and mineral remedies that help bring the body into balance and achieve a goal of facilitating optimum wellness. Kendall received her Ayurveda training at the California College of Ayurveda, and her reiki instruction from The Reiki Center in Columbus. She also has a master’s degree in social work and has worked in health care for nearly 20 years. Location: 1200 W 5th Ave. For more information, call 614-893-6940 or visit AyurvedaWellnessOhio.com. 6

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In many parts of the U.S., autumn brings fallen leaves, and the benefits of composting can be extended via leaf molding. “You get new leaves every year. You don’t need to take leaves to a landfill or burn them,” advises Lee Reich, Ph.D., a garden and orchard consultant in New Paltz, New York (LeeReich.com). Digging or tilling leaves into garden beds and containers, using them as mulch, fosters natural soil conditioning, supplies beneficial nutrients and enriches earthworm habitat. PlanetNatural.com estimates that 50 to 80 percent of tree nutrients end up in their leaves. According to FineGardening.com, “Leaf mold prevents extreme fluctuations in soil temperature, keeps the soil surface loose so water penetrates easily, retains soil moisture by slowing water evaporation and stimulates biological activity, creating a microbial environment that helps thwart pests.” One method comprises piling leaves in a corner of the yard or in a wood or wire bin at least three feet wide and tall. Thoroughly dampen the entire pile and let it sit, checking the moisture level occasionally during dry periods and adding water if necessary. Another option is to fill a large plastic bag with leaves and moisten them. Seal the bag, and then cut some holes or slits for airflow. Check every month or two and add water if the leaves are dry. Either way, the decomposition process for most leaves can take six to 12 months; DIYNatural.com reports that some leaves, like oak, can take up to three years to decompose. Hasten the process by mowing the leaves a couple of times before adding them to the pile or bag; turning them over every few weeks with a shovel or garden fork; or covering the contained pile with a plastic tarp to keep the leaves wetter and warmer.

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Decaying Autumn Leaves Feed Summer Gardens


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globalbriefs News and resources to inspire concerned citizens to work together in building a healthier, stronger society that benefits all.

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Save on Holiday Plane Tickets

The easiest way to save money on airfare is by being flexible, because flying on certain days at certain times can be more affordable. Shopping among airports and carriers can also yield dividends, perhaps leaving from one airport and returning to another or combining airlines based on the lowest available rates for legs of the trip. Off hours for flying are very early in the morning or late at night; keep looking for deals right up to the deadline. Airlines send deals and special offers to those that sign up for email alerts. Stay updated on their social media platforms if they release special offers to online followers. To avoid incrementally increasing prices and falling victim to some packagers’ tactics of dynamic pricing and tracking computer searches, clear the browser’s cookies between searches. Try helpful Travel Apps for smartphones; not only are they mobile, they vary in service and scope to suit individual needs. Most are free.

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Wildlife Wipeout

Wind Turbines Kill Winged Creatures Wind turbines make cleaner energy, but are dangerous to birds and bats. According to a study in the Wildlife Society Bulletin, approximately 573,000 birds and 888,000 bats are killed annually by wind turbines, which are providing increased wind power capacity nationwide. At one solar power plant in California, an estimated 3,500 birds died in just the plant’s first year of operation. What would help most is offshore turbines and knowledge about migration routes. The safest place for wind turbines is in the ocean, because songbirds and bats don’t migrate over such waters. On land, many songbirds fly at night and can’t see the wind turbines until it’s too late. Once they’ve discovered the unsafe area, they avoid it. Because migration routes are based on availability of food, water and resting areas, birds are forced to fly around the turbines, adding miles to their trip and the burning of more calories. Estimates of just how many bats are dying each year range from the tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands. Radar installations help to keep bats away from the deadly blades. Other remedies include slowing the blades at night to reduce collisions, which has proved to reduce overall wildlife deaths by 73 percent. In 2016 the American Wind Energy Association announced voluntary guidelines to halt turbines during low wind speeds, when bats are most active, to reduce bat fatalities by 30 percent. With two more industry changes, bat fatalities could drop 90 percent: feathering, or turning the blades parallel to the wind so the turbines don’t rotate; and higher cut-in speeds so they don’t rotate in light winds. Take action at NationOfChange.org/petitions/protect-bats-lethal-wind-turbines. 8

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Eco Sneakers

Biodegradable Reeboks Help Solve Waste Problem Reebok is introducing a completely compostable sneaker designed to neither harm the environment when created nor potentially clog a landfill when discarded. The shoe’s upper section is made of sustainable organic cotton, while the sole is derived from industrially grown corn, harvested when it’s older and tougher. Even the eyelets are stitched, using no metal or plastic.

Fast Foodies

Toddlers Routinely Reach for French Fries A collaborative study published in the journal Pediatrics concludes that toddlers under the age of 2 are more likely to eat French fries than vegetables on any given day; one in four 6-to-11-month-olds and one in five 1-year-olds consumed no vegetables at all. This concerning downward trend began more than a decade ago. The percentage of babies and toddlers eating canned or frozen fruits and vegetables declined by 10 percent between 2005 and 2012, and the consumption of dark, leafy greens among those under 2 has halved since 2005. Dr. Annemarie Stroustrup, an associate professor with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, in New York City, says, “You often have to offer a new food to a toddler up to 10 times before they will eat it.”

tratong/Shutterstock.com

Fare Price


Saving Salmon

Resource Saver

Fernando Cortes/Shutterstock.com

A legal challenge in Washington state may require spending nearly $2 billion to restore salmon habitat by removing barriers that block fish migration. The Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld a 2013 ruling ordering the state to fix or replace hundreds of culverts that allow streams to pass beneath roads, but block the salmon. Lorraine Loomis, chair of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, states, “This is a win for salmon, treaty rights and everyone that lives here.” The group represents 21 tribes in western Washington that challenged the state over the culverts in 2001, part of decades-long litigation over tribal fishing rights. She advises, “Fixing fish-blocking culverts under state roads will open up hundreds of miles of habitat and result in more salmon.”

American Roots

Columbus Day Renamed to Honor First Peoples Many people feel that Christopher Columbus is partly responsible for the genocide of Native Americans, and bestowing him a day of celebration adds insult to injury. In a progressive move, the Anadarko City Council, in Oklahoma, unanimously voted to change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day—observed this year on October 9. City employees get the holiday off, and other municipalities in Oklahoma have followed suit.

Innovative Building Material Trumps Concrete Oleksandr Rybitskiy/Shutterstock.com

Alexander Raths/Shutterstock.com

Court Removes Manmade Barriers

Concrete and steel allow us to build immense houses, skyscrapers and dams, but in 2012, the U.S. Energy Information Administration determined that cement manufacturing uses more energy than any other industry. A new substitute process of growing biodegradable bricks via millions of bacteria-depositing chemicals, similar to the way coral grows, is now coming into use. The bacteria are injected into a brick mold with an aggregate material such as sand. After a short time, the bacteria turn it into a solid brick. Not only is this a renewable resource, it uses relatively little energy and is a viable option for future methods of construction, including terraforming other planets (Tinyurl.com/Biodegradable BuildingMaterials).

Migrating Trees

WathanyuSowong/Shutterstock.com

Forests Shift West with Climate Change The consequences of climate change are impacting plant species in unanticipated, but logical ways; for instance, conifers and other needle trees are moving northward because they are more sensitive to temperature than flowering, deciduous trees. They already populate the boreal forest of eastern North America, so they’re well-adapted to expand into colder, drier conditions. Individual trees can’t move, but populations can shift over time as saplings expand into a new region while older growth dies in another. A new study published in Science Advances also shows that about three-quarters of tree species common to eastern American forests, including white oaks, sugar maples and American holly, have shifted their population centers westward since 1980 due to drier conditions in the East. Global warming has significantly altered rainfall totals. Songlin Fei, a professor of forestry at Purdue University, in West Lafayette, Indiana, and one of the study authors, observes, “Different species are responding to climate change differently. Most of the broadleaf species of deciduous trees are following moisture that’s moving westward.” Changes in land use, conservation efforts, wildfire frequency and the arrival of pests and blights all play parts in shifting populations. Forest ecosystems are defined as much by the mix of species and the interaction between them as by the simple presence of many trees. If different species migrate in different directions, then ecological communities could eventually collapse. natural awakenings October 2017

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by Trudy Pieper, ND

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raveling exposes us to many circumstances that could compromise our systems. The culprit could be the local water supply, too much dairy or too many baked treats, an excessive amount of coffee, anxiety or failing to stay adequately hydrated, any of which can increase the likelihood of not feeling 100 percent well. When travelling, consider packing any of these natural remedies: Ginger Crystallized ginger is easy to carry and effective for treating nausea, migraines, digestion, aches, pains and congestion. Rescue Remedy This blend of flower essences helps maintain calm, especially if luggage gets lost or a flight is delayed. It can also help control anxiety in many situations. Activated Charcoal Activated charcoal works to absorb toxins in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and provide relief from food poisoning, stomach bugs, gas, bloating and diarrhea. Take special care to stay properly hydrated when taking charcoal. Probiotics Keep the immune system working and encourage a healthy gut environment with the good bacteria provided by probiotics. There are several probiotic products available that stay fully active without requiring refrigeration, making them easily portable. Trudy Pieper is a naturopathic doctor at Phoenix Wellness Center in Johnstown, and the author of Prevention is the Cure for Cancer. For more information, call 740-616-9949 or visit PhoenixWellness4U.com. See ad, page 38.

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healthbriefs

Resveratrol May Help Eye Health

Valentyn Volkov /Shutterstock.com

esveratrol is a natural substance found in grapes, peanuts, blueberries and other foods that’s known for its heart-protective nature. Researchers believe it may also help promote eye health, including prevention of glaucoma, cataracts and macular degeneration, but not much is known about its presence in the eyes. Scientists from Tongji Medical College, in China, set out to measure the concentration of trans-resveratrol in the eyes after oral supplementation. Three daily doses of Longevinex, an oral trans-resveratrol-based capsule supplement, was administered to 35 adults prior to eye surgery on one of their eyes, and tissue samples of the conjunctiva, aqueous humor and vitreous humor were taken. Researchers measured the tissues for resveratrol concentration to determine how much of the supplement penetrated the eyes. Resveratrol metabolites were detected in the conjunctiva of 25 of the eyes, indicating that the beneficial substance does pass through the brain.

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Music Soothes Pain After Surgery

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esearchers from the Louis Armstrong Center for Music and Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, in New York City, studied the impact of music therapy on 60 patients that had undergone spinal fusion surgery. Half received a 30-minute music therapy session, along with standard postoperative care, within 72 hours of surgery. The other half received only standard care. The scientists used the visual analog scale to measure pain before and after music therapy in both groups concurrently. The patients receiving music therapy experienced average pain level reductions from 6.2 to 5.09, while the control group averaged slight increases in pain, from 5.2 to 5.87. “The degree of change in the music group is notable for having been achieved by non-pharmacologic means, with little chance of adverse effects,” explains Center Director and study co-author Joanne Loewy. “Pain is subjective and personal, and warrants an individualized approach to care. Certified, licensed music therapists can tailor treatment to each patient’s musical preferences and address their pain level.”


milestone

WOMEN LIVE LONGER WHEN SURROUNDED BY GREENERY

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esearchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, in Boston, followed 108,630 U.S. women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study between 2000 and 2008, comparing their mortality rates with the amount of vegetation around their homes. The researchers also accounted for related risk factors such as age, socioeconomic status, race and ethnicity, and smoking behaviors. They concluded that subjects living in the greenest areas had a 12 percent lower mortality rate than those living in the least lush areas during the study period.

Banning Trans Fats Lowers Heart Attacks

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leven counties in New York instituted restrictions on trans fatty acids in restaurants in 2007. Researchers from Yale University School of Medicine used data from the New York State Department of Health statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System and U.S. Census population estimates to determine the impact of these restrictions on the health of the community; they compared the 11 counties that had the restrictions to 25 counties without them. The scientists concluded that hospital heart attack admissions were significantly lower for the 11 counties with the restrictions.

Walking Reduces Symptoms of Dementia

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study from the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, examined the impact of regular walking on people with vascular cognitive impairment, the second-most common form of dementia. The ailment occurs when blood vessels become damaged by cardiovascular disease, impeding good blood circulation and making the brain work harder. The researchers scanned the brains and conducted computerized decision-making and attention tests on 38 people with mild, early forms of vascular cognitive impairment. Half of the subjects were asked to participate in supervised, one-hour walking sessions three times per week for a six-month period. The remaining subjects did not walk. After six months, the walking group showed improvements in both blood pressure and brain function, with their brains requiring less effort during the decision-making and attention tests.

Worthington Optimal Wellness Celebrates 30 Years

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r. Julia A. Keiser opened Worthington Optimal Wellness (WOW) in 1987 as a chiropractic practice. As the practice grew, patients began requesting other wellness services to address increased physical, mental and chemical stresses. WOW now encompasses three doctors of chiropractic, nutritional counseling, exercise instruction, massage, an allergy relief program, nutritional cleansing, cold laser treatment and wellness education. Keiser, originally a social worker, was herself a recipient of chiropractic services after an accident that left her with chronic pain. After experiencing firsthand the benefits and relief that came through chiropractic treatment, she enrolled at Palmer College of Chiropractic in Davenport, Iowa and started WOW after graduation. The mission at WOW is to create a healthier, happier community. Their focus is to determine the root cause of the problem and correct it, instead of potentially suppressing symptoms with drugs. For the individual patient, this assessment involves a review of their entire health picture, including their symptoms, stresses, lifestyle and health goals. The doctor and patient then create a program for optimal well-being. To accomplish their mission throughout the Central Ohio community, WOW presents outreach education for corporations, schools and businesses, including health fairs, “Lunch and Learn” programs, ongoing educational series and health cost assessments. Location: 6180 Linworth Rd, Worthington. For more information, call 614-848-5211 or visit Worthington OptimalWellness.com.

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healthbriefs

Vitamin D plus Calcium Lowers Cancer Risk

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esearchers from the Creighton University School of Nursing, in Omaha, Nebraska, studied 2,303 healthy postmenopausal women to determine whether a link between vitamin D and cancer existed. The treatment group comprised 1,156 women receiving 2,000 International Units (IU) of vitamin D3 and 1,500 milligrams of calcium per day for four years. The 1,147 women in the control group received placebos for the same duration. Within the study timeframe, 64 women from the placebo group were diagnosed with some form of cancer, while only 49 subjects from the treatment group faced a cancer diagnosis. This represents a small, but significant reduction in the cancer rate for those taking vitamin D3. Further analyses of the levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the blood revealed that the women that developed cancer had substantially lower levels of this vitamin than the subjects that remained healthy.

Spirulina Reduces Weight and Cholesterol

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pirulina platensis, a single-celled blue-green algae used in supplements, is often taken for the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. A new study from Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, in Iran, tested the efficacy of spirulina supplementation on the body mass index (BMI), weight and cholesterol levels of 64 obese adults between the ages of 20 and 50. Subjects were divided into intervention and placebo groups. The intervention group took twice-daily supplements of Spirulina platensis for 12 weeks. BMI, fasting blood samples and lipid profiles were assessed at the beginning and end of the study, and food intake and appetite were reported daily. The scientists found more than double the reductions in both body weight and BMI in the spirulina group, compared to the control group. In addition, reductions in both total cholesterol and appetite were found in the intervention group.


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TRANSFORMATIVE

TRAVEL Outer Adventures, Inner Journeys by April Thompson

An open-hearted journey can take unexpected paths. More travelers today are searching for deep and lasting changes in their view of themselves and the world.

Declare Your Intentions

Cousineau suggests that travelers prepare to open their thinking by reading about the history, culture and geography of a place, and then continue to learn en route by talking to locals for insight rather than relying only on a guidebook. “Make yourself vulnerable. Ask questions and be humble. Talk to your waiter or cab driver about their lives and conditions in their country. Those that become most delighted and transformed by their experiences are the most curious,” observes Cousineau. Anna Pollock, of London, England, founder of Conscious Travel and a sustainable travel expert, elaborates on potential results. “Travelers may see the world and their part in it differently or feel greater clarity, peace, freedom or hope. For some, it’s about insights into their personal purpose. Others may return with a deeper sense of connectedness or feeling of mastery that comes from trying something completely new.” Jake Haupert, of Seattle, owner of Evergreen Escapes International, co-founded the Transformational Travel Council to help people embark on such life-altering journeys, and translate “Aha!” moments on the road into meaningful changes back home. He has witnessed individuals undergo radical shifts from changing careers to becoming parents. One couple was so moved by their experiences on an African safari that they adopted their first child from Kenya.

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Attention and intention are the main ingredients for transformative travel for Phil Cousineau, acclaimed author of The Art of Pilgrimage. “Ask yourself what is motivating the journey: Are you going just to check something off your bucket list because you read about it or are you going because your grandma told you how magical her visit there was in the 1920s? Are you going because you’re at a crossroads in your life, marriage or work?” queries Cousineau. Naming your intention helps open up the heart and psyche for transformation. Cousineau recommends sharing our choice beforehand

with a friend or even a casual acquaintance. Writing it down can also unpack those yearnings and understand the pull to a place. Part of the intention setting is clarifying what we hope to accomplish through making a journey, suggests Nathaniel Boyle, creator of The Travelers podcast and the travel platform Holocene that facilitates community among transformation-seeking travelers. It might be climbing a mountain with our spouse to strengthen a marriage, or taking a cooking class in Italy or a basket weaving workshop in Indonesia to rekindle a sense of fresh input and creative expression.

Stay Open

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Move Beyond Comfort

“Travel can serve as a vehicle for expansive personal growth. Through it, we learn to explore the world and ourselves,” Boyle observes. “When you venture outside the controlled environment of prepackaged trips for tourists to face difficult decisions and confusing and chaotic situations that require problem solving, that’s where real change can occur,” says Haupert. “My 12,000-mile journey from Washington, D.C., to Antarctica was transformative in so many ways,” says journalist Andrew Evans, author of The Black Penguin memoir. “I’m a geographer by training and spent four years studying maps, but I never understood the true size of the world until I traveled across it on a Greyhound bus. I now see the world as much smaller and much more accessible. The trip made me a stronger, more confident person, and less afraid of what other people think of me; it also made me want to keep traveling.” “Travel comes from the word travail, to labor, and trip from tripalium, Latin for a medieval torture rack. Metaphorically, travel can feel like torture at times, and some travelers feel unhappy, unprepared, bored or disappointed,” remarks Cousineau. “But the flip side is that travels can stretch us, just like a medieval rack.” If you have stretch goals, you can build them into an itinerary, advises Haupert, whether it’s getting up the courage to skydive or negotiating a purchase in a foreign street market.

Do Less, Experience More

To heighten experiential awareness while traveling, build fewer to-dos into an itinerary, the experts recommend. “Immerse yourself in a place. Leave time for unplanned explorations, rather than bouncing between destinations without space for spontaneity and restful reflection,” says Haupert. “Also build in time for meditation, yoga, simple relaxation or other intentionally restorative moments in-between the high-intensity peak experiences.” Haupert suggests staging a

ceremonial start to a journey, such as a special dinner or bike ride upon arrival. Similarly, Cousineau recommends starting a new journal on every journey, to ceremoniously start anew in one’s thinking. Engaging in ritual can also help awaken the traveler, says Cousineau. He suggests walking in silence as we approach a sacred site, or physically engaging with it, as pilgrims might do when they palm the feet of a Buddha statue or press their forehead to the Wailing Wall. Sacred sites are fertile ground for transformative experiences, says Lori Erickson, an Episcopal deacon, travel writer and author of Holy Rover: Journeys in Search of Mystery, Miracles, and God, a memoir of her trips to a dozen of the world’s holy sites. “So many people have prayed and opened their hearts in a holy place that you can feel the energy,” she says. Erickson suggests that travelers seek out hallowed ground from different traditions, which can help heal divides among people of divergent faiths. “The art and architecture of holy sites are beautiful manifestations of spiritual longing and human creativity. These places have the power to move you, regardless of your own spiritual background.”

Lasting Travel Gifts

When you give while traveling, you often get back even more, says Cousineau. “A pilgrim never travels empty-handed. Bring gifts; even postcards from home can make a meaningful connection.” He recently brought baseball equipment along on a group tour he led to give to kids in baseball-crazed Cuba. Giving appreciation is as important as tangible mementos, he notes. “Gratitude makes transformation possible; that’s what modern people are longing for, to be touched.” Boyle suggests that finding ways to give back can unlock unique opportunities. Quinn Vanderberg and Jonathon Button, guests on Boyle’s podcast, left stable lives and jobs in California for Nicaragua in 2012 with only their travel bags and a shared

Journey Jump-Offs Here’s a short list of resources to inspire transformative adventuring. n The blog at AyanaJourneys.com explores Cambodia’s sacred Buddhist sites.   n Evergreen Escapes at Evergreen EscapesIntl.com specializes in unforgettable locales tailored to the traveler’s inner calling.   n “The Travelers” podcast via Holocene.io/travelers features stories and advice from 200-plus change-makers on topics ranging from creativity, fear and gratitude to travel-related careers.   n Muddy Shoe Adventures at MuddyShoeAdventures.com offers small-group trips that challenge participants with combinations of physical activities and cultural experiences.   n OuterTravelsInnerJourneys.com connects people through shared spiritual adventures like mind-body healing and immersion in nature.   n Phil Cousineau (PhilCousineau.net) hosts writer’s retreats, literary tours and pilgrimages to historic sacred sites.   n Responsible Travel at Responsible Travel.com offers socially and environmentally conscious tours to all seven continents, including small-ship cruises to more authentic, lesser-known ports of call.   n Transformational Travel Council’s website Transformational. travel conveys uplifting stories, a travelers’ forum and other tools for change-seekers.                                                                                 n World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms (wwoof.net) links volunteers with organic farmers to help build a sustainable global community.

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supplies to a child in need. Since 2012, the project has expanded to also support kids in Guatemala, Kenya, Mexico and Morocco.

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dream. Brainstorming a vision for a new life together, the 25-year-old pair had realized, “We wanted life to be filled with travel, culture and people, and to make an impact along the way,” says Vanderburg. “We went knowing we wanted to create a social venture, but first wanted to see what was really needed by the community.” They went on to partner with local educational nonprofits and artisans to launch Life Out of the Box, a line of clothing and accessories modeled after Toms’ “Buy one, give one” business model. For every product sold, the entrepreneurs donate school

Drive Home Transformation

Starting with a moment of reflection before departing a place, take advantage of a trip’s afterglow to recall insights learned, gel memories, share insights and move to make changes stick. Haupert sees this as a good time to develop an action plan to “express gratitude for the journey and create a

Close Encounters Eager for a transformative adventure without traveling afar? Here are some ideas for exploring cultures and connecting with others closer to home. 4 Attend festivals celebrating varied cultures in your local community. Every spring in Washington, D.C., embassies showcase the cuisine, art and history of 70 countries. Frackville, Pennsylvania’s 103-year-old Lithuanian Days is the oldest ethnic festival in the country. 4 Host a traveling cyclist and hear tales from the trails via WarmShowers.org, a hospitality exchange for 90,000 touring cyclists and hosts. 4 Take advantage of local, state and national parks, including 88 ocean and coastal parks within the National Park Service (nps.gov). Along with wilderness sites, the service also stewards important cultural heritage sites nationwide. 4 Find a spiritual retreat center at RetreatFinder.com. 4 Overnight on an organic farm. Visit FarmStayUS.com to sample what’s in season in the region. 4 Meet and host individual travelers via CouchSurfing.com, a network of 11 million globetrotters in 150,000 cities.

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Adventure travelers named transformation and an expanded worldview as top motives for their explorations. ~Adventure Travel Trade Association framework for your homecoming.” Then, take a day to reflect upon returning home before jumping back into work or other obligations, internalizing your experience and integrating your “traveler self” back into normalcy. It might involve a trip to the spa, an afternoon of journaling or organizing trip photos, suggests Haupert. “Resist the urge to check emails the minute the plane touches down or start planning the next trip. Take time to remember the journey and see your home turf with fresh eyes,” adds Cousineau. The returned pilgrim has a responsibility to memorialize the journey, an ancient tradition of Judeo-Christian and Islamic faiths, advises Cousineau. The San Francisco writer traveled with a group on foot from Louisville, Kentucky, to Thomas Merton’s Abbey of Our Lady of Gethsemani, near Bardstown, Kentucky, to celebrate the legacy of Merton and Mahatma Gandhi. One of the women inked a footprint from each of 100plus travelers, sewing them into a quilt to commemorate the pilgrimage. Chronicling the journey can be as simple as a dinner party with friends to share what we have learned, says Cousineau, but suggests that travelers engage attendees to also contribute their own stories and reflections. “We have a choice upon returning; do nothing and just let that experience fade or own it for ourselves,” concurs Boyle. “It’s incumbent to extract the meaning of our experiences and find a way to express them, whether through a photo series, article, painting or video. The traveler’s ‘third act’ of creativity after preparation and execution is how we process change.” Connect with freelance writer April Thompson, in Washington, D.C., at AprilWrites.com. natural awakenings October 2017

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BUILDING BETTER BONES The Right Moves Strengthen Bones at Any Age

by Kathleen Barnes

Success in the quest for stronger bones is possible at any age.

Start and Stay Young

“Peak bone strength is reached by the age of 30, so it’s vital for young people to engage in dynamic impact movement through their teen years and 20s,” says Sherri Betz, chair of the American Physical Therapy Association bone health group, a doctor of physical therapy and geriatric-certified specialist with a private practice in Santa Cruz, California. Engaging in sports during our youthful developing years helps build strong, wide and dense bones that will carry us well into old age, literally giving us a firmer base to stand on. It’s paramount to encourage children and young people to be physically active and for us all to continue with athletic activities throughout adulthood to preserve the bone health peak we reach at age 30.

Optimal Bone Exercises

“Adulthood is a perfectly good time to start building and improving bone fitness and health. The outcome is just a little bit less,” says Steven A. Hawkins, Ph.D., a professor of exercise science at California Lutheran University, in Thousand Oaks. 20

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“Bone responds to exercise much like muscle,” explains Larry Tucker, Ph.D., professor of exercise sciences at Brigham Young University, in Provo, Utah. “Bone doesn’t grow, per se, but like muscle, it does get denser and stronger according to the stresses and strains put on it.” “The key is to put a heavy load on bones to stimulate them to grow,” Hawkins notes. Standing exercises are recommended, because the bones most likely to benefit from strengthening exercise are 30 targeted leg and hip bones, says Tucker. “Surprising the bone is your best bet,” points out Betz. “Don’t do the same things over and over again at the same time, either repetitive exercises like running or weight lifting or consistent combinations; even high-intensity exercise can diminish the effects.” The most highly recommended exercises involve those that require changing directions, bouncing and leaping—from basketball to lively dances, and even some intense yoga postures. Hopping and jumping are probably the best way to strengthen bones, but must be done in the proper way, according to

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Walking Isn’t It

Walking, running, weight training and other repetitive exercises don’t improve bone density, says Hawkins. “Walk and do other repetitive exercises for cardiovascular health and

general fitness. While these might help maintain current bone strength, they won’t improve bone density.” Walking reduced the risk of hip fracture by 41 percent for postmenopausal women walking four hours a week, with fewer falls due to improved strength, balance and other factors per the Journal of the American Medical Association. Numerous studies confirm that exercise of any kind keeps us healthy, but for bone health, the answer is to start weight-bearing exercises early and sustain the practice for a lifetime.

Yoga for Bones Yoga doesn’t involve bouncing or jumping for the most part, but it can be helpful in maintaining strong bones, says Sherri Betz, a Santa Cruz, California, physical therapist and Pilates and yoga instructor. “Poses, including the tree, chair, warrior, triangle, half moon and sun salute, need to be as dynamic as possible and focus on leg strengthening and spine extension.

Kathleen Barnes is a health writer and author of The Calcium Lie II: What Your Doctor Still Doesn’t Know, with Dr. Robert Thompson. Connect at KathleenBarnes.com.

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Tucker and others. Research by Tucker’s team published in the American Journal of Health Promotion studied the effects of jumping on hip bone density in premenopausal women. It may seem counterintuitive, but Tucker reports that most benefits are gained from jumping as high as possible, resting 30 seconds and repeating up to 10 times twice a day in intervals at least eight hours apart. “If you jump continuously, the exercise loses effectiveness pretty quickly,” he says. Those that enjoy circuit training should do something else during the 30-second rests between repetitions, Tucker advises. Because it’s the jolt of jumping that stimulates bone strength, using a mini-trampoline or another cushioning device to lessen impact on the body won’t increase bone density. Betz cautions against starting a jumping program too quickly. “Proper alignment, balance and body awareness come first,” she says. “Do 20 to 25 heel raises in a row, a full squat with good alignment and a full lunge to ready the body for a jumping program.” Such strengthening safeguards against falling and injury.

The most common way of testing bone density is a DEXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) scan. The result is called a T-score and is one case where a zero is perfect. A score of +1.0 to -1.0 is considered normal. A score between -1.0 and -2.5 is considered osteopenia, or weakened bones. A score lower than -2.5 indicates some level of osteoporosis. The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends bone density testing for women and men older than 65 and 70, respectively, and those that are petite, prone to breaking bones or have other risk factors. For more information, visit Tinyurl.com/BoneDensityTest.

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Om-Schooled Kids Learning Meditation Calms Students by April Thompson

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choolchildren are learning the calming effect of tuning into their minds and bodies through a pioneering program in Baltimore, Maryland, that’s replacing time outs and school detentions with mindful moments. Trained staff—including many former students—teach yoga, mindfulness practices, meditation, centering and breath work that empower kids to resolve conflicts peacefully. Brothers Atman and Ali Smith and friend Andres Gonzalez founded the nonprofit Holistic Life Foundation (HLF) in 2001 in response to the pressing need to help kids living in challenging urban environments better manage stress, anger and other heightened emotions. Today, the organization is sowing the seeds of mindfulness with some 7,500 students a week across 18 Baltimore-area schools, usually beginning through daylong, school-wide interventions and afterschool programs supporting targeted populations. Frustrated kids cool off and center themselves through breathing exercises and meditation in the Mindful Moment Room in the HLF flagship Robert W. Coleman Elementary School. “Sometimes when I get mad, I just breathe deep. I picture being in a certain place I like

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These are tools kids can rely on for the rest of their lives, and use them to get back to their center. ~Ali Smith and I just stop being mad… I think of being a bigger person and doing something maybe a wise man would do,” advises one fifth-grade participant. “When we had to take a big test, before I took it and in the middle, I took deep breaths to stay calm and finish the test. When everybody around you is making a lot of noises, you just try to tune them out and be yourself, do your breathing,” says another fifth-grader. The training starts with educators learning mindfulness techniques both to help their students and also manage their own stress in the classroom. “The program was a fantastic experience,” says Lori Gustovson, a teacher at Baltimore’s Lincoln Elementary School. “We integrated the exercises into our daily schedules, helping many students and teachers focus their attention and regulate emotions such as anxiety, anger and frustration. We are a better school because of the time they spent in our classrooms teaching us the beauty of paying attention to breath, movement and each other,” she observes. Participating schools have reported fewer fights, better attendance and higher grades, among other benefits, according to Ali Smith, all results backed by independent research. Recent studies in schools from San Francisco to Columbus, Ohio, have shown that teaching kids mindfulness practices can heighten attentiveness, self-control and empathy, while reducing stress, hyperactivity and depression, and improving academic performance. The kids also apply their newfound skills at home. “To take ownership of the practice and understand the benefits, you have to know how to explain it,

so we use a reciprocal teaching model,” says Ali. “We teach the kids to say, ‘Mom, Dad, you look stressed; can you take a breather with me?’” Martin, a Lincoln Elementary student, was pleased to report, “I went to my house and taught my mom how to do all the things you guys taught us.” Virginia, another student, noted, “This morning I got mad at my dad, but then I remembered to breathe, and then I didn’t shout.” Other schools are following suit. Mindful Schools began in 2007 as a single-school program in Oakland, California, and then expanded to support online and in-person courses and a

network of mindful educators spanning all 50 states and more than 100 countries. The David Lynch Foundation funds efforts to bring transcendental meditation to underserved kids in classrooms like the Brooklyn Urban Garden Charter School, in Queens, New York; Wilson High School, in Portland, Oregon; and Wayzata West Middle School, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, among others. Find easy instruction at Tinyurl.com/ MindfulnessStarterLesson. Connect with freelance writer April Thompson, in Washington, D.C., at AprilWrites.com.

Mindful Exercises This meditation exercise is recommended by the Holistic Life Foundation to help kids slow down, relax, de-stress or clear their heads:

Sit comfortably with one hand on your belly, with your head, neck and spine in alignment. Breathe through your nose. As you inhale, feel your belly expand and pause for a second. Then, exhale and feel the belly fall. Repeat for 10 breaths.

This mindfulness instruction is excerpted from a starter lesson at MindfulSchools.org:

Mindfulness is noticing what is happening in the present moment. It can help calm us when we are angry, sad or frustrated. It can help us notice when we are happy or grateful and also to focus, whether in school or in sports. It’s important to let our bodies be very still. When that happens, it gets very quiet. When we have still and quiet bodies, that’s what we call our mindful bodies. Now, let’s close our eyes and just sit like this for one minute.

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peacefully resolve conflicts in order to reach consensus.

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Creating Community 15 Ways to Connect by Linda Buzzell

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n facing up to today’s often degrading environmental, economic, political, social and hyper-individualistic cultural conditions, we instinctively know that survival requires coming together to effect constructive change. Here are proven approaches to community building that work.

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Build a campfire. Whether literal or metaphoric, create a clear, focused attraction that draws people into a circle.

Connect with nature and the seasons. Tying gatherings into what’s happening seasonally with all life forms is a traditionally effective way of fostering community.

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Welcome each person. Either designate greeters or go around the circle welcoming and acknowledging each participant before proceeding with the event’s main activity. People that feel seen and known are more likely to stay involved. 24

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Provide food and drink. Traditional societies have always taken hospitality seriously. Having people bring items to add to the collective feast is better than catering.

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Ceremony, ritual and the sacred. Deep in our collective human memory lie countless spring and harvest festivals, ceremonial or religious events, meals and celebrations that included a strong sense of passage, initiation and the sacredness of all life. Use one as a springboard to add meaning to a contemporary gathering.

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Collective problem solving. People bond into a community when they participate in solving a real-world community problem, helping someone in need or addressing a situation that demands a community solution. Consider using Robert’s Rules of Order or other guidelines for discussions that maintain civility, discourage competitiveness and

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Storytelling. Humans learn best when seeing and hearing stories. Facts don’t arouse us as much as narratives and full-body experiences do. Bombarding people with facts won’t create desired change. We must be inspired to act on the knowledge.

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Elders. Shared history, respect and affection are vital to belonging. Adults coping with a highstress, industrialized culture might tend to find elders’ stories slow-moving and boring, but they are a critical resource for our collective survival. Beware of the “star from afar” syndrome that posits outsiders as experts, rather than honoring and developing our own community resources, which won’t disappear at the end of an event.

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Gifts and sharing. As we focus on creating a sharing society versus a gimme culture, it’s nice to give small gifts such as a plant or garden flower, organic seeds or regifted items to event attendees. It’s a simple way to help everyone feel valued, appreciated and welcomed. The key is keeping events local, simple and created by the community for the community. Many hands make light work, and some of the best community events cost the host little, while everyone involved brings their own chair or blanket, serving ware and potluck dish.

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Shopping. People have been bonding through meeting others in the marketplace since ancient times. Sales or silent auctions are popular when the money paid becomes a gift to the community.

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A little excitement. Raffles and door prizes add fun as long as any money raised goes into the common coffers as a gift to all. Child care. Children provide a necessary source of untamed energy and entertainment for any gathering. Multigenerational exchanges also help form and shape them through exposure to role


models and life education, even if they might not feel engaged at the time.

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Transportation. Facilitating carpools and providing transportation for those without cars or unable to walk builds community even before the event starts.

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Dance and body movement. Modern society makes us sit a lot. Physical action connects us in a way nothing else can.

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Beauty and music. Our eyes and ears are portals to the soul and spirit of the human psyche. Even a simple drum can bond individuals into a coherent group. Community singing can be powerful medicine, as places of worship ever demonstrate. A simple flower on the table or painting on the wall brings powerful archetypal energies to bear as we come together. An outdoor meeting brings nature’s magnificence to our senses, adding extraordinary power to events. The bottom line is that any community gathering, organization or event that engages body, mind and spirit has a far greater chance of surviving and thriving. Linda Buzzell is a psychotherapist, ecotherapist, blogger and co-editor of Ecotherapy: Healing with Nature in Mind. She co-founded a local permaculture guild, and a voluntary simplicity circle which met for 10 years in her local community. Connect at EcotherapyHeals.com.

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Choosing a Chiropractor How to Find the Right One by Marlaina Donato

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hiropractic medicine is known for its non-surgical approach to chronic pain and other musculoskeletal conditions, but also has much more to offer. However, finding the right doctor can be as daunting as shopping for a comfortable pair of shoes. Here, three reputable practitioners talk about securing individualized care and getting the most out of chiropractic.

Address Specific Needs

Clarifying the desired outcome is helpful, because some clients are just looking for a quick fix to reduce pain, while others may be seeking overall better health, lasting wellness and an improved quality of life. “Due to insurance issues, we’ve become known as pain doctors, but that’s not the full extent of chiropractic,” explains Dr. Michelle Robin, owner of Your Wellness Connection and the educational DrMichelleRobin.com website, in Shawnee, Kansas. “Also, you can see more than one chiropractor, as each has their own strength.” Dr. Michael Aho, of Crosstown Chiropractic, in Chicago, agrees. “Chiropractic care encompasses 26

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many styles, so one of the biggest variables is the type of treatment the doctor uses. Most offices commonly treat neck, mid-back and low back pain. If you have a specific shoulder, knee or foot problem, you may want to find a doctor that frequently treats those issues. If you are pregnant, choose a chiropractor that has experience working with pregnant women.” “There are more than 140 different chiropractic techniques. Some are light touch, while others are aggressive. Some are hands-on and some use instruments for adjusting. It’s important that the doctor’s approach resonates with your nature,” advises Dr. Jackie St. Cyr of the Innate Chiropractic Healing Arts Center, in Houston. Robin advises that sitting in a doctor’s reception room to just observe and trusting our intuition is helpful before moving forward with a consultation.

Ask Questions

First, find out if a chiropractor has embraced either a conventional medical or holistic model, and then delve more deeply to find the right approach and level of care. “Ask how long a

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doctor has practiced and their governing philosophy. Do they treat the full spine or focus on the point of pain, and what range of techniques do they apply? You want them to know your spine before they adjust it; make sure they conduct a new patient exam,” suggests St.Cyr. An exam may include a thermography scan and X-rays. Helpful questions include what to expect during the initial visit, recommended frequency of treatment, the desired doctor’s office hours and how treatment might benefit a particular condition. Because most chiropractic offices offer compatible treatments, also ask about complementary modalities such as acupuncture, massage therapy, heat therapy, and interferential current therapy using minute electrical pulses for deep tissue pain relief.

Be Consistent

“You shouldn’t expect instant results,” says Aho. “You’ll benefit the most if you don’t wait too long after first experiencing symptoms of a problem before starting treatment, and are consistent with your treatment.” Being proactive can foster good results. St.Cyr concurs, stating, “When patients follow their chiropractor’s recommended routine of regular corrective care, they get the best results. Be consistent with visits and do your customized spinal exercises; they’ve been proven to work.” Robin expounds that not following through with homecare is a common pitfall for patients. “Like dental care, you always need to do something for your spine every day, be it stretching, other exercise or good nutrition.” She notes that everyone’s response to chiropractic is different. “Be realistic. If you’ve experienced injuries or accidents, it will take longer, and your healing might look different from that of someone else that is free of injuries and follows a healthier diet. Sometimes people give up on chiropractic instead of finding a chiropractor that is good for them. You wouldn’t give up going to the dentist, and the same should apply to chiropractic care.” Marlaina Donato is a freelance writer, author and multimedia artist. Connect at MarlainaDonato.com.

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fermentation company.” Christopher explains that the combination of salt and shredded or chopped vegetables can launch the production of probiotic lactic acid bacteria that preserves the food and drives off “bad bacteria”. Jennifer McGruther, who lives in the Pacific Northwest, is the author of The Nourished Kitchen cookbook, an offshoot of her blog of the same name. Her first batch of fermented food was yogurt. Now she visits her local farmers’ market every Saturday before spending Sunday prepping foods for the rest of the week. “Traditional foods like fermented vegetables, yogurt or kombucha don’t take long to prepare; they take time to culture, but it’s so rewarding,” she says.

How Much Is Enough?

Fermented Foods Revival Rediscover Probiotic-Rich Foods by Judith Fertig

Colorful jars of fermented Korean kimchee, Indian chutney, German sauerkraut and bottles of kombucha line many grocery store shelves today. We’re in the midst of a fermented food revival.

Grassroots Groundswell

“I grew up in New York City as the grandson of immigrants from Belarus, and sauerkraut and pickles were common foods I always loved, but neither my grandparents nor anyone else I knew made them,” says Sandor Katz. This Woodbury, Tennessee, writer who travels the world giving related workshops is credited with bringing fermented foods back into the limelight. He explains, “I am self-taught and learned to ferment by experimentation. It was that first successful batch of sauerkraut that sparked my obses-

sion. I also love eating cheese, beer, chocolate, coffee, yogurt and many other products of fermentation.” Kirsten and Christopher Shockey, the authors of Fermented Vegetables: Creative Recipes for Fermenting 64 Vegetables & Herbs in Krauts, Kimchis, Brined Pickles, Chutneys, Relishes & Pastes, homestead in Oregon’s Jackson Valley. “A fateful Christmas gift—a ceramic crock full of bubbling, fermenting cabbage under the tree, funky fermenty smell and all,” first piqued their interest, Kirsten recalls. “Eventually, we started our own small farmstead

Natural Awakenings recommends using organic, non-GMO (genetically modified) and non-bromated ingredients whenever possible.

Fermented foods offer a variety of positive effects on health. “If you’re consuming a diet rich in fermented foods, you’re essentially bathing your GI tract in healthy, food-related organisms,” says food research scientist Robert Hutkins, Ph.D., a professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Fermented foods with live probiotics can also improve brain function, according to a study in the journal Gastroenterology. Fermented foods are meant to be eaten as condiments, not consumed in large quantities. Overdoing such intake might cause bloating, cramping and other digestion problems. Dr. Leonard Smith, a gastrointestinal and vascular surgeon and medical advisor for the University of Miami Department of Integrative Medicine, recommends “a half-cup of cultured vegetables or two ounces of your favorite probiotic liquid per day to start.” He says it’s possible to eventually work up to having a serving of cultured vegetables and probiotic liquids at every meal, or possibly as a between-meal snack. Christopher Shockey adds, “We don’t see these foods as a ‘medicine’ to be eaten daily because you have to force yourself; instead, we see it as a fun, delicious, easy, healthful addition to mealtime.” Judith Fertig writes cookbooks and foodie fiction from Overland Park, KS (JudithFertig.com).

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A Few Fermented Recipes to Start by Judith Fertig

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ermented foods are well known for building gut health. Now a growing body of research shows that they improve immunity, brain and heart functions,” says Michelle Schoffro Cook, Ph.D. The board-certified doctor of natural medicine, certified herbalist and author blogs from Vancouver, Canada. Get started with these simple, plant-based recipes from her latest book, The Cultured Cook: Delicious Fermented Foods with Probiotics to 1 radish, finely chopped Knock Out Inflammation, Boost Gut ½ small onion, finely chopped Health, Lose Weight & Extend Your Life. 1 turnip, chopped into ½-inch chunks 1 carrot, chopped into ½-inch chunks 3 small apples, chopped into Fermented Chopped ½-inch chunks Salad Handful of green beans, cut into 1-inch lengths Yields: about 6 cups 1 rutabaga, chopped into ½-inch chunks Unlike other salads, this version stores 1 to 2 grape leaves, kale leaves or other for many months in the fridge. Serve large leafy greens (optional) on its own or toss it in vinaigrette and 3 Tbsp unrefined fine or 6 Tbsp serve over brown rice for a quick and unrefined coarse sea salt nutritious rice bowl dinner. 1 quart (or liter) filtered water

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In a medium bowl, mix the radish, onion, turnip, carrot, apples, green beans and rutabaga; then transfer to a small crock. Place the grape leaves or other leafy greens on top of the chopped ingredients to help hold them under the brine; then weigh the mix down with food-safe weights or a jar or bowl of water. In a pitcher or large measuring cup, dissolve the salt in the water, stirring if necessary to dissolve the salt. Pour the brine over the salad, cover with a lid or cloth, and let ferment for one week. Remove the covering, weights and grape leaves or other leafy greens. Dish out into jars or a bowl, cover and refrigerate, where the salad should last six to 12 months. Recipes and photos are courtesy of Michelle Schoffro Cook and New World Library; visit DrMichelleCook.com.


Vegan Kefir Traditional kefir is made with cow’s milk, but can be made with plantbased milks like cashew, almond, sunflower seed or coconut. The sweetener feeds the kefir microbes, leaving minimal sugar in the end product. The grains will grow over time; only about one tablespoon of kefir grains is needed to keep the kefir going; remove the extras to eat, give to friends or add to compost. 1 quart (or liter) filtered water ½ cup raw, unsalted cashews 1 tsp coconut sugar, pure maple syrup or agave nectar 1 Tbsp kefir grains (a natural starter, available at health food stores and online) Mandarin sections for garnish (optional) Use a blender to blend the water, cashews and coconut sugar (or maple syrup or agave nectar) until it’s smooth and creamy. Pour the cashew milk into a 1½- to 2-quart glass jar, making sure it is less than two-thirds full. Add the kefir grains, stir and then place the cap on the jar. Leave the jar at room temperature for 24 to 48 hours, gently shaking it periodically. The cashew milk will become somewhat bubbly, then will begin to coagulate and separate; shake it to remix the kefir or scoop out the thicker curds and use them like soft cheese or sour cream. Refrigerate up to one week. When ready to serve, pour the kefir into a glass and garnish the rim with mandarin orange sections, if desired.

Digestion and the Five Senses From the Ayurvedic Perspective by Wendy Kendall

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igestion does not occur just in the stomach because of what we eat. In addition to food, we digest sensory information such as sound, image, touch and scent. The expression “that turns my stomach” is what someone might say after seeing, smelling, tasting, hearing or touching something they consider to be unpleasant. Although it is just an expression, according the principles of Ayurvedic medicine what we expose ourselves to, or “digest,” on a daily basis has an impact on how we feel physically and emotionally. Digestion is also one of the three pillars of life and is one of the focal points in Ayurveda. Consider how we might feel after seeing something violent on television or overhearing people argue. Our stomachs might tighten a bit, or we might feel a little bit anxious or edgy. Contrast that with how we can feel after seeing a beautiful sunset or eating some delicious and healthy food. A picturesque sunset can make us smile, and we feel nourished and satisfied after eating a good meal. Everything around us is taken in through smell, touch, taste, hearing and sight. Individuals who do not have all five senses might experience the world around them differently, and often times they are more sensitive to their environment. For these reasons and many more, we are not just what we eat, but also what we hear, touch, smell and see. According to Dr. Marc Halpern in his book Principals of Ayurvedic Medicine, digestion occurs through all five senses and that misuse of one or more of these senses is a contributing factor

of disease. While it is impossible to avoid completely all negativity, Ayurveda can bring awareness to what we digest on all levels. It can then help us learn more positive ways to use our senses and enhance overall health and well-being. Commonly referred to in Ayurveda as “five sense therapies” they include breathing techniques, meditation, yoga, color therapy, diet and more. Use of these therapies are employed to help us achieve better mind/body balance to enjoy greater health. An Ayurvedic Health Educator will always work with individuals to develop a plan specifically tailored to their needs. For those who experience bouts of indigestion, it could be related not just to what was eaten, but also what was seen on TV, listened to on the radio or through experiences from the day. Many of us do not think about how the world around us or how the one we create for ourselves impacts our minds and our bodies for better or worse. As we become more conscious of what we “digest,” we might naturally experience a desire to move away from previously indulgent food and activities. Perhaps one might think twice before watching that violent TV show or raising our voice in anger. Perfection and abstinence are not the goals, but, instead, awareness, understanding and a willingness to travel down the path are the objectives. Wendy Kendall is a Licensed Social Worker and Ayurvedic Health Educator with Ayurveda Wellness Ohio. For more information, call 614-893-6940 or visit AyurvedaWellnessOhio.com.

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calendarofevents NOTE: All calendar events must be received via email by the 13th of the month and adhere to our guidelines. Email Publisher@NACentralOhio.com for guidelines and to submit entries. No phone calls or faxes, please. Or visit NACentralOhio.com to submit online.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3 Tummy Time Series – (Series: 10/10, 10/17, 10/24) 9:30-10:15am. The Tummy Time Method Series is designed for newborns to pre-crawling babies. There are four classes in this series, and in each we will teach parents to engage with their babies in a relaxing way to promote more time on the belly. Led by Allyson Wessells, physical therapist and lactation consultant. Please bring a baby blanket. $45. Whole Yoga and Wellness, 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus. 614298-5437, Ext 207. WholeKidsPediatrics.com/ Yoga-and-Wellness. Infant Massage – (Series: 10/10, 10/17) 10:3011:15am. During this three-week series, we will talk about the basics of infant massage. Massage can assist with symptoms of colic, gas and constipation, as well as promote relaxation and improve sleep quality. Please bring a baby blanket. $35. Whole Yoga and Wellness, 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus. 614-298-5437, Ext 207. WholeKidsPediatrics.com/Yoga-and-Wellness.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5 Taste of Holistic: Aromatherapy and Hypnotherapy – 6:30-8pm. Aromatherapy is currently one of the fastest growing holistic health fields. Learn how aromatherapy works, how to choose quality oils, as well as the basic oils everyone should have. Also, learn why hypnosis is not mind control, but rather a way to learn how to control one’s own mind. We will discuss the power of the mind and how to use it to foster change and growth. Free. American Institute of Alternative Medicine, 6685 Doubletree Ave, Columbus. 614825-6255. AIAM.edu. Introduction: Living From the Intelligence of Your Heart – 7pm. This is a complimentary introduction to a new heart-focused class series. When we live from the intelligence of our heart, it leads to better health, happiness, inner ease and well-being. The six-week class begins October 12 and is facilitated by HeartMath Coach David Hulse. Free. 1550 Old Henderson Rd, Ste N160, Columbus. 614-928-3102. LightWithin.com.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6 Essential Oils Foundations – 6-7pm. Join us on the first Friday of each month for a session on essential oils as we cover one or two plants and learn about benefits, contraindications, chemistry and more. The October oil is Chamomile. Smell various brands and see the plant that produces the oil. Donation based. All Life Center, 123 Hyatts Rd, Delaware. 419-560-7100. Willowes. SkincareTherapy.net.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7 Basic Hypnosis Course – (Series: 10/8, 10/21, 10/22) 8am-5pm. Learn powerful and effective techniques to facilitate growth and change. Students will gain a solid foundation in basic

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hypnotherapy principles and techniques to achieve important goals, such as better memory, ending addictions, weight management, smoking cessation, sports performance and stress management. Instruction includes self-hypnosis training, how to teach self-hypnosis and how to conduct a pre-hypnosis interview. Passing a final exam is required to obtain 32 CE credit units. If enrollment requirement is not met, course is subject $320. American Institute of Alternative Medicine, 6685 Doubletree Ave, Columbus. 614825-6255. AIAM.edu. From Sabotage to Success – 9am-6pm. Based on the New York Times best-selling book Infinite Possibilities. Discover the “Secret Ninja Move” and other essential tools that can help create an achievable action plan. Do not settle for a life that is unsatisfactory. This course helps students understand how the mind and brain can work together to sabotage our best efforts or help us achieve success, how our beliefs and opinions shape the conditions that either help or hinder us, and our role in the manifestation process and how the Universe supports our intentions. Includes vegetarian lunch and snacks, as well as a comprehensive binder to help students stay on track with achieving goals. Instructor: Janie MacMillan. $279. The Reiki Center, 1540 W 5th Ave, Columbus. 614-486-8323. TheReikiCenter.net. Yoga for Back Pain and Spine Health – 10:3011:30am. This workshop is a gentle class with a focus on stretching and strengthening muscles in the back, abdomen and hips. We will improve flexibility and strength in these areas, as well as relieve and prevent back pain. Taught by Dhanu Sant, MD. As a physician and yoga teacher, Dr. Sant offers a unique perspective and will provide therapeutic yoga sequences for back pain. $25. Whole Yoga and Wellness, 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus. 614-298-5437, Ext 207. WholeKidsPediatrics.com/Yoga-and-Wellness.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 Reiki 2 Class – (Series: 10/15) 9am-5pm. This advanced reiki class significantly enhances the skills we discovered in the Reiki 1 class. Through four personalized, hands-on attunements we will further clear blockages and extend our connection to the life force energy. Our discussions will include how to develop intuitive abilities to sense blockages in self and others, as well as how to effectively connect with Guides for their assistance. Students will receive detailed instruction on how to work effectively with others. Learn how and when to use reiki symbols for maximum benefit, how to provide an effective distant healing treatment, and how to set up a professional practice, for those who have selected that career path. Discover how to realign body and spirit in an extensive Chakra Balancing Exercise. Includes course handouts, vegetarian luncheons and snacks, as well as ample practice time. Limited to eight students to provide maximum personalized instruction. Students who have not taken the Reiki 1 class at The Reiki Center must demonstrate competency and knowledge equivalent to the center’s classes. Instructor: Linda Haley, RMT, Director of The Reiki Center. $350. The Reiki Center, 1540 W 5th Ave, Columbus. 614-486-8323. TheReikiCenter.net. Yoga for Back Pain and Spine Health – 10:3011:30am. This workshop is a gentle class with a focus on stretching and strengthening muscles in the back, abdomen and hips. We will improve flexibility and strength in these areas, as well as relieve and prevent back pain. Taught by Dhanu Sant, MD. As a physician and yoga teacher, Dr. Sant offers a unique perspective and will provide therapeutic yoga sequences for back pain. $25. Whole Yoga and Wellness, 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus. 614-298-5437, Ext 207. WholeKidsPediatrics.com/Yoga-and-Wellness. Picky Eaters: Cooking Demo and Samples with Wellness Matters – 1-2pm. For those who have a picky eater at home. Receive advice and suggestions to help tackle the challenging job of getting a child to eat more healthy foods. Our integrative physician, Dhanu Sant, MD, will provide medical and nutrition advice as well as tips to help along the journey. $25. Whole Yoga and Wellness, 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus. 614-298-5437, Ext 207. WholeKidsPediatrics. com/Yoga-and-Wellness.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15

Discovering Your Psychic Self – (Series: 10/19, 10/26, 11/2, 11/9, 11/16) 6-9pm. Enjoy the experience and journey of discovering your own psychic gifts. Students will be empowered with tools to help expand their knowledge and spread their wings in a safe place. We will learn about psychics, mediums and empaths, chakras and their colors, the basic astrology signs and spirit guides, as well as how to connect with the soul and create an energetic shield for psychic protection. $350. The Reiki Center, 1540 W 5th Ave, Columbus. 614-486-8323. TheReikiCenter.net.

Ayurvedic Support for Menopause – 2-4pm. Gain Ayurvedic insight to help calm the chaos that often accompanies menopause. Understanding one’s constitution is the first step to managing the transition, as well as various lifestyle modifications that invite grace on the path to a new stage of life. We will cover several helpful mind-body techniques. $12 in advance, $15 at the door. $12 in advance, $15 at the door. The Mandala Center for the Movement Arts, 2965 Donnylane Blvd, Columbus. 614-369-0664. Pranamyra.com.

Living from the Intelligence of Your Heart – (Series: 10/19, 10/26, 11/2, 11/9, 11/16) 7pm. When we live from the intelligence of our heart, it leads to better health, happiness, inner ease and well-being. Led by HeartMath Coach David Hulse. $15 each class, or $60 for the entire series. 1550 Old Henderson Rd, Ste N160, Columbus. 614928-3102. LightWithin.com.

AIAM Open House – 5-7pm. Join us for an evening of fun. Guests will receive complimentary services, a chance to win a $60 gift card, clinic and program information, school and clinic tours, as well as activities and refreshments. Free. American Institute of Alternative Medicine, 6685 Doubletree Ave, Columbus. 614-825-6255. AIAM.edu.

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19 Taste of Holistic: Touch for Health and Guided Imagery – 6:30-8pm. In this introductory class, we will learn about muscle testing and how it can help, as well as what guided imagery is and how it can be useful for personal growth. Includes demonstrations. Free. American Institute of Alternative Medicine, 6685 Doubletree Ave, Columbus. 614-825-6255. AIAM.edu.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 Reiki 1 Class – (Series: 10/22) 9am-5pm. The Reiki Center is the only facility in Central Ohio to provide reiki training in the traditional method. The difference between traditional and modern reiki training is significant, as the traditional version provides a deeper understanding of the practice’s spiritual impact, including finding meaning and purpose. Learn how to identify and transmit healing energy to relieve a headache or an aching muscle without medication. Hands-on experiences will instruct how to feel energy and see its immediate impact on self, family, friends and pets. Course includes vegetarian lunches and snacks, as well as a binder of instruction materials and a certificate of completion. Maximum of eight students. Instructor: Linda Haley. $300. The Reiki Center, 1540 W 5th Ave, Columbus. 614-4868323. TheReikiCenter.net.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24 Back to Work Lactation Workshop – 10:3011:15am. In this workshop, we will discuss strategies for easing back into work, optimizing breastmilk production and how to maintain the mother/child breastfeeding relationship at home. Led by Allyson Wessells, a lactation consultant at Natural Nurturing and WholeKids Pediatrics. $5. Whole Yoga and Wellness, 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus. 614-298-5437, Ext 207. WholeKidsPediatrics.com/Yoga-and-Wellness.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27 Reiki 1 Class: Friday Night Series – (Series: 11/3, 11/10, 11/17) 6-9pm. The Reiki Center is the only facility in Central Ohio that provides reiki training in the traditional (original) method. The difference between traditional and modern (Western) reiki training is significant, as the original version provides more comprehensive training and a deeper understanding of the practice’s spiritual impact on life, including finding meaning and purpose. We will learn to identify and transmit healing energy to relieve a headache or an aching muscle without medication. Hands-on experiences will demonstrate how to feel energy and see its immediate impact on self, family, friends and pets. Instructor: LJ Groom. $300. The Reiki Center, 1540 W 5th Ave, Columbus. 614-486-8323. TheReikiCenter.net.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28 Nutrition and Yoga for Gut Health – 10:3011:30am. This workshop offers a nutritional and yoga program for balancing and healing digestive problems. Group yoga movements will be woven in throughout the presentation so that we are not sitting the entire time. No prior yoga experience is necessary, and mats are available as needed. Children over age 10 may attend, but must register separately. $25. Whole Yoga and Wellness, 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus. 614-298-5437, Ext 207. WholeKidsPediatrics. com/Yoga-and-Wellness.

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farmers’markets

Clintonville Farmers’ Market – 9am-Noon. A producer-only market, where everything for sale is grown or made by a local farmer or cottage food producer. 3535 N High St, Columbus. ClintonvilleFarmersMarket.org.

daily HTH Farm Market – See website for day-specific hours. Fresh seasonal produce, plants and mulch, locally-raised beef and chicken, plus specialty items such as brown eggs, jams, jellies, Amish cheese and pies. 2340 W Dublin-Granville Rd, Linworth. 614-266-9377. FarmersMarketColumbus.com.

tuesday Pearl Market – ENDS October 10. 10:30am1:30pm. This urban market delivers a merchant mix reflective of the rich cultural diversity of Central Ohio, including a wide array of locally-grown produce, hand-crafted merchandise and delicious food. 19 N Pearl St, Columbus. 614-591-4509. DowntownColumbus.com.

wednesday Outdoor Farm and Handcraft Market – 2-7pm. 508 N Cassady Ave, Bexley. 614-2523951. BexleyNaturalMarket.org.

thursday All Life Community Market – 4-7pm. Cooking demonstrations and locally grown fresh fruits and veggies. 5700 Columbus Pike, Lewis Center. 740-201-8242. AllLifeCommunity.org. Bexley Farmers’ Market – 4-7pm. Where farms meet Main Street. Local produce, meats and cheeses, children’s events, live music, food trucks. 2111 E Main St., Bexley. BexleyFarmers Market.org.

North Market Farmers’ Market – 8am-1pm. Central Ohio’s oldest farmers’ market, serving the community since 1876. 59 Spruce St, Columbus. 614-463-9664. NorthMarket.com.

Mount Vernon Farmer’s Market – 9am-Noon. 1 S Main St, Mount Vernon. Facebook.com/ MountVernonFarmersMarket

Plain City Farmers’ Market – ENDS October 5. 4:30-7pm. Fresh fruits and veggies, baked and canned goods, pet treats, plants and cut flowers, live music and activities for children and adults. 105 W Main St, Plain City. Facebook.com/ PlainCityFarmersMarket.

friday Pearl Market – ENDS October 13. 10:30am1:30pm. This urban market delivers a merchant mix reflective of the rich cultural diversity of Central Ohio, including a wide array of locally-grown produce, hand-crafted merchandise and delicious food. 19 N Pearl St, Columbus. 614-591-4509. DowntownColumbus.com.

Powell Chamber Farmers’ Market – 9am-Noon. Come support local vendors who produce homemade, home-baked, or homegrown items. 240 N Liberty St, Powell. 614-888-1090. Facebook.com/ PowellChamberFarmersMarket. Sunbury Farmers’ Market – ENDS October 14. 9am-Noon. Home grown and homemade products from local vendors. 39 E Granville St, Sunbury. 740965-2860. Facebook.com/SunburyFarmersMarket.

marketmilestones Congratulations to the following markets on their anniversaries of serving the Central Ohio community:

30 years

saturday

Worthington Farmers’ Market

Union County Farmers Market – ENDS October 14. 8-11am. Seasonal offerings of locally grown, raised, baked and made goods. 160 E 6th St, Marysville. 937-644-8530. UnionCountyFarmersMarket.com.

Pearl Market

Worthington Farmers’ Market – 8am-Noon. Central Ohio’s largest farmers market, boasting more than 70 vendors and offering locally grown seasonal fruits and vegetables, locally produced cheeses, jams, jellies, honey and maple syrup, high-quality cuts of meat from carefully raised farm animals, eggs from pastured chickens, flowers, herbs, plants, homemade soaps, and foodstuffs. 7227 N High St, Worthington. 614285-5341. WorthingtonFarmersMarket.com.

25 years 15 years

Clintonville Farmers’ Market

Only I can

change my life. No one can do it for me. ~Carol Burnett

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ongoingevents sunday tuesday Morning Hatha – 10-11am. It’s “Easy Like Sunday Morning.” Join Emily Dicken for a traditional Hatha yoga class with an emphasis on “workshopping” poses. Students are invited to problem solve, ask questions and listen to their body. We find new insights every week and grow together. $10. Body Wisdom Healing Group, 3001 Indianola Ave, Columbus. 614-784-9473. BWHG. net/Classes. Yoga Well Being – 10:30-11:45am. This class is based in the Hatha tradition. The moves are challenging, yet simple and accessible to all. Open to new and veteran students. Practice proper breathing and meditation in a warmed room. Yoga-Well-Being, 1510 Hess St, Columbus. 614432-7553. YWBYoga.com. Advanced Yingjie Tai Chi – 3-4pm. This Tai Chi style blends various martial arts into a philosophy designed to develop strength, relaxation, and self-defense. Positive energy for stress relief. $35/ session, $85/monthly. The Grey Budha, 400 West Rich St, Columbus. 614-975-7683. GreyBudha. Weebly.com.

monday Nia with Jill Riley-Hetterscheidt – 9:4510:45am. All fitness level can benefit from this mindful movement to an eclectic mix of music. We will use a variety of movements from sources including martial arts, dance arts, healing arts and our imaginations. Each class will set a focus and intention to enhance the experience. Nia is designed to be done in bare feet. Please wear clothes comfortable to move in. $10, with complimentary admission for Silver Sneakers members. The Mandala Center, 2965 Donnylane Blvd, Columbus. 614-638-5563. Slow Flow and Core Vinyasa Yoga Classes – 1011:15am. Join us for a nurturing, reflective practice to facilitate endurance, strength, tension release and self-awareness. Drop-ins welcome. Instructor Julia McSheffery. 10-class and unlimited passes available. $14 non-members, $12 members. Center for Wholeness, 4041 N High St, Ste 100, Columbus. 614-395-2900. ResourceYogaStudios.com. Beginner’s Tai Chi/Chi Gong – 5-6pm. Join Marya Barrios for this age-old Chinese system of slow, low-impact, meditative physical exercise designed for relaxation, improved balance and health. Often described as meditation in motion, tai chi involves a series of movements performed in a slow, focused manner, accompanied by deep breathing to enhance the mind-body connection. Suitable for all levels of fitness. $10. Body Wisdom Healing Group, 3001 Indianola Ave, Columbus. 614-784-9473. BWHG.net/Classes. Salty Yoga – 7-8pm. Relax and breathe in during a one-hour Slow Flow yoga class combined with salt inhalation therapy. Instructor: Kathy Morgan. $20. City Salt Spa, 218 W Main St, Plain City. 614-873-0072. CitySaltSpa.com.

Sunrise Meditation – 7-7:30am. Group meditation in the Dharma House studio, overlooking a wooded ravine. Suggested donation. Dharma House Columbus, 1970 W Dublin-Granville Rd, Worthington. 614-344-8409. DharmaHouseColumbus.com. Walk-In Psychic Clinic – Noon-5:30pm. A certified psychic medium will answer big questions in a private setting. For those need clarity in just one area, instead of a full reading, or for those looking to “dip a toe in,” this is an affordable way to meet those needs in a fifteen-minute reading. $32 credit card, $30 cash. All Life Community Center, 123 Hyatts Rd, Delaware. 614-905-1668. PsychicBarbaraWagner.com. Free Flow – 6-7pm. This upbeat vinyasa class begins with a slow warm up, then moves into a rhythmic and continuous flow, building lots of heat and momentum. Clear the mind, work the body and end in a relaxed state of calmness. Yoga-Well-Being, 1510 Hess St, Columbus. 614432-7553. YWBYoga.com. Gentle Yoga Class – 6:15-7:30pm. This class if perfect for beginners. It is slow-paced to release stress and gain flexibility, with modifications offered to make it a safe practice for all levels. $10. Center for Wholeness, 4041 N High St, Columbus. 614-398-0890. JoyfulLotusYoga.com. Salty Yoga – 6:30-7:30pm. Relax and breathe in during a one-hour Slow Flow yoga class combined with salt inhalation therapy. Instructor: Kathy Morgan. $20. City Salt Spa, 218 W Main St, Plain City. 614-873-0072. CitySaltSpa.com. Mellow Yoga – 7:15-8:15pm. This restorative class helps to limber up, expand a stiff back and defog a clouded mind. Yoga-Well-Being, 1510 Hess St, Columbus. 614-432-7553. YWBYoga.com.

core strength, body awareness, flexibility and breathing, as we nurture and grow mindfulness and self-esteem. Class will start with casual games to allow you to drop off your child between 5:15-5:30pm. $15 for an individual class, or a six-to-eight class pass for $10 per class. Whole Yoga and Wellness, 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus. 614-298-5437. WholeKidsPediatrics. com/Yoga-And-Wellness. Yoga Fundamentals – 6-7:15pm. Designed for those who might have difficulty using a yoga mat, this class is suitable for all levels of practice and includes standing poses and balances, plus work along a wall to lengthen and strengthen the body. Taught by Sipra Pimputkar. $15. Yoga-Well-Being, 1510 Hess St, Columbus. 614-432-7553. YWBYoga.com. Girls Yoga – 6:15-7pm. We empower the spirit of each individual girl as we stretch, breathe and have fun! We will focus on core strength, body awareness, flexibility and breathing as we nurture and grow mindfulness and self-esteem. Learning to let go and bring inward focus is a great tool to give your child early in life. $15 for an individual class, or a six-to-eight class pass for $10 per class. Whole Yoga and Wellness, 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus. 614-298-5437. WholeKidsPediatrics.com/Yoga-And-Wellness. Beginning Yingjie Tai Chi – 6:30-8pm. This Tai Chi style blends various martial arts into a philosophy designed to develop strength, relaxation, and self-defense. Positive energy for stress relief. $35/ session, $85/monthly. The Grey Budha, 400 West Rich St, Columbus. 614-975-7683. GreyBudha. Weebly.com. Turtle Flow Yoga – 6:35-7:35pm. Experience completeness by integrating breath and movement to create a powerful and stabilizing, yet delicate and meditative flow. The measured pace supports quality of breath, postural alignment, and awareness of the body and mind. Great for beginners to advanced yogis. $15. Arena District Athletic Club, 325 John H. McConnell Blvd, Ste 150, Columbus. 614-719-9616. MaggieFekete.com.

wednesday Sunrise Meditation – 7-7:30am. Group meditation in the Dharma House studio, overlooking a wooded ravine. Suggested donation. Dharma House Columbus, 1970 W Dublin-Granville Rd, Worthington. 614-344-8409. DharmaHouseColumbus.com. Salty Yoga – 9-10am. Relax and breathe in during a one-hour Slow Flow yoga class combined with salt inhalation therapy. Instructor: Lindsay Davis. $20. City Salt Spa, 218 W Main St, Plain City. 614-873-0072. CitySaltSpa.com. Slow Flow and Core Vinyasa Yoga Classes – 1011:15am. Join us for a nurturing, reflective practice to facilitate endurance, strength, tension release and self-awareness. Drop-ins welcome. Instructor Julia McSheffery. 10-class and unlimited passes available. $14 non-members, $12 members. Center for Wholeness, 4041 N High St, Ste 100, Columbus. 614-395-2900. ResourceYogaStudios.com. Boys Yoga – 5:15-6pm. Unwind with us as we balance out our boys’ over-active lifestyles with stretching, breathing and fun. We will focus on

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Evening Hatha – 6:30-7:30pm. Join Robyn Bragg for a sequenced and relaxing Hatha yoga practice. It will help students make it to the weekend. $10. Body Wisdom Healing Group, 3001 Indianola Ave, Columbus. 614-784-9473. BWHG.net/Classes. Yoga Talks – 7:30-8:30pm. Join us for open discussions about yoga poses, meditation, spirituality and philosophy. Free. Yoga Happiness Studio, 219 E Arcadia Ave, Columbus. 614-446-2091. YogaHappiness.us.

thursday Sunrise Meditation – 7-7:30am. Group meditation in the Dharma House studio, overlooking a wooded ravine. Suggested donation. Dharma House Columbus, 1970 W Dublin-Granville Rd, Worthington. 614-344-8409. DharmaHouseColumbus.com. Small Steps: Reflexology Walk-In Sessions – 2-6pm. Feet represent our understanding of ourselves, our lives and others. They are our foundation support throughout life. When we nurture and care for our feet, we allow ourselves to receive healing at the very roots of our being and open new ways of seeing the world. Reflexology uses acupressure on foot reflexes to release tension, increase circulation, revitalize an energetic flow and assist in connecting deeper to Earth. 15-minute mini reflexology sessions include use of the Richway Biomat, an FDA-approved medical device for relaxation. No appointment is necessary, as we schedule on a “first come, first served” basis. Fee based. All Life Community Center, 123 Hyatts Rd, Delaware. 614-905-1668. Facebook.com/ AllLifeCenter/Events.

Hatha Yoga with Eszter Gozon – 5:30-6:30pm. $10. The Mandala Center, 2965 Donnylane Blvd, Columbus. 614-369-0664. Kundalini Yoga with Sada Nam Singh – 7:309pm. This self-realization practice, originally taught by Yogi Bhajan, aims to help us overcome self-limitations of the mind, while releasing tension and blockages in the body, to realize our true blissful selves. We will detoxify our bodies and build the energetic centers, also known as chakras. Kundalini yoga involves periods of exertion designed to strengthen the body, mind, and willpower. We will balance our yoga with relaxation and meditation, as well as the accompaniment of spiritual music. All levels are welcome. Yoga-Well-Being, 1510 Hess St, Columbus. 614432-7553. YWBYoga.com. Columbus Threshold Choir Rehearsal – 7-8:30pm. For those who can carry a tune, and enjoy conveying kindness through singing. This all-female choir is dedicated to singing at the bedsides of those struggling between living and dying, in hospitals, hospices, extended care facilities and private residences in the Columbus metropolitan area. Free. Columbus Mennonite Church, 35 Oakland Park Ave, Columbus. 614-600-2460. Columbus@ThresholdChoir.org. ThresholdChoir. org/Columbus.

friday Sunrise Meditation – 7-7:30am. Group meditation in the Dharma House studio, overlooking a wooded ravine. Suggested donation. Dharma House Columbus, 1970 W Dublin-Granville Rd, Worthington. 614-344-8409. DharmaHouse Columbus.com. Slow Flow and Core Vinyasa Yoga Classes – 1011:15am. Join us for a nurturing, reflective practice to facilitate endurance, strength, tension release and self-awareness. Drop-ins welcome. Instructor Julia McSheffery. 10-class and unlimited passes available. $14 non-members, $12 members. Center for Wholeness, 4041 N High St, Ste 100, Columbus. 614-395-2900. ResourceYogaStudios.com. Beginner’s Mat Pilates – 5:45-6:45pm. Join Sonia Rinder for this popular mat Pilates class to produce positive change in the body. Students will improve flexibility, posture and core strength, as well as produce a more sculpted body in only one day each week. $10. Body Wisdom Healing Group, 3001 Indianola Ave, Columbus. 614-7849473. BWHG.net/Classes.

We travel initially to lose ourselves; and we travel next to find ourselves. ~Pico Iyer

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Dancing Mindfulness – 7:30-8:45pm. For beginners and experienced movers alike, this meditation and creative movement class explores the mindbody connection and mindfulness through dance. $10 suggested donation. Center for Wholeness, 4140 N High St, Ste 100, Columbus. 614-7848488. DancingMindfulness.com.

saturday Beginner’s Yoga with Troy Pyles – 8:30-9:30am. $10. The Mandala Center, 2965 Donnylane Blvd, Columbus. 614-369-0664. Yoga of 12-Step Recovery – 8:30-10am. This class is an open, inclusive group for anyone

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dealing with addictive behaviors in themselves or others. We start with 45 minutes of sharing, followed by a 45-minute yoga practice. All levels welcome. Free. Harmony Project Community Space, 773 E Long St, Columbus. 614-859-2376. ThrivingTreeYoga.com. Morning Hatha – 10-11am. Start the weekend off right with some yoga. Instructor Emily Dicken ensures students find postures that are accessible, comfortable and well aligned. $10. Body Wisdom Healing Group, 3001 Indianola Ave, Columbus. 614-784-9473. BWHG.net/Classes. Nia with Trish Riley Lyon – 10-11:15am. $10. The Mandala Center, 2965 Donnylane Blvd, Columbus. 513-373-5661. Mind Path Tai Chi and Qigong Foundation – 2-3:30pm. Join Don Gubbins for a complete study of the classic Yang-Style Taiji. Come learn this ancient Chinese form of exercise, which incorporates slow, natural movements and breath work to reduce stress, lower blood pressure and improve balance. Suitable for all levels of fitness. $14. Body Wisdom Healing Group, 3001 Indianola Ave, Columbus. 614-784-9473. BWHG.net/Classes.

classifieds Classified ads are $1 per word, per month. Minimum 25 words. To place a listing, email content to Publisher@ NACentralOhio.com. Submission deadline is the 15th of the month.

FOR SALE HYPERBARIC OXYGEN CHAMBER – Summit to Sea 40” diameter large-size unit. Purchased in 2016 for personal use. Minimally used, works like new. Includes homemade wooden stands to elevate tank for easy side access. Oxygen compressor not included, but comes with a port for hookup. Dual motors for quick inflation. Bidirectional zippers allow for self-directed use. Requires prescription or physician letter prior to purchase, due to classification as a medical device. Originally $11K, selling for $8K. 614-596-5312. DrJoe@wowway.com.

HELP WANTED THE ALL LIFE CENTER IS GROWING – We are looking for Administrative Assistants to join our expanding team. If you would like to be part of the All Life family, email your resume to contact@AllLifeCenter.org. INTEGRATIVE FAMILY MEDICINE CENTER – Seeking a Certified Nurse Practitioner (CNP) and doctor (MD or DO) with experience in integrative medicine to join a growing practice. 614-515-5244.

ORGANIC BEEF FOR SALE – Freezer beef, high in omega-3s. One-hundred percent grass fed, with no grain finishing. Economical, healthy, and raised at Pleasant Springs Farm, Mount Vernon. 740-4279001. OEFFA.org/userprofile.php?geg=1073.


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naturaldirectory Connecting you to the leaders in natural healthcare and green living in our community. To find out how you can be included in the Natural Directory email Publisher@NACentralOhio.com to request our media kit.

ALLERGY TESTING LEAVES OF LIFE – INTEGRATIVE WELLNESS CENTER 7720 Rivers Edge Dr, Ste 121, Columbus 614-888-HERB (4372) Info@LeavesOfLife.com LeavesOfLife.com

Leaves of Life focuses on helping clients achieve optimal health holistically, through individualized diet and lifestyle changes, targeted nutrition, detoxification, laser allergy immune conditioning, hormone balancing and energy work. Our approach empowers, educates and treats the patient, not the illness, by removing roadblocks to healing, addressing deficiencies and imbalances, and harmonizing the mind, body and spirit. See ad, page 25.

BIOFEEDBACK

CHIROPRACTIC BEECHER CHIROPRACTIC

Dr. Joseph Iuvara Dr. Benjamin Long Dr. Paul Valenti 428 Beecher Rd, Ste B, Gahanna 614-855-5533 BeecherChiro.com We l c o m e t o B e e c h e r Chiropractic and Wellness Center. Our goal is to help improve your health through complementary and integrative techniques designed to enrich and balance your everyday life. Our team of doctors and therapists have created a welcoming environment where each person is treated based on their own unique needs. Balancing all aspects of a person on an individual basis, and offering cutting-edge treatments that are only available in our center, sets us apart as Ohio’s foremost chiropractic and wellness center.

COLON HYDROTHERAPY

BRAINCORE THERAPY

Deb Wellmes, MA, CCC/SLP, ND Beecher Wellness Center 428 Beecher Rd, Ste B, Gahanna 614-855-5533 BrainCoreOhio@gmail.com BrainCoreOhio.com BrainCore Therapy™ provides a unique, drug-free approach to treating Brainwave Dysregulation, a condition brought about by tension on the nervous system from a variety of factors. Brainwave Dysregulation may be associated with several neurological conditions such as ADD/ ADHD, insomnia, panic attacks, autism, anxiety, memory loss, TBI, migraines and PTSD.

RADIANT LIVING

81 W Waterloo St, Canal Winchester 614-833-3884 3805 N High St, Ste 204, Columbus 614-369-1533 RadiantLivingByVickie.com Colon hydrotherapy is a safe, effective method of removing waste from the large intestine without the use of drugs. By introducing filtered and temperature-regulated water into the colon, the waste is softened and loosened, resulting in evacuation through natural elimination. A certified technician performs this process in a private, relaxing atmosphere on an FDA-approved closed system. See ad, page 23.

CRYOTHERAPY

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Central Ohio

OHIO CRYO

Upper Arlington - 1700 Zollinger Rd Ste 10, Columbus Dublin - 7501 Sawmill Rd, Ste 19, Dublin 614-768-2796 OhioCryo.com Cryotherapy is a noninvasive, three-minute exposure to -225°F nitrogen gas to trigger the body’s natural nervous system response to reduce muscle and joint inflammation, alleviate pain and decrease soreness. For those who suffer from inflammation caused by arthritis, muscle or joint damage, injury, surgery or nerve pain, cryotherapy can be a useful, natural modality to help alleviate painful symptoms. See ad, page 23.

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DENTISTRY DENTAL ALTERNATIVES

Dr. Richard DeLano, DDS, MS 150 E Wilson Bridge Rd, Ste 150, Worthington 614-888-0377 DentalAlternatives.net Dental Alternatives is the dental office of Richard M. DeLano III, DDS, MS. Dr. DeLano practices general dentistry with a holistic approach. He takes time with his patients to explain the choices they have concerning their oral health. Dental Alternatives is a mercury-safe and fluoride-free dental practice. Visit our website to learn more. See ad, page 20.

DIGESTIVE HEALTH ALTERNATIVE HEALTH OASIS

Kate Dixon, Loomis Digestive Specialist, CNHP, Certified Colon Hydrotherapist Dr. Michael H. Fritz, Chiropractor, Certified Applied Kinesiologist, Certified Microscopist, Naturopathic Doctor 10223 Sawmill Pkwy, Powell 614-717-9144 Info@AlternativeHealthOasis.com AlternativeHealthOasis.com Each year statistics show that more Americans complain of digestive pain. These discomforts are commonly attributed to symptoms such as: stomachache, allergies, skin problems, depression, anxiety, immune dysfunctions and diarrhea. They may also be related to chronic pain, bloating and cramps. We believe diet and digestion play a major role in the prevention and reversal of chronic degenerative disease. We objectively test and compare against our extensive patient history survey to determine which specific enzymes and nutrients are missing from the client, and then help bring the body back into balance.

EDUCATION AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE

6685 Doubletree Ave, Columbus 614-825-6255 AIAM.edu For the public, we offer affordable treatments at our community, intern, student and professional clinics. For prospective students, we offer community and continuing education classes and licensing programs in acupuncture, massage therapy and holistic wellness, as well as holistic practical and registered nursing. We are transforming health care holistically. Change your life today! See ad, page 18.


SIMPLY LIVING SUSTAINABLE U Sarah Edwards PO Box 82273, Columbus 614-447-0296 SEdwards@SimplyLiving.org Sustainable.SimplyLiving.org

We provide classes to train and educate people about sustainability topics and practices. Subjects include, but are not limited to, Food, Urban Homesteading, Health and Wellness, Green Building, Finance, Energy Solutions, Transportation and Economics. Visit our website for the current class schedule. See ad, page 21.

ESSENTIAL OILS DOTERRA ESSENTIAL OILS

Lori and Mark Vaas, Blue Diamond Wellness Advocates 614-681-4646 LoriVaas@gmail.com MydoTerra.com/LoriVaas Who is controlling your health care? Empower yourself with Nature’s medicine: essential oils! We will teach you how at our free classes. doTERRA is the only brand to be thirdparty certified as 100 percent pure and potent, and why it is currently being used in many hospitals, including locally at the OSU’s James Cancer Hospital. Email us for a current class schedule, or to schedule your free private consult. Also visit our Facebook page – Lori’s Essential Oil Well. See ad, page 9.

FENG SHUI FENG SHUI INSTITUTE OF AMERICA Connie Spruill, Owner/Director An International Feng Shui Certification School 614-325-5452 (cell) 614-837-8370 (school) FengShuiConnie@gmail.com Feng-Shui-Institute-Of-America.com

We enroll new students throughout the year for feng shui certification. Our program teaches a scientific and mindful approach, incorporating brain science and teaching only remedies that are backed up by science. We offer a proven business system training that guarantees new profit centers for your holistic practice. We are a Certified Gold School with the International Feng Shui Guild. Private feng shui consultations are available for residential and businesses. Continuing education courses can be customized for your industry. If you are not inclined to enroll in full certification, we offer a personal feng shui coaching course to apply to your own life. See ad, page 15.

HALOTHERAPY

INTEGRATIVE HEALTH

CITY SALT SPA

COLUMBUS INTEGRATIVE FAMILY MEDICINE CENTER

218 W Main St, Plain City 614-873-0072 CitySaltSpa.com Salt therapy is a drug-free, natural treatment for respiratory and skin ailments through salt inhalation. In addition to two adult salt therapy rooms, our family wellness center has a dedicated children’s salt therapy play room. Beyond providing salt therapy sessions, we also host Salty Yoga classes plus offer Salty Reiki and Salty Massage. We have a full line of Himalayan salt lamps and products, as wells as Young Living essential oils. See ad, page 31.

HEALTH EDUCATION PROJECT HEALTH COLUMBUS Nancy Downhour, B.S. Ed., C.N.C. 740-833-5650 ProjectHealthColumbus.com

This is NOT a diet program. Instead, it is an effective wellness program. INFLAMMATION is the underlying cause of each of the major metabolic diseases, including obesity, diabetes and hypertension. The Project Health curriculum provides a proven way to turn off inflammation through an individualized food plan, weekly online sessions packed with information on how to implement successful menus for the rest of your life, as well as the accountability to stay on track. We work with foods you can find at the grocery store, and you can even still enjoy eating out. Live a LONGER, BETTER LIFE. See ad, page 25.

HYPNOTHERAPY INTEGRATIVE HYPNOTHERAPY

TD Hickerson, Certified Hypnotherapist 77 E Wilson Bridge Rd #200, Worthington 614-304-1061 Info@Integrative-Hypnotherapy.com Integrative-Hypnotherapy.com At Integrative Hypnotherapy, we help our clients grow through the issues that kept them frustrated, worried and hurt. We help them find the relief they need, and build confidence, peace and ease into their daily lives. We do this by getting to the root of the matter (the thoughts and beliefs in the mind) and that is precisely why the changes stick. If you need some support in making a lasting positive change, schedule yourself a free phone consult today at In-Hyp.com/free, or call us at 614-304-1061. P.S. - We can help with a number of issues. See In-Hyp.com/155 for a list of some of the issues we work with. See ad, page 7.

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time. ~Andre Gide

Dr. Ruslana Kurpita, MD Melinda Skipper, CNP 453 Waterbury Ct, Gahanna 614-515-5244 CIFMCenter.com

If you are looking for integrative and holistic approach to your health care or are torn between recommendations from your regular primary care provider and alternative practitioners, not sure whose advice to follow and possibly self-doctoring, we are a place where both traditional medicine and evidence-based alternative approaches work together seamlessly. We provide holistic primary care for you and your family. We value comprehensive preventative care and work with chronic conditions such as fatigue, fibromyalgia, various hormonal imbalances, diabetes, high blood pressure and chronic GI issues. We take time to listen to your story, ask important questions, order the necessary tests and get to the bottom of the problem instead of just treating the symptoms. We work with many insurance companies. See ad, page 19.

THE ALL LIFE COMMUNITY FOR INTEGRATIVE WELL BEING 740-201-8242 AllLifeCommunity.org

The All Life Community is a nonprofit organization set up as a co-op, with over 170 members. Most members practice out of their own locations throughout Central Ohio, though some practice exclusively at our 24-acre facility. Please browse our website to see the many offerings from our wellness practitioners, artists, musicians, event planners and small business support professionals, as well as a host of resources for your home and family. See ad, page 11.

MASSAGE THERAPY PRANAMYRA

Eszter Gozon, LMT The Mandala Center for Movement Arts 2965 Donnylane Blvd, Columbus 614-369-0664 Pranamyra@gmail.com Pranamyra.com I provide massage therapy, Reiki and private yoga training to help you regain and maintain well-being. I am certified in neuromuscular therapy and incorporate techniques such as trigger point therapy, myofascial release and postural analysis into individualized treatment sessions. Personalized yoga training, by itself or as a complement to massage, can unify your goals for body and mind.

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MEDITATION OM2OHM WELLNESS STUDIO

Sheri Mollica-Rathburn, Owner, C.MI 324 W Case St, Powell 614-787-0583 Sheri@Om2Ohm.com Om2Ohm.com Om2Ohm will change the way you think about stress management. We offer Peace Management for individuals and groups, teaching management of daily peace as opposed to stress. Through Certified Meditation Instruction, Sound Healing, Chromotherapy, Mindfulness based guidance, Energy and Body Work we will transform and empower you. Allow yourself time for peace in our beautiful Om2Ohm wellness center, leave your worries at the door and enter into your “Om away from home”.

MUSIC INSTRUCTION WES MILLER MUSIC LESSONS 787 S State St, Westerville 614-323-7052 SaxophoneLessonsColumbus.com

Wes is a music teacher with 25 years of teaching experience. He creates custom-made lesson plans for students of all ages and abilities. In addition, students have the option of joining one of his in-house student groups to further apply what they are learning in their lessons. In addition to saxophone lessons, Wes provides instruction for other woodwinds and brass instruments. See ad, page 7.

NATURAL FOODS BEXLEY NATURAL MARKET

508 N Cassady Ave, Bexley 614-252-3951 BexleyNaturalMarket@yahoo.com BexleyNaturalMarket.org The Bexley Natural Market is a not-for-profit cooperative grocery store dedicated to providing food of the highest possible nutritional quality to our members and community. We provide many local and organic products, bulk foods, organic herbs and spices, as well as a vast array of vitamins and supplements to support the health of our customers. We like to support local businesses and farmers by being a space in which their products are available. See ad, page 33.

IT’S ALL NATURAL!

1360 Cherry Bottom Rd, Gahanna 614-476-6159 ItsAll-Natural.com It’s All Natural! is a prominent source of vegetarian and vegan products, offering organic, ecoconscious and down-to-earth items. Our mission is to promote a benevolent, eco-friendly and vegan lifestyle. We strive to be fertile ground where seeds of love can be planted to grow in health and harmony. See ad, page 15.

MOMENTUM98 NATURAL HEALTH STORE 3509 N High St, Columbus 614-262-7087 Moment98@aol.com Momentum98.com

We have been serving the holistic health needs of the Central Ohio community since January 1, 1980, selling products that uplift on all levels of existence. We carry raw foods and superfoods, herbal supplements and oxygen supplements, castor oil and essential oils, plus Chinese herbal tonics and shilajit. We also specialize in wellness and natural living accessories, including over 100 massage tools, magnets, color therapy glasses, coning candles, tuning forks, yoga supplies, hemp clothing, inversion and exercise machines, water purifying and energizing devices, plus foot detox ionizers. Stop by our store to experience five to ten minutes of the Relax far-infrared saunas and lamps, to detoxify, ease inflammation and pain, and invigorate the body. See ad, page 11.

RAISIN RACK NATURAL FOOD MARKET 2545 W Schrock Rd, Westerville 614-882-5886 RaisinRack.com

Raisin Rack offers a complete variety of organic groceries, including gluten-free foods, vegan and vegetarian products, and dairy-free items. Bulk grains, herbs, nuts and seeds accompany organic fruits and vegetables, as well as a complete selection of vitamins, minerals, herbals and other nutrients from leading national brands. See ad, page 31.

NATUROPATHY PHOENIX WELLNESS CENTER Dr. Trudy Pieper, ND Dr. Allison Engelbert, ND 10 S Main St, Johnstown 740-616-9949 PhoenixWellness4U.com

Drs. Trudy and Allison are board certified and accredited by the American Naturo-pathic Medical Association (ANMA), the oldest and largest professional naturopathic medical organization in the U.S. Dr. Trudy is author of Prevention is the Cure for Cancer and was awarded the ANMA 2014 Higher Achievement Award. Dr. Allison is a Master Herbalist and specializes in women’s wellness.

REAL ESTATE DUNIGAN REAL ESTATE GROUP Cindy Dunigan, Realtor 3500 N High St, Columbus 614-361-8400 Cindy.Dunigan@e-Merge.com CindyDunigan.com

There are only a handful of Realtors in the Central Ohio area that carry the National Association of Realtors GREEN designation, and Cindy Dunigan is one of them. She has taken the initiative to encourage the industry to produce more sustainable homes, and helps communities to reduce their consumption by implementing sustainable practices. Cindy is devoted to reducing her own footprint on the environment, and lives by her motto: “We can make a significant impact on the world around us one person at a time.”

SALON/SPA THE NATURAL NAIL SPA 8487 Sancus Blvd, Columbus 614-985-3205 TheNaturalNailSpa.com

Incorporating the most natural products and processes for manicure, pedicure and waxing, while maintaining the highest level of cleanliness and sterilization available. See ad, page 7.

Smile in the mirror. Do that every morning and you’ll start to see a big difference in your life.

We must be willing to let go of the life we planned so as to have the life that is waiting for us. ~Joseph Campbell 38

Central Ohio

NACentralOhio.com

~Yoko Ono


SOUND HEALING SOMAENERGETICS VIBRATIONAL ATTUNEMENT David Hulse, CVSMT 1550 Old Henderson Rd, Ste N160, Columbus 614-928-3102 SomaEnergetics.com

Let the stress melt away as sound therapy pioneer David Hulse bathes you in the soothing sound of the Solfeggio Tuning Forks. Tune into your higher self as David retrieves information for guidance and clarity during this accelerated time of change. Available in 30 or 60-minute sessions, by appointment only. See ad, page 21.

WELLNESS CENTER BODY WISDOM HEALING GROUP 3001 Indianola Ave, Columbus 614-784-9473 BWHG.net

For over 20 years, we have provided holistic wellness through therapeutic massage with a mind-body approach. We have recently expanded our services and now teach Healing Group, LLC movement classes such as 3001 Indianola Avenue Columbus, OH 43202 yoga, tai chi, dance and Pilates, as well as offer 614-784-9473 speakers, workshops and Ayurvedic nutritional counseling. See ad, page 31.

YOGA

THE REIKI CENTER

Linda Haley, RMT, Director 1540 W 5th Ave, Columbus 614-486-8323 TheReikiCenter.net

WHOLE YOGA AND WELLNESS

The Reiki Center is Central Ohio’s oldest and largest natural wellness center, plus the only center to offer Reiki classes in the traditional format. More than 20 services are available to meet your wellness, spiritual and emotional goals, including energy therapies, therapeutic bodywork, shamanic and intuitive services, as well as animal therapies. Open daily from 9am-9pm. See ad, page 19.

WILBRIDGE WELLNESS GROUP

Becky Appelfeller, MAT, CRS, BEP 614-515-3692 Pam Hatch, M.Ed. 614-338-5716 6797 N High St, Ste 221, Worthington WilbridgeWellness.com We offer life coaching, counseling and alternative therapy services to individuals, couples, families and groups. Becky practices a holistic wellness approach to healing and emotional health, drawing from an extensive training in Gestalt therapy, Neuro Emotional Technique (NET), Rubenfeld Synergy and integrative bioenergetic medicine. Pam’s specialties include Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) and hypnotherapy, as well as nutrition and lifestyle guidance for mental and emotional health, weight loss and management, plus support for depression and anxiety. See ad, page 21.

Jenni Endres, Studio Manager 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus 614-298-5437, Ext 207 WholeKidsPediatrics.com/Yoga-And-Wellness Whole Yoga and We l l n e s s i s committed to offering classes and workshops to prevent illness and promote wellness. Our programs support health from infancy to adulthood with lactation support, infant development, children’s yoga and therapeutic yoga for conditions such as back pain, asthma and emotional health. We focus on collaboration with community resources, such as the Scioto Trail, to offer unique programming for children and adults. See ad, page 10.

My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style. ~Maya Angelou

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Natural Awakenings Central Ohio - October 2017 issue  

Central Ohio edition of the free monthly national health/wellness and sustainability publication.