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HEALTHY

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Sharing Thanksgiving Ways to Focus on What Really Matters

How to Prevent, Manage and Reverse

Diabetes

November 2017 |

The Sound Good Reads of Silence for Kids Discover the Benefits of Quiet at a Silent Retreat

Advice for Parents From Award-Winners

Central Ohio Edition | NACentralOhio.com


letterfrompublisher Welcome to the November “Diabetes Prevention and Reversal/Silent Retreats” issue of Natural Awakenings Central Ohio.

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ne of my younger brothers is a Catholic priest stationed in Venezuela, a country where the social and political climate exacerbates a tragic economic recession. Given the emotional demands of his job, especially due to the setting, he periodically embarks on silent retreats whenever he returns to the United States. These solitary undertakings provide precious time for him to “recharge the batteries” and decompress from the daily stressors of continually providing solace and inspiration to the community where he lives and works. During these silent retreats, he lives in a modest cabin and eschews technology or any connection to the outside world. Living like a monk, this hermit-like approach serves to cleanse his cluttered mind from the feelings he harbors after immersion in the sights and sounds of a place filled with the harsh realities of malnutrition, inadequate medical care, crime and death. During his nearly weeklong solitude, he has ample time to process the interactions filling his mind with raw visuals and sensory overload. I can hear the change in his voice and see it in his demeanor when he emerges from his cocoon. While he is not necessarily a brand-new person, nor is his mind a blank slate, he does have renewed focus after accessing a framework providing him the time and setting to tamp down the complex interactions that amass through the course of his ministry. Technology provides a novel way to connect instantly and meaningfully with others; this is something that many of us crave, being the social creatures that we are. The drawback to this constant connection comes through always being “switched on.” There is a unique phenomenon experienced by cell phone users called “phantom vibration syndrome,” whereby a person falsely senses their device has vibrated due to an incoming text or call. Upon checking, however, they find that no activity has occurred. The collateral damage from being overly “plugged in” to the social media network is that we do not allow ourselves any structured “down time” to cleanse our minds from the deluge of information we encounter each day. One successful technique several friends of mine have used is to have a “technology-free weekend.” For those who cannot bear the thought of disconnection for two full days, maybe just start with either Saturday or Sunday. This is an excellent way to evaluate if personal technology usage is an addiction, or merely a distraction. From there, take steps to mitigate the issues by scheduling regular or temporary “unplugged” time.

contact us Publisher Sean Peterson Editor Jim Froehlich Design & Production Patrick Floresca Ad Design Charles Erickson Jenny Kline Ad Sales Liz Jaggers Franchise Sales Anna Romano 239-530-1377

Natural Awakenings Central Ohio PO Box 4056 Dublin, OH 43016 Phone: 614-427-3260 Fax: 614-455-0281 Publisher@NACentralOhio.com www.NACentralOhio.com © 2017 by Natural Awakenings. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reproduced and reprinted, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing. Natural Awakenings is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. It is available in selected stores, health and education centers, healing centers, public libraries and wherever free publications are generally seen. Please call to find a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business. We do not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the articles and advertisements, nor are we responsible for the products and services advertised. We welcome your ideas, articles and feedback.

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contents 8

6 newsbriefs 7 welldone 8 globalbriefs 10 healthbriefs

16 fitbody 18 greenliving 20 healthykids 22 inspiration

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24 healingways 26 consciouseating 29 naturalpet 30 wisewords 32 calendar 34 classifieds 36 naturaldirectory

advertising & submissions

Natural Awakenings is your guide to a healthier, more balanced life. In each issue readers find cutting-edge information on natural health, nutrition, fitness, personal growth, green living, creative expression and the products and services that support a healthy lifestyle.

12 HOW TO PREVENT, 12

MANAGE AND REVERSE DIABETES

by Linda Sechrist

16 FOUR WAYS TO FLEX MUSCLES

Passive, Static, Active and Dynamic Stretching by Marlaina Donato

18 CLEAN ENERGY FROM THE GROUND UP

Geothermal Offers Low-Cost Heating and Cooling by Jim Motavalli

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20 GOOD READS FOR KIDS Advice for Parents From Award-Winners by Randy Kambic

22 SHARING THANKSGIVING

HOW TO ADVERTISE To advertise with Natural Awakenings or request a media kit, please contact us at 614-427-3260 or email Publisher@NACentralOhio.com. Deadline for ads: the 17th of the month.

Ways to Focus on What Really Matters

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CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS Email Calendar Events to: Publisher@NACentralOhio.com or fax to 614-455-0281. Deadline for calendar: the 17th of the month. REGIONAL MARKETS Advertise your products or services in multiple markets! Natural Awakenings Publishing Corp. is a growing franchised family of locally owned magazines serving communities since 1994. To place your ad in other markets call 239-449-8309. For franchising opportunities call 239-530-1377 or visit NaturalAwakeningsMag.com.

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by Marlaina Donato

24 THE SOUND OF SILENCE Quiet at a Silent Retreat by April Thompson

26 HEALTHY HOLIDAY STUFFING RECIPES

New Twists on Old Favorites

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by Judith Fertig

29 FIRST AID

FOR DOGS

Seven Natural Home Remedies by Karen Becker

30 LISSA RANKIN ON

MOVING FROM FEAR TO FREEDOM by April Thompson

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newsbriefs All-Natural Pet Food and Accessories Store Opens in Worthington

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aurie Deerwester, a franchisee since 2016 for Pet Wants, a national home delivery service for healthy pet food founded in 2010, has expanded her Columbus business to a storefront location at the Sharon Square shopping center. In addition to high-quality food, she stocks the store with treats, natural chews, tough toys, dental products, supplements, CBD oils and organic spa products for pets and their owners. The store will also host dog and cat-related events throughout the year and work with local rescue organizations to provide added visibility for adoptable animals. The Pet Wants philosophy is to help pets live the longest, healthiest lives possible by feeding them healthy, fresh food. Their proprietary pet food is slow-cooked in small batches with fresh, high-quality ingredients such as salmon, chicken, lamb and brown rice. Their products also do not use sugar, fillers, animal byproducts, corn, wheat, soy or dyes, and can be formulated specially for animals with allergies. Location: 5594 N High St. For more information, call 614450-1929 or visit PetStoreColumbus.com.

If you are lucky enough to find a way of life you love, you have to find the courage to live it. ~John Irving Meet Your

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We invite you to join and experience a truly conscious, loving, dating environment with amazing members. Autumn is here; be proactive by joining today. Your natural match is waiting to meet you!

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Apothecary Closes Physical Location

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oline Apothecary has filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, citing common concerns facing small retail businesses, such as cashflow, excessive debt and low margins. The Columbus brick and mortar location at 15 West Dunedin Road will close soon, but owner Lily Kunning vows to continue to provide her products and herbalism classes for the Central Ohio community. The shop opened in 2013 as a resource to purchase bulk herbs, spices and essential oils, as well as a house line of remedies, body care and tonics made by Kunning, the shop herbalist. “I started my trade, hung up my shingle, and very soon the shop was buzzing with people wanting to learn about and consume herbs,” says Kunning. Boline won Columbus Monthly’s “Best of Columbus” in 2015. Kunning made it a priority to source locally grown herbs as much as possible, both to add revenue for small farmers and homesteaders, but also to help create a network of medical herb cultivation. While a court-appointed trustee has not yet set a final closing date for the shop, Kunning assures her customers that she will notify everyone as soon as she knows. Customers were notified by email and social media of the forthcoming closure, but Kunning assures them she and her remedies will still be available. “I want to assure folks that I am still an herbalist and will continue to make the products that they have come to depend upon,” says Kunning. “I will also continue to teach classes and workshops.” She also has plans to turn a negative situation into a positive opportunity. “My intention is to create a sliding scale holistic clinic that also features other types of practitioners,” says Kunning. “People can help me do that by supporting me on Patreon, continuing to buy my products, and by seeing me for consultations and classes.” “If enough people want to see a clinic happen and help me do that through Patreon, I will do the work to make it happen. My big concern about closing the shop is many people without access to money or insurance will go without remedies. I saw and gave away a lot of treatments to Columbus’ homeless population, the working poor and the uninsured. If the clinic happens, those folks won’t fall through the cracks,” says Kunning. For more information, visit LilyKunning.com or Patreon. com/LilyKunning.


welldone Local Holistic Health Community Outreach Program Receives National Acclaim

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he Stone Soup Project, a nonprofit branch of The Reiki Center in Columbus, was featured in the October 2017 issue of Alternative and Complementary Therapies, a national journal. The article commends the program for being a model for the delivery of holistic health services to underserved populations in the Central Ohio area. It explores how the project is a blueprint for other organizations interested in making free health services available to high-risk individuals in the community who might be unaware of holistic health care availability or who might not be able to otherwise afford it. Such treatments include massage therapy, reiki, emotional freedom technique, reflexology, The Trager Approach and CranioSacral Therapy. The group has provided these services at no cost to organizations serving veterans, the disabled, sex-trafficked women, the institutionalized elderly, Alzheimer’s caregivers and hospice staff, as well as service and rescued animals. “The current opioid crisis is a symptom of how people suffering from stress and pain in our community are not receiving access to non-pharmacological methods of pain and stress management,” notes The Reiki Center director Linda Haley, named Columbus Monthly’s Face of Natural Healing last year. “Additionally, health disparities make it unlikely that high risk groups can take advantage of the relief our practitioners provide.” Because of the group’s service ethic and in addition to the national recognition, local organization The Columbus Foundation recently gave the program their endorsement and added The Stone Soup Project to their “Giving Store.” Monetary donations to support the project’s ongoing work can be made at ColumbusFoundation.org. Those who would like to volunteer to provide such services, or receive any of these services for their local organization’s target population, should use the contact information provided below to reach out to the program directly. Location: 1540 W 5th Ave, Columbus. For more information, call 614-486-8323, email Linda Haley at Linda@ TheReikiCenter.net, or visit TheReikiCenter.net. See ad, page 15.

The most relaxing dental experience you will ever have. • Holistic approach to dental anxiety • Based on science & organic elements utilizing: Essential Oils, dimmed lighting, music, Touch Therapy on face and scalp, Sodalite stones placed on throat and third eye (to balance), warm blankets and hand mitts to comfort you

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Everyone deserves the comforts of the This is a free service with all dental treatments for those who choose it.

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Getting Greener

News and resources to inspire concerned citizens to work together in building a healthier, stronger society that benefits all.

Renewables Hit High Mark in UK

Wine Worry

Window Pain

Birds Die Flying Into Reflective Glass

For glyphosate-related consumer information, search Actions at MomsAcrossAmerica.com.

Landfill Eulogy

Landfills generate environmental problems such as the greenhouse gas methane that warms the atmosphere and toxic chemicals from household cleaning products that pollute soil and groundwater. Installations are smelly, noisy and can breed disease-transmitting vermin, as well as harm wildlife. Recycling helps cut the volume of waste, but the bulk of all trash continues to fill these dumps. Sweden produces about the same amount of waste as other European nations, but less than 1 percent of its household refuse ends up in landfills. Thirty-two waste-to-energy (WTE) plants that have been operating across the country for years incinerate more than 2 million tons of trash annually— almost 50 percent of all waste. The country still recycles, but anything else normally ends up in the WTE incinerators, creating steam to generate electricity distributed on the grid. This system heats close to a million homes and powers more than a quarter-million, thus reducing Sweden’s reliance on fossil fuels. Sweden also helps to clean up other countries in the European Union by importing their trash and burning it. Because specific products contain materials that cannot be recycled or incinerated, some landfills are still necessary. 8

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Yaniv Schwartz/Shutterstock.com

Sweden Dumps its Dumps

One night earlier this year, nearly 400 birds migrating north from Central and South America died in the midst of a storm from slamming into the 23-story American National Insurance Company skyscraper in Galveston, Texas. Among the victims were Nashville warblers, yellow warblers and ovenbirds. The American Bird Conservancy estimates as many as 1 billion birds die annually from colliding with glass in the U.S. as they see and therefore fly into the reflection of landscapes and the sky or inside vegetation. The exterior of the Galveston building, previously lit by large floodlights, is now illuminated only by green lights on its top level for air travel safety considerations. Other widely available means to protect birds include products to make residential and commercial windows less attractive to them. Specially placed tape or mullions creating stripes or patterns can help birds identify glass and avoid deadly crashes. Awnings, shutters and outside screens can also reduce bird collisions with buildings.

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Monsanto’s toxic Roundup herbicide glyphosate has been found in all 10 California vintages tested, including organic wines. While glyphosate isn’t sprayed directly onto grapes because it would kill the vines, it’s often used to spray the ground in the vineyard to be absorbed via the roots. Sometimes, glyphosate drifts from conventional vineyards into nearby organic and biodynamic vineyards. Other times, the toxin remains in the soil after a conventional farm has been converted to organic; the chemical may persist onsite for more than 20 years. Glyphosate is patented as an antibiotic. Designed to kill bacteria, it harms both soils and human health, and has been cited as a human carcinogen by the World Health Organization.

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Glyphosate Toxin Turns Up in Wines

In a major marker of renewable growth, sources of energy that includes wind, solar, hydro and wood pellet burning briefly generated more electricity—50.7 percent—than coal and gas in Great Britain for the first time on June 7. When nuclear sources are added, the number increased to 72.1 percent. Records for wind power are also being set across Northern Europe.

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globalbriefs


Get Outside oliveromg/Shutterstock.com

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Black Friday Alternative

Pedestrian Power

This year, all REI outdoor outfitter stores will close on Black Friday and join hundreds of national and local organizations and like-minded brands to ask, “Will You Go Out with Us?” For the third year, the REI #OptOutside initiative will mobilize Americans to firmly establish a new tradition of choosing trails over sales on Black Friday, including camping under the stars instead of camping out at malls. For helpful ideas, visit rei.com/ opt-outside.

Smart Street Lights Powered by Footsteps Conventional street lights collectively emit more than 100 million tons of carbon dioxide annually. The city of Las Vegas, a leader in municipal sustainability, has contracted with EnGoPlanet, a New York City clean tech startup, to install the world’s first Smart Street Lights powered by pedestrians’ footsteps via kinetic energy pads and solar energy. When someone steps on a kinetic tile, energy is created and goes directly to a battery. Petar Mirovic, CEO of EnGoPlanet, says, “Clean and free energy is all around us. Urban cities have to build the smart infrastructures of tomorrow that will be able to harvest all of that energy. This project is a small but important step in that direction.” Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman says, “Through our LEED-certified buildings, solar projects, water reclamation, alternative-fueled vehicles and sustainable streetlights, Las Vegas continues to lead the way.” The company also cites Smart Street Light projects in Chicago, Detroit, Auburn Hills (Michigan), Asbury Park (New Jersey) and at stadiums such as the Mercedes-Benz Superdome, in New Orleans. View an illustrative video at Tinyurl.com/SmartStreetLights. natural awakenings November 2017

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cientists from the Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, in Japan, examined the impact of a combination of acupuncture and traditional herbal medicine on the rate of delirium in cardiovascular patients admitted into an intensive care unit. Of the 59 patients studied, 29 were treated with conventional care and 30 were given the same care, plus herbal medicine three times a day and acupuncture once a day. In the treatment group, incidental rates of delirium were 6.6 percent, significantly lower than the 37.9 percent rate found in the control group. This group also required fewer sedative drugs traditionally used to combat aggressive behavior in delirious patients.

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Acupuncture and Herbs Ease Delirium in Patients

Overtime Hours Linked to Tooth Decay

TEETOTALERS ENJOY LESS HEART DISEASE In a meta-analysis of 45 research studies covering thousands of subjects led by Canada’s University of Victoria, in British Columbia, researchers found that former and occasional drinkers have a 45 percent increased risk of heart disease than non-drinkers. This discovery contradicts the widely held belief that occasional alcohol consumption reduces the risk of coronary heart disease. 10

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esearchers from the Tokyo Dental College, in Japan, have discovered a link between excessive overtime work and oral health by comparing overtime hours worked per month with the rate of untreated tooth decay. Of 951 financial workers studied, 13 percent of the men with no overtime hours reported tooth decay, while 19 percent of those working up to 45 hours of overtime per month did. This increased to 27 percent for those working 45 to 80 extra hours per month and exceeded 31 percent for those logging more than 80. Workers with the most overtime hours were more likely to list “too busy with work” as their reason for leaving decayed teeth untreated. The results came after adjusting for differences in age, education, smoking, snacking, dental visits and oral hygiene.

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Black Cumin Oil Helps Control Asthma

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igella sativa oil (NSO), commonly called black cumin, is used to treat a variety of inflammatory conditions. Researchers from University College London, in the UK, and King Abdulaziz University, in Saudi Arabia, studied the impact of this oil on patients with asthma. Scientists divided 80 asthmatics into two groups of 40. One group was treated with 500 milligrams of NSO twice a day for four weeks. The other was given a placebo. The researchers used an asthma control score to measure improvement, along with pulmonary function testing and the level of blood eosinophils, disease-fighting white blood cells that indicate inflammation and allergic reaction. The researchers found normal eosinophil levels and significant improvement in the average asthma control test score for those in the NSO group, plus improved pulmonary function, compared to the placebo group.

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healthbriefs


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esearchers from the Wake Forest School of Medicine, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, have found that aerobic exercise increases overall brain volume and gray matter, and helps improve brain function. Thirty-five adults with mild cognitive impairment were split into an aerobic group and a stretching group. The aerobic group participated in moderate-to-vigorous exercise four times per week for six months, while the others did stretching exercises at the same rate. The researchers used magnetic resolution imaging with each participant at the beginning of the study and after six months to determine potential changes in the brain. They found that both groups showed volume increases in gray matter regions linked to short-term memory, but the aerobic group displayed a larger preservation of overall brain volume. They also had greater improvements in cognitive function.

Cranberry Prebiotic Promotes Gut Health

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esearch from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, has found that the cell walls of cranberries contain xyloglucan, a complex sugar that feeds the beneficial, naturally occurring bifidobacteria, enhancing the body’s microbiome. “A lot of plant cell walls are indigestible, just like we can’t digest the special sugars found in xyloglucans,” explains nutritional microbiologist and researcher David Sela, Ph.D. “But when we eat cranberries, the xyloglucans enter our intestines, where beneficial bacteria can break them down into useful molecules and compounds.” Sela emphasizes the importance of prebiotics. “With probiotics, we are taking extra doses of beneficial bacteria that may or may not help our gut health,” he says. “But with prebiotics, we already know that we have the beneficial guys in our guts, so let’s feed them with more nutrients and things that they like.”

Onions Healthy for Heart and Kidneys

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cientists from the Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences and Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, both in Tehran, Iran, investigated the impact on leading diseases of regularly eating onion and garlic (both belonging to the genus Allium). Using data from more than 12,000 people for an average of six years, researchers assessed their onion and garlic consumption using a food frequency questionnaire and compared those measurements with blood pressure and incidences of both cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. The scientists discovered the subjects that ate more onion and garlic regularly had risk reductions of 64 percent in cardiovascular disease, 32 percent in chronic kidney disease and 25 percent in hypertension compared to those that ate less of them.

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Nejron Photo/Shutterstock.com Maks Narodenko /Shutterstock.com

Aerobics Improve Brain Function


How to Prevent, Manage and Reverse Diabetes by Linda Sechrist

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ore health practitioners today are recognizing both the mind-body connection, as well as energetic and metaphysical insights into preventing and reversing illnesses. As a result, those facing diabetes and other health challenges are accessing contemporary resources such as Louise L. Hay’s explanation of the emotional roots of disease in You Can Heal Your Life, and the medical science and natural methods explained by health researcher and author Gary Null, Ph.D., in No More Diabetes: A Complete Guide to Preventing, Treating, and Overcoming Diabetes. Applying a “both” rather than an “either” approach illuminates the importance of recognizing the ways our thoughts, emotions and lifestyle choices can impact chronic illness and long-term health.

Two Perspectives

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Hay suggests that this metabolic disorder may be rooted in a feeling of being deprived of life’s sweetness and longing for what might have been, accompanied by a great need to control deep sorrow. Such chronic unease can show up as Type 1, or insulin-dependent, diabetes; Type 2, or non-insulin-dependent diabetes; latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), a slowly progressing variation of Type 1; or gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy. Eavesdropping on our repetitive inner mind chatter and observing its impact on outer experiences can reveal faulty thinking that disrupts the mind-body connection. Hay, a firm believer in the power of affirmations to send a message to the subconscious mind, recommends them to aid healing. For diabetes, she suggests, “This moment is filled

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with joy. I now choose to experience the sweetness of today.” Null cites medical evidence that explains how the physical causes of diabetes are related to the pancreatic production of the hormone insulin and the body’s use of it, together with rollercoaster blood sugar levels determined by food selections, stress, sleeplessness, insufficient rest and lack of exercise. His approach for preventing, reversing or managing this debilitating condition is to raise awareness of the physical, behavioral and mental causes that lead to its emergence, and making healthy lifestyle choices that regulate blood sugar levels.

Naturally Control Blood Sugar

Glucose, the human body’s key source of cellular energy, is the end product of the digestive system breaking down carbohydrates, proteins and fats for absorption in the intestines. From there, it passes into the bloodstream. Glucose also supplies energy for the brain. Normal blood glucose levels vary throughout the day. For healthy individuals, a fasting blood sugar level upon awakening is less than 100 milligrams (mg) per deciliter (dl) of blood. Before meals, normal levels are 70 to 99 mg/dl; otherwise, 100 to 125. Consistent readings above 126 indicate that lifestyle changes are needed to avoid eventual progression into full

cholesterol are important measures of heart health. Triglyceride levels of 150 mg/dl in fasting blood is a risk factor for a stroke or heart attack.”

Early Heads-Up

Type 2 diabetes. When there’s an inability to efficiently transport glucose from the blood into cells, cells don’t receive the energy they need to function properly. “Elevated glucose levels contribute to blood vessel damage, high blood pressure and inflammation among other issues. High glucose causes insulin levels to spike in an effort to draw the glucose into cells. This stresses the pancreas and causes a sugar crash, called hypoglycemia, which can lead individuals to make impulsive, poor food choices,” advises Marcy Kirshenbaum, a board-certified clinical nutritionist and owner of Enhance Nutrition, in Northbrook, Illinois. She notes, “Elevated sugar and insulin levels raise triglycerides, a fat that circulates in the blood, and cholesterol, specifically the LDL (low-density lipoprotein) levels. Triglycerides and

According to the American Diabetes Association, 8.1 million of the 29.1 million individuals diagnosed with diabetes were previously unaware of any early symptoms such as dry mouth, excessive thirst, frequent urination, constant hunger (even after meals), unusual weight gain or loss and lack of energy. “Many individuals only learn of their condition from a doctor-ordered routine blood test such as the A1C glycated hemoglobin procedure, which reads blood sugar levels over a three-month period,” advises Dr. Nancy Iankowitz, a board-certified family nurse practitioner and founding director of Holistic and Integrative Healing, in Holmes, New York. Individuals that consume large amounts of simple carbohydrates and sugars, are overweight or are exceedingly sedentary and eat unhealthy processed foods, have a higher risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. Iankowitz’s effective, patientcentered practice follows a practical, four-month healing plan that includes tracking foods, moods, blood pressure, sleeping habits and exercise, all necessary to manage or reverse Type 2 diabetes.

Sustainable.SimplyLiving.org

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Effective Diet Choices

Making the highest-impact food choices is critical in the earliest stages of diabetes. That’s why nutritionist and holistic integrative health practitioner Saskia Kleinert, an independent practitioner who also serves as director of the Emeryville Health & Wellness Center, in California, helps patients integrate dietary changes into everyday life. “Patient education includes the necessity of eating low-glycemic index foods and reducing blood glucose levels, while increasing healthy fats with nuts, avocado and olive oil,”

advises Kleinert. She notes that antioxidant-rich plant foods are another key component of an effective dietary plan for all age groups. The role of exercise is also vital for those needing to reverse pre-diabetes or managing diabetes aided by insulin injections. “Exercise increases the muscle cell’s demand for glucose, moving it out of the blood into muscle cells that use it as fuel, and so lowering insulin levels,” explains Jamie Coughlan, a naturopathic doctor who practices in Pleasanton and Pleasant Hill, California.

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Dr. Angelo Baccellieri, owner of Westchester Wellness Medicine, in Harrison, New York, introduces patients to intermittent fasting, an eating pattern that helps treat insulin resistance and control blood sugar. “The concept is predicated on going 14 to 16 hours without food, replicating how our primitive ancestors ate. They feasted when food was available and fasted during famines, sometimes going several days without eating,” advises Baccellieri, who notes that intermittent fasting can be done one day a week. “Our biochemistry actually does very well with this approach, which isn’t hard to do when your last meal is at 7 p.m. and you skip breakfast and delay lunch the next day until 1 p.m. You can drink water with lemon, teas and black coffee throughout. By 1 p.m., the body has been 18 hours without protein and carbohydrates, allowing insulin levels to remain at a low level. Excess insulin from too much sugar shifts the body into a storage mode. Having no sugar stores available, the body can then switch into a ketogenic state that allows the body to burn fat for fuel,” explains Baccellieri. Herbs such as turmeric reduce inflammation. Berberine can help cells use glucose efficiently. Supplements such as vitamin C, B-complex, resveratrol and pycnogenol (pine bark extract) can raise antioxidant levels, in which most pre-diabetic and diabetic individuals are deficient, according to a study published in PubMed. Cautious health professionals tailor supplement recommendations to each patient.

Helpful Weight Loss

In The Diabetes Breakthrough, based on a scientifically tested way to reverse diabetes through weight loss, Dr. Osama Hamdy and Sheri R. Colberg, Ph.D., explain a home-based version of the 12-week Why WAIT (Weight Achievement and Intensive Treatment) program offered at the Joslin Diabetes Center, affiliated with Harvard Medical School, in Boston. WAIT allows participants to reach their weight and blood glucose goals, along with improvements in blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and liver and kidney function.


Nourishing myself is a joyful experience, and I am worth the time spent on my healing. ~Louise L. Hay The program’s success is due to doable increases in exercising that put greater emphasis on strengthening muscles; effective ways to change bad habits; successful portion control; healthy alternatives to favorite foods; carbohydrate counting; and meals composed of the right balance of complex carbohydrates and antioxidant-rich plant foods, protein and fat, all to achieve optimum body weight and diabetes control.

No Quick Fix

Restoration of health begins with the most important lifestyle changes. n Replace processed and sugary foods in meals and snacks with nutrient dense, whole foods. n Determine possible food sensitivities with an elimination diet. n Eat some protein with every meal. n Eliminate environmental toxins. n Perform some form of cardiovascular exercise and resistance training at least three to five times a week. n Add stress-relieving practices such as yoga, tai chi or qigong. According to Hamdy, “On average, diabetes has the potential to rob you of more than 12 years of life, while dramatically reducing the quality of life for more than 20 years through chronic pain, loss of mobility, blindness, chronic dialysis and heart disease.” Such serious consequences also include stroke, hearing impairment and Alzheimer’s, he adds. All provide good reasons to live responsibly every day, cherishing long-term goals of laying claim to the best possible health. Linda Sechrist is a senior staff writer for Natural Awakenings. Connect at LindaSechrist.com. natural awakenings November 2017

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fitbody

Four Ways to Flex Muscles

Passive, Static, Active and Dynamic Stretching hether working out at the gym or taking to the trails, stretching is sometimes an overlooked asset to any exercise regimen. Eliminating stretches or not doing them properly increases the risk of injury and deprives muscles of what they need for optimum performance. “Just because you are in shape doesn’t always mean you have good flexibility,” notes LaReine Chabut, a Los Angeles fitness expert and author of Stretching for Dummies. “If you do plenty of strength training and cardio, but you don’t do any stretching, you’re creating an imbalance in your body. Flexibility plays a big part in overall fitness.” Loosening up correctly not only fosters flexibility, but also improves muscle endurance and coordination. “Everyone should be stretching, especially as you age, to maintain range of motion and balance,” advises fitness trainer Ben Wegman, of The Fhitting Room, in New York City. “A personal workout regime can be enhanced with stretching, which also increases mobility, improves posture and performance, and reduces stress levels.”

Four Categories, Many Variations “Different types of stretches access different muscles 16

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and different types of flexibility, but together, can benefit everyone,” says Wegman. There are many ways to stretch, but knowing what to do and when to do it can be key to optimum results and injury prevention. Warming up to different types of stretches can be a little daunting, but the basic four (sometimes combined in terminology) are passive, static, active and dynamic. In the past, ballistic stretching was common and included potentially harmful bouncing techniques, but today dynamic stretching has become a favorite among trainers, consisting of specific, controlled movements that prepare the body for the demands of both engaging in sports and an average workout. “Stretches can be confusing, so as a rule of thumb, I suggest dynamic stretching for any workout that involves movement and passive stretching for cooling down after a workout to release the muscles,” says Chabut. Stretching also plays an important role in yoga, which generally complements different stretches by adding a mind-body connection. “Breath is the key difference between yoga and regular stretching,” notes Chabut. “The use of breath allows you to get deeper into the muscle. Yoga also places particular emphasis on

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by Marlaina Donato


core muscles: the abdominals, lower back and spinal muscles. Through focus and deep breathing, yoga allows you to move beyond stretching into a deeper physical experience that both strengthens and focuses your body.”

an injured muscle or stretch too forcefully. “Introduce low-intensity stretching back into a regime only under a doctor’s supervision,” she cautions.

Injury Prevention and Recovery

For Chabut, moderation is everything. “Gently warm up the body before moving into deeper stretches. Build heat in the muscles slowly to avoid potential injury,” she advises. Proper stretching is beneficial, but not doing so can foster bad habits and cause muscle or tendon tears. “Stretching cold muscles or using improper techniques such as bouncing when holding a stretch position are common mistakes,” observes Whelan. Stretching doesn’t have to be reserved for workouts, and with a little discipline, its benefits can easily be attained at home or the office. “Take 10 minutes during your favorite TV program and perform a couple of stretches,” suggests Wegman. “Make it a point to get up every half-hour and stretch for five minutes before resuming work. If you aren’t being pushed or pushing yourself, you won’t see results or make improvements. If it doesn’t challenge you, it doesn’t change you.”

Nancy Whelan, a physical therapist and owner of The Physical Therapy Center, in West Palm Beach, Florida, emphasizes the importance of proper technique for clients to avoid further injury, especially individuals that had a torn Achilles tendon. “Stretching is important when doing any exercise, and especially important following surgery or injury, because the body’s reaction to either one is to contract, which can cause secondary problems,” explains Whelan. “I think the body has an intelligence we must listen to. We must acknowledge our limitations and the signals our body sends us to let us know that something is harmful or painful,” she notes. “When you take responsibility to take care of your body, it will take care of you.” For injury prevention, dynamic stretching offers many benefits. “It’s the best because it ensures that all major joints have full range of motion and sufficient muscle length,” says Wegman. She advises never to stretch

Daily Moderation

Marlaina Donato is a freelance writer, author and multimedia artist. Connect at MarlainaDonato.com.

Stretching Guide at a Glance

Benefit: Increases flexibility in the muscles being stretched and increases strength in the opposing muscles.

STATIC What it is: Hold a stretch in a challenging, but not painful position, for 10 to 30 seconds until feeling discomfort; once this is felt, the muscle then releases and relaxes.

PASSIVE What it is: Employ an outside force such as a stretching device, strap or another’s body weight such as a trainer, physical therapist or massage therapist, which assists the stretch while the individual remains passive. The targeted muscles are not actively engaged. Examples include post-workout stretches applying pressure with a body part, towel or other prop or piece of equipment.

Benefit: Improves flexibility. ACTIVE (aka Static Active) What it is: Engage and contract the muscle group opposite the one being stretched to initiate the stretch; repeat. Many yoga poses are examples of active stretching.

Benefit: Increases range of motion, decreases muscle tension (spasm)

Helpful Resources BOOKS Dynamic Stretching: The Revolutionary New Warm-Up Method to Improve Power, Performance and Range of Motion, by Mark Kovacs Dynamic Stretching vs. Static Stretching and Their Benefits, by Jack Cascio Exercise Balls for Dummies (including safe stretches for pregnant woman) and Stretching for Dummies, both by LeReine Chabut Stretching: 20 Simple Stretching Techniques to Relieve Pain and Increase Flexibility, by Neb Notliar ONLINE VIDEOS BlackBeltWiki.com/stretching (range of stretches specific to martial arts styles and body parts) DoYogaWithMe.com/yoga-beginners (free yoga videos for all levels) ElderGym.com/elderly-flexibility (highly detailed instruction tailored to seniors) Essentrics.com/media.html (videos from the PBS series Classical Stretch) StretchCoach.com/resources/ stretching-videos (instruction specific to sports and muscle groups) StudioSweatOnDemand.com/classes/ feature/good-for-beginners (select stretching videos)

and reduces post-workout soreness and fatigue. DYNAMIC What it is: Use controlled, gradual movements and stretches that involve repeated range of motion moves, especially in relation to a specific activity or sport that will follow the warm-up. Benefit: Prepares the body for activity and warms the muscles; especially advantageous after static stretches. Builds strength. Primary sources: Fitness Science; Scott White, a power trainer in Scottsdale, AZ.

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greenliving

Clean Energy From the Ground Up Geothermal Offers LowCost Heating and Cooling

by Jim Motavalli t’s an uncertain time for home-based geothermal heating and cooling, which has been increasing for years. The good news is that the cost of the technology is down and its efficiency is up. Yet a helpful 30 percent federal income tax credit inaugurated in 2009 disappeared in 2017 and may not get renewed anytime soon, even though H.R. 1090, a bill aimed at restoring the credit, has had strong support in Congress, led by New York Republican Congressman Tom Reed. While ideal spots for tapping into Earth’s energy are where tectonic plates meet and move, such as along the U.S. West Coast and in Alaska, it’s a misperception that it’s only possible in corresponding states. Anyone in the U.S. can use a geothermal heat pump, which works by accessing the constant 50-degree temperature just below the Earth’s surface. Iceland is equipped to get 50 percent of its energy from geothermal. Other countries now accessing it for at least 15 percent of their energy include Costa Rica, El Salvador, Kenya and the Philippines.

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How It Works The systems work by moving water through plastic pipes sunk into the ground, and using a heat exchanger to warm or cool refrigerant that then circulates throughout the house. Operating like a conventional heat pump, it needs less than half as much energy—just one kilowatt-hour of electricity—to produce 12,000 BTU (British thermal units, a standard energy measure). Its efficiency is double that of the best air conditioner and 50 percent superior to the best natural gas furnace, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. Planet-friendly geothermal energy emits no pollution and reduces the need for fossil fuels.

Return on Investment While they can cost $20,000 to $25,000 for an average-sized home, the systems are long-lasting; most provide a 10-year or longer warranty, based on having few moving parts that may break. The above-ground compressor and pump have a 20-year life expectancy and the expensive underground piping system should last a lifetime, says Brian Clark Howard, a National Geographic editor and co-author of Geothermal HVAC [heating, ventilation and air conditioning]. “Once the wells are dug and the loops are in, you’ll probably never have to revisit them.” According to Ryan Dougherty, chief operating officer of the Geothermal Exchange Organization, which represents manufacturers and installers, a typical home system costs approximately $24,000 installed, including the ground heat exchanger and all necessary ductwork. Renewable energy often makes sense without subsidies. Dougherty still sees geothermal as a good deal for homeowners, with a payback period of seven to 10 years. Dale Binkley of Landenberg, Pennsylvania, installed his home’s geothermal heat pump in 2006, before the 30 percent federal tax credit took effect. His out-of-pocket cost was $23,522, with a small federal credit and modest rebate from the local utility. Binkley is pleased. “The system is easy to maintain, cost efficient, and

works well. It heats and cools better than I thought it would,” he says. Binkley saved $1,000 on his heating and cooling bill the first year, a savings he continues to enjoy every year.

Thanks & Giving Season

Added Benefits “You’ll gain outstanding temperature and humidity control, plus a better running, more-efficient HVAC system,” Howard says. “Installing geothermal will also increase property values.” Institutional customers reap comparable benefits. As a tax-exempt entity, the Cozy Green Library, in Darien, Connecticut, uses geothermal heating and cooling, along with energy-efficient computers, LED light bulbs and storm water biofiltration. Carefully evaluating options allows homeowners and commercial landlords to make an informed decision about tapping into Earth’s free energy. Jim Motavalli, of Fairfield, CT, is an author, freelance journalist and speaker specializing in clean automotive and other environmental topics. Connect at JimMotavalli.com.

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healthykids

Good Reads for Kids

Advice for Parents From Award-Winners by Randy Kambic

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hile kids may list movies, video games, music downloads and other media featuring their favorite athlete, actor or music star as priority holiday gifts, books will expand their thoughts, curiosity and dreams by exposing them to a different set of role models and aspirations. Reading takes kids away from tech screens and expands horizons in ways that can improve their school grades, maturity and overall inquisitiveness. Many wise-hearted parents are recognizing the benefits, as children’s book sales were up 5 percent in the 12-month period ending in mid-October 2016, according to the American Booksellers Association.

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Humor, fantasy and magic, classics, nonfiction, time travel and participatory activities rank among the most popular topics.

Award-Winners’ Advice

“Children can’t be what they can’t see,” says author Laurie Lawlor, of Evanston, Illinois. Her 2017 book Super Women: Six Scientists that Changed the World—a nonfiction account designed to excite kids 8 and up about math, science and engineering—cultivates positive role models via inspirational personal stories. She points out that most of those depicted were not that well known, and therefore can be emulated and more readily related to.

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One of these is Katherine Coleman Johnson, a black National Aeronautics and Space Administration research mathematician and physicist, portrayed in the recent film Hidden Figures. Marine scientist Eugenie Clark, known as the “shark lady” for her daring underwater research, and major pioneers in cartography, archaeology and other fields also stir inquiring minds. “I wanted to provide a variety of fields, backgrounds and ethnicities,” remarks Lawlor. “They were all determined, very smart and persistent, and made strides in opening doors for women.” Lawlor’s 2012 children’s book Rachel Carson and Her Book That Changed The World describes how Carson’s seminal 1962 book Silent Spring helped spawn the conservation and pro-environment movement by chronicling the dangers of pollution. Children’s fascination with nature and wildlife can also be met through the Dog and Bear series by Laura Vaccaro Seeger, out of Long Island, New York, and Vermonter Jim Arnosky’s scientifically sound wildlife chronicles (JimArnosky.com). Kelly Barnhill, of Minneapolis, whose latest work is The Girl Who Drank the Moon, characterizes children as quiet, yet highly active when reading. “They are encountering characters and then building, inserting themselves and more information into the stories, making it more relevant to them,” she says. The former middle school language arts teacher advocates parental reading aloud with children. “Make it a daily practice of turning to a separate book from what they may be reading on their own. You’re helping


them develop cognitive structure by reinforcing and explaining. It’s a shared lens on life.”

Cultivate Reading 4 Know the child’s interests. “If

they like horses or birds, you’re certain to find great related books,” advises Lawlor.

4 Lead by example. “Seeing you reading or gardening or making things invites them to learn more about what they like,” says Lawlor. 4 Be flexible and share. There’s no

clear-cut time to transition from reading aloud to having a child do it on their own. Try taking turns reading a paragraph and then a page with them. “Women tend to read more than men, so get Dad involved, as well,” says Barnhill.

4 Access quantity. “Make many

books available to kids,” advises Barnhill. “They’ll enjoy having a choice.” Thrift stores are stocked with heavily discounted used books.

4 Empower them. The interactive, hands-on format of Ellen Sabin’s new The Imagine It Book allows children to “dive in and see how they can make

an impact, be innovative, play, fail and then succeed,” says Sabin. “Make them feel like they are ‘driving the bus.’” Welcoming diversity and providing a safe and reassuring community space for both confident and vulnerable youngsters, the American Library Association (ala.org) provides libraries with positive, unifying resources for children and families. They include a Storytime for Social Justice Kit; booklist for Hope and Inspiration storytime events; resource list on Talking to Kids about Racism and Justice for parents, caregivers and educators; and curated media list on immigration. The Barnes & Noble bookseller groups selected children’s books— including classics such as Dr. Seuss titles, poetry, nature, sports, history and science—in five age categories from newborn through teenage years. “It’s an amazing era for children’s books,” assesses Barnhill. “The success of the Harry Potter series reminded people that kids like real stories. There’s been a boom in creativity, vigor and technical skills in story construction.” Freelance writer and editor Randy Kambic, in Estero, FL, is a frequent contributor to Natural Awakenings.

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Books Expand Kids’ Horizons

aunched in April, Reading Without Walls (ReadingWithoutWalls.com) is a national initiative celebrating and encouraging reading, diversity and appreciation for those unlike ourselves. “We feel that this will change lives,” says Shaina Birkhead, strategic partnerships director with the Children’s Book Council, one of the program’s partner organizations. Under the program umbrella, libraries, bookshops, teachers, community youth groups and parents can host “challenge” events. An online guide includes tips on setting up displays and props; fun crafts and drawing activities; how to talk about reading; writing and design contests, word games and puzzles; and bookmark prizes. “Reading opens up minds and hearts to new people, places and things,” says Gene Luen Yang, a national ambassador of the program and author of the youthful tale American Born Chinese.

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inspiration

Athens, Ohio, author of Kindness is Contagious, observes, “We are literally created to be kind; it’s well known that feel-good endorphins are released when we do an act of kindness. I think we often hold back because we predetermine that our resources are limited. Know your talents and gifts, and build your acts of kindness accordingly.” Marlaina Donato is a freelance writer, author and multimedia artist (MarlainaDonato.com).

Feed Your Soul

Sharing Thanksgiving

Ways to Focus on What Really Matters by Marlaina Donato

n Revive a traditional weekly or monthly dinner with family or friends. n Whip up and enjoy a healthy dinner or dessert with someone not seen in a while.

Thanksgiving inspires a season of appreciation for what sustains us and gives meaning to life.

n Organize a healthy potluck using local ingredients and encourage invitees to bring someone that’s new to the group.

Share Good Food

n Choose a healthier version of a holiday favorite and print out the recipe for everyone at the event.

“I think true sustenance is when our hunger for connection and belonging meet,” says Sarah Ban Breathnach, the Los Angeles author of The Simple Abundance Journal of Gratitude. “When my daughter was small, we would purchase a complete Thanksgiving dinner for the local food pantry when we shopped for our own, saying, ‘One for us, one for them.’” Nourishment of our emotional and spiritual selves often begins with choosing simple, whole food. Rocco DiSpirito, a New York City celebrity chef and author of Rocco’s Healthy + Delicious, reminds us, “Eat real food! Return to the basics of eating what’s produced by Mother Nature. You’ll become a better partner, parent and person.” Cooking is more enjoyable when shared; beyond partaking together, partnering in meal preparation is a fun way to nurture bonds with others any time of the year.

Share Life’s Happiness Common interests lessen the chasm between our to-do lists and nurturing camaraderie. Anna Maria Caldara, of Bangor, Pennsylvania, has opened her 22

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doors for intimate community events through the years. “My former home, a converted church, was a perfect space for organizing and a way to give back,” says Caldara, who has hosted gatherings on local environmental issues, music performances, literary nights and annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. celebrations. Small living spaces can be just as welcoming and facilitate simple conversation, a valuable gesture. “The art of listening is such a beautiful, but rare act of kindness. I love technology, but there’s no denying that our devices have made us poor listeners,” says Michael J. Chase, of southern Maine, the founder of The Kindness Center, whose books include Am I Being Kind and Off: A Memoir of Darkness, a Manual of Hope. Each month, Chase makes it a point to visit friends and send some handwritten notes instead of using social media.

Practice Kindness Sharing our time or talent will be remembered long after the holiday feasting. Author Nicole J. Phillips, of

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n Fill a holiday basket with yummy and colorful edibles and drop it off at a local business or library to express appreciation. n Seek reconciliation by initiating a conversation with someone that may have been hurtful. n Explore ThePeoplesSupper.org to join or host a dinner to make new friends.

Offer Some Time n Offer to help clean up a friend’s yard or organize a closet or room in their house. n Host a children’s art party and donate their works to a local facility or shelter. n If in possession of a holistic, artful or practical skill, gift it. n Bring a pot of homemade soup to a friend or neighbor that’s under the weather. n Find ideas for random acts of kindness at Kindness.org.


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The Sound of Silence Discover the Benefits of Quiet at a Silent Retreat by April Thompson

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ndividuals seeking to escape life’s ceaseless distractions, deepen their personal spiritual practice, enhance well-being and gain fresh perspective, are patronizing silent retreats in rising numbers. “Retreats are a special opportunity to enter a healing space where your natural energy, insight, intelligence and wisdom can arise,” says Linda Mary Peacock, known as Thanissara, a former Buddhist nun, cofounder of South Africa’s Dharma-giri Hermitage and Outreach and a retreat leader at the Spirit Rock Insight Meditation Center, in Woodacre, California. Sheila Russ, of Richmond, Virginia, has participated in several retreats with silent components, hosted by spiritual traditions spanning Baptist to

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Benedictine. “People of different faiths all have the same need to reach inside and listen. If we don’t slow down and get quiet, we can’t hear what’s going on with us,” says Russ. “Spending time in contemplation is cleansing and freeing; I feel like mentally and spiritually I can breathe.”

Scientific Support

Attaining heightened well-being after a retreat may have a neurological basis, according to research from Thomas Jefferson University’s Marcus Institute of Integrative Health, in Philadelphia. Silent retreats appear to raise the brain’s levels of mood-boosting chemicals, according to Dr. Andrew Newberg, director of research there. Newberg’s team tested the brains

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of retreat participants before and one week after an Ignatian-based retreat, finding significant changes in their serotonin and dopamine systems. “Whether through prayers, walks or meditations, the single-minded ritualistic aspect of retreats seems to predispose the brain for peak spiritual experience,” he observes.

What to Expect

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healingways

Formats vary, but most silent retreats entail extended periods of sitting meditation or prayer, often alternating with walking meditation or other mindful movement. Some may also entail a work detail, like sweeping the meditation hall or helping prepare meals. “Work tasks help bring mindfulness into everyday life,” says Chas DiCapua, a resident teacher for the Insight Meditation Society’s flagship retreat center in Barre, Massachusetts, who has led silent retreats teaching Buddhist practices for 20 years. “The community aspect is equally important; being surrounded by people that support your spiritual practice can encourage you on what can be a lonely path.” Silence doesn’t mean being static and somber or not thinking, counsels David Harshada Wagner, of Ojai, California, whose meditation retreats draw from the Indian mystical traditions of yoga, vedanta and tantra. “Silence is more than the absence of talking; it’s a powerful energy,” says Wagner. “Silent retreats are the loudest, as the energy is roaring within. It should be a joyous practice.” Yet retreats aren’t a cakewalk. Los Angeles author and mindfulness


facilitator Jennifer Howd chronicles the challenges of her first nine-day silent retreat in Joshua Tree, California, in her memoir Sit, Walk, Don’t Talk. Seven retreats later, Howd says that although the journey isn’t always easy, she always gains insights about herself and the nature of the mind.

Choosing a Retreat

Retreat leaders caution that while it’s good to jettison expectations and approach the experience with an open mind, choose a retreat that fits individual needs. The level of personal attention at retreats can vary greatly, remarks Thanissara. “Some may host 100 or more people, relying largely on taped instruction without much interaction with group leaders. A small group might be better for a first retreat,” she suggests. Thanissara recommends an upfront review of instructor credentials and starting with a weekend retreat

The deliberate, conscientious practices of my first silent retreat made me appreciate each moment: the gifts, blessings, music, stretching, meditation, prayers and practice of stillness. ~Unity retreat feedback before embarking on one of longer duration. Regardless of length, retreats aren’t always for everyone. “If you’re going through emotional or psychological difficulties, it’s best to discuss your circumstances with a teacher at the retreat center before deciding to attend. If you’re in therapy, talk with your therapist,” counsels DiCapua.

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Omega Institute: One of the

largest centers on the East Coast, the Omega Institute (eOmega.org), in Rhinebeck, New York, offers yoga, meditation and mindfulness retreats led by notable and varied spiritual teachers.

Unity: The Unity church, a Chris-

tian faith honoring all paths to God,

Afterwards, ease back into the daily routine; don’t rush back into old patterns of media and food consumption, recommends Howd. “Try to build-in a day or two of down time. You may still be processing things emotionally.” DiCapua suggests finding a local community of a kindred practice to keep the momentum going, and not expect to keep it up as earnestly at home as at the retreat. Attending daylong maintenance retreats on Saturdays or Sundays can also help sustain individual practice. Above all, “Appreciate yourself for having thought to go on a retreat and follow it through,” says DiCapua. “It can be a radical thing.” Connect with freelance writer April Thompson, in Washington, D.C., at AprilWrites.com.

Rolling Meadows: Located in ru-

Retreats for All Faiths

etreat centers vary from nondenominational to those aligned with a faith, but even within a tradition, styles of meditation vary. The following opportunities highlight some of the more prevalent offerings. RetreatFinder.com and RetreatsOnline.com can be helpful tools.

Retreat Back to Everyday Life

ral Brooks, Maine, Rolling Meadows (RollingMeadowsRetreat.com) offers silent retreats combining yoga and meditation. Leaders Patricia Sunyata Brown and Surya-Chandra Das take an eclectic approach incorporating multiple traditions to stimulate self-inquiry and compassion.

offers an annual silent retreat facilitated by Rev. Paulette Pipe (TouchingTheStillness.org). Held at Unity Center, in Kansas City, Missouri, the experience incorporates soulful music, labyrinth walks and meditation practice.

Tassajara Zen Mountain Center: A working monastery for more

than 50 years, Tassajara Zen Mountain Center and Hot Springs (sfzc. org/tassajara), in the Ventana Mountains of northern California, offers lay meditation practitioners a sense of monastic life each summer. Retreats are mainly taught in the Zen Buddhist tradition, focused on observing the breath and mind.

Insight Meditation Society:

Founded by Sharon Salzberg, Jack Kornfield and Joseph Goldstein in the 1970s, the Insight Meditation Society (Dharma.org) focuses on the Buddhist practices of metta (spreading lovingkindness) and vipassana (insight) meditation. Silent retreats at its historic center in Barre, Massachusetts, range from two days to three months.

Jesuits: A Roman Catholic order cofounded by St. Ignatius, the Jesuit tradition incorporates prayer, meditation, self-awareness and other contemplative practices. Jesuits. org/retreat-centers lists Jesuit retreat centers across the U.S. where seekers can deepen their relationship with God through silence.

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Healthy Holiday Stuffing Recipes New Twists on Old Favorites by Judith Fertig

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hanksgiving side dishes continue to evolve, even though traditional entrées still hold pride of place. New, lighter alternatives to time-honored stuffing maximize flavorful dried fruits, herbs and nuts. Healthy options may use gluten-free bread or black rice, cauliflower, chestnuts or pecans for flavor, bulk and color. A stuffing can also fill a halved acorn squash or cored apple. According to renowned health authority Dr. Joseph Mercola, pecans contain more than 19 vitamins

and minerals, including anti-inflammatory magnesium, heart-healthy oleic acid, phenolic antioxidants and immune-boosting manganese. Erica Kannall, a registered dietitian in Spokane, Washington, and a certified health and fitness specialist with the American College of Sports Medicine, likes dried fruits because they contribute antioxidants and fiber.

Intriguing Options

Celebrity chef Rocco DiSpirito, of New York City, salutes his Italian

Natural Awakenings recommends using organic, non-GMO (genetically modified) and non-bromated ingredients whenever possible.

heritage with chestnuts and embraces healthy living with millet and mushrooms in his special stuffing. His new book Rocco’s Healthy + Delicious includes healthy takes on Thanksgiving dishes such as a sugar-free cranberry sauce. Sonnet Lauberth, a certified holistic health coach, blogger and cookbook author in Seattle, created a healthy stuffing she loves. “My Grain-Free Sage and Pecan Dressing is one of my favorite dishes to bring to gatherings because it works with a variety of diets,” she says. “It’s gluten-, dairy- and grain-free, paleo and vegan. The pecans can be omitted for a nut-free version.” Riced cauliflower is the base, which is available prepackaged at some groceries, but can be made at home simply by chopping the florets into rice-kernel-size pieces. “Cauliflower is the perfect base for this recipe, as it adds a nice texture in place of bread and provides extra fiber,” she says. Laurie Gauguin, a personal chef in the San Francisco Bay area, specializes in gluten-free dishes that she prepares in clients’ homes. “Anything that will hold its shape and not crumble too much can work as a stuffing base,” she says. “Gluten-free, somewhat sticky grains, like short grain brown rice, Chinese black rice, millet or softcooked quinoa work well.” “Choose a mixture that contrasts with the texture and color of the food you’re stuffing,” advises Gauguin. “I created a stuffing that has crunchy pecans, tender black rice and chewy, dried cranberries to contrast with the creaminess of the cored squash entrée. The black rice looks striking against the golden squash.” A stuffing that everyone can eat is ideal for a holiday gathering, either to serve or bring. Lauberth observes, “While not always possible, it’s nice if the host can accommodate various dietary concerns and preferences. Bring your own hearty side dish or two so that you have enough to make a meal for yourself if needed.” Judith Fertig writes cookbooks and foodie fiction from Overland Park, KS (JudithFertig.com).

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consciouseating


Healthy Holiday Stuffing Recipes

Heat a large, safe, nonstick pan over medium heat and use it to sweat the onions, celery and carrots until tender and translucent, about 10 minutes.

Rocco DiSpirito’s Stuffing 1 Tbsp grapeseed oil ¼ cup millet 1 lb crimini mushrooms, sliced 1 large onion, diced 3 stalks celery, diced 1 medium carrot, diced 4 chestnuts, chopped 1 Tbsp fresh sage, chopped 1½ Tbsp poultry seasoning 3 scoops Rocco’s Protein Powder Plus (check Amazon.com) 2 egg whites 1¾ cups low sodium chicken or vegetable stock Kosher or sea salt and freshly ground pepper Place grapeseed oil in a 12-inch cast iron pan; place the pan in the oven and preheat oven to 425˚ F.

photo by Stephen Blancett

Yields: 8 servings

Cook a quarter-cup millet in a small saucepan on the stovetop according to package instructions. When millet is cooked through, transfer it to a large mixing bowl. Heat a large, safe, nonstick sauté pan over high heat and use it to sauté the mushrooms until tender and golden, approximately seven to 10 minutes. Transfer mushrooms to the same mixing bowl as the millet.

Transfer the vegetable mix to the same mixing bowl as the millet and mushrooms. Add the chestnuts, sage, poultry seasoning, protein powder, egg whites and chicken stock to the large mixing bowl, and then use a rubber spatula to mix well, so that no lumps are visible. Carefully remove the cast iron pan from the oven, and then pour stuffing batter into it. Popping occurs as the outside batter develops a crust. Return the cast iron pan to the oven and bake for 13 minutes. Remove from oven and turn the result out onto a serving dish. Recipe courtesy of Rocco DiSpirito, Rocco’s Healthy + Delicious.

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1 Tbsp fresh sage, chopped 2 tsp fresh thyme, chopped ½ tsp kosher or sea salt ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup chopped fresh Italian parsley Preheat oven to 250˚ F. Spread pecans on a baking sheet and place in the oven until lightly toasted, about five minutes. Monitor to ensure the nuts don’t burn. Remove pecans from the oven and place in a food processor. Coarsely chop and set aside. Heat coconut oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add onions, garlic and celery and cook until onions are translucent, about five minutes.

1 cup pecans 1 Tbsp coconut oil 1 medium yellow onion, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 stalks celery, diced 4 cups raw cauliflower rice (prepackaged or via a grater or food processor shredding blade)

Yields: 4 Servings ½ lb cranberries 2 Tbsp grated orange zest ¼ cup orange juice 8 packets Monk Fruit in the Raw sweetener Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper In a small saucepot, combine the cranberries, orange zest, orange juice, monk fruit, salt and pepper. Cook over medium heat until the cranberries burst and the mixture becomes thick and dry, about 40 minutes. Recipe courtesy of Rocco DiSpirito, Rocco’s Healthy + Delicious.

Add additional salt and pepper if desired. Toss with parsley and serve hot.

photo by Stephen Blancett

Grain-Free Sage and Pecan Stuffing

Add the pecans, cauliflower rice, sage, thyme, salt and pepper and cook for seven to 10 minutes, until the rice is tender.

Sugar-Free Cranberry Sauce

Recipe courtesy of Sonnet Lauberth, InSonnetsKitchen. com/60-healthy-gluten-free-thanksgiving-recipes.

Looking For an Integrative/Holistic Approach to Your Health? At Columbus Integrative Family Medicine Center, we provide holistic primary care with both traditional medicine and evidence-based alternative approaches to care for you and your family. We value preventative care and work with chronic conditions such as fatigue, bromyalgia, hormonal imbalances, diabetes, high blood pressure, chronic GI issues and much more. We get to the bottom of the problem, and not just treat the symptoms. We use natural approaches, lifestyle changes, nutrition, herbs, vitamins, minerals, supplements, essential oils as well as prescription medications when necessary. We also work with many insurance companies.

NOW HIRING CNP & MD/DO knowledgeable in integrative medicine.

Services provided: Medical Appointments & Consultations • Medical massage • Nutrition consultation

Call (614) 515-5244 or visit www.cifmcenter.com to schedule your rst appointment. 28

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FIRST AID FOR DOGS

Seven Natural Home Remedies by Karen Becker

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Fleas Solution: Apple cider vinegar (ACV). It doesn’t kill fleas, but helps deter them. Put a solution of equal parts raw, organic ACV and water in a spray bottle and spritz the pet before they head outdoors plus dog bedding. Consider adding it to a dog’s food as well; one teaspoon for Constipation, Diarrhea and Oth- every 20 pounds of pooch. During baths, pour diluted ACV er Minor Digestive Issues of one cup of vinegar to one gallon Solution: Canned pumpkin. For of water over a freshly bathed dog occasional mild tummy upsets, give (avoid the head) for a flea-preventive a teaspoon of pumpkin for every 10 rinse. Massage the ACV solution into pounds of body weight, one to two their coat and towel dry. Don’t rinse. times a day, either in food or as a treat, Alternatively, add about two cups of for non-allergic dogs. Pumpkin’s soluble apple cider vinegar to their bathwater. fiber can ease diarrhea and constipation. any pet parents check their kitchen cabinets first when treating their canine companion’s minor health issues. Three helpful basics are canned, 100 percent pumpkin, povidone iodine antiseptic and 3 percent hydrogen peroxide, plus apple cider vinegar and coconut oil.

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Minor Skin Abrasions, Cuts, Infections or Hot Spots Solution: Povidone iodine. The gentle Betadine brand can allay staph, yeast and most common bacteria. It’s safe if a pet licks it. Dilute the povidone iodine until it looks like iced tea, soak a clean cloth and gently wipe infected skin areas. Rinse the cloth, wipe the skin, and then pat dry. Repeat twice daily for a minor issue.

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Itchy, Irritated Paws Solution: Footbaths. About 50 percent of a dog’s foot licking and chewing can be alleviated by simply rinsing off allergens and other irritants from its paws. For large dogs, soak one foot at a time in a bucket. Stand small dogs in a sink or tub, or dunk one paw at a time in a small container of solution. Dilute povidone iodine to the color of iced tea and add to the footbath. Swish it around while the dog stands in it for two to five minutes. Talk soothingly and offer treats as needed.

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Crusty Skin and Nails Solution: Coconut oil. Skin treatments using 100 percent organic, cold-pressed, human-grade coconut oil can reduce flaking and improve skin quality, especially for seniors with crusty patches of skin and funky nails. Bathe the dog, and then rub the oil into the skin all over their body, especially on dry areas. Let it absorb for about five minutes. Follow with another bath (not much lather) and a very light rinse. Also, dab it directly on hotspots, eruptions and rashes after disinfecting.

coat and skin for about five minutes or until the skunk smell starts to dissipate. Use a sponge to apply the solution to the chin, cheeks, forehead and ears. Rinse thoroughly. When rinsing the head, tilt the dog’s chin upward to protect the eyes. It may be necessary to repeat the entire process up to three times. Rinse off the solution completely.

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Toxin Ingestion Solution: Hydrogen peroxide to induce vomiting. Use 3 percent hydrogen peroxide and give one teaspoon for every 10 pounds of dog weight. Add a little vanilla ice cream or honey to encourage swallowing, or simply syringe it down their throat, if necessary. Walk the dog for a few minutes— movement helps the hydrogen peroxide work—which typically occurs within 15 minutes. If the dog doesn’t vomit in 15 minutes, give a second dose. If after another 15 minutes they still haven’t vomited, call a veterinarian. Don’t induce vomiting if the dog is throwing up already, has lost consciousness or can’t stand, or it’s been more than two hours since they ingested the toxin. Harsh chemicals can cause burning both as they are swallowed and come back up. For these problems, seek veterinary care immediately. Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative veterinarian in the Chicago area, consults internationally and writes Mercola Healthy Pets (HealthyPets.Mercola.com).

absolutimages/Shutterstock.com

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Skunk Encounter Solution: Skunk rinse. In a pail, mix one quart of 3 percent hydrogen peroxide, one-quarter cup of baking soda and two teaspoons dishwashing liquid. For a large dog, double, triple or quadruple the mixture, based on their size and coat. Apply the mixture to the dog’s dry coat, taking care to avoid the eyes. Massage the mixture into the natural awakenings November 2017

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wisewords

Lissa Rankin on

Moving From Fear to Freedom by April Thompson

L

issa Rankin wears many hats: physician, mystic, author, artist, speaker and blogger. What unites her many pursuits is a passion for helping people optimize their health and understand how science and spirituality converge toward that goal. A former obstetrician and gynecologist, Rankin is the founder of the Whole Health Medicine Institute, in San Francisco, which trains doctors in mind-bodyspirit medicine. She’s authored six books to date, including the bestseller Mind over Medicine, The Fear Cure and The Anatomy of a Calling. She lives in California’s Marin County and blogs at LissaRankin.com.

What common signs indicate that fear is affecting our health? When people are sick, there is almost always an element of fear. Many of us have “ridden shotgun” at one time or another with a health diagnosis, and that’s scary, so even if it’s not predisposing the illness itself, it can stimulate fear. Studies from institutions such as the Harvard School of Public Health and Carnegie Mellon University have discovered strong correlations between fear, stress and anxiety and health issues. When fear is predisposing us to illness, addressing the root cause of the issue is preventive medicine. Whether triggered by something trivial or real, fear activates the “fight30

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or-flight” stress response in the brain. The body has natural self-healing mechanisms, but these only operate when our nervous system is relaxed, so effectively dealing with fear is foundationally critical to wellness.

How can we distinguish between true and false fear? True fear is an actual threat to physical survival, like being approached by someone wielding a gun. However, most fear is generated by a story we make up in our minds. Our wild imaginations, the source of beautiful creativity, can be a destructive force, too, as we envision all kinds of worstcase scenarios, most of which will not come true. Modern-day humans average more than 50 stress responses a day, which indicates we’re way off track in our relationship to fear. The mind constantly strategizes how to get what it wants and avoid what it doesn’t. A spiritual practice can help interrupt the “monkey mind” constantly ruminating on what could go wrong. Paying attention to fear around practical issues like not being able to pay bills is helpful because it can keep us from being reckless, such as buying an unneeded luxury item although our mortgage payment looms. But letting false fear prevent us from following a dream, ending an un-

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healthy relationship or leaving a toxic job can predispose us to illness. Fear is the emotional equivalent of pain in the body. Attend to it when it arises; try to understand what it is telling you and see what’s in need of healing.

What are some effective ways to defang false fear? Ultimately, we need to come into the right relationship with uncertainty; it’s the gateway to possibility. People often think that fear provides protection, when our intuition, which typically requires a relaxed state of mind, is a far more effective protector. There have been studies about doctors following their hunches to a patient’s underlying condition, leading to life-saving diagnoses.

How can we cultivate courage, curiosity and resilience, rather than feed our fears? Cultivating a spiritual practice such as mindfulness helps put a pause between a feeling like fear and the reaction that might ensue. You learn to sit with uncomfortable feelings and recognize the story you are spinning in your mind about what’s happening. It also means letting go of expectations when things don’t go as planned. Fear is my cue to activate a practice of surrender; to turn something over to the universe. I will also ask for help to calm my heart and let go of attachments. For me, this life-changing practice means I now trust the mystery more than my mind. I trust the unknown more than science and logic. The latter may be useful tools when doing taxes or a research paper, but I don’t trust them to be the best navigation system of my life or help me in a crisis. Psychology isn’t enough to address fear, which comes with the territory if you think that we are just flesh robots programmed to maximize self-interest, alone in a hostile universe. Once you learn to see the possibilities and hand over the wheel to a greater, benign organizing intelligence, something unwinds in the nervous system and we relax into the wonder of mystery. Connect with freelance writer April Thompson at AprilWrites.com.


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calendarofevents NOTE: All calendar events must be received via email by the 17th of the month and adhere to our guidelines. Email Publisher@NACentralOhio.com for guidelines and to submit entries. No phone calls or faxes, please. Or visit NACentralOhio.com to submit online.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2 Taste of Holistic: Reflexology and Energy Healing – 6:30-8pm. Learn which foot and hand reflexology points provide better health, as well as simple energy healing methods for personal, family and pet use. Free. American Institute of Alternative Medicine, 6685 Doubletree Ave, Columbus. 614-825-6255. AIAM.edu.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3 Essential Oils Foundations – 6-7pm. Join us on the first Friday of each month for a session on essential oils as we cover one or two plants and learn about benefits, contraindications, chemistry and more. The feature oil for November is Frankincense. We will discuss the Boswellia tree and its properties. Smell various brands and see the plant that produces the oil. Donation based. All Life Center, 123 Hyatts Rd, Delaware. 419-560-7100. Willowes.SkincareTherapy.net.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4 Ayurvedic Eating and Weight Management – 2-4pm. Whether wanting to lose, gain, or maintain weight in a healthy manner, this workshop can help with understanding and individual’s constitution and the optimal eating practices to achieve a weight goal. Ayurveda offers in-depth recommendations for food choices, as well as important guidelines for eating habits. We will also complete a Dosha quiz and explore the “six tastes.” $12 in advance, $15 at the door. The Mandala Center for the Movement Arts, 2965 Donnylane Blvd, Columbus. 614-369-0664. Pranamyra.com.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 5 Animal Reiki – 9am-5pm. Animal Reiki is an energetic connection, specially adapted to pets and other animals, that offers targeted pain and stress reduction techniques through light touch. Practitioners can take a more active role in animal health and well-being by being able to understand and energetically work with animals. In this fullday class, we will learn treatment techniques for assessing energy imbalances throughout the animal chakra system (energy centers) and how to work with each of these energy centers to enhance the effectiveness of each session. This class is especially beneficial to those who care for and work with animals either in a professional or volunteer capacity. Includes hands-on practice and an animal-themed meditation. Prerequisite: Reiki I or equivalent Reiki training. Maximum of four students, to permit maximum time for personal instruction. Instructors: Denise Musser and Kaye Smith. $150. The Reiki Center, 1540 W 5th Ave, Columbus. 614-486-8323. TheReikiCenter.net.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 Tummy Time Series – (Series: 11/14, 11/21, 11/28) 9:30-10:15am. The Tummy Time Method Series is designed for newborns to pre-crawling

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babies. There are four classes in this series, and in each we will teach parents to engage with their babies in a relaxing way to promote more time on the belly. Led by Allyson Wessells, physical therapist and lactation consultant. Please bring a baby blanket. $45. Whole Yoga and Wellness, 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus. 614298-5437, Ext 207. WholeKidsPediatrics.com/ Yoga-and-Wellness. Infant Massage – (Series: 11/14, 11/21) 10:3011:15am. During this three-week series, we will talk about the basics of infant massage. Massage can assist with symptoms of colic, gas and constipation, as well as promote relaxation and improve sleep quality. Please bring a baby blanket. $35. Whole Yoga and Wellness, 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus. 614-298-5437, Ext 207. WholeKidsPediatrics.com/Yoga-and-Wellness.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9 Cupping With Hong Chen – 4:30-7:30pm. In this one-day class, we will learn to use suction to lift the skin and underlying fascia to free up adhesions within the tissues, thereby increasing local circulation and enabling the body to recover and heal faster. Cupping can be used to treat plantar fasciitis, pain in the lower back, hip, IT band, shoulders, upper back or neck, carpal tunnel syndrome and fibromyalgia, plus respiratory problems such as asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia and chest congestion related to the common cold. Registration ends November 3. $135. American Institute of Alternative Medicine, 6685 Doubletree Ave, Columbus. 614-825-6255. AIAM.edu. Reiki Review Class – 6-9pm. For those who studied reiki at another school or took the Reiki 1 course at our center some time ago and are looking for updated skills. We will cover all the basics from our beginner’s class and provide one booster attunement to clear blockages and be prepared to receive new energies. The Reiki Center is the only center in the Central Ohio area to provide traditional reiki training in the original format. If past studies were in the modern or Western style, training in spiritual development was possibly omitted. Instructor: Linda Haley. $75. The Reiki Center, 1540 W 5th Ave, Columbus. 614-4868323. TheReikiCenter.net.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11 Reiki 1 Class – (Series: 11/12) 9am-5pm. The Reiki Center is the only facility in Central Ohio to provide reiki training in the traditional method. The difference between traditional and modern reiki training is significant, as the traditional version provides a deeper understanding of the practice’s spiritual impact, including finding meaning and purpose. Learn how to identify and transmit healing energy to relieve a headache or an aching muscle without medication. Hands-on experiences will instruct how to feel energy and see its immediate impact on self, family, friends

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and pets. Course includes vegetarian lunches and snacks, as well as a binder of instruction materials and a certificate of completion. Maximum of eight students. Instructor: Linda Haley. $300. The Reiki Center, 1540 W 5th Ave, Columbus. 614-4868323. TheReikiCenter.net. Shamanic Reiki Class – 5-9pm. In this class for reiki practitioners, we will explore and practice shamanic healing techniques and how to incorporate them into a reiki practice. Techniques covered could include Power Animal Retrieval, Soul Retrieval, and Extraction. Learn to trust and develop divination skills, explore more in-depth work with teachers and guides, and expand a practice with Spirit to power up healing abilities. Instructor: Heidi Howes. $75. The Reiki Center, 1540 W 5th Ave, Columbus. 614-486-8323. TheReikiCenter.net.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12 Horse-Centered Meditation and Prayer Circle – 10:30am-Noon. This is a combination of a Quaker meeting and horses. We will undergo the Guided Practice of Presence and experience some undemanding time for rest and reflection in nature at a horse rescue facility. $15. Circle P Sanctuary, 2013 County Rd 24, Marengo. 740-625-5661. DivineEquines.com.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15 AIAM Open House – 5-7pm. Join us for an evening of fun. Guests will receive a complimentary service of either acupuncture, cupping, chair massage, reflexology or a health check, a chance to win a $60 gift card, clinic and program information, school and clinic tours, as well as activities and refreshments. Free. American Institute of Alternative Medicine, 6685 Doubletree Ave, Columbus. 614-825-6255. AIAM.edu.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 Taste of Holistic: Aromatherapy and Hypnotherapy – 6:30-8pm. Aromatherapy is currently one of the fastest growing holistic health fields. Learn how aromatherapy works, how to choose quality oils, as well as the basic oils everyone should have. Also, learn why hypnosis is not mind control, but rather a way to learn how to control one’s own mind. We will discuss the power of the mind and how to use it to foster change and growth. Free. American Institute of Alternative Medicine, 6685 Doubletree Ave, Columbus. 614825-6255. AIAM.edu.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18 Basic Hypnosis Course – (Series: 11/19, 12/9, 12/10) 8am-5pm. Learn about powerful and effective techniques to facilitate growth and change in this two-weekend course. We will provide a solid foundation in the basic hypnotherapy principles and techniques used to help others achieve important goals such as an improved memory, ending an addiction, managing weight, ceasing smoking, improved sports performance and managing stress. Training includes a self-hypnosis session, how to teach self-hypnosis, and how to conduct a pre-hypnosis interview. Must pass a required exam to obtain 32 Continuing Education credit hours. Registration ends November 13. If enrollment requirements are not met, this class is subject to cancellation. $320. American Institute of Alternative Medicine, 6685 Doubletree Ave, Columbus. 614-825-6255. AIAM.edu.


Reflexology Course – (Series: 11/19, 12/2, 12/3) 8am-5pm. Join us for a two-weekend reflexology course and learn about one of the fastest growing holistic therapies in the U.S., where an estimated 1.5 million people visit a reflexologist each year. This powerful skill has been practiced for thousands of years to enhance health and wellness, and is an excellent therapy for personal or family use, as well as an income source. We will demonstrate a full foot and hand reflexology session, plus cover basic office procedures. Must pass a required exam to obtain 32 Continuing Education credit hours. Registration ends November 13. If enrollment requirements are not met, this class is subject to cancellation. $320. American Institute of Alternative Medicine, 6685 Doubletree Ave, Columbus. 614-825-6255. AIAM.edu. Reiki 1/Animal Reiki Weekend Class – (Series: 11/19) 9am-6pm. The Reiki Center is the only facility in Central Ohio to provide reiki training in the traditional method. The difference between traditional and modern reiki training is significant, as the traditional version provides a deeper understanding of the practice’s spiritual impact, including finding meaning and purpose. In the Reiki 1 portion, we will learn how to identify and transmit healing energy to relieve a headache or an aching muscle without medication. In the Animal Reiki class, we will discover an energetic connection, specially adapted to pets and other animals, that offers targeted pain and stress reduction techniques through light touch. Practitioners can take a more active role in animal health and well-being by being able to understand and energetically work with animals. In this full-day class, we will learn treatment techniques for assessing energy imbalances throughout the animal chakra system (energy centers) and how to work with each of these energy centers to enhance the effectiveness of each session. This class is especially beneficial to those who care for and work with animals either in a professional or volunteer capacity. Includes handson practice and an animal-themed meditation. Maximum of four students, to permit maximum time for personal instruction. Instructor: Kaye Smith. $400. The Reiki Center, 1540 W 5th Ave, Columbus. 614-486-8323. TheReikiCenter.net.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28 Back to Work Lactation Workshop – 10:3011:15am. In this workshop, we will discuss strategies for easing back into work, optimizing breastmilk production and how to maintain the mother/child breastfeeding relationship at home. Led by Allyson Wessells, a lactation consultant at Natural Nurturing and WholeKids Pediatrics. $5. Whole Yoga and Wellness, 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus. 614-298-5437, Ext 207. WholeKidsPediatrics.com/Yoga-and-Wellness.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30 Taste of Holistic: Touch for Health and Guided Imagery – 6:30-8pm. In this introductory class, we will learn about muscle testing and how it can help, as well as what guided imagery is and how it can be useful for personal growth. Includes demonstrations. Free. American Institute of Alternative Medicine, 6685 Doubletree Ave, Columbus. 614-825-6255. AIAM.edu.

ongoingevents sunday tuesday Morning Hatha – 10-11am. It’s “Easy Like Sunday Morning.” Join Emily Dicken for a traditional Hatha yoga class with an emphasis on “workshopping” poses. Students are invited to problem solve, ask questions and listen to their body. We find new insights every week and grow together. $10. Body Wisdom Healing Group, 3001 Indianola Ave, Columbus. 614-784-9473. BWHG. net/Classes. Yoga Well Being – 10:30-11:45am. This class is based in the Hatha tradition. The moves are challenging, yet simple and accessible to all. Open to new and veteran students. Practice proper breathing and meditation in a warmed room. Yoga-Well-Being, 1510 Hess St, Columbus. 614432-7553. YWBYoga.com. Advanced Yingjie Tai Chi – 3-4pm. This Tai Chi style blends various martial arts into a philosophy designed to develop strength, relaxation, and self-defense. Positive energy for stress relief. $35/ session, $85/monthly. The Grey Budha, 400 West Rich St, Columbus. 614-975-7683. GreyBudha. Weebly.com.

monday Nia with Jill Riley-Hetterscheidt – 9:4510:45am. All fitness level can benefit from this mindful movement to an eclectic mix of music. We will use a variety of movements from sources including martial arts, dance arts, healing arts and our imaginations. Each class will set a focus and intention to enhance the experience. Nia is designed to be done in bare feet. Please wear clothes comfortable to move in. $10, with complimentary admission for Silver Sneakers members. The Mandala Center, 2965 Donnylane Blvd, Columbus. 614-638-5563. Slow Flow and Core Vinyasa Yoga Classes – 1011:15am. Join us for a nurturing, reflective practice to facilitate endurance, strength, tension release and self-awareness. Drop-ins welcome. Instructor Julia McSheffery. 10-class and unlimited passes available. $14 non-members, $12 members. Center for Wholeness, 4041 N High St, Ste 100, Columbus. 614-395-2900. ResourceYogaStudios.com. Beginner’s Tai Chi/Chi Gong – 5-6pm. Join Marya Barrios for this age-old Chinese system of slow, low-impact, meditative physical exercise designed for relaxation, improved balance and health. Often described as meditation in motion, tai chi involves a series of movements performed in a slow, focused manner, accompanied by deep breathing to enhance the mind-body connection. Suitable for all levels of fitness. $10. Body Wisdom Healing Group, 3001 Indianola Ave, Columbus. 614-784-9473. BWHG.net/Classes. Salty Yoga – 7-8pm. Relax and breathe in during a one-hour Slow Flow yoga class combined with salt inhalation therapy. Instructor: Kathy Morgan. $20. City Salt Spa, 218 W Main St, Plain City. 614-873-0072. CitySaltSpa.com.

Sunrise Meditation – 7-7:30am. Group meditation in the Dharma House studio, overlooking a wooded ravine. Suggested donation. Dharma House Columbus, 1970 W Dublin-Granville Rd, Worthington. 614-344-8409. DharmaHouse Columbus.com. Free Flow – 6-7pm. This upbeat vinyasa class begins with a slow warm up, then moves into a rhythmic and continuous flow, building lots of heat and momentum. Clear the mind, work the body and end in a relaxed state of calmness. Yoga-Well-Being, 1510 Hess St, Columbus. 614432-7553. YWBYoga.com. Gentle Yoga Class – 6:15-7:30pm. This class if perfect for beginners. It is slow-paced to release stress and gain flexibility, with modifications offered to make it a safe practice for all levels. $10. Center for Wholeness, 4041 N High St, Columbus. 614-398-0890. JoyfulLotusYoga.com. Salty Yoga – 7-8pm. Relax and breathe in during a one-hour Slow Flow yoga class combined with salt inhalation therapy. Instructor: Kathy Morgan. $20. City Salt Spa, 218 W Main St, Plain City. 614-873-0072. CitySaltSpa.com. Mellow Yoga – 7:15-8:15pm. This restorative class helps to limber up, expand a stiff back and defog a clouded mind. Yoga-Well-Being, 1510 Hess St, Columbus. 614-432-7553. YWBYoga.com.

wednesday Sunrise Meditation – 7-7:30am. Group meditation in the Dharma House studio, overlooking a wooded ravine. Suggested donation. Dharma House Columbus, 1970 W Dublin-Granville Rd, Worthington. 614-344-8409. DharmaHouse Columbus.com. Slow Flow and Core Vinyasa Yoga Classes – 1011:15am. Join us for a nurturing, reflective practice to facilitate endurance, strength, tension release and self-awareness. Drop-ins welcome. Instructor Julia McSheffery. 10-class and unlimited passes available. $14 non-members, $12 members. Center for Wholeness, 4041 N High St, Ste 100, Columbus. 614-395-2900. ResourceYogaStudios.com. Boys Yoga – 5:15-6pm. Unwind with us as we balance out our boys’ over-active lifestyles with stretching, breathing and fun. We will focus on core strength, body awareness, flexibility and breathing, as we nurture and grow mindfulness and self-esteem. Class will start with casual games to allow you to drop off your child between 5:15-5:30pm. $15 for an individual class, or a six-to-eight class pass for $10 per class. Whole Yoga and Wellness, 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus. 614-298-5437. WholeKidsPediatrics. com/Yoga-And-Wellness.

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Yoga Fundamentals – 6-7:15pm. Designed for those who might have difficulty using a yoga mat, this class is suitable for all levels of practice and includes standing poses and balances, plus work along a wall to lengthen and strengthen the body. Taught by Sipra Pimputkar. $15. Yoga-Well-Being, 1510 Hess St, Columbus. 614-432-7553. YWBYoga.com. Girls Yoga – 6:15-7pm. We empower the spirit of each individual girl as we stretch, breathe and have fun! We will focus on core strength, body awareness, flexibility and breathing as we nurture and grow mindfulness and self-esteem. Learning to let go and bring inward focus is a great tool to give your child early in life. $15 for an individual class, or a six-to-eight class pass for $10 per class. Whole Yoga and Wellness, 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus. 614-298-5437. WholeKidsPediatrics.com/Yoga-And-Wellness. Salty Yoga – 6:30-7:30pm. Relax and breathe in during a one-hour Slow Flow yoga class combined with salt inhalation therapy. Instructor: Lindsay Davis. $20. City Salt Spa, 218 W Main St, Plain City. 614-873-0072. CitySaltSpa.com. Beginning Yingjie Tai Chi – 6:30-8pm. This Tai Chi style blends various martial arts into a philosophy designed to develop strength, relaxation, and self-defense. Positive energy for stress relief. $35/ session, $85/monthly. The Grey Budha, 400 West Rich St, Columbus. 614-975-7683. GreyBudha. Weebly.com. Turtle Flow Yoga – 6:35-7:35pm. Experience completeness by integrating breath and movement to create a powerful and stabilizing, yet delicate and meditative flow. The measured pace supports quality of breath, postural alignment, and awareness of the body and mind. Great for beginners to advanced yogis. $15. Arena District Athletic Club, 325 John H. McConnell Blvd, Ste 150, Columbus. 614-719-9616. MaggieFekete.com. Evening Hatha – 6:30-7:30pm. Join Robyn Bragg for a sequenced and relaxing Hatha yoga practice. It will help students make it to the weekend. $10. Body Wisdom Healing Group, 3001 Indianola Ave, Columbus. 614-784-9473. BWHG.net/ Classes. Yoga Talks – 7:30-8:30pm. Join us for open discussions about yoga poses, meditation, spirituality and philosophy. Free. Yoga Happiness Studio, 219 E Arcadia Ave, Columbus. 614-446-2091. YogaHappiness.us.

thursday Sunrise Meditation – 7-7:30am. Group meditation in the Dharma House studio, overlooking a wooded ravine. Suggested donation. Dharma House Columbus, 1970 W Dublin-Granville Rd, Worthington. 614-344-8409. DharmaHouseColumbus.com. Hatha Yoga with Eszter Gozon – 5:30-6:30pm. $10. The Mandala Center, 2965 Donnylane Blvd, Columbus. 614-369-0664. Kundalini Yoga with Sada Nam Singh – 7:309pm. This self-realization practice, originally taught by Yogi Bhajan, aims to help us overcome self-limitations of the mind, while releasing tension and blockages in the body, to realize our

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Central Ohio

true blissful selves. We will detoxify our bodies and build the energetic centers, also known as chakras. Kundalini yoga involves periods of exertion designed to strengthen the body, mind, and willpower. We will balance our yoga with relaxation and meditation, as well as the accompaniment of spiritual music. All levels are welcome. Yoga-Well-Being, 1510 Hess St, Columbus. 614432-7553. YWBYoga.com. Columbus Threshold Choir Rehearsal – 7-8:30pm. For those who can carry a tune, and enjoy conveying kindness through singing. This all-female choir is dedicated to singing at the bedsides of those struggling between living and dying, in hospitals, hospices, extended care facilities and private residences in the Columbus metropolitan area. Free. Columbus Mennonite Church, 35 Oakland Park Ave, Columbus. 614-600-2460. Columbus@ThresholdChoir.org. ThresholdChoir. org/Columbus.

friday Sunrise Meditation – 7-7:30am. Group meditation in the Dharma House studio, overlooking a wooded ravine. Suggested donation. Dharma House Columbus, 1970 W Dublin-Granville Rd, Worthington. 614-344-8409. DharmaHouseColumbus.com. Slow Flow and Core Vinyasa Yoga Classes – 1011:15am. Join us for a nurturing, reflective practice to facilitate endurance, strength, tension release and self-awareness. Drop-ins welcome. Instructor Julia McSheffery. 10-class and unlimited passes available. $14 non-members, $12 members. Center for Wholeness, 4041 N High St, Ste 100, Columbus. 614-395-2900. ResourceYogaStudios.com. Community Acupuncture – 3-6pm. Acupuncture is useful for insomnia, headaches, immune support and more. Join licensed acupuncturists Sharmine Lynch, Stacey Kent or Leslie Roeth for a session. $30. House of AUM, 125 S Walnut St, Yellow Springs. 937-532-5467. House-of-AUM.com. Beginner’s Mat Pilates – 5:45-6:45pm. Join Sonia Rinder for this popular mat Pilates class to produce positive change in the body. Students will improve flexibility, posture and core strength, as well as produce a more sculpted body in only one day each week. $10. Body Wisdom Healing Group, 3001 Indianola Ave, Columbus. 614-7849473. BWHG.net/Classes. Dancing Mindfulness – 7:30-8:45pm. For beginners and experienced movers alike, this meditation and creative movement class explores the mindbody connection and mindfulness through dance. $10 suggested donation. Center for Wholeness, 4140 N High St, Ste 100, Columbus. 614-7848488. DancingMindfulness.com.

saturday Beginner’s Yoga with Troy Pyles – 8:30-9:30am. $10. The Mandala Center, 2965 Donnylane Blvd, Columbus. 614-369-0664. Yoga of 12-Step Recovery – 8:30-10am. This class is an open, inclusive group for anyone dealing with addictive behaviors in themselves or others. We start with 45 minutes of sharing,

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followed by a 45-minute yoga practice. All levels welcome. Free. Harmony Project Community Space, 773 E Long St, Columbus. 614-859-2376. ThrivingTreeYoga.com. Morning Hatha – 10-11am. Start the weekend off right with some yoga. Instructor Emily Dicken ensures students find postures that are accessible, comfortable and well aligned. $10. Body Wisdom Healing Group, 3001 Indianola Ave, Columbus. 614-784-9473. BWHG.net/Classes. Nia with Trish Riley Lyon – 10-11:15am. $10. The Mandala Center, 2965 Donnylane Blvd, Columbus. 513-373-5661. Mind Path Tai Chi and Qigong Foundation – 2-3:30pm. Join Don Gubbins for a complete study of the classic Yang-Style Taiji. Come learn this ancient Chinese form of exercise, which incorporates slow, natural movements and breath work to reduce stress, lower blood pressure and improve balance. Suitable for all levels of fitness. $14. Body Wisdom Healing Group, 3001 Indianola Ave, Columbus. 614-784-9473. BWHG.net/Classes.

PLANS CHANGE Please call ahead to confirm date and times

classifieds Classified ads are $1 per word, per month. Minimum 25 words. To place a listing, email content to Publisher@ NACentralOhio.com. Submission deadline is the 15th of the month.

FOR SALE HYPERBARIC OXYGEN CHAMBER – Summit to Sea 40” diameter large-size unit. Purchased in 2016 for personal use. Minimally used, works like new. Includes homemade wooden stands to elevate tank for easy side access. Oxygen compressor not included, but comes with a port for hookup. Dual motors for quick inflation. Bidirectional zippers allow for self-directed use. Requires prescription or physician letter prior to purchase, due to classification as a medical device. Originally $11K, selling for $8K. 614-596-5312. DrJoe@wowway.com.

HELP WANTED INTEGRATIVE FAMILY MEDICINE CENTER – Seeking a Certified Nurse Practitioner (CNP) and doctor (MD or DO) with experience in integrative medicine to join a growing practice. 614-515-5244.

ORGANIC BEEF FOR SALE – Freezer beef, high in omega-3s. One-hundred percent grass fed, with no grain finishing. Economical, healthy, and raised at Pleasant Springs Farm, Mount Vernon. 740-4279001. OEFFA.org/userprofile.php?geg=1073.


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naturaldirectory Connecting you to the leaders in natural healthcare and green living in our community. To find out how you can be included in the Natural Directory email Publisher@NACentralOhio.com to request our media kit.

BIOFEEDBACK BRAINCORE THERAPY

Deb Wellmes, MA, CCC/SLP, ND Beecher Wellness Center 428 Beecher Rd, Ste B, Gahanna 614-855-5533 BrainCoreOhio@gmail.com BrainCoreOhio.com BrainCore Therapy™ provides a unique, drug-free approach to treating Brainwave Dysregulation, a condition brought about by tension on the nervous system from a variety of factors. Brainwave Dysregulation may be associated with several neurological conditions such as ADD/ ADHD, insomnia, panic attacks, autism, anxiety, memory loss, TBI, migraines and PTSD.

DENTISTRY DENTAL ALTERNATIVES

Dr. Richard DeLano, DDS, MS 150 E Wilson Bridge Rd, Ste 150, Worthington 614-888-0377 DentalAlternatives.net Dental Alternatives is the dental office of Richard M. DeLano III, DDS, MS. Dr. DeLano practices general dentistry with a holistic approach. He takes time with his patients to explain the choices they have concerning their oral health. Dental Alternatives is a mercury-safe and fluoride-free dental practice. Visit our website to learn more. See ad, page 16.

DIGESTIVE HEALTH

CHIROPRACTIC BEECHER CHIROPRACTIC

Dr. Joseph Iuvara Dr. Benjamin Long Dr. Paul Valenti 428 Beecher Rd, Ste B, Gahanna 614-855-5533 BeecherChiro.com We l c o m e t o B e e c h e r Chiropractic and Wellness Center. Our goal is to help improve your health through complementary and integrative techniques designed to enrich and balance your everyday life. Our team of doctors and therapists have created a welcoming environment where each person is treated based on their own unique needs. Balancing all aspects of a person on an individual basis, and offering cutting-edge treatments that are only available in our center, sets us apart as Ohio’s foremost chiropractic and wellness center.

COLON HYDROTHERAPY RADIANT LIVING

ALTERNATIVE HEALTH OASIS

Kate Dixon, Loomis Digestive Specialist, CNHP, Certified Colon Hydrotherapist Dr. Michael H. Fritz, Chiropractor, Certified Applied Kinesiologist, Certified Microscopist, Naturopathic Doctor 10223 Sawmill Pkwy, Powell 614-717-9144 Info@AlternativeHealthOasis.com AlternativeHealthOasis.com Each year statistics show that more Americans complain of digestive pain. These discomforts are commonly attributed to symptoms such as: stomachache, allergies, skin problems, depression, anxiety, immune dysfunctions and diarrhea. They may also be related to chronic pain, bloating and cramps. We believe diet and digestion play a major role in the prevention and reversal of chronic degenerative disease. We objectively test and compare against our extensive patient history survey to determine which specific enzymes and nutrients are missing from the client, and then help bring the body back into balance.

81 W Waterloo St, Canal Winchester 614-833-3884 3805 N High St, Ste 204, Columbus 614-369-1533 RadiantLivingByVickie.com Colon hydrotherapy is a safe, effective method of removing waste from the large intestine without the use of drugs. By introducing filtered and temperature-regulated water into the colon, the waste is softened and loosened, resulting in evacuation through natural elimination. A certified technician performs this process in a private, relaxing atmosphere on an FDA-approved closed system. See ad, page 10.

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EDUCATION AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE

6685 Doubletree Ave, Columbus 614-825-6255 AIAM.edu For the public, we offer affordable treatments at our community, intern, student and professional clinics. For prospective students, we offer community and continuing education classes and licensing programs in acupuncture, massage therapy and holistic wellness, as well as holistic practical and registered nursing. We are transforming health care holistically. Change your life today! See ad, page 14.

SIMPLY LIVING SUSTAINABLE U Sarah Edwards PO Box 82273, Columbus 614-447-0296 SEdwards@SimplyLiving.org Sustainable.SimplyLiving.org

We provide classes to train and educate people about sustainability topics and practices. Subjects include, but are not limited to, Food, Urban Homesteading, Health and Wellness, Green Building, Finance, Energy Solutions, Transportation and Economics. Visit our website for the current class schedule. See ad, page 13.

ESSENTIAL OILS DOTERRA ESSENTIAL OILS

Lori and Mark Vaas, Blue Diamond Wellness Advocates 614-681-4646 LoriVaas@gmail.com MydoTerra.com/LoriVaas Who is controlling your health care? Empower yourself with Nature’s medicine: essential oils! We will teach you how at our free classes. doTERRA is the only brand to be thirdparty certified as 100 percent pure and potent, and why it is currently being used in many hospitals, including locally at the OSU’s James Cancer Hospital. Email us for a current class schedule, or to schedule your free private consult. Also visit our Facebook page – Lori’s Essential Oil Well. See ad, page 19.

Silence is a

source of great strength. ~Lao Tzu


FENG SHUI FENG SHUI INSTITUTE OF AMERICA Connie Spruill, Owner/Director An International Feng Shui Certification School 614-325-5452 (cell) 614-837-8370 (school) FengShuiConnie@gmail.com Feng-Shui-Institute-Of-America.com

We enroll new students throughout the year for feng shui certification. Our program teaches a scientific and mindful approach, incorporating brain science and teaching only remedies that are backed up by science. We offer a proven business system training that guarantees new profit centers for your holistic practice. We are a Certified Gold School with the International Feng Shui Guild. Private feng shui consultations are available for residential and businesses. Continuing education courses can be customized for your industry. If you are not inclined to enroll in full certification, we offer a personal feng shui coaching course to apply to your own life. See ad, page 11.

HALOTHERAPY CITY SALT SPA

218 W Main St, Plain City 614-873-0072 CitySaltSpa.com Salt therapy is a drug-free, natural treatment for respiratory and skin ailments through salt inhalation. In addition to two adult salt therapy rooms, our family wellness center has a dedicated children’s salt therapy play room. Beyond providing salt therapy sessions, we also host Salty Yoga classes plus offer Salty Reiki and Salty Massage. We have a full line of Himalayan salt lamps and products, as wells as Young Living essential oils. See ad, page 11.

HEALTH EDUCATION PROJECT HEALTH COLUMBUS Nancy Downhour, B.S. Ed., C.N.C. 740-833-5650 ProjectHealthColumbus.com

This is NOT a diet program. Instead, it is an effective wellness program. INFLAMMATION is the underlying cause of each of the major metabolic diseases, including obesity, diabetes and hypertension. The Project Health curriculum provides a proven way to turn off inflammation through an individualized food plan, weekly online sessions packed with information on how to implement successful menus for the rest of your life, as well as the accountability to stay on track. We work with foods you can find at the grocery store, and you can even still enjoy eating out. Live a LONGER, BETTER LIFE. See ad, page 24.

HYPNOTHERAPY

MASSAGE THERAPY

INTEGRATIVE HYPNOTHERAPY

PRANAMYRA

At Integrative Hypnotherapy, we help our clients grow through the issues that kept them frustrated, worried and hurt. We help them find the relief they need, and build confidence, peace and ease into their daily lives. We do this by getting to the root of the matter (the thoughts and beliefs in the mind) and that is precisely why the changes stick. If you need some support in making a lasting positive change, schedule yourself a free phone consult today at In-Hyp.com/free, or call us at 614-304-1061. P.S. - We can help with a number of issues. See In-Hyp.com/155 for a list of some of the issues we work with. See ad, page 23.

I provide massage therapy, Reiki and private yoga training to help you regain and maintain well-being. I am certified in neuromuscular therapy and incorporate techniques such as trigger point therapy, myofascial release and postural analysis into individualized treatment sessions. Personalized yoga training, by itself or as a complement to massage, can unify your goals for body and mind.

TD Hickerson, Certified Hypnotherapist 77 E Wilson Bridge Rd #200, Worthington 614-304-1061 Info@Integrative-Hypnotherapy.com Integrative-Hypnotherapy.com

INTEGRATIVE HEALTH Dr. Ruslana Kurpita, MD Melinda Skipper, CNP 453 Waterbury Ct, Gahanna 614-515-5244 CIFMCenter.com

If you are looking for integrative and holistic approach to your health care or are torn between recommendations from your regular primary care provider and alternative practitioners, not sure whose advice to follow and possibly self-doctoring, we are a place where both traditional medicine and evidence-based alternative approaches work together seamlessly. We provide holistic primary care for you and your family. We value comprehensive preventative care and work with chronic conditions such as fatigue, fibromyalgia, various hormonal imbalances, diabetes, high blood pressure and chronic GI issues. We take time to listen to your story, ask important questions, order the necessary tests and get to the bottom of the problem instead of just treating the symptoms. We work with many insurance companies. See ad, page 28.

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MUSIC INSTRUCTION WES MILLER MUSIC LESSONS

COLUMBUS INTEGRATIVE FAMILY MEDICINE CENTER

Buy into your

Eszter Gozon, LMT The Mandala Center for Movement Arts 2965 Donnylane Blvd, Columbus 614-369-0664 Pranamyra@gmail.com Pranamyra.com

787 S State St, Westerville 614-323-7052 SaxophoneLessonsColumbus.com

Wes is a music teacher with 25 years of teaching experience. He creates custom-made lesson plans for students of all ages and abilities. In addition, students have the option of joining one of his in-house student groups to further apply what they are learning in their lessons. In addition to saxophone lessons, Wes provides instruction for other woodwinds and brass instruments. See ad, page 7.

NATURAL FOODS BEXLEY NATURAL MARKET

508 N Cassady Ave, Bexley 614-252-3951 BexleyNaturalMarket@yahoo.com BexleyNaturalMarket.org The Bexley Natural Market is a not-for-profit cooperative grocery store dedicated to providing food of the highest possible nutritional quality to our members and community. We provide many local and organic products, bulk foods, organic herbs and spices, as well as a vast array of vitamins and supplements to support the health of our customers. We like to support local businesses and farmers by being a space in which their products are available. See ad, page 20.

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IT’S ALL NATURAL!

1360 Cherry Bottom Rd, Gahanna 614-476-6159 ItsAll-Natural.com It’s All Natural! is a prominent source of vegetarian and vegan products, offering organic, ecoconscious and down-to-earth items. Our mission is to promote a benevolent, eco-friendly and vegan lifestyle. We strive to be fertile ground where seeds of love can be planted to grow in health and harmony. See ad, page 19.

MOMENTUM98 NATURAL HEALTH STORE 3509 N High St, Columbus 614-262-7087 Moment98@aol.com Momentum98.com

RAISIN RACK NATURAL FOOD MARKET 2545 W Schrock Rd, Westerville 614-882-5886 RaisinRack.com

Raisin Rack offers a complete variety of organic groceries, including gluten-free foods, vegan and vegetarian products, and dairy-free items. Bulk grains, herbs, nuts and seeds accompany organic fruits and vegetables, as well as a complete selection of vitamins, minerals, herbals and other nutrients from leading national brands. See ad, page 26.

NATUROPATHY PHOENIX WELLNESS CENTER

We have been serving the holistic health needs of the Central Ohio community since January 1, 1980, selling products that uplift on all levels of existence. We carry raw foods and superfoods, herbal supplements and oxygen supplements, castor oil and essential oils, plus Chinese herbal tonics and shilajit. We also specialize in wellness and natural living accessories, including over 100 massage tools, magnets, color therapy glasses, coning candles, tuning forks, yoga supplies, hemp clothing, inversion and exercise machines, water purifying and energizing devices, plus foot detox ionizers. Stop by our store to experience five to ten minutes of the Relax far-infrared saunas and lamps, to detoxify, ease inflammation and pain, and invigorate the body. See ad, page 31.

Dr. Trudy Pieper, ND Dr. Allison Engelbert, ND 10 S Main St, Johnstown 740-616-9949 PhoenixWellness4U.com

Drs. Trudy and Allison are board certified and accredited by the American Naturo-pathic Medical Association (ANMA), the oldest and largest professional naturopathic medical organization in the U.S. Dr. Trudy is author of Prevention is the Cure for Cancer and was awarded the ANMA 2014 Higher Achievement Award. Dr. Allison is a Master Herbalist and specializes in women’s wellness.

REAL ESTATE DUNIGAN REAL ESTATE GROUP

With the new day

comes new strength and new thoughts. ~Eleanor Roosevelt

Cindy Dunigan, Realtor 3500 N High St, Columbus 614-361-8400 Cindy.Dunigan@e-Merge.com CindyDunigan.com

There are only a handful of Realtors in the Central Ohio area that carry the National Association of Realtors GREEN designation, and Cindy Dunigan is one of them. She has taken the initiative to encourage the industry to produce more sustainable homes, and helps communities to reduce their consumption by implementing sustainable practices. Cindy is devoted to reducing her own footprint on the environment, and lives by her motto: “We can make a significant impact on the world around us one person at a time.”

SALON/SPA THE NATURAL NAIL SPA 8487 Sancus Blvd, Columbus 614-985-3205 TheNaturalNailSpa.com

Incorporating the most natural products and processes for manicure, pedicure and waxing, while maintaining the highest level of cleanliness and sterilization available.

SOUND HEALING SOMAENERGETICS VIBRATIONAL ATTUNEMENT David Hulse, CVSMT 1550 Old Henderson Rd, Ste N160, Columbus 614-928-3102 SomaEnergetics.com

Let the stress melt away as sound therapy pioneer David Hulse bathes you in the soothing sound of the Solfeggio Tuning Forks. Tune into your higher self as David retrieves information for guidance and clarity during this accelerated time of change. Available in 30 or 60-minute sessions, by appointment only. See ad, page 13.

WELLNESS CENTER BODY WISDOM HEALING GROUP 3001 Indianola Ave, Columbus 614-784-9473 BWHG.net

For over 20 years, we have provided holistic wellness through therapeutic massage with a mind-body approach. We have recently expanded our services and now teach Healing Group, LLC movement classes such as 3001 Indianola Avenue Columbus, OH 43202 yoga, tai chi, dance and Pilates, as well as offer 614-784-9473 speakers, workshops and Ayurvedic nutritional counseling. See ad, page 9.

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THE REIKI CENTER

Linda Haley, RMT, Director 1540 W 5th Ave, Columbus 614-486-8323 TheReikiCenter.net The Reiki Center is Central Ohio’s oldest and largest natural wellness center, plus the only center to offer Reiki classes in the traditional format. More than 20 services are available to meet your wellness, spiritual and emotional goals, including energy therapies, therapeutic bodywork, shamanic and intuitive services, as well as animal therapies. Open daily from 9am-9pm. See ad, page 15.

Publish One of the Nation’s Leading Healthy Living Magazines Own a Natural Awakenings Magazine Turn Your Passion Into A Business

As a Natural Awakenings publisher, you can empower yourself and others to create a healthier world while working from your home earning an income doing something you love! No publishing experience is necessary. You’ll work for yourself but not by yourself. We offer a complete training and support system that allows you to successfully publish your own magazine.

WILBRIDGE WELLNESS GROUP

Becky Appelfeller, MAT, CRS, BEP 614-515-3692 Pam Hatch, M.Ed. 614-338-5716 6797 N High St, Ste 221, Worthington WilbridgeWellness.com We offer life coaching, counseling and alternative therapy services to individuals, couples, families and groups. Becky practices a holistic wellness approach to healing and emotional health, drawing from an extensive training in Gestalt therapy, Neuro Emotional Technique (NET), Rubenfeld Synergy and integrative bioenergetic medicine. Pam’s specialties include Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) and hypnotherapy, as well as nutrition and lifestyle guidance for mental and emotional health, weight loss and management, plus support for depression and anxiety. See ad, page 13.

YOGA WHOLE YOGA AND WELLNESS

Jenni Endres, Studio Manager 1335 Dublin Rd, Ste 100E, Columbus 614-298-5437, Ext 207 WholeKidsPediatrics.com/Yoga-And-Wellness Whole Yoga and We l l n e s s i s committed to offering classes and workshops to prevent illness and promote wellness. Our programs support health from infancy to adulthood with lactation support, infant development, children’s yoga and therapeutic yoga for conditions such as back pain, asthma and emotional health. We focus on collaboration with community resources, such as the Scioto Trail, to offer unique programming for children and adults. See ad, page 20.

Be thankful for what you have; you’ll end up having more. If you concentrate on what you don’t have, you will never, ever have enough. ~Oprah Winfrey

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Natural Awakenings Central Ohio - November 2017 issue  

Central Ohio edition of the free monthly national health/wellness and sustainability publication.

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