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CAMPUS ACTIVITIES

Programming Vol. 46, No. 8 APRIL 2014

MAKING YOUR MONEY WORK FOR YOU AS A COLLEGE STUDENT Core Steps in Collaborative Risk Management ASSESSMENT: WHAT WORKS ON YOUR CAMPUS? How Do You Change an Event’s Culture? OWN YOUR BUDGET! Journey to Becoming a Student Affairs Professional

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THANK YOU

to the sponsors of the 2014 NACA速 National Convention

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Seeking 2014 Research Grant Proposals

Are you a graduate student, faculty or staff member conducting research on issues related to college student activities and campus engagement? Submit a 2014 NACA® Research Grant Proposal today for an opportunity to receive a cash stipend or paid travel to the NACA National Convention! For more information, see page 62.

2014–2015 Call for Content

NACA is accepting proposals or other content dealing with a topic reflecting your expertise for the following categories: Education Sessions at the 2014-2015 Regional Conferences Educational Sessions at the 2015 National Convention NACA® Webinar presentations NACA® Research Grant Advancing Research in Campus Activities Awards Digital Library Resources Articles for NACA’s Campus Activities Programming® For deadlines and more information, visit www.naca.org or email Dionne Ellison at dionnee@naca.org.

APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

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CAMPUS ACTIVITIES

Programming

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Vol. 46, No. 8 APRIL 2014

RISK MANAGEMENT

Core Steps in Collaborative Risk Management for Student Activities...........................6 By Joseph Lizza, The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey Risk Management: Small Scale vs. Large Scale..................................................................8 By Evan M. Schaefer, Arizona State University, and Rich Ramos, Simpson College (IA) How Do You Change an Event’s Culture? Student Life at the Beach Can Be a Blast.......................................................................... 20 By Jon Kapell, University of North Carolina-Wilmington Navigating Student Organization Travel........................................................................... 24 By Jillian Van Auken, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

ASSESSMENT

Assessment: What Works on Your Campus?..................................................................... 12 By Michael Baumhardt, The University of Scranton (PA), and Robert Borgmann, Florida International University Administrative Assessment = Student Learning: An Equation that Works................ 14 By Brianne Rogers, Purdue University (IN) Assessment: Don’t Let It Be Your Missing Link................................................................. 16 By Alicia Bates, Hartwick College (NY)

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BUDGETING AND FINANCE

Own Your Budget!...................................................................................................................28 By Alison Pukala, Merrimack College (MA) The Basics of Budgeting: Making Your Money Work for You as a College Student... 30 By Kaleb L. Briscoe, Indiana State University It’s Only the Beginning: Plan Your Financial Future Now!...............................................38 By Ja’Net Adams, Impact Speakers Group (NC)

ALTERNATIVE PROGRAMMING

Have Baby, Will Graduate: Successful Young Single Parents in College The Ohio State University ACCESS Collaborative Program........................................... 40 By Paula H. Smith, PhD, LSW, and Jessica Parent, MA, The Ohio State University We Do Late Night Right and I Can Prove It........................................................................ 42 By Troy Morehouse, Alfred State, SUNY College of Technology THE GRADUATE EXPERIENCE The Journey to Becoming a Student Affairs Professional: A Grad Student’s Story..... 46 By Sonam Shah, The George Washington University (DC)

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APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


NACA® SPOTLIGHT

NACA Recognizes Outstanding Volunteers and Programs C. Shaw Smith New Professional Award........................................................................ 50 Patsy Morley Outstanding Programmer Award........................................................... 50 Frank Harris Outstanding Student Government Advisor Award............................... 51 Founders Award................................................................................................................... 51 Legacy Award....................................................................................................................... 51 Outstanding Diversity Achievement Award – Program ..............................................52 Diversity Activities Group..................................................................................................52 Foundation Honorary Trustees.........................................................................................53 Institute Coordinators........................................................................................................53 2014 Graduate Interns, Mentors...................................................................................... 54 Leadership Fellows, Mentors............................................................................................ 54 Retiring Board of Directors Members............................................................................. 54 Retiring Program Leaders..................................................................................................55 2014 National Convention Program Committee Chair.................................................55 David W. Phillips Outstanding NACA® Office Service Award.......................................55 Tribute Honors Alan B. Davis for Service as Executive Director................................56 NACA® Your Best Campus Tradition™ Video Competition Awards............................. 57 Advisory Groups Recognized............................................................................................ 57 Block Booking: Schools Opt for Huge Savings in 2014....................................................58 NACA Implements Technology Upgrade.............................................................................62 2014 NACA® Research Grant Call for Proposals................................................................62 International Experiential Learning Institute....................................................................63 2014 NACA® Institutes Announced......................................................................................63 NACA® National Convention Graduate Intern Program Application Deadline........... 64 NACA® Northern Plains Regional Student Leadership Scholarship............................. 64 Upcoming NACA® Foundation Scholarship Deadlines..................................................... 64 Coming in May 2014: Campus Activities Programming®.................................................65 Campus Activities Programming® 2014-2015 Content Areas........................................65 Share Your Good News!..........................................................................................................65 NACA® Leadership...................................................................................................................66 10 Questions with … Eboni Turnbow, Wane State University (MI).................................................................. 68

COLUMNS

EDITOR’S PAGE Assessing the Risks..................................................................................................................4 By Glenn Farr MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR Transitions..................................................................................................................................5 Matt Morrin CURTAIN CALL Spring Farewells..................................................................................................................... C3 By Nancy Oeswein ADVERTISERS ACUI.................................................................33 Fantasy World........................................ 34-35 Judson Laipply............................................... 61 NACA® Foundation...........................................1 NACA® Foundation Scholarships.............. 60 NACA® Foundation Testimonials................. 11 NACA® Foundation Trivia Sponsors...........33 NACA® Institutes........................................... 27 APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

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NACA® Membership Renewal.................... C4 NACA® National Convention Sponsors.....C2 NACA® Regional Conferences..................... 19 NACA® Summer Leadership Event............23 PEER/CEP.................................................36-37 Wolfman Productions................................. 64

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EDITOR’S PAGE

Assessing the Risks

GLENN FARR

glennf@naca.org @EditorGlennNACA

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URING MY 20s AND 30s, I periodically, as I described it, threw all the pieces of my life into the air to see where they might land. In fact, one such toss involved taking the job that moved me to Columbia, SC, which consequently put me in line to become editor of Campus Activities Programming®. While, at the time, the term “assessment” meant nothing to me, I was essentially engaging in personal assessment – looking at different areas of my life, determining what did and didn’t work, and changing those things that didn’t suit me. My approach may have been more chaotic and capricious than the kind of assessment taking place in the campus activities field, but it worked for me then. These days, I no longer have to toss the pieces of my life into the air to induce personal assessment. Life has developed a habit of doing that for me, whether or not I am seeking it. Risk management often goes hand in hand with such assessment and, as life leads me to consider a current opportunity, the risks involved are prominent among my considerations. Eight years ago, I had the mixed blessing of being able to perform the role of Captain Hook in a local production of Peter Pan. It was one of those rare matches of man and material for me. Vocally and from a character standpoint, the role fit me like a second skin. It also gave me a certain measure of local fame and a set of nicknames I enjoy, as there are a few people who still refer to me as “Captain,” or even better, as simply, “Hook.”

Chair, NACA Board of Directors Matt Morrin Executive Director Alan B. Davis MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS STAFF Director of Membership Marketing & Events Dawn Thomas Marketing & Communications Manager Latrice Williams Editor Glenn Farr Graphic Designer Jason Jeffers Online Marketing Manager Wes Wikel Advertising Sales Lisa Stroud

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Campus Activities Programming® (ISSN 07462328) is published eight times a year by NACA (January/February, March, April, May, Summer, October, November/December) exclusively for NACA® members, Copyright © 2014 by the National Association for Campus Activities. Editorial, publishing and advertising offices: 13 Harbison Way, Columbia, SC 29212-3401. NACA full membership is restricted to institutions of higher learning; up to five subscriptions of Campus Activities Programming® are allotted to member institutions based on full-time equivalent enrollment. Additional subscriptions are available for $95 each. Associate membership is restricted to firms whose talent, products, programs or services are directly related to the field of collegiate extracurricular activities; up to $144 of their membership fee is for up to three subscriptions to Campus Activities Programming®. Additional subscriptions are available to members for $95; to non-members for $95. Library of Congress card number 74-646983; Library of Congress call number PN2016.N32A3. Statements of fact and opinion, or other claims made herein, are the responsibility of the authors, letter writers, providers of artist performance reports, and/or advertisers, and do not imply an opinion on the part of the Campus Activities Programming® staff, NACA® Office employees, or officers, staff and other members of the Association. All rights reserved, including the right to reproduce the contents of Campus Activities

A few weeks ago, it was announced the same theatre would be restaging the production. A number of people expressed their desire to see me perform as Hook again and hoped I’d audition for it. And that’s where I began assessing my options. In spite of the positives that came out of being Hook back then, it was a physically grueling role to perform, in that I was required to race and jump around a multiple-level set wearing a triple-layer costume, wig and hat, some of which performed like a parasail on some of those jumps. I remember being perpetually exhausted throughout the run of that show. In addition, 10 days before opening, during a rehearsal, I fell off the set, careening from a six-foot high platform, landing chest first on a wooden bench. No blood and nothing broken, but rather intense pain as strained muscles and other connective fibers healed during the next six months. Even today, when my back or neck misbehave, I wonder if that, too, is a result of that fall. There is much to consider, especially knowing the demands of the role and my history with it. As I write this, auditions are taking place tonight. Will I audition? I’m still assessing. Especially the risks.

Programming®, either in whole or in part. Any reproduction includes, but is not limited to, computerized storage of information for later retrieval or audio, visual, print or Internet purposes. All protections offered under federal copyright law will be strictly pursued, and no reproduction of any portion of this publication may occur without specific written permission from NACA. No material can be copied, in any form, if the purpose is to sell the material. Periodicals postage paid at Columbia, SC. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Campus Activities Programming®, 13 Harbison Way, Columbia, SC 29212-3401. NACA, National Association for Campus Activities, Campus Activities Programming®, Programming, and all other designated trademarks, service marks, and trade names (collectively the “Marks”) are trademarks or registered trademarks of and are proprietary to NACA, or other respective owners that have granted NACA the right and license to use such Marks. NACA allows its members to promote their NACA® membership on Web sites and printed materials. However, this designation does not imply NACA sponsorship or approval of events or content. For questions about the use of the NACA® membership logo or to request permission to use it, please contact Dawn Thomas at dawnt@naca.org.

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MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

Transitions MATT MORRIN

mattm@naca.org @nacaboardchair thenaca.tumblr.com

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APPY SPRING! I know spring officially started in March, but given the long winter many of you had, I think it is safe to say spring is getting started a little later this year. April is typically a busy time on campus. There are many award and recognition ceremonies, new student organization officer trainings and, of course, graduation and commencement ceremonies are just around the corner. All of these involve some sort of transition – winter into spring, new leaders in organizations, and our graduating seniors having to start their lives in the “real” world. I wish all of our graduating seniors and graduate students the best of luck as they begin this new chapter in their lives, especially Trevor Mulholland from Southeast Missouri State University, who served as the Student Advisory Group Facilitator and guest of the Board this past year. Trevor was a great addition to our Board meetings and I thank him for his contributions and service to NACA. Transitions are essentially changing from one state or condition to another. As I reflect on my term as Chair, transition is the word I think effectively describes the state of NACA this past year. In May, we started to implement a new governance structure, which included changes to the structure of the Board and the creation of two new advisory groups. We also started the process to identify a new Executive Director for the Association. This process involved not only working with Alan Davis to ensure this transition would not negatively impact the services offered this year, but also develop a plan to ensure a smooth succession of leadership when the new Executive Director joins us later this spring. Transition also includes growth and there was much growth this year, not only in services and programs, but also in our relationships. At the Convention in Boston, we met with representatives from higher education associations from nine countries to discuss student affairs practices around the world and how NACA may be able to partner to develop services and programs to better prepare our students to be successful in a global community. NACA has the opportunity to be a leader in these initiatives and I hope future leaders will pursue opportunities to collaborate as they arise. We are also initiating a new leadership institute that will take place in June at Walt Disney World. The program will focus on leadership development for students who lead and supervise other students, and best practices in customer service. The program will utilize resources available at Walt Disney World, including Disney cast members and Disney educational programs. NACA® volunteers will serve as faculty and will ensure that what is learned is applicable to students’ roles on campus. I am very excited about this opportunity and encourage you to send students to this inaugural NACA and Disney event. Registration information is available on the NACA® website. APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

I want to recognize and congratulate the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) as it celebrates its 100th Anniversary – Congratulations ACUI! ACUI has been an integral part of many campuses and the experiences of many students and professional colleagues for the past century. NACA and ACUI have shared many members over the years, including one of our founders, C. Shaw Smith. In Boston, members of the Board met with the leadership of ACUI to discuss ways we can work together in the future to better serve our members. I hope these talks will continue after my term ends, as I truly believe NACA will benefit from intentional collaborations with other higher education associations. As my term as Chair of the Board comes to an end, there are a few people I want to THANK! for supporting me the past few years as Chair-elect and Chair. Volunteering with NACA usually requires us to spend time away from our campus jobs, friends and families. I am very thankful for the support I’ve received from colleagues, staff and students in the Department of Student Life & Engagement at the University of South Florida-St. Petersburg. The service and support they received during the past year was definitely impacted by the time I spent serving NACA and I sincerely appreciate their understanding and willingness to work with my schedule. My supervisor, Dr. Julie Wong, has been incredibly supportive and a great resource who could always provide a helpful non-NACA perspective on NACA® topics I would discuss with her. Finally, many THANKS to my partner, Nik, who was willing to take on more of the responsibilities of managing our home and raising our dogs so that I could serve in this role. I’m sure many who are not involved with NACA don’t truly understand the work we do and I appreciate the faith he had that the work I was doing was important and making a positive impact to benefit our members. Serving in this role is definitely a family commitment. I am very thankful and honored for the opportunity I had to serve as Chair of the Board this year and appreciate the support I received from so many of our volunteers and members of the Board and the team in the Office. I look forward to assuming the role of Immediate Past Chair serving NACA under Ken Brill’s leadership. Ken is a great volunteer and leader. I have full confidence NACA will thrive with Ken as Chair. On behalf of the Board, the new Executive Director, and the NACA® Office Staff, I ask for your support and understanding as the new Executive Director and NACA® leaders assume their roles. The transitions that started this year are going to continue for a time. When they have passed, NACA will be a much stronger, more effective and relevant association that will continue to be a leader in the student affairs field. Have a safe and fun summer!

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Core Steps in Collaborative Risk Management for Student Activities

What Is Risk Management? Risk management, as it relates to student activities and programming, is the process of organizations being aware of potential and perceived risks involved in activities. It also includes monitoring organization activities and taking corrective actions and proactive steps to minimize accidental injury and/or loss. In order to fully understand and address risks collaboratively, all key participants should understand these core steps.

1. Identify: What are the risks? Before implementing a program, traveling to a conference or training retreat, or participating in any other on- or off-campus activity, student organizations should work to identify the potential risks associated with their activity. When thinking about risks, it is important to consider things that could lead to injury, but also include possible risks to the group’s reputation, personal feelings of members or participants, finances, and/or property.

2. Evaluate: What is the worst that could happen? Once you have identified the risks, they should be evaluated to determine the potential consequence to the organization, individuals participating in the activity, and/ or the college or university community should one of the risks be realized. It is also important to think through the environment in which the event/activity is taking place and determine the probability of the risks occurring. A proper evaluation of potential risks before hosting or participating in an event will assist the organization in minimizing and eliminating potential problems to an acceptable level as agreed upon by the organization and campus.

By

Joseph Lizza

The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey

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E STUDENT ACTIVITIES PROFESSIONALS frequently advise student organizations in planning safe and successful programs and activities. However, do these organizations understand why risk must be managed, what activities have an increased level of risk, and what can be done to reduce risk factors? Student organization risk management involves considering the potential and perceived risk involved in student activities, including taking proactive steps to minimize injury and loss. Another question we must ask is whether or not we are including student organizations in the risk assessment process? Do the students have a voice in the overall process? When it comes to risk, our students may be key partners in developing the policies and procedures to keep our campus communities safe. As a student affairs professional, I believe the principles of risk management have a place in our field, and that staff and student leaders can benefit greatly from the incorporation of certain risk management principles and techniques into their regular practice. I hope students and advisors will take what I share here and use it in developing the necessary skills to create a collaborative process to identify and evaluate risks when developing programs.

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3. React: What can be done with this risk? Once the risks have been evaluated, organizations must determine the most effective method for managing each risk identified. Organizations may choose to do one of three things after evaluation: eliminate, limit, or accept the risks. Risk response generally includes:

• Avoidance: Eliminating a specific threat, usually by eliminating the cause. • Mitigation: Reducing the risk by reducing the probability of the occurrence. • Acceptance: Accepting the consequences of the risk. This is often accomplished by developing a contingency plan to execute should the risk event occur. Many student organization events by their very nature involve some type and level of risk. Therefore, the answer should not always be to eliminate the activity simply because the risk exists. Instead, organization leadership, in conjunction with the advisor and other campus resources, should work to determine how to best manage and minimize the risk to create an enjoyable campus program.

4. Implement: What will we actually do? It is not enough to identify and plan for potential problems. In order to be truly successful, an organization must follow through on the action items identified to lessen and/ or eliminate potential risks. Document your action plans and educate members of the organization, as well as other APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


campus constituents, on what’s included in the plan. Design steps that allow for monitoring potentially risky components of the activity on site to assure that risk management tactics are followed.

5. Assess: How did we do? What would we do differently? Upon completion of an event, even one that is annual or regularly hosted, student organization leadership should evaluate the experience. The organization should reflect and identify both those things that went well and those that were not as successful to provide valuable information for future events, as well as future leaders who hope to host the same or a similar event.

Guiding Principles of Risk Management in Student Activities The steps listed above can be seen as core steps in the risk management process for student activities. However, if they are taken by themselves and not incorporated into guiding principles that foster collaboration, understanding and personal growth, they will never be as impactful as they could be. Here are three principles that should guide professionals and students involved in student activities and campus programing:

1. Risk management practices should have a connection with the institutional mission. Institutional values should guide the goal setting and implementation of risk management efforts. One informs and reinforces the other, and risk management practices should be justifiable on the basis that they are supportive of the institutional mission and goals. Campus-wide risk managers may identify certain student practices that are problematic from their perspective, and it may be their desire to see those practices addressed, or addressed more comprehensively. The vehicle for communicating that risk identification and engendering response from student affairs may be the institutional mission. But, a proactive collaboration will be able to serve the purposes of both risk managers and programmers, if a common motivating force can be identified. The mission can serve as the common ground from which proactive collaboration can emerge. Campus Example: At Stockton College, the mission and vision of the institution play an integral role in student organization and campus programming. Scheduling priority is given to events that support the mission of the college. These events do not necessarily need to be academic in nature; social events can still support the mission of providing a venue for experiencing and embracing diversity, encouraging independent thinking, and responsible decision making.

2. Risk management should be holistic. If only the office of the risk manager, or the business office, performs the campus risk management function, risk is not being comprehensively, proactively or effectively managed. Risk managers need to make teammates of student affairs colleagues and ask for their assistance in spreading sound risk management practices throughout the institution. APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

Campus Example: At Stockton College, we proactively assess programming risks with various institutional partners, thus inviting and encouraging collaboration and a shared investment in sound policies and procedures. Offices often involved in this shared evaluation and decision-making are Student Development, Campus Center, Dean of Students, Campus Police, Student Senate, Greek Council and the sponsoring organization. By bringing key constituents together, we can better understand and address each other’s wants, needs and concerns.

3. Risk management should never be an afterthought. Risk management must occur throughout the life cycle of the program. Uncertainties can be discovered at any time, while the relative probability and consequence of identified risks can change over time. By starting the process early, the campus can be in a better position to complete the necessary steps in a timeframe that is not rushed or reactionary in nature. Campus Example: At Stockton College, we encourage the evaluation of risk at every step of the programing process, from the initial brainstorming by an organization, to meeting with an advisor, and to requesting and reserving space. The campus utilizes the history of programs as a primary factor in assessing risk; those events with a positive history are assessed quickly and past practices are implemented to assist in continuing the streak. New events are discussed and assessed based on various factors and evaluated against a rubric to determine what the risks are, what can be done to minimize or reduce them, and what we should simply be pro-active in planning to encounter.

A Journey, Not a Destination The process of assessing and responding to risk in a collaborative and equitable way for both student affairs professionals and the student leaders they advise must be considered a journey, not a destination. While the ultimate goal of this process is to make our campuses safer, we need to understand that by essentially changing the campus culture, we can inadvertently accomplish our goals by aligning everyone’s values.

About the Author Joseph Lizza is Assistant Director of

Campus Center Operations & Programs at The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, where he was named 2009 Staff

Advisor of the Year. He previously served as Graduate Coordinator for Student Activities at Rowan University (NJ). In NACA, he currently serves as Chair of the NACA® Mid Atlantic Regional Conference Program Committee. He previously served as the region’s Education and Professional Development Coordinator, as well as its Volunteer Coordinator. He was named the region’s Outstanding New Professional in 2008 and an Outstanding Professional in 2011. He holds a bachelor’s degree in elementary and secondary education from Monmouth University (NJ) and a master’s degree in higher education administration from Rowan University. Currently, he is pursuing a doctorate in educational leadership from Rowan University. 7


RISK MANAGEMENT Small Scale vs. Large Scale

By

Evan M. Schaefer

Arizona State University and

Rich Ramos

Simpson College (IA)

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ROGRAMMING AN EVENT IS NOT AN EASY TASK TO ACCOMPLISH when taking all its aspects into consideration. Most often, student programmers tend to gravitate towards the details of artist selection, venue selection and what would fit best in the green room. The challenge is getting them to think critically about the potential risks that are assumed by virtue of hosting the activity on campus. Risk management is the identification, assessment and prioritization of all risks associated with whatever the task. The goal should be to mitigate as many risks as possible when programming events on college campuses. Regardless of the size of the institution (large or small), risk assessment and management should always be present in the planning and execution of events. We would like to explain how a small, private liberal arts college in Iowa (Simpson College) and a large, public four-year state institution in Arizona (Arizona State University) analyze risk when programming events. Risk management is an extremely large and broad topic, so, for our purposes, we are going to identify the similarities and differences in our approaches based on a standard scenario.

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Institutional Profiles: Arizona State University (ASU) is a four-year, public research institution located in the Phoenix/Tempe metropolitan area. To date, ASU boasts an enrollment figure of nearly 72,000 students distributed over five different campuses. This enrollment makes ASU the largest public institution in the country. Simpson College is a four-year, private, Methodist-affiliated, liberal arts institution located in Indianola, IA. Simpson boasts an enrollment figure of nearly 1,900 students and has two additional satellite campuses located in West Des Moines and Ankeny. Event Scenario: Date: Mid August Time: 5 – 8 pm Profile: This event will consist of inflatable/mechanical

rides, food/merchandise vendors, and music (deejay). Venue: Outdoors Expected Attendance: 60% of enrollment APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMINGÂŽ


The Arizona State University (Tempe Campus) Approach: Based on the above scenario, we are trying to program an event for nearly 5,000 students.

Venue: We know there is only one venue that will support an event of this size, the Sun Devil Fitness Complex’s 180,000 sq. ft. green space used for Intramural sports, Sport Club practices, ROTC trainings and much more! We conduct a pre-event walk through with the facility management to determine whether or not this event will be feasible in the space. This meeting typically includes the facility team, consisting of an assistant director for facility operations, facility event coordinator, and facility event scheduler to explain the purpose and go over initial details of the event. Due to thermal storage units being located under the west side of the field, the capacity of the field is limited to 6,000 lbs. per axle or point for anything to be driven or placed on it. The water storage tanks located throughout the entire south half of the field limit the west side to only 12,000 lbs. per axle or point. This must be taken into consideration when considering rides, vendor activation and the size/placement of the stage. Staking is prohibited in this field because of all the underground utilities.

Inflatable/Mechanical Games: The vendor(s) providing the equipment/labor must provide a certificate of insurance (COI) that shows coverage of $1,000,000 in general liability, $1,000,000 in automobile liability, and $1,000,000 in Worker’s Compensation naming the State of Arizona, Arizona Board of Regents and Arizona State University as additionally insured with regard to general liability. A liability waiver is generated by the ASU Risk Management department to either post or have each participant sign. Due to an unfortunate past incident and ensuing lawsuit, mechanical bulls are strictly forbidden by ASU and are not covered. We communicate with the vendor(s) so they know none of their activation can be staked. We also determine what power is required for their activation and identify if it needs to be brought in or if house power will be able to cover it.

Food/Merchandise Vendors: The vendor(s) providing the equipment/labor must provide a certificate of insurance (COI) that shows coverage of $1,000,000 in general liability, $1,000,000 in automobile liability, and $1,000,000 in Worker’s Compensation naming the State of Arizona, Arizona Board of Regents and Arizona State University as additionally insured with regard to general liability. If food is distributed on campus, a temporary food service establishment permit must be completed by each vendor at least 14 days before the event and returned to our Manager of Food Safety/Health Sanitation. If food is distributed on campus and NOT by our contracted food service provider, then a food exemption request form will need to be filled out at least 14 days before the event and returned to our Event and Meeting Services area in the APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

Memorial Union. Only one of these forms will be needed. This simply releases ASU from any liability should anyone get sick from the food. Canopies are ordered to cover the food and turf to cover the ground to avoid dirt flying up into the food. To sell food or product, the vendor(s) must obtain a City of Tempe sales tax permit and State of Arizona sales tax license. An inspection of all food distributors must be completed by the Manager of Food Safety/Health Sanitation during the event.

Permits: ASU has a fire marshal’s office and police that are separate from the City of Tempe, although they do collaborate on a wide range of projects and programs. Each requires a separate application and permit process. We complete the special event request permit for fire/ safety compliance through our fire marshal’s office. Included in this request are: • Descriptions of the inflatable/mechanical rides; • Copies of all the vendors’ COIs; and • Operational layout of the event (the layout is used to determine the occupancy of the event). We complete the ASU special event permit application through the ASU Police Department. From this application, the Special Event Coordinator for ASU Police can determine the number of officers needed for the event. Due to the event size, an additional licensed, bonded and insured private security company is contracted. No students are allowed to serve in any security capacity unless they are hired by the private agency.

Cost/Investment: If any of the vendor(s) are going to exceed $5,000, but less than $25,000, in cost to ASU, an informal bid process is conducted by the sponsoring department in conjunction with ASU Purchasing. If the vendor(s) are going to exceed $25,000, a formal bid process run exclusively by ASU Purchasing is required. This is the standard process for any event, either large or small, that occurs at Arizona State University.

The Simpson College Approach: Even pursuing the same scenario, we look at the process a bit differently at Simpson College. While we do evaluate all of the same things with regard to safety, we take a different route to achieve the final outcome, as we will be programming for only 1,000 students.

Venue: The venue is an area located directly outside of the new Kent Campus Center and adjacent to our athletic complex, which we also use as a part of the program space. As a part of the new campus center, 7,500 sq. ft. of load-bearing concrete was poured to support events and vehicles and events requiring additional support. Total square footage space is approximately 22,000 sq. ft. Approximately half of the venue space is concrete, while the rest is grass. The space is not entirely free of obstacles and obstructions. In the very middle of it is a large green pad with a 40 ft. flagpole located in its center. There are also a number of trees 9


that have been planted in the space we must consider. As this is the main hub of campus and is centrally located, a number of underground cables run directly through the area. Staking is permitted only in grassy areas and only after the locations of all buried lines have been identified and marked. Staking is prohibited on concrete pads. Prior to contracting of inflatable/mechanical games, the size of each of the games is determined and locations are plotted to ensure we have adequate space for not only the game, but for the participants, too.

Inflatable/Mechanical Games: As with ASU, we require all vendors to provide proof of insurance, with the college being named in the certificate of insurance provided to the college. Insurance is required at the level of $1,000,000. All game providers are expected to provide their own labor pool to run and staff the games and no Simpson College student labor is allowed to run them. Mechanical bulls are allowed, but in the planning of the event, the program board has many conversations as to the value of such a game at our start-of-the-year function. Many of the providers we currently use for this event no longer carry mechanical bulls as a part of their inventory due to the risk involved in that particular game. Power is provided by the venue. With the construction of the campus center, two separate 200 amp disconnects were added to the building, with events exactly like this in mind.

Food Vendors: Food vendors at our function are also required to provide us with a certificate of insurance with Simpson College named at $1,000,000. If food is being furnished by the college’s contracted food service company, insurance is already provided through our existing contract. All food service vendors are required to provide their own labor pool and supplies. The program board in no way gets involved with the distribution of the food product.

Permits: A major difference between large and small institutions, at least in our case, can be seen here. Whereas at ASU, the required permits may seem endless, there are fewer with which Simpson College must contend. Obviously, the number of permits required is driven by the city in which your institution is located, which is the case for us. A city street bisects our event location. To prevent unwanted vehicles driving through, and for the safety of participants, we file a permit with the city to temporarily close the street before, during and after the event to allow for setup and teardown. The permit with the city also requires Simpson College to provide a COI to the city, with the city being named as additionally insured in the amount of $1,000,000. In conjunction with this, we are also required to provide a detailed map of the event, as well as the exact times for the street closing. We are prohibited from totally blocking off the street so as to allow for access of emergency vehicles if needed. The only other permit required for us is a noise permit to allow for a deejay to play amplified music. Both permits must be submitted no less than 60 days before the event. 10

Costs/Investment: For vendors for our events, a bid process is not required. Contracts for this event are considered entertainment and formal bids are not necessary. The student activities office is allowed to sign off on and approve any and all entertainment contracts of $5,000 and less. Additional costs for our event include private security to ensure the safety of all participants. Total numbers for security for this year’s event included 10 private security team members. For insurance purposes, the private security firm has a long-term contract with the college to provide security services for special events. Additional costs include night lighting to ensure a safe, well-lit program for all involved.

Risk Assessment Is Always Essential While the processes our institutions pursue may be different and the events we offer may vary in scope, we both must take risk assessment into consideration when planning events. Every event, no matter the size, will involve some level of risk. Your job is to minimize that risk and ensure to the best of your ability that the event you offer is safe and fun for everyone involved. Planning and anticipating what could go wrong is key to proper risk mitigation. It may seem like a lot to take on, but with proper forethought, your event can be safe as it achieves its intended outcomes.

About the Authors Evan Schaefer is a Coordinator, Sr.,

Student Organizations and Programming, at Arizona State University and is a Certified Special Events Professional (CSEP) as endorsed by the International Special Events Society (ISES). He previously served as a Program Advisor at St. Cloud State University (MN). Active in NACA, he served on the NACA® Board of Directors Interview Committee in 2012 and on the NACA® Showcase Selection Task Force in 2011-2012. He has also served on the NACA® Concert Management Institute Staff, as well as the NACA® Concert Management Institute Coordinator-elect. He is currently the NACA® National Block Booking Coordinator, after having served as the NACA® Assistant National Block Booking Coordinator. He holds a bachelor’s degree in music education from Simpson College (IA) and a master’s degree in higher education administration from St. Cloud State University (MN). Rich Ramos is the Assistant Dean of Students at Simpson College (IA). He

holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Central College (IA) and a master’s degree in counseling and student personnel from Creighton University (NE). He has been a volunteer for NACA for more than 20 years, serving in various leadership positions at both the regional and national levels. He currently serves as Chair of the NACA Foundation Steering Committee and in 2012, he served as the Concert Management Institute Coordinator. APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


Learn How NACA® Foundation Scholarships Can Benefit You Applying is Easy! Tresavoya Blake

University of Wisconsin Urban and Regional Studies As a college student, I am grateful for any help that I receive, and I am so grateful for the NACA® Central & Northern Plains Scholarship for Student Leaders from NACA! It will definitely help towards my academic and professional goals by aiding me financially as I receive my college education. The funds will assist with my tuition or help pay for books. Overall, this scholarship from NACA will help me achieve another step toward my academic goal of graduating from college and going on to graduate school. Once again, I am very appreciative for this great reward.

Rachel West

Centre College (KY) English Receiving the NACA® Mid America & Central Region Scholarship for Student Leaders has been incredibly helpful as I look toward the future. Not only has the monetary prize helped me to ensure the continuation of my undergraduate education, but knowing that I am working toward becoming a better student leader has given me a great deal of confidence in my own abilities when working with our Student Activities Council.

Nicole Haas

Western Michigan University Organizational Communication As a recipient of the NACA® Joseph D. Giampapa Scholarship for Student Leaders, I will use the scholarship to aid me in continuing my education endeavors as I inch closer and closer to graduation. I am currently studying organizational communication at Western Michigan University with an expected graduation date of December 2014, and after graduation I have even larger plans for my future. I plan on attending graduate school to obtain a master’s degree in higher education and student affairs. All of my experiences I have gained in undergraduate studies, including campus programming, admissions and first year experience programs have led me to my passion of wanting to work with the college population for the rest of my career. Attending the NACA® conferences have just reaffirmed my love for campus programming, so I am ecstatic to be a recipient of a scholarship from an organization that means a lot to me. Scholarships are funded through donations to the NACA® Foundation. Are you Interested in donating and making a difference for students? Visit www.naca.org to donate online!

APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

11


Assessment:

What Works on Your Campus? By

Michael Baumhardt, The University of Scranton (PA) and

Robert Borgmann, Florida International University PROGRAMMING IS WHAT WE DO. Whether it’s programming a large-scale concert or providing novelties to our students, we are always working towards providing some type of entertainment to our student bodies. But how do we know what to provide? You might find yourselves asking questions like: • What do students want to see? • What do students want to get out of their collegiate experience? • How do we know these programs are working? There are many different things you can do to assess how your programming board is meeting the needs of your students, and we’ll touch upon areas on which to focus and what types of questions you should be asking.

Considering Assessment Platforms When you make the decision to assess your campus population, you need to determine which platform you’d like to use. There are various platforms available online, including many that provide low-cost or free options. In conducting an annual assessment, The University of Scranton has used Survey Monkey. This free platform allows up to a certain number of responses depending upon the survey you build. It also allows for a longer survey to be built, while incorporating “logic” that allows participants to be directed to further questions based upon previous responses. If your campus has purchased the OrgSync or Qualtrics platform, you are able to use their form creator to develop an assessment instrument in a similar fashion. In addition to longer surveys, your programming board may want to gain a quicker response that is more targeted. When you are seeking such information, it is best to conduct a poll, which can be built through Facebook, OrgSync, or Survey Monkey, just to name a few. Polls on these platforms have the ability to show results immediately upon voting. The benefit is that it allows participants to see where they fall in comparison to their peers. However, we caution you against allowing participants to see results beforehand, as it may influence their responses. An option that allows you to conduct face-to-face feedback involves focus groups. This assessment platform allows a facilitator to interact with participants and ask further questions tailored to participants’ responses. The facilitator can 12

be someone who is regularly involved with the programming board, which allows the board to guide the discussion, or the facilitator can be an outsider with whom participants can feel comfortable giving truly honest answers. Note that focus groups are best conducted in a small setting and are highly time consuming, so please factor this into your consideration when deciding whether to pursue them.

Building Your Assessment Instruments Once you select the platform to use for your assessment, determine which questions you will ask participants. The type of questions may vary depending upon whether you are using a poll, conducting a short assessment, or choosing to have a more comprehensive assessment. An annual comprehensive assessment should not only capture results from the previous academic year, but also include questions that explore ideas for the upcoming year. Each of our universities breaks its comprehensive survey down into the areas of event scheduling, marketing, location, and future event preferences. These results can then be used to assist in our organizations’ strategic planning and our events for the coming year. Throughout the past two years, in addition to the comprehensive annual assessment, The University of Scranton has conducted a short attendee assessment after each event. In the beginning, this information was captured through paper and pencil, but now with the use of OrgSync, it is automated and conducted electronically. And with the use of OrgSync this past year, the response rate went up tremendously, allowing the programming board to obtain timely results and make adjustments from event to event throughout the year. This information can then ultimately be used to increase your event attendance and the overall reputation of your programming board. Within a short event evaluation, you can include anything from demographics to how the attendee found out about the event and how well each attendee enjoyed the event. With regard to the demographics of each attendee, we recommend you capture their gender, class year, and residency (on-campus/off-campus/commuter), in addition to things specific to your own campus needs. Additional questions can include satisfaction with the event, marketing techniques, and future event ideas. APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


Marketing and Advertising

Looking to the Future

Assessing your marketing and outreach efforts is important. How else are you going to know how students are learning about your events? You need to find different ways of getting students to complete these assessments, though. You know you’ll reach certain populations through social media, but what about the students who aren’t connected to them? What are you doing to reach them? Sometimes, online surveys can be a vital resource, but using paper surveys students can complete at or following an event is beneficial. You are certain, after all, that these are the students who heard about the event and showed up. When it comes to social media, each outlet has a different reach. Some people have defected from Facebook in favor of Twitter and Instagram, and that is okay! Direct people to your website. All of these outlets allow you to post links, either in a message itself, or as a comment. Students want to give feedback because of their experience, so why not give them every opportunity to do so. What kinds of questions should you ask? It depends on your programming board’s current marketing efforts. With regard to your target audience, you want to ask: • How did they hear about the events you’re hosting (flyers, posters, social media, word of mouth, website, etc.)? • What catches their attention in the marketing materials? • Would they be interested in signing up for a text message service? • Would they subscribe to a YouTube channel if your board created one? • What can the programming board do better in order to spread the word about events happening on campus? Sometimes, students have great ideas that have yet to reach your board. You need to seek students’ insight and let them know you want their feedback just as much as they want to attend your events. Allowing them to share their opinions provides buy-in for them and shows you’re truly programming for the student body, not just your programming board members.

Looking ahead through assessment is a great opportunity for you to get feedback from your campus. By surveying students, you’ll be able to find out what they really want to see. It’s important to make sure you’re programming for them, and not just your programming board. Asking questions pertaining to what kind of events they’d like to see more of, whether they prefer more events of a smaller scale or fewer events of a much larger scale, or what event ideas they may have can really give your programming board a solid foundation to begin the coming year. And while you’re at it, it may also be a good idea to ask them about what areas in which your programming board could most improve. The beauty of looking toward the future is that you can take your students’ suggestions to the NACA® Regional Conferences or the National Convention or to the agencies with which you typically work. Attending showcases or seeking talent advice from agents, with your students’ feedback in mind, can help make your programming calendar more diverse and finely tuned to your campus’ needs.

Timing Want to get the best attendance at your events? Find out when most people are available on campus. Ask students what times typically work best throughout the week. You may find that most students end their day of coursework by 5:30 pm, so why would you be hosting events at 3 pm? It’s about reaching the most students possible. Some of your institutions are commuter campuses, so find out when most people have time between classes. Go through your student union with an iPad or survey cards and have them answer questions to see what times are good for them. If you’re having a day event, what times are high-traffic times at your school? If you are at a residential campus, do weekends or evenings work best for your student population? These questions will help you learn how to best program for your students.

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Authors’ Note: This article was based on our presentation at the 2013 NACA® National Convention. If you would like copies of these assessment pieces, please feel free to email Michael Baumhardt at michael.baumhardt@scranton.edu or Robert Borgmann at rborgman@fiu.edu.

About the Authors Michael Baumhardt is Assistant Director

of the Center for Student Engagement at The University of Scranton (PA). He previously served as Assistant Director of Student Activities and Orientation at the institution. Active in NACA, he has served in regional and national capacities, and serves as the Assistant Marketplace Coordinator for the National Convention. He has also served as Graduate Intern Coordinator and as a member of the Educational Session Review Team. For the NACA® Mid Atlantic Regional Conference, he currently serves as Business Networks Coordinator. He is also affiliated with the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) and currently serves as National Co-Chair of its Student Leadership Programs Knowledge Community. He holds an MBA in management from The University of Scranton, a master’s degree in higher education and student affairs from Bowling Green State University (OH) and a bachelor’s degree in human resources management from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. Robert “Bobby” Borgmann is the Assistant Director for Campus Life at Florida International University, where he oversees the

student programming board and homecoming council. He has been with Florida International University since 2010 and previously served as the Coordinator for Campus Life until the beginning of 2013. Borgmann earned a bachelor’s degree in English and a master’s degree in higher education administration from Florida International University. He is affiliated with Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education (NASPA) and currently serves as a co-lead facilitator for the LeaderShape Institute. 13


Administrative Assessment = Student Learning:

An Equation that Works! By

Brianne Rogers, Purdue University (IN)

A

FEW YEARS AGO, I served on a search committee for a student activities director position. When one candidate was asked about her experience and future goals regarding utilizing learning outcomes, she initially responded by sticking out her tongue, shaking her head, and rolling her eyes while enthusiastically stating, “Eee! Yuck, learning outcomes!” This doesn’t just show you what not do in a job interview, but also illustrates how many student affairs professionals view learning outcomes – even today. Many professionals view them as something pursued to please institutional administrators or as a necessary evil in a new age of governmental accountability. Those with a more positive outlook see learning outcomes as programmatic objectives to be evaluated in order to improve events after assessment results are analyzed. The latter is an excellent and worthy perspective – one that serves the student affairs profession well. However, what about using learning outcomes not just for internal staff purposes, but also as a teaching tool for the students completing the program being evaluated? All practitioners – from academic advisors to student activities coordinators – strive to assist in college students’ growth, development and learning, both personally and professionally. With some small adjustments, practitioners can turn the tools used to access learning outcomes into educational tools or teaching moments to help students continue to grow and develop. The following highlights practices of representatives of two common campus activities groups – a programming board and student government. Each co-curricular activity used different learning outcomes and measurement instruments; however, each modified the assessment process to produce a learning tool or opportunity for the participating students.

Add to Routine, Subtract the Results (Programming Board) Program Learning Outcome: As a result of serving on the executive board, students will be able to recognize the skills they have gained and articulate them. This will be measured through a pre- and post-comparison of the résumés. Student affairs practitioners are generally low on time 14

and energy even before committing time to assessment. However, the process of turning instruments into teaching tools for students does not have to be a separate project if you add it into part of a weekly routine. Most advisors meet at least biweekly with the executive members of a programming board, so setting aside time during the regularly scheduled one-on-one meeting makes it easy to commit to completing the assessment. Additionally, when the studentlearning tool is tailored résumé coaching – as in this example – it makes sense to execute it in a more private setting. Before the individual coaching can occur, a baseline for each student has to be established. Collecting the students’ résumés after one semester gives most students enough time to complete programming that has provided experiences they should be listing on their résumés. After reviewing the résumés, you can then provide coaching based on the students’ needs, which they receive during their one-on-one time. Categories can be as simple as “low,” “moderate,” and “high.” For example, low can be defined as, “Student doesn’t list the programming board position on the résumé or doesn’t mention skills or experiences under the position. The student doesn’t recognize skills gained through the programming board position nor have the ability to articulate them on a résumé.” Résumés then need to be collected after the coaching sessions and categorized again, so progress can be recorded. This progress is what is reported in the assessment summary and also serves as an evaluation of your individual coaching sessions. The sessions, where the learning starts, vary based on individual student needs. For example, for the low-level student, focus on identifying the position’s valuable experiences and very basic labeling of the skills found within the experiences. On the other hand, for a high-level student – with good articulation of skills – the coaching focuses on the experiences the student missed, such as Block Booking at a conference, which provide unique skill building. These individual coaching sessions aren’t just valuable for the assessment process or even helping students learn how to write résumés. The process also encourages students to APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


utilize reflection and compels them to think and write critically, which are excellent concepts for students to learn and are additional results realized outside of the established learning outcome. The biggest challenge with this qualitative approach is the reporting afterwards – analyzing the group results and then reporting it in a clear, concise, yet thorough way. Also, aggregating the pre- and post-résumés could be time consuming if you hope to publish the results, which would then require methodical coding mechanisms. However, if not a goal after the first year (when the categories need to be created and defined), the most time outside of your normal routine will be writing the report, as again the student learning occurred during the already scheduled one-on-one meetings

Two Approaches of Turning Learning Outcomes and Assessment Instruments into Teaching Tools for Students Co-Curricular Organization

Learning Outcome

Assessment Tool

Time to Add Student Learning

Method of Student Learning

Additional Student Learning

Number of Students

Programming Board

Skill Recognition and Articulation

Qualitative

Low

Oneon-one coaching/ advising

Thinking and writing critically

10-12

Student Government

Critical Thinking

Quantitative

High

Individual handouts

Reflection on communication styles, leadership identities, and personal civic responsibilities

25-50

Subtract for Reporting, Multiply for Student Learning (Student Government) Student Activities Office Learning Outcome: Students will develop critical thinking skills through participation, reflection and engagement in out-ofclass experiences: activities, events, employment, governance and service. Learning outcomes can be written specifically for an extracurricular organization – like the programming board example above – or learning outcomes can be for an entire office, with the goal of individual programs achieving the learning outcome. The next example demonstrates how a quantitative questionnaire administered as pre- and post-tests to student government members provides evidence of support for the office’s learning outcome, while still providing extra learning opportunities for students. The scale (adopted from Northern Michigan University’s Student Leadership Fellowship Program) asked students to rate to what extent they were “able to,” “have knowledge/understanding,” or “feel” about the 28 different questions. The questions were written to measure specific aspects of broad concepts that the students should be developing as participants in student government, such as civic responsibility, teamwork and communication skills. Several of the questions also related to the office’s learning outcome of developing critical thinking skills and some were selected to be included in the overarching final assessment report. The assessment now has served multiple purposes: learning outcome data for administrative reports and information on whether students are learning the concepts they should be through the co-curricular activity. However, this same assessment can also be utilized as a direct learning tool for the students by providing reflection prompts and creating summaries of individual assessment results. Students recorded their names on the pre- and post-questionnaires, so individual comparisons could occur. A standard form was created and then completed for each individual student by recording the question numbers that had movement within the scale. For example, if a student chose three, “a slight extent,” on the pre-test and four, “an average extent,” on the post, it would be recorded that the student ranked himself one higher. Equally important, it was recorded when a student ranked himself lower, as it was suggested this showed the student came to realize their actual skill level, which had previously been overestimated. Set reflection questions were provided on the form that prompted the students on how to utilize the individual assessment results. Additional directions were also given verbally or via e-mail.

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The biggest challenge with this assessment and student learning tool is the time factor, especially considering the standard size of a student government at a mid-sized or large institution. Additionally, since the post-questionnaires are given close to the end of the year, the turnaround time to complete the individual comparisons before students leave for the summer is very short. Inventive use of campus resources can overcome this challenge, such as offering a practicum credit for graduate students in the university’s higher education program or even utilizing undergraduate juniors or seniors who have an interest in entering student affairs. Whichever way, the student learning that occurs when students utilize the summaries is worth the time investment. The reflection questions not only bring the tool full circle to this example’s learning outcome of critical thinking, but also encourage reflection related to the students’ communication styles, leadership identities, and personal civic responsibilities. Additionally, students who lack confidence are bolstered by seeing how they have improved just as overconfident students receive an honest assessment of their skills – both of which are significant learning experiences.

Solving the Equation The above approaches are just two examples of taking learning outcomes and assessment instruments from being only program appraisal to becoming learning opportunities for college students. To balance the equation of administrative assessment and student learning, first inventory your learning outcome assessments as well as any student reflection pieces or guides. I focus here on how to turn assessment into a student-learning tool, but the opposite approach – turning student-learning tools into assessment instruments – could be another approach. Finally, think creatively, especially if you work with a large number of students. A presentation summarizing last year’s assessment with supplemental handouts is a viable way of turning internal assessment into a teaching moment. Whatever the approach, you can take the “Eek! Yuck!” out of learning outcomes by implementing an equation you can get behind.

About the Author Brianne Rogers is Coordinator of Leadership Devel-

opment in Student Activities and Organizations at Purdue University (IN). She previously served as a programming board advisor at North Central College (IL) and as Co-Advisor of Student Government at the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse. She holds a bachelor’s degree in public administration from Northern Michigan University and a master’s degree in student affairs in higher education from the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse. 15


Don’t Let It Be Your Missing Link By

Alicia Bates

Hartwick College (NY)

What is assessment? Upcraft and Schuh (1996) define assessment as “any effort to gather, analyze, and interpret evidence which describes institutional, departmental, divisional, or agency effectiveness” (p. 18). Effectiveness includes cost-effectiveness, clientele satisfaction, and meeting clientele needs, etc. (Upcraft & Schuh, 1996, p. 18). You may use assessment to figure out if a new program is worth doing again, how to revamp different aspects of traditional events, or to determine what new events students are interested in seeing. Assessment methods and tools should be developed based on your programming board’s mission and goals. As with many other avenues of programming, assessment ideas that work for one school may not work for another. It is imperative that your programming board take into account the information they want to learn from students and develop assessment tools that best suit your campus and will be most beneficial to your board.

Creating assessment There are many characteristics to consider as you conduct an assessment. Some characteristics outlined by Palomba and Banta (1999) stipulate that assessment asks important questions, leads to reflection and action, and allows for continuity, flexibility and improvement in assessment (p.16).

Ask the important questions Make sure your assessment focuses on the things you really want to know. Once you start considering your questions, it is easy to get sidetracked by other things about which you may be curious. Your assessment should focus on providing you feedback for the areas in which you need the most information.

Lead to reflection and action While you may be asking students a lot of yes or no questions, it can be extremely helpful to find out the reasons behind the answers they give. Offer students the opportunity to explain why they want certain things or why they feel a certain way about a program. Understanding why students were not 16

fond of a performer or why they did not eat the food offered can help your programming board in planning future events.

Allow for continuity, flexibility and improvement If, while conducting your assessment, you find that participants do not understand what you are asking, are interpreting a question differently, or you are not attracting your target audience, do not be afraid re-evaluate your assessment method and try something new. Also, assessment questions and techniques that work one year may not work the next, so it is best to be prepared with different ways to reach out to students.

Ideas for assessing student feedback Evaluation card Utilizing an event evaluation card (see next page) is a very basic idea, but it serves to be very effective. Before students leave your event, ask them to fill out an evaluation card. Below is an example of the evaluation card the Hartwick Campus Activities Board (HCAB) borrowed from our neighbors at SUNY Oneonta. We have used this card for all of our programs throughout the year to gauge what students thought about events we offered. Students are able to write in the name of the event at the top of the card and then rate how they believe the event went. We ask them to let us know their favorite part of the event and also what they didn’t really care for. This alerts the board to the areas where we can improve, in addition to what we did well. Last year, HCAB also focused on the timing of our events and advertising techniques, so we included questions about timing of events and how students heard about them. As incentive for completing the evaluation card, students were allowed to opt into a drawing for a big prize at the end of the semester; the more events students attended and evaluation cards they completed, the more chances they had to win. At the end of the semester, participating students had a chance to win an iPad Mini. Offering this incentive has increased the amount of feedback we have received because students want to increase their chances of winning. APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


Email surveys If you have tracked attendance at your event and have the names of the students who attended, you may also survey them via email. The survey can be short and ask basic questions: • What did you enjoy about the event? • What about the event could be improved? • What types of events would you like to see in the future? Keep in mind that you cut your probability of receiving feedback almost in half if you email the survey. Emails tend to get lost and forgotten in students’ email accounts and they are less motivated to provide feedback because they know it’s not something they have to prioritize. If you choose to send surveys through email, offer a drawing for a prize. The prize can be something small like a water bottle or swag your programming board has accumulated and can give away. Students are more likely to participate if they know there is a possibility of winning something.

Digital video Using a digital video recorder (such as a Flip Cam) is an interactive way to find out what students thought about an event. This method is great for students who enjoy being in the spotlight. As students are leaving or hanging around talking to the performer, ask three to five to give their opinions of the event. At the next board meeting, play back the responses as you are debriefing the event. This method also helps break up the monotony of a weekly meeting. Furthermore, you can use the recorded comments to make a nice video promotion or introduction if you decide to host the event again in future.

Student outreach table Student outreach tables work best in an area that receives a lot of traffic as students move about through their day. For HCAB, we know the best way to quickly find out what movies APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

students want to see on campus for the next semester is to have a table outside of our cafeteria area between 11 am-1 pm. This two-hour block is a high-traffic time and area as students get lunch between classes. On the way in or out, students can stop by the table, ask questions, pick movies, and get free stuff. It is important to keep in mind that having a student outreach table should be interactive. Sitting behind the table hoping for students to stop and see what you have going on is not going to give you the results you are seeking. Make sure you stand and talk to students as they pass by. Engage them in what you are promoting and encourage them to offer feedback. The more open you appear to receiving feedback, the more open students are to giving it.

Observation In the midst of implementing different types of assessment, programming boards often forget perhaps the most powerful form: observation. During events, it is important for programmers to walk around and talk to participants, to observe and take note of what is happening around them. See for yourself what aspects of your events students are enjoying; things that are sort of working, but would be better if they were more developed; and what just does not work at all.

Ideas for assessing programmer feedback After-event pow wow After the event is over and you have completed tear down, come together as a group to quickly share the highs and lows of the event. Voicing these immediately afterwards can serve as a boost for everything you did well while also informing the group of areas you need to discuss and work through at your next meeting.

Discussion of past events during meetings Take time at your weekly or bi-weekly meetings for 17


the entire board to assess previous events. Give each programmer the opportunity to share their opinions about the events, their observations, or the feedback they have heard since an event occurred. Hearing different perspectives of the event gives you a well-rounded account of how the event functioned.

majority of students will benefit, through improving the student experience or maximizing student satisfaction, from what you plan to do.

Programmer evaluation forms

It is easy to start your assessment and lose sight of your goal. Once you begin reviewing feedback, different followup questions may begin to present themselves and that can often lead to tangents. Make sure you keep in mind who your target audience is and the exact information you are looking to get from them.

Have the programmer in charge of the event compile all the feedback (evaluation cards, observations, discussions) and document it on a programmer evaluation form. This should include strengths and areas of improvement for the event as whole, as well as specifics about the performer, location, time, etc. It is also good to have the programmer provide feedback on whether the event should be done again and the rationale behind that feedback. With this information documented, officer transition becomes a little easier because new programmers have documents to which they can refer should they have questions about previous ideas or events.

Benefits of assessment Once you have gathered your feedback through assessment, it is then time to enter the next phase, which is evaluation. Evaluation is defined as “any effort to use assessment evidence to improve institutional, departmental, divisional, or agency effectiveness” (Upcraft & Schuh, 1996, p. 19). Using the feedback you receive from assessment can come with great benefits to the programming board and student body.

Enhancing the student experience Students come to the events they want to see. Reaching out to the student body to learn what events they want to see is a great way to connect with them and show you care. As a programmer, you feel good about yourself when you know you have produced a program students have enjoyed. Evaluating feedback and using it to improve future events will help you ensure that students who attend your programs are the getting the most out of them.

Setting/achieving goals Each semester or year, your programming board should discuss as a group the goals you would like to accomplish. Reviewing previous assessments can help you shape your goals and provide direction for how the board would like to move forward. It is important to make sure your board is progressing and working on areas that need to be improved while still capitalizing on its strengths.

Funding “As resources decline and pressures for accountability increase, there is a natural tendency for institutions to reallocate resources to … academic priorities” (Upcraft & Schuh, 1996, p. 8). Assessment allows you to show administration how the board is progressing throughout the year and from year to year. If your board is petitioning for more money, conducting assessment and being able to have documents to back up your requests can help. It is always helpful to show administration the research behind your requests, as they are more likely to approve them if they know the 18

Things to keep in mind Your target audience and purpose for assessment

Assessment needs to be “in their face” If students can take the survey with them, you cut your response rate in half. Do your best to meet the students where they are and secure their input in the moment.

Don’t go assessment crazy Yes, assessment can be addicting, especially for us data geeks. Once you begin looking at feedback, you can develop an eagerness to want to know more. However, it is important to keep in mind that not everyone cares about assessment as much as we would like them to. If you are always actively pushing an assessment in your students’ faces, they can and will lose interest.

Create and maintain enthusiasm As with any program, if you’re excited about it, that energy can translate to other students. Don’t just sit behind a table and ask people to fill out your survey or shout questions at them. Stand up, be seen, interact with students and be enthusiastic!

References Palomba, C.A., & Banta, T.W. (1999). Assessment essentials: Planning, implementing, and improving assessment in higher education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Upcraft, M.L., & Schuh, J. H. (1996). Assessment in Student Affairs: A Guide for Practitioners. San Francisco: JosseyBass Publishers.

About the Author Alicia Bates is Assistant Director of Campus Activities at Hartwick College (NY). Active in NACA, she has served as

the NACA® Mid Atlantic Professional Development Programs Coordinator and on the NACA® South Educational Session Review Committee. In 2012, she served as an NACA® Leadership Fellow. In graduate school, she served as a graduate assistant for programming, as well as a graduate student for Greek affairs. She is also affiliated with the Alpha Delta Pi Sorority and the Order of Omega. She holds a bachelor’s degree in mass communication and journalism from Methodist University (NC) and a master’s degree in college student affairs from Nova Southeastern University (FL). APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


road trip! NACA® Regional Conferences are just around the corner! Plan now to make sure you don’t miss out! NACA® South // Oct 9–12, 2014 // Myrtle Beach, SC NACA® Mid Atlantic // Oct 16–19, 2014 // Lancaster, PA NACA® Central // Oct 23–26, 2014 // Arlington, TX NACA® Northeast // Oct 30–Nov 2, 2014 // Hartford, CT NACA® Mid America // Nov 6–9, 2014 // Covington, KY NACA® West // Nov 13–16, 2014 // Portland, OR

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How Do You Change an Event’s Culture?

t a e f i L t n e d n u t a C S h c a e B e t h s t a l B a Be By

Jon Kapell

University of North Carolina-Wilmington Photos in this article are from the University of North CarolinaWilmington 2013 Beach Blast. 20

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IVING AND WORKING AT A BEACH CAMPUS can be one of the best and most interesting experiences in a student activities career – and one of the most challenging. Imagine more than 2,500 students and community members attending an annual start-of-the-school year event – on the beach. Some are sunbathing, some are walking around talking with old friends and making new ones, many are cooling off in the ocean waves, and a few are consuming alcohol regardless of being under the legal age. Now, imagine all of this being overseen by no more than seven full-time staff professionals and a handful of beach police officers. That was what a UNCW tradition called Beach Blast used to look like. The residents of the beach town and the local media dreaded this annual tradition, fearing every part of it, from the thousands of students to the cars parked on lawns or other private property. A few years ago, members of the community asked the town’s board of aldermen to prohibit this event from taking place ever again based on the parking issues, alcohol abuse, and fighting among some of the intoxicated participants as they left the beach. The tradition of Beach Blast, it seemed, was about to come to an end. That is, until the spring and summer of 2006, when a planning committee, spearheaded by two full-time professional staff, collaborated with beach town officials and then proposed significant changes to the event. Many of the changes that were implemented were seen by students as a violation of their perceived right to celebrate as they had in the past. And, as a result of those changes, many students felt the event had been ruined.

Event History There were numerous concerns expressed by the residents and leaders of the local beach community where the event was held, with participant and emergency management being the primary concern. With so many students and community members attending the event, the attendeeto-staff ratio far exceeded expectations for reasonable management of any possible crisis. This was to become one of the biggest challenges in reinventing this tradition. Alcohol was cited as another of the most prevalent issues related to the event. The beach town has a law against consumption of alcohol on the beach; however, the town’s police department had not been enforcing this law. Many of the students attending the event were aware of the law, but also knew the police did not actively enforce it through arrests or citations. In their minds, this gave them permission to consume alcohol during the event. The beach police informed the university that while they were not willing to enforce the open-container law, it was expected that the university would handle this aspect of the event. With the small number of staff present, curtailing alcohol consumption simply was not feasible. Parking was the next concern expressed by beach residents. With limited spaces available, many of the attendees parked wherever they could fit their cars. There were hundreds of cars parked illegally in business parking lots, in homeowners’ driveways or on their lawns, or alongside the road near the beach access points. The final issue involved how the event was being advertised. For several years leading up to 2006, radio airtime APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

was purchased to promote awareness of the tradition to the students and community. With the radio station having one of the largest market shares in the area, we were very effective in getting the message out to the students about the event, but that also meant any community member who heard the commercials knew about it and could attend, as well.

Making the Change In proposing and making changes to the event, we used John Kotter’s eight-step change model as the basis for action. He proposes the following steps in his theory: 1. Create urgency. 2. Form a powerful coalition. 3. Create a vision for change. 4. Communicate the vision. 5. Remove obstacles. 6. Create short-term wins. 7. Build on the change. 8. Anchor the changes in the culture. The creation of urgency for the event came about as a bold statement by the beach community leadership in which they said they were not going to allow the event to continue if even the most remote possibility existed that the aforementioned issues would accompany it. After being told the permit for the event would most likely not be approved, developing a plan to make changes and ensure the continuity of this tradition became a priority for event planners, and the high level of urgency became evident at the onset of the planning process. As the re-invention of the event began, university administrators spent many hours meeting with the leadership and the various members of the beach community to form a powerful coalition. It was important for them to understand that their concerns were being heard and actively addressed in the development of an event-management plan that outlined the myriad intricacies of the program. Through the writing of the Event Management Plan, we were able to create the vision for change that addressed the desires of the beach community and thereby communicated the vision of how the event would be managed through subsequent meetings with stakeholders. The next step in the change-model process – removing the obstacles that stood in the way of a successful event – posed our most significant challenge. The primary obstacle we faced was the lack of a volunteer force to handle the number of students attending. In previous years, there was only a handful of staff volunteers at the event. The demand for an increase in the number of staff and student volunteers was evident. Subsequently, there have been upwards of 40 to 50 full-time staff volunteers and nearly 40 students assisting during the event. An external security staff has also been hired to provide 11 officers in addition to three beach police officers. With this additional coverage, we have been able to address issues, the presence of alcohol has diminished greatly, and the number of incidents has declined. With the larger number of volunteers needing training, we added training sessions so that all volunteers were aware of expectations and how to handle a crisis should it arise. The second issue in event management was to eliminate on-air advertising. Doing this accomplished two things for the event: 21


1. It provided a significant cost savings and certain funds could now be used for other expenses, specifically for hiring additional security staffing, and 2. Not advertising to the public decreased the number of non-student participants and the number of incidents caused by non-students. The next challenge in adapting the event involved installing temporary snow fencing on the beach to define a perimeter for it. Because the location is a public beach, no one may be denied entry; however, the fencing created a visual boundary that helped to contain the participants inside the confines of the event. At each entrance through the fencing, a volunteer and an event security staff are now stationed to check student IDs, as well as their bags and coolers to verify that no alcohol is brought into the event. With the high number of students attending, there needed to be some formalized activities in which they could participate. There had been surf camps in the past that reached fewer than 60 students, so there was a concerted effort to incorporate other engagement opportunities. While the surf camps continued, the university’s campus recreation department set up volleyball nets. In addition, a group of 10 to 12 vendors became involved, some of which provided food and soft drinks in addition to contests and activities every 15 to 20 minutes during the program. The local radio station also provided an on-air personality to play music and help to make announcements on behalf of event organizers only to those on the beach. No announcements were made on air about the event. The final obstacle to be addressed was parking. UNCW maintains a contract with the local city transit system for shuttle service for campus-related transportation for students. As the date for Beach Blast occurs before the first day of classes in the fall, the shuttle company is not yet running its full fleet. This allowed event organizers to use its 11 unused shuttle buses to run continuously between the campus and the event location. In the first year, we estimated that more than 1,500 students used the shuttles. In recent years, that number has grown to more than 1,900 riders each year. Having all these changes in place allowed for the Event Management Plan to be compiled as a written document and shared to create short term wins for all involved. We shared the plan with the beach community and its town leadership, resulting in a high level of confidence in the management of the event. In previous years, the permit for the event had almost 22

been denied. Now, with the Event Management Plan in effect, the town leadership no longer debates the process and merits of the event. They have a new sense of trust in event organizers and in the students who attend, knowing that protocols are in place should a problem arise. The Event Management Plan continues to be adapted each year to meet the ongoing needs of the beach community, the staff and the students. In some years, the number of staff and security personnel is reallocated to more highly trafficked areas of the beach, and in other years, we have found we have it just the way it needs to be to maintain the integrity and safety of all involved. This building on the change has synergized the relationship between the beach community and the university and has opened doors for other relationships.

Student Reception and Success In the first few years with the new Beach Blast model in place, there was a great deal of student resistance, as they felt their “party” was not what it used to be. Students tried to bring in alcohol during those first few years, and when the alcohol was discovered, they were required to discard it. The police were more visible and they began to enforce the beach community’s laws with the students. Word quickly spread, though, that alcohol would not be tolerated at the event, and those who chose to imbibe and were caught would face legal action, be subject to the campus conduct system, or both. The organizers of the event were known as “those people who ruined the event,” but it was a moniker we proudly wore. In the years since we implemented these major changes, some students have admitted they appreciated the new event structure, as there have been fewer intoxicated people causing problems. Attendance has continued to grow each year, from about 2,500 people in 2006 to more than 4,200 in 2011. There are still those students who choose to make poor decisions and fewer than a dozen students each year drink before or during the event, which is a tiny percentage of those attending. The changes have been anchored into the culture of the event and have helped to continue in building relationships between the university and the beach community.

References Kotter, J.P. (1996). Leading change. Boston, Mass: Harvard Business School Press.

About the Author Jon Kapell is Director for Campus Activities and Involvement at the University of North Carolina-Wilmington. He

previously served in positions at Drexel University (PA) and the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. He holds a bachelor’s degree in communication studies from West Chester University (PA) and a master’s degree in human services administration from Rider University (NJ). He is a past vice president for Habitat for Humanity and currently serves on the board of directors for Kappa Delta Rho. He has written articles for Campus Activities Programming® in the past on topics ranging from planning the perfect coffeehouse to making the call to move a rain event indoors. APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


SAVE THE DATE!

NACA® Summer Leadership Event Share the Disney experience while developing leadership skills. June 19-22, 2014 Walt Disney World® Resort, Florida (FL)

© Disney

Audience: Student Leaders Focus: Experiential Learning • Leadership Development Peer-to-Peer Training Customer Service and other Employability Skills www.mydisneymeetings.com/naca2014

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Navigating Student Organization Travel By

Jillian Van Auken

Indiana UniversityPurdue University Indianapolis

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When traveling with students to NACA® conferences, Conventions and other events, it’s crucial to be aware of all policies and risks involved, as they pertain to both your institution and the host city/site. APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


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TUDENT ORGANIZATIONS TRAVEL FOR MANY PURPOSES, near and far, to meet organizational goals and provide opportunities to their members not available on campus. Whether traveling to a conference, retreat or a social event, there are risks inherent in students traveling outside of the university. It is important for student organizations to understand the risks associated with travel and to be proactive beforehand about minimizing potential risks. Taking time to identify, understand and build awareness of the risks associated with travel will reduce liability for an organization. Traveling outside of the university can be an overwhelming process, but educating yourself about your university’s policies and procedures for managing risk will provide your organization the means to ensure safe travel.

It’s an Adventure! Every fall and winter, I embark on an adventure with students to the NACA® Mid America Regional Conference and the NACA® National Convention. Each trip presents new experiences and challenges as I travel to a new state, navigate winter weather in the Midwest or try to keep track of students in unfamiliar surroundings. I have been stuck in airports, been lost in unfamiliar cities without a GPS signal and had to navigate public transportation in a big city. Although I have traveled with students to conferences numerous times, it always surprises me what I learn along the way. After each trip, I find myself reflecting on it and adding new tools to my travel toolkit for the next conference. In addition to the new discoveries I make on my travel adventures, new policies pop up that require me to change my approach to travel or adjust the way I do things. Developing a travel toolkit is an essential step to safe, fun travel.

My Travel Toolkit So what’s in my travel toolkit, you ask? It can be broken down into four basic components: 1. Knowledge of local/state laws and university travel policies, 2. Completing the proper paperwork for travel, 3. Setting expectations for conference participation, and 4. A pre-trip meeting. These four components provide a great foundation for minimizing travel risk and setting students up for a fun, safe conference experience.

1. Knowledge of local/state laws and university travel policies It’s important for an advisor to have a working knowledge of the local and state laws and university policies pertaining to travel. Understanding these will provide student organization advisors with a road map for traveling outside of the university. The university policies apply the local and state laws to a university context and put in place procedures to assist students, faculty and staff in complying with the laws. For example, at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), carpooling in a personal vehicle to an event or conference is considered a high-risk activity and is strongly discouraged. It is recommended that student organizations travel by a university vehicle or one provided by a university approved car rental company. In addition, students, faculty APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

and staff members serving as drivers must pass a motor vehicle records check to receive authorization to transport students. Understanding university specific policies, similar to those I shared above, provides context for how to approach travel with students on your campus and outline the parameters surrounding travel activity.

2. Completing the proper paperwork for travel Once you have an understanding of the local/state laws and university travel policies, prepare the required paperwork to notify participants of the risk involved in travel, collect the necessary information in case of emergency and establish participant expectations. The student activities office at IUPUI provides student organizations a travel packet that includes the recommended paperwork. It includes an emergency contact form, participant commitment agreement, participant release and waiver, a sample conference/ retreat application and a pre-trip meeting agenda template. The purpose of the packet is to provide student organization advisors a means to collect the necessary participant information for travel and to outline information advisors should review with students prior to travel activity. The participant agreement outlines the expectations to which participants are to adhere while traveling with the university and provides advisors an opportunity to ensure students understand the boundaries set for the conference or retreat. The participant release and waiver ensures students are aware of the risks associated with travel to and from the conference and the risks associated with participation in the conference or retreat. It is important to note that travel waivers do not release the university or student organization of responsibility for injury or other travel-related incidents, but, instead, simply notify participants that there is risk associated with participation in the activity. To reduce the level of risk involved in travel activity, the activity risks need to be assessed and proactive steps taken. Lastly, the sample conference/retreat application and pretrip meeting agenda provide advisors templates and things to consider when traveling with students.

3. Setting expectations for conference participation It is essential that expectations are set for how students conduct themselves in a conference setting, especially when traveling to a new city. These include general expectations for student behavior at the conference and highlight areas where risk is inherent, such as use of alcohol, staying in a hotel room and traveling between the hotel and conference venue. Whether the students participating in the conference are of age or not, setting expectations for the use of alcohol during the conference is important. I have a no-alcohol tolerance policy, meaning students are not permitted to use alcohol while on a university-sponsored trip. Any violation of this policy is subject to the Office of Student Conduct upon return to campus. It is common knowledge that there is risk involved in participating in alcohol-related activities. Setting a no-tolerance alcohol policy minimizes the risk that an alcohol-related incident will occur at a conference. Hotel rooms are booked through the university, but put 25


in the student’s name. The university covers the cost of the hotel stay, but students are held accountable for any room service, damage or incidental charges. When the university books hotel rooms for a student stay, it is expected that students conduct themselves in a mature and responsible manner during their stay; not throwing parties or damaging the hotel room. Students are also expected to stay at the hotel and/or conference venue unless traveling to a meal or with the rest of the group to a location outside of the conference. When it is necessary for students to travel between the hotel and conference venue without the advisor or as a group, they are asked to follow the “buddy system.” It is safer for students to travel in pairs than by themselves in an unfamiliar city. Setting the above expectations and taking time to review them before departure from campus reduces the level of risk associated with the travel activity.

4. A pre-trip meeting A pre-trip meeting is a great opportunity to review expectations for student behavior during travel and/or while at a conference, to provide participants information about the conference and for students to complete required paperwork. By reviewing expectations for travel and conference behavior before departure, the advisor provides students the opportunity to ask clarifying questions and gain an understanding of the reasoning behind the expectations prior to the conference. A pre-trip meeting also provides time to review conference lingo, what to expect at the conference and the daily schedule. Providing context for conference participation sets students up for success and to take full advantage of the opportunities provided. Additionally, the advisor can have students read and complete their emergency medical forms and participant release and waivers. By completing the paperwork in person, students are given the opportunity to ask questions and ensure they understand the risks involved in attending the conference and the protocol for medical treatment.

It is essential that expectations are set for how students conduct themselves in a conference setting, especially when traveling to a new city.

addition, the risk management office can provide student organization advisors help in navigating travel policy and answer questions pertaining to travel risk. The General Counsel can provide guidance on the development of participant releases and waivers and assist you in gaining an understanding of how to properly use waivers for travel. Identifying the individuals who can assist you with travel risk will make conference preparation a much smoother process and will ensure you have a working understanding of the risks associated with your next trip.

Develop Your Own Travel Toolkit When student organizations and their advisors take the time to understand the risks associated with travel outside of the university, the level of risk and the chance that an injury or incident will occur during travel activity is reduced. Breaking down student organization travel into a few easy steps can make the process less overwhelming and ensures participants have a fun and safe travel experience. The key is to be proactive in setting expectations, understanding travel policy and taking the necessary measures prior to travel activity. So, before you embark on your next adventure, make sure you take time to develop your own travel toolkit and sit back, relax and enjoy the ride. Happy travels!

References IUPUI Student Organization Website. Retrieved from www.rso.iupui.edu Indiana University Office of Insurance, Loss Control and Claims. Retrieved from http://inlocc.iu.edu/orm/ SiteMap2.cfm Indiana University Office of the Vice President and General Counsel. Retrieved from http://www.iu.edu/~vpgc/ sample-agreements/release-from-liability-templates.shtml

About the Author Jillian Van Auken is Coordinator for Student Activities at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis,

where she was named Advisor of the Year for 2010-2011. Active in NACA, she has presented/co-presented educational sessions in the past and has also previously written for Campus Activities Programming®. She holds a bachelor’s degree in education from Otterbein College (OH) and a master’s degree from Miami University (OH), where she was Outstanding Graduate Adviser for 2009-2010.

Campus Partners Building a relationship with the student activities and risk management offices and general counsel on your campus is another great step to understanding travel risk and policy. The student activities and risk management offices likely have staff with an understanding of travel risk and who can provide assistance in locating necessary resources. In 26

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SAVE THE DATE Enhance your professional development skills this spring and summer with these upcoming institutes!

International Experiential Learning Institute

Mark your calendars for this institute where you will learn how student engagement can be supported through experiential learning. May 21-23, 2014 Memorial University St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada

Student Organizations Institute

The NACA®/ASCA/NIRSA/ACUI Student Organizations Institute (SOI) will offer higher education professionals and student organization advisors the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the principles related to advising, risk management, student conduct and more! June 25-27, 2014 Washington University in St. Louis St. Louis, MO

National Leadership Symposium

Attend this professional development experience designed for faculty members, student affairs professionals, and other educators involved with promoting leadership education at colleges and universities. July 14-17, 2014 University of Tampa For more information on these institutes and others hosted by NACA, visit www.naca.org

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!

OWN YOUR BUDGET

By

Allison Pukala

Merrimack College (MA)

Many programming budgets are large and have hundreds of charges to them over the course of an academic year. But with good preparation and weekly updating, these budgets will no longer own you – YOU will own them! Key Terms • Allocation: A system of dividing your budget into

different categories from which you are planning to spend funds (i.e. Concert, Day Programming, OffCampus Trips, Co-sponsorship etc.). • Budget Adjustment: Adapting your budget as your year progresses to match your needs. • Expenses: Monies paid for events, meetings or programs. • Supplemental Budget: Monies added to areas that need funding.

Where to Start Once budget funds are received for the next academic year, it is important for the advisor and the student organization treasurer to review them. If your organization received a large lump sum, review your previous year’s spending and 28

allocate your new budget based on what you anticipate your spending for the coming year to be. If your budget is already allocated when you receive it, review it and compare it to your spending from the previous year to see where you may need to make cuts or additions. You may also want to prepare for any supplemental requests you may need to make if your student government association allows this. After you have allocated your funds, create an Excel spreadsheet providing each budget category its own area with the amount allocated listed at the top. Color coordinating can help. Set up columns under each category to log the date, vendor, event/program and cost for each expense. The charges can be tallied by Excel to maintain your budget totals for you. Logging every expense is key to understanding how even the smallest charges add up to the total cost of an event.

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Weekly and Monthly Maintenance It is important for the advisor and the treasurer to each maintain a spreadsheet separately. This will provide you with a simple way to have a system of checks and balances. If the treasurer has a mailbox, the advisor should leave a copy of all expenses in it with the expectation that the treasurer check it and also log in the data. This will allow your weekly meetings to be more productive. Meeting weekly allows the advisor and the treasurer to review the expenses they have each logged in during the week to see if there are any discrepancies. If there are, this is the time to go through all of the charges and find out why the discrepancies have appeared. You do not want to do this at the end of the year to discover then that you under- or overspent your budget. The weekly meetings are also a great time to evaluate how you’re spending under each category. You can then make budget adjustments or determine whether you need to request supplemental funding. Do you need more money for daytime programming and your concert is costing you less then you estimated? Move the funds from one category to the other. Have you come up with a new program idea and would like to have more money so you can create the event? Request supplemental funding from your SGA. And then, of course, add it to your spreadsheet. With pre-planning, weekly and monthly upkeep and an annual budget review, you will be able to own your budget and not let it own you.

Common Errors in Budgeting

Not Working Together and Communicating The budget is not the sole responsibility of the organization’s advisor or the treasurer. It is a joint responsibility. For organizations with a larger budget, it is important to meet weekly, with each maintaining photocopies of all expenses. The treasurer should maintain a spreadsheet similar to that of the advisor and, as I pointed out before, the weekly meetings are a great time to balance the accounts and discover any differences. Sometimes, charges may be listed under the wrong account category or for the wrong amount. Two pairs of eyes are better then one when it comes to any budget. For smaller budgets, you may pursue a similar process and bi-weekly meetings or meeting as needed may work better. No matter what the case, communication is key to a successful advisor/treasurer relationship and to a successful year of budgeting!

Final Tips 1. Set aside uninterrupted time to work on a budget that best works for your organization. 2. Be thorough and patient. Log every expense your organization incurs and make sure your budget copies match one another along the way. Don’t overlook even the smallest of differences – they can add up. 3. Have fun and spend money with confidence.

Not allocating Your Funds When first receiving a budget, it is easy to be excited and blinded by the lump-sum amount and see dollar bills and large-scale event possibilities everywhere you look. Unfortunately, it is important to step back and review your spending from the past year, comparing it to the amount you have received for this year. Once you have done that, break your budget down into categories that work for you in an Excel spreadsheet. Some suggested categories include: Day Programming, Evening Programming, Welcome Week, Spring Concert, etc. At a minimum, set your budget for each section to what you spent the year before in that area or more, if possible. If you are trying to do more daytime programming, this is the time to move funds to provide more money to that area. As for areas where you did not spend much, take funds away from them and give money to areas it is needed.

Not Balancing Your Virtual Checkbook Once you have allocated your funds and have begun spending for the year, tracking your spending is vital. Keeping track in your head is not a formal accounting technique, so it is best to avoid that. Instead, using your Excel spreadsheet, log the date, vendor, related event/program and amount spent into the category under which it falls. Subtract the amounts you log in from the overall total for each budget category to make sure you are not over- or under-spending in any area. (This form of balancing your budget will help you allocate your funds for the next year, as well.) APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

IT IS IMPORTANT FOR THE ADVISOR AND THE TREASURER TO EACH MAINTAIN A SPREADSHEET SEPARATELY. THIS WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH A SIMPLE WAY TO HAVE A SYSTEM OF CHECKS AND BALANCES.

About the Author Allison Pukala is Director of Student Involvement at Merrimack College (MA),

where she previously served as Associate Director of the Office of Student Involvement, as well as the Assistant Director of Student Involvement. She also served as a Staff Associate in the Campus Center Programs Office at Salem State University (MA). Active in NACA, she has served as the Diversity Chair and Treasurer, as well as a member of the CAMP Staff and the Special Events Committee, for the NACA® Northeast Regional Conference. She is also affiliated with NASPA, having received its Richard F. Stevens Outstanding New Professional Award and now serving as its Region I Student Leadership Programs Knowledge Community Blog Coordinator. She now serves as the Massachusetts NASPA Board Secretary. She holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Merrimack College and a master’s degree in administration of higher education from Suffolk University (MA).

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The Basics of Budgeting: Making Your Money Work for You as a College Student By

Kaleb L. Briscoe

Indiana State University

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T IS FAIR TO SAY THAT MANY COLLEGE STUDENTS DO NOT UNDERSTAND BUDGETING. Before college, their parents and/or relatives have provided all necessities for their livelihood. Then college hits, and they are forced to make their own decisions, handle day-to-day business, and, most importantly, be in charge of their own finances. This increase of responsibility with little to no guidance is often scary for many college students. You (the student) can find yourself maxing out credit cards, having to repay large student loan debts, and struggling to make ends meet. Before you go down this road of no return, though, you would be wise to learn the basics of budgeting. We should begin by defining the term budgeting. It consists of an estimate of itemized income that is used to develop a financial plan (Dictionary.com). Budgeting provides individuals with the opportunity to assess their current income and current expenses. As a college student, your expenses can be relative high, especially if you are not accustomed to paying your own bills. Typical expenses for college students include tuition and fees, books and supplies, room and board/off-campus housing, groceries, personal care items, transportation/car expenses, health insurance, cell phones, clothing, and extracurricular activities. Students who wish to establish and maintain financial security should follow these basic steps:

Step 1: Analyze your Current Income and Expenses Students must monitor what they spend monthly by writing down their expenses and income. For example, Logan is a junior political science major serving as a workstudy student in the athletics department and bringing home $640 a month. In addition, she is actively involved on campus, currently serving as Student Government Association President, for which she receives a stipend of $360 dollars a month, increasing her monthly income to $1,000. She prepares a list of her current expenses: car note, $210; car insurance, $50; gas, $50; phone bill, $50; groceries, $80; and personal expenses, $160. Logan’s income is $1000, but she spends $600 a month, leaving her with $400 dollars a month. The average amount students should be saving monthly is 20% of your income. In this scenario, Logan would save $200 and have $200 dollars to live off each month. Can the average student live off of $200 dollars a month? Absolutely not. Therefore, Logan would need to strategize ways to save money each month to decrease her expenses or find ways to increase her monthly income. Every day, many students fall into the same category as Logan, or worse, because most are not saving at all, leaving them with no reserve in time of emergencies. Assessing and reviewing current income and expenses to see where modifications can be made is an easy resolution for Logan and many students in her situation.

Step 2: Brainstorm Effective Ways to Save Money Timothy and Ashley are the average couple on campus who love to hang out and party. Timothy, who is the star quarterback of the football team, and Ashley, who serves as the cheerleading captain, both like nice things. However, they are each on a limited budget. During the off-season, Timothy always likes to find special ways to show Ashley APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

affection. Instead of taking Ashley to the movies and out to eat, he gets a Red Box movie rental for a dollar and sets up an indoor picnic, cooking a special meal for two. Ashley thinks that Timothy is romantic and creative; more importantly, he is very cost-conscious. Because dating can be another expense for many couples in college, finding a way to make your mate happy while also making cuts calls for inventiveness. In the example above, Timothy has found innovative ways to simultaneously cut costs and please his girlfriend. Many students today want to save money, but they are not sure where to begin. Students should start by thinking of smarter ways to do the same things you like to do at a cheaper price. For instance, if you like to eat, buy groceries using coupons or specials. Publix and Winn-Dixie, for example, have buy-one, get-one-free specials that change weekly. WalMart’s low everyday prices are guaranteed to save you 5 to 10 cents per item when compared to their competitors. These are examples of clever ways to shop for less while obtaining the same grocery items. While shopping can be a great way to de-stress while in college, you do not want outrageous credit card bills, owing more than half of your income because you thought you needed that cool shirt. (If you think it’s necessary to have a credit card, get only one for emergencies.) Students should always shop on a budget, looking for holiday specials and sales. For example, Macy’s advertises and promotes 25% percent off sales each holiday. So what should you do? Buy only what you can afford and what is on sale.

Step 3: Create a Budget and Stick to It Sarah and Katie have been best friends since high school. They do everything together, including living in a nice apartment off campus. They thought budgeting together as roommates would be an effective way to cut household expenses. Katie works as an assistant manager at a local restaurant, whereas Sarah works as a sales clerk at Office Depot. As Katie and Sarah begin to create their budget, they realize Katie brings home more money than Sarah, which has an impact on their initial plan to save together. Katie can save more money monthly because she makes more. Katie and Sarah are now revisiting the idea and trying to find an effective way for each of them to save on their own. As this illustration shows, one of the most difficult aspects of budgeting is developing a budget that works for you and sticking to it. Please remember what works for one student might not work for you. Everyone is unique and has different expenses. An example of a budget that would likely work for any given college student would include: • Living expenses ($500-800 a month): Stay on campus or off campus with a roommate. • Transportation costs ($40-60 dollars a month): Minimize the amount of gas you use (carpool to events and functions). • Cable and Internet ($50-80): Get basic cable and Internet and try to find a special with companies that use contracts or promotions. • Groceries ($50-$80): Food is a necessity, so please eat. However, keep in mind that the Sunday paper offers many coupons and sales. The dollar store is your friend, too, so grocery shop on a budget to get the best bang for your 31


buck. If feasible, enroll in your school’s meal program. In such a budget, total expenses range from $640-1,020 monthly for a college student. Students should focus on these valuable techniques to save on essential expenses: • Use public transportation instead of a personal vehicle. This will help you save on gas, yearly parking decals, and other automotive-related expenses. • Eat in throughout the day. It is cheaper to buy groceries and cook versus eating out daily. (If you do eat out, do so only during lunch for lunch specials.) • Make your own coffee instead of purchasing coffee daily. Coffee can be expensive and random trips to Starbucks add up; buy a coffeemaker and make your own. • Use student discounts. If your school or community offers a variety of ways to save money, take advantage of them. • Rent or buy used textbooks. Books can be expensive if you don’t utilize your resources wisely.

Seek Help when You Need It So, what happens when students have followed this advice but still find themselves in a financial crunch? They should seek help. Counselors, mentors, advisors, faculty, staff and administrative personnel are available to assist you and serve as “free” resources. We (those previously mentioned) have not only been in the same position as you, we are also struggling with our own financial hurdles. Reach out to us so we can lend a hand. These relationships can benefit you on your collegiate journey. Martha is a sophomore early childhood major who attends college on 75 percent assistantship and scholarship. However, paying the costs of the remaining 25 percent and books has been a struggle for her parents each semester. Martha is very involved on campus and has developed a strong rapport with faculty and staff. In addition to her stellar 3.5 GPA, she is involved in prominent organizations on campus. As balancing school and finances becomes overwhelming, Martha decides to have a meeting with her Campus Life Coordinator (who is also one of her organization advisors). After serious discussion, her advisor suggested she apply for work-study and speak with a financial aid counselor about other avenues for assistance. Her advisor then called the Financial Aid Office to talk about her case and referred her to an excellent resource. In this case, Martha did not have a plan, but she had good guidance from someone who knew her and cared about her. This relationship between Martha and her advisor, like many others on campus, begins by students associating with good people. With that being said, there are a couple of key individuals at your college that you, as a student, should know by name. •F  inancial aid representatives can be very helpful when you are seeking free scholarships, grants and other opportunities. These individuals normally have listings of possible aid for which students can apply and receive. In addition, if grants or free aid are not depleted, students who contact the financial aid office may be selected based on communication of need. •S  tudent affairs representatives give critical insight into resources such as organization scholarships and internship assistance. These are mechanisms students can tap into for résumé development and income sources. Remember to get involved in at least one honor society, one national organization and incorporate traveling abroad when possible. These strategies can all lead to 32

future success in studies, jobs and scholarship funds. •A  cademic advisors keep you on track with your studies. In addition, these individuals are well versed in academia. Therefore, they are familiar with ways to secure scholarships based on writing skills and your GPA. Students who work hard in school should be rewarded. Make sure you share accolades you receive with your chair or advisor. One good experience can spiral into a great experience with help from others! •C  areer service specialists are your “go-to” people for internships, part-time jobs, and future career endeavors. This office is a critical resource throughout your college career because it constantly hosts résumé workshops, career fairs, and networking activities. It is your obligation to use this office and its resources wisely, as dollars count while you are in school and especially when you have just graduated.

Many Possibilities for Fiscal Success as a Student There are many possibilities for enjoying fiscal success while you are a student. It is important to manage your finances responsibly and not be carrying high levels of debt or be paying back student loans until you are 60. If you take out student loans, those funds should be for essentials, only. Use the strategies I’ve shared to make your money work for you, but keep in mind that how well these tips work may be dependent on the type of school you attend. All of the resources I have shared might not be available. Take the initiative and search for effective ways to manage your money and give yourself a cost-efficient educational experience. Virtually anything is possible if you work hard and network. So what are you waiting for? It’s time to start budgeting!

References Dictionary.com. Definition of budgeting. Retrieved from http:// dictionary.reference.com/browse/budgeting?s=ts, 2013

About the Author Kaleb L. Briscoe is Assistant Director of Financial Aid at Albany Technical College (GA), as well as a graduate student at Indiana State University, where she is pursuing a master’s

in higher education and student affairs. She holds a bachelor’s degree in business marketing and master’s degree in business administration, both from Albany State University. In her current capacity at Albany Technical College, she works closely with students on fiscal and financial advisement issues, programming and forums, and assisting the college with enrollment management initiatives. During her undergraduate matriculation at ASU, she held key position in Student Government Association, Student Activity Advisory Board, Students in Free Enterprise, and Alpha Psi Omega National Theatre Honor Society. In addition to her current position with ATC, she teaches in the marketing management program and mentors high school students in Dougherty County for college preparation. Briscoe is actively involved in the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA), National Education Association (NEA), American College Personnel Association (ACPA), and Kappa Delta Pi International Honor Society. She was recently selected as the 2013-2014 NASPA Graduate Associate representing Indiana State University.

APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


Association of College Unions International Serving campus community builders since 1914 www.acui.org/orlando To honor its centennial, ACUI is encouraging individuals to complete 100 hours of service. Make your pledge at www.acui.org/100/service.

THANK YOU

to the sponsors of the 2014 NACA速 Foundation Trivia Tournament Judson Laipply Einstein Sponsor

Brainiac Sponsor Brainiac Sponsor Event Shirt Sponsor

APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING速

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APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING速

37


IT’S ONLY THE BEGINNING:

Plan Your Financial Future Now!

By

Ja’Net Adams

Impact Speakers Group (NC)

38

APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


A

LL GRADES ARE IN AND IT’S OFFICIAL: you will shortly be walking across the stage and receiving the diploma for which you have worked so hard the last several years. But, wait – graduation is not the end of your journey; it is only the beginning. Yes, you made it out of college, but now what? Now that you’re on your own, how do you plan to survive? Every college graduate will come to the realization that the day has come to take care of themselves and, for many graduating seniors, that thought is terrifying. Think about it: for 20-plus years, someone else has been paying for your housing, food, clothes, etc. Now, that suddenly ends! And while providing for yourself after graduation is a valid concern, there is also another monthly expense that always seems to creep up on a majority of college graduates: the student loan bill. During college, students who have taken out loans do realize they will ultimately need to repay them, but few know the exact amount that will be due each month until the first bill arrives six months after graduation. Then, reality sets in, the reality that they are in tens of thousands of dollars of debt and must repay it without the help of their parents. The average student graduates from college with $27,000 in student loan debt. That is just an average, which means some students have less, but many have much more debt than $27K. When the first student loan payment comes due, it is a wakeup call, because all of a sudden, that two- or four-year roller coaster ride you just jumped off was not free. Now, some bank or the government wants its money back, with interest. So, what can seniors do while still in college to get ready financially for the real world?

Prepare before You Graduate Start preparing now for the financial responsibilities that are coming your way after graduation. If you have a job offer, calculate the amount of money that will be in your paycheck each month after all taxes are taken out. After you know this figure, it is time to calculate how much of that money is going to go into somebody else’s bank account or, in other words, become “bill money.” Where do you plan to live after college? If it is in an apartment, begin looking for one in the city where the job is located and price it out. Are utilities included in the rental fee? More than likely, they are not, so you need to factor in the electric and water bills in addition to rent. If you plan to watch cable TV and surf the Internet, add two more bills to the pile. How many bills does that make? Four, and we still have not discussed your cell phone, car payment, car insurance, food, and gas. Whew! Your paycheck is getting smaller and it’s only June! The majority of college graduates are able to budget for all of these bills and still have enough money to go to a movie every once in a while. But many graduates get into financial trouble six months later when the student loan bill is added to the mix, which turns their financial world upside down. They find themselves asking, “How am I going to pay this student loan bill every month and still be able to eat?” In order for you to not be asking that question six months after graduation, find out how much you owe in students loans before receiving your diploma. Call the company or financial institution that holds your note and ask them to give APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

you an estimate of what your monthly payment will be and add that number to your monthly expenses. This preparation, alone, will place you in a better financial position than many of your fellow graduates. Whether or not you have student loans, you still need to prepare for your financial life after college. In addition to calculating your future expenses, you also need to stay away from financial traps and build an emergency fund.

Avoid Financial Traps I cannot stress enough this first financial trap: credit cards. Please DO NOT get a credit card! Contrary to what you’ve likely heard, you DO NOT need to build this kind of credit to get a car or a house, so let the credit companies keep their cards. I know you’ve been told throughout your life that a credit score is important, but financial experts have differing opinions on that. All that a credit card will do is put you in risk of losing a lot of money. Also stay away from “buy now-pay later” plans, especially when buying furniture for your new apartment. The salesperson will say to you, “Buy the furniture today and you won’t have a payment or interest for five years!” On the surface, this deal seems like a dream come true, but if you don’t pay off the furniture within five years, you will owe the furniture price as well as all the interest that has been accruing during the five-year loan term.

Create an Emergency Fund An emergency fund is your safety net. As soon as your first paycheck after college reaches your bank account, start putting money aside for unforeseen emergencies. The amount you should strive to save is $500-$1,000, with a strong emphasis on $1,000. I suggest $1,000 because many of the emergencies that may pop up will be $1,000 or less. As you get better at paying your own bills and paying off all your debt, you can then build an emergency fund that will cover eight to 12 months of living expenses.

Understand that You Are in Control Moving out into the “real world” may, at first, seem intimidating, but you control what happens to your financial life. You have power over your financial future, and the choices you make after you receive your degree can determine whether you struggle paycheck to paycheck or build longterm wealth. Have the courage to stand out from the crowd because, believe me, the crowd is broke! This IS only the beginning, but with the right preparation and discipline, I see a bright financial future ahead for you!

About the Author Ja’Net Adams is a professional speaker with Impact Speakers Group (NC) who is also

CEO of EMACK Consulting LLC (NC). Active in NACA, she participated in the NACA® South and NACA® Mid America Regional Conferences in 2013 and the 2014 NACA® National Convention, as well as the 2014 NACA Northern Plains Regional Conference. She holds a bachelor’s degree in marketing from South Carolina State University and is a monthly financial contributor to Black Business Ink. 39


HAVE BABY,

WILL GRADUATE: Successful Young Single Parents in College The Ohio State University ACCESS Collaborative Program

By

Paula H. Smith, PhD, LSW and

Jessica Parent, MA

The Ohio State University

40

“I WILL HAVE MY BABY AND I WILL GRADUATE,” has been the mantra proudly pursued by generations of young women in The Ohio State University ACCESS Collaborative Program. Even in 2008, “Have Baby Will Graduate” brandished the front cover of the University’s onCampus newspaper. The article detailed the accomplishments of single-parent student Emily Christian, who, at age 18, came to college with her son and four years later accepted a diploma and an offer to attend graduate school. Today, that same student and ACCESS alumna is a full-time University employee working at the OSU Wexner Medical Center as a Development Officer. Established in 1989, The ACCESS Collaborative Program is a prominent retention program, the first of its kind in the country. From 1989 until 2004, 147 out of 247 single-parent women have become alumnae of OSU with the assistance of the Program; an impressive 61% degree completion rate. According to current literature, the issues that are common barriers to college completion for under-resourced single parents are: safe and affordable childcare; safe, affordable and secure housing; strong support systems, and adequate resources to actively sustain the student and their families. The Office of Diversity and Inclusion developed the Program as a direct response to those issues. The Program coordinates government, university and community support services to assist both male and female single-parent students, who have full custody of their children, earn their degrees and secure employment, thereby breaking the cycle of poverty. ACCESS provides programming focused on the topics of parenting and life skills; child development; career development; financial planning; scholarship opportunities; mentoring; and professional development. Inherent to the Program’s theory of selfempowerment, is the belief that students who live the experience should be involved in developing solutions to the problems. The ACCESS Collaborative Program provides numerous benefits to meet the family’s daily living needs, as well as aid in the successful academic performance of the student. All participants are required to attend 13 programming sessions during fall and spring semesters. Participants receive up to 10 hours of evening childcare per week from The OSU Childcare Center. This resource is provided to participants for evening academic activities such as attending workshops, tutoring sessions, classes and studying. Participants are granted priority registration for classes to ensure enrollment in courses required for graduation. Also, the top 10 participants with a GPA of 2.7 or above are eligible to receive one of the quarterly $300 book scholarships. Lastly, participants are entitled to receive priority consideration for housing in Buckeye Village, a safe, on-campus family housing community for which the ACCESS Program provides a monthly $300 rent subsidy for up to 10 students. Developing key partnerships with off-campus community resources like Community Properties of Ohio Management (CPO), an affiliate of the Ohio Capital Corporation for Housing, is vital. The organization’s mission of providing quality affordable housing; linking residents with resources that stabilize their housing; and assisting residents to move beyond poverty where possible, parallels the premise of the ACCESS Program APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


of “breaking the cycle of poverty one degree at a time.” The Columbus Scholar House is a prime example. CPO built 10 brand new HUD project-based units in the King-Lincoln District of Columbus. Although the units are owned by the management company, the seven OSU families living in the building are eligible to receive Section 8 housing vouchers for the two- and three-bedroom units ranging from between 970 to 1,145 square feet of living space. The students are able to remain in Columbus Scholar House for up to six months after graduation and assistance is provided with finding safe and secure housing. Also, in an effort to assist with stability and academic success, the students receive supportive services on site, as well as on campus. Another benefit planned for the future for the students involved in the partnership is a lease-to-buy program that will be provided by CPO. Students will have the opportunity to put their minds at ease regarding finding affordable, safe and secure housing after graduation if they have the prospect of investing in not only their own, but their children’s future by becoming homeowners. The ACCESS Collaborative Program has developed national policy and research agendas in the spirit of collaboration with other advocates who work with this unique student population by hosting the national Student Parent Support Symposium. In 2014, the Symposium will commemorate its 10th year of commitment to national service and the topic of advocacy for the professionals who work with the student-parent population in higher education. In 2005, the ACCESS Collaborative Program recognized a void and the symposium has successfully brought together professionals from across the continental US, Hawaii and Canada to discuss best practices, challenges, program models, collaboration within communities, and advocating for the provision of or increase in support services in higher education for this unique population. This event has provided a network and means of collaboration for existing programs, as well as for colleges and universities interested in learning how to better serve their student-parent populations. The 2014 Symposium will be themed, “Babies, Diapers & Diplomas: Supporting Those Who Support Student Parents in Higher Education.” Additionally, the conference will feature Pre-Symposium Intensive Sessions covering the topics of Program Evaluation, Ethics and Grant Resources/Writing, guaranteeing to attract even more professionals interested in this vulnerable population. More information about the annual Symposium, to be held May 28-30, 2014, can be found at: http://odi.osu.edu/ centers/access-collaborative/access-symposium/. For the past 25 years, The ACCESS Collaborative Program has been instrumental in meeting the needs of single parents as students and as heads of their households. While the program strives to increase the retention and graduation rates of all under-resourced, single-parent students, attention is given to the unique circumstances of students from diverse social groups, including minorities, by minimizing the barriers that may prevent these students’ full participation in college. If you would like more information on the ACCESS Collaborative Program at The Ohio State University, visit the program’s website at: http://odi.osu.edu/centers/access-collaborative/ access-home.html. APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

About the Authors Dr. Paula H. Smith has

served for the past 19 years in a number of capacities at The Ohio State University Office of Minority Affairs. She currently serves

as a researcher, evaluator and grants writer for the ACCESS Collaborative Program. She has served as the Director of The Ohio State University Young Scholars Program (YSP) in Columbus, as well as the Acting Director of Recruitment and Development, and Director of Research, Development and Grants. Smith’s career profiles continuous involvement with developing and implementing recruitment and retention strategies for underrepresented populations, rural women, minorities, and low income students – both adolescents as well as adults. Her successful grantsmanship includes applying for and receiving funding from such entities as Eisenhower Foundation, JOBS, Ohio Department of Education and Human Services, Sallie Mae Foundation, Ohio Board of Regents, and Community Block Grants. Funding for projects and programs she has administered has exceeded $4 million. Smith earned a bachelor’s degree from The Ohio State University, a master’s degree in Counseling from Wright State University (OH) and doctorate in social work from The Ohio State University. She is a licensed social worker. Jessica Parent has worked at The Ohio State University in the Office of Diversity

OSU graduate Emily Christian

The Program coordinates government, university and community support services to assist both male and female single-parent students, who have full custody of their children, earn their degrees and secure employment, thereby breaking the cycle of poverty.

and Inclusion in several capacities for the past eight years. She has extensive professional experience in higher education conference and program planning, implementation of workshops, student advising, research, grantwriting and data management. Her areas of special interest include management, oversight, coordination and contact with a variety of customers and contractors as demonstrated by her leadership during the annual OSU Student Parent Support Symposium. She has also played a significant role in the establishment of the national organization Higher Education Alliance of Advocates for Students with Children (HEAASC) and served as a founding board member from 2007-2010. Parent holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Ohio University and a master’s degree in public policy and management from The Ohio State University.

41


Alfred Late Night Staff

By

Troy Morehouse

Alfred State, SUNY College of Technology

42

APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING速


About Alfred Late Night Why do we exist? At Alfred State, SUNY College of Technology, all late-night programming is conducted by Alfred Late Night. It provides alternative programming during typical high-risk behavior hours, offering Alfred State students an opportunity to be engaged, and entertained in a safe/fun environment. The programs we offer range from cooking competitions or movie nights to dodgeball and three-on-three basketball tournaments, and all the way to live bands and dance parties.

When do we program? Alfred Late Night programs during typical high-risk hours. These events occur every Friday and Saturday night starting at 11 pm and ending by 3 am. In addition, Alfred Late Night has recently expanded into Wednesday night programming. This came about because we recognized an increased amount of alcohol-related incidents within residence halls and other areas on campus on Wednesday nights. During the fall 2013 semester, Alfred Late Night was authorized to begin programming on Wednesdays from 9 pm until midnight and, as a result, there has been a drastic decrease in such incidents on Wednesday nights.

a professional to be present and are run entirely under the supervision of the Alfred Late Night Leadership Team.

Programming Program Selection Alfred Late Night hosts three events per week, roughly 39 events per semester, and almost 80 events per year. Because our assessment shows students are most likely to attend events hosted by clubs/organizations of which they are members, Alfred Late Night seeks to collaborate with other clubs as much as possible. The incentives for clubs to collaborate are: financial support for their event, staffing, and the programming experience we provide. All clubs that want to collaborate with Alfred Late Night must complete an application that outlines the program they would like to host, dates requested, and how funds will be spent. The Coordinator reviews applications, then meets with each club to discuss further details before approval is granted. Once an application is approved, a member of the Leadership Team is assigned the event and will work with the club to ensure its success. In the last year, more than 30 clubs have collaborated with Alfred Late Night.

Students become engrossed in a gaming tournament during Alfred Late Night.

What makes us different? Although there is perhaps no best way to organize a latenight programming board, Alfred Late Night is different from most because of its unique design and structure and the autonomy given to student leaders. Alfred Late Night is a Service Club funded by Student Senate, with a roughly $38,000 budget, one of the largest of any Student Senatefunded clubs at Alfred State. Also, Alfred Late Night is a 100% student-driven organization with a total of 30 paid student employees. We rely on paid members due to the difficulty of securing volunteers during the Late Night hours. All team members are paid $8 per hour for attending any Late Night-affiliated meetings, time spent event planning, purchasing items for events and, of course, working events. Included among the 30 paid team members is a nine-person Leadership Team charged with all event coordination and planning. The Leadership Team consists of one Coordinator who is an experienced member of Alfred Late Night. This person takes the lead on coordinating or delegating all responsibilities within the organization, but does not work events. There are also three Captains who are charged with leading most events, shopping/purchasing for events, making reservations and handling inventory, advertising and treasurer duties. In addition, there are three Assistant Captains who work with the Captains during events to make sure things go as planned, and occasionally lead smaller events. Finally, there are two members of the Leadership Team who handle all tech responsibilities, which may include anything from movie setups and speakers to DJ equipment or a photo booth. Alfred Late Night is much different from most because of the degree of responsibility and freedom given to its student employees. They are all highly trained in handling tense/ difficult attendees, identifying people under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs, and de-escalating situations. Because of this autonomy and training, most events do not require APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING速

Program Setup All Alfred Late Night programs fall into one of three categories based upon the likelihood of any type of risk: low, medium and high risk. Examples of low-risk events include cooking nights, pumpkin carving, and craft nights. An event is low-risk if there is no competition, it is not a party, and the likelihood of an incident is low. At all low-risk events, there is at least one member of the Leadership Team and an additional team member present. In an effort to control costs, there is a recommended limit of $75 for programming expenditures for low-risk events, and payroll does not count towards this amount. Medium-risk events are any that are competition-based and include such things as flag football tournaments, video 43


Police and an administrator, high-risk events cost upwards of $1,300 per event. Due to this, and the increased likelihood of incidents, there is a limit of one high-risk event per week, and two per month.

How Did You Hear About This Event?

What Would You Be Doing Instead?

Assessments During the 2011-2012 academic year, Alfred Late Night was out of money by Spring Break, leaving the club in a difficult situation with some very large annual programs remaining on the schedule. In an effort to avoid over-spending in the future, we decided to create two assessments to ensure the best use of funding. After considering possible assessments, we created an Attendee Survey and a Return on Investment Assessment.

Attendee Survey

80

40%

70

30%

60

20%

50

10%

40

0%

30 20

Watching TV

50%

Studying

90

Sleeping

We designed the Attendee Survey to tell us whether or not programs were effective, provide information about the most effective forms of advertising, and provide data on what students would be doing if not at the event. To gather data, the Leadership Team randomly asked 10 people at each event to complete the survey, which asked: • Are you a member of the host club/organization? • What time did you arrive at the event? • Did you like the event? • Would you like to see this event again? • Would you attend a similar event on a Wednesday? (We had not yet begun Wednesday night programming.) • If you were not attending this event, what would you be doing? • How did you hear about this event?

Partying

Percentage who heard about the event from this media format

game tournaments, and trivia nights. These are deemed medium-risk because there is the possibility of conflict due to the competition and/or possibility of prizes being awarded. At all medium-risk events, there are two members of the Leadership Team and three to four additional team members. Also, medium-risk events come with a recommended limit of $100 for programming costs. High-risk events are defined as any that are a party, have live music, and/or are expected to have 5% of the student body (roughly 175 students) or more in attendance. Examples of high-risk events include dance parties, costume parties, battles of the bands, and large-scale comedy shows. Because the probability of students arriving at these types of events under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs is higher, there is the possibility of a large number of students present, and the environment of the event creates greater risk. All high-risk events are handled much differently than medium- and low-risk events and are required to have on site: • Two members of the Leadership Team; • Eight to 10 more team members; • One professional from the Office of Student Engagement as the primary administrator; • One trained professional from campus as the secondary administrator (who is paid $75 for the event); and • Two New York State University Police officers (who are paid overtime by Alfred Late Night Events to work the event). Along with this staffing, all attendees are required to enter through a single designated entrance and pass through a metal detector to ensure a safe environment. The recommended limits for programming costs of high-risk events is $300, but because of team member labor, costs of University

10

44

Other

Word of Mouth

Twitter

Facebook

Student Announcement

On-Campus TV

Posters

0

Although all of this information was helpful, the most important thing we learned was that approximately 43% of respondents said they would be partying on or off campus if not at the Alfred Late Night event. APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


Attendee Survey – What We Learned, Moving Forward As we began gathering data, we learned we were doing some things very well. For example, roughly 97% of respondents said they liked the event and would attend a similar event in the future. Also, we learned the vast majority of our students heard about our events via word of mouth, posters, and/or Facebook. This meant we could improve our advertising by boosting our social media presence and increasing word-of-mouth advertising. We were able to successfully do that this year by assigning all social media to one Leadership Team member. This person is now able to focus a great deal of time into growing the Facebook page by increasing the number of photos, tagging people in all photos and creating more event invitations, all of which have grown the page measurably. To improve word-of-mouth advertising, we now encourage team members to talk about upcoming events and invite their friends. The data showed 43.75% of respondents said they would, or would possibly, attend Wednesday night programs. With this information and the knowledge of a spike in alcoholrelated incidents on campus, we gained approval to launch Late Night programming on Wednesdays. Although all of this information was helpful, the most important thing we learned was that approximately 43% of respondents said they would be partying on or off campus if not at the Alfred Late Night event. (I would speculate this number might actually be higher because some respondents may have been afraid to answer honestly.) This data is very important because the main purpose of Alfred Late Night Events is to provide students a fun and safe alternative to partying and it proves we have been able to do so. We were able to use this information to increase our budget from $33,000 in 2012-2013 to $38,000 in 2013-2014.

Return on Investment Assessment We created the Return on Investment Assessment to help determine whether or not each event was a good use of funding, learn what can be improved, and help elevate the level of customer service provided to clubs. To implement this assessment, we asked a member of the Leadership Team and a member of the club/organization hosting the event to complete the survey, which asked: • What went well? • What can be improved? • Were there any incidents? • Were all policies followed? • Was this event high-, medium- or low-risk? • Total number of attendees at the event? • Money spent by Alfred Late Night? • Money spent by the host club/organization?

Return on Investment Survey – What We Learned, Moving Forward The Return on Investment Survey allowed us to easily compare the number of attendees at different types of events. For example, it became quite evident that cooking events, athletic competitions and holiday-themed events were usually very well attended. We also learned events not hosted by outside clubs/organizations, and movie nights and APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

video game tournaments that Return on Investment were not part of larger events, achieved very poor attendance. 120 Additionally, we learned the average cost per attendee, 100 excluding payroll costs, for high80 risk events is $8.17 per person, medium-risk events is $4.35 per 60 person, and for low-risk events is $6.82 per person. These numbers 40 provide us with a target cost per person when planning events, 20 which has helped us determine the amount of funds to allocate to 0 High Risk Medium Risk Low Risk each type of event. As mentioned Events Events Events above, these amounts are $75 for ¾ Average Attendance low-risk, $100 for medium-risk, ¾ Cost per Attendee and $825 for high-risk events (this includes the cost of University Police and a secondary administrator). Finally, because we learned events that did not involve collaborations with another club were poorly attended, we have increased our outreach to other clubs. By tracking all clubs with which we have already worked, we are now able to reach out and turn some programs into annual events. Also, Leadership Team members are now encouraged to recruit clubs/organizations to co-program, which has resulted in many new clubs collaborating with Alfred Late Night.

What Can You Do? When creating an assessment, you must first determine what you want to evaluate. Our assessments focused on spending and effective programming. You must also determine the best way to implement the assessment, who you would like to survey, how you would like to survey them, and what is the best way to distribute the assessments. We found it best to survey people in person at events via paper surveys, but an electronic survey may be much easier and more efficient. Good luck in creating and implementing your own assessment focus on outcomes and improving your programs!

About the Author Troy Morehouse is Coordinator of Student Engagement at Alfred State, SUNY College of Technology, where he is also

Residence Director. He presented the educational session on which this article is based at the 2012 NACA® Mid Atlantic Regional Conference. He has also presented the session “Developing Clubs and Organizations – From Assessment to Growth” at the 2013 NACA® Mid Atlantic Regional Conference and at the 2014 NACA® National Convention. He has also presented on leadership and civic engagement at the fall 2012 regional conference of CSPA-NYS (College Student Personnel Association of New York State). He holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Pennsylvania State University, a Pennsylvania state teaching certification from Edinboro University of Pennsylvania and a master’s degree in organizational leadership from Lewis University (IL). 45


THE GRADUATE EXPERIENCE

The Journey to becoming a Student Affairs Professional: A Grad Student’s Story By

Sonam Shah

The George Washington University (DC)

T

HINKING ABOUT GOING TO GRAD SCHOOL? Already in grad school? Have grad students working for you? Based on personal experience, interviews with fellow grad students, and interviews with full-time student affairs professionals, I would like to share some advice to help you make the best of your graduate journey. In addition, I hope some of these tips can also help supervisors to best utilize their grad students. Most student affairs professionals decide to obtain a master’s in higher education administration, student affairs or related field because we were very involved with our university or college as undergraduates and want to continue working with students. I dedicated a great deal of time to the programming association at my undergraduate institution and truly enjoyed the experience. I still remember the time and energy all the committee members and I put into the planning and programming process for our events. It was great to have so many resources upon which to draw and be able to put our visions into action. On the day of the event, we would be scrambling to complete some last-minute tasks, troubleshoot issues, and manage our nerves and excitement. At the completion of our events, as all the students were walking out with smiles on their faces, a few would look at me and say “thank you” for putting on a great event. Those moments were so reaffirming they made me realize all the hard work was well worth it. Upon graduation, I spent about two years working in advertising and media buying. After my first year in the job, I realized this field was not for me and I began considering an alternate profession to pursue. I found myself constantly trying to remember what in my past had made me happiest. Not that I was trying to relive college life again, but I recalled that being involved in campus programming was something I really enjoyed and at which I was pretty good. So, I conducted research into the types of positions my advisors held. I looked into similar positions at various universities and colleges and realized a master’s degree in higher education was required for most of these positions. Then began my journey to take the GRE, apply to graduate programs, and mentally prepare for being back in a classroom setting.

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Choosing a Fellowship “It’s not about destination, it’s about the journey” —Ralph Waldo Emerson It was definitely a tough transition to go from being a full-time employee with healthcare and other benefits to being a financially struggling fulltime graduate student. I had to think about loans, rent, cost of living, etc. Fortunately, most master’s in higher education programs are designed for students to be able to work, either full time or part time. You will likely find that the institution you attend, as well as other institutions nearby, reserve a fair number of fellowship positions for graduate students studying higher education or focusing on student affairs. When I began the application process for fellowships, I was applying only to positions related to student activities because I knew that was the area on which I wanted to focus. However, I was also competing with about 20 other students in my program for the same positions and it was a bit nerve wracking. After about three months of no luck, I decided it was best to begin expanding my search. I applied to positions within athletics, student rights and responsibility, new student orientation, and much more. I ended up with a graduate rotational internship position, which provided me with the opportunity to spend six months in the office of Campus Support Services and a second set of six months with the Office of Safety and Security. My initial concerns pertained to the type of work I would be assigned. However, once I began both rotations, I grew excited to work on projects and take ownership of various initiatives. The experience was very enriching because I had the opportunity to learn about offices I didn’t know existed and see how important their roles are to the university. I also grew a great network with the campus partners of those offices and was excited to know more administrators across the institution. After I completed that position, I had to begin the search again for a replacement fellowship for my second year of grad school. In my current position, I work for Administration and Hallmark Programs and help with the planning and programming of some of the major events on campus. It has felt really great to be involved with event planning and student

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affairs. One of the strongest assets I bring to the team is my previous experience with the graduate rotational internship position. Due to the fact I have connections with other offices on campus that are not within the Division of Student Affairs, I can confidently communicate with them to make our events better. In addition, the projects on which I worked during the rotational internship provided me with skills that actually help me a great deal with programming. I am more effective in creating timelines, know of many more avenues of marketing across the university, have more insight about sponsorship opportunities, and can assess the safety of our students during events. I also had a second fellowship for a year and half at Georgetown University working with late-night programming in the Center for Student Engagement, during which I was able to learn about the nuances associated with late-night programming, some best practices related to assessment, and observe the culture at an institution other than the one I was attending. Halfway through my second year, the late-night program had been discontinued. However, I was luckily able to keep my position and was involved in the creation of my new graduate assistant position description. My supervisor knew I had always wanted to work with student organizations and leadership programs, so this provided me with the perfect opportunity to build skills in advising students and facilitating trainings. Prospects may arise when you least expect, so it’s important to make your ambitions known and think strategically about your future. As you are making your journey through graduate school, don’t be discouraged by the kinds of fellowships that might be available. Be open to trying something new because having different experiences can only help you achieve your goals and make you more marketable for future positions.

During the Fellowship “Opportunity does not knock, it presents itself when it beats down the door” —Kyle Chandler You’ve landed your graduate fellowship, but how can you make sure you’re making the best of it to help you further your development as a student affairs professional? Here are five tips you can use while serving in any position.

1. Have a flexible career path. As I mentioned before, don’t be afraid to take fellowship positions in areas you weren’t considering before. You may stumble upon a field you truly enjoy and would want to pursue further. It will also help you be more marketable during your full-time job search.

2. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Sometimes it’s easy for employers to forget you are new and still learning, so they begin speaking to you as though you may understand the office lingo. Many schools have acronyms for various departments or policies and it’s important to make sure you know what they stand for. During staff 48

meetings, keep notes on items that were new to you or you didn’t understand and then discuss them with your supervisor afterwards.

3. Speak up. If you see any new projects developing in your office that pique your interest, be vocal and seize the opportunity by offering to be involved. It is also important to take ownership of any mistakes. Communication is a skill that is essential for all types of positions and if you leave your supervisor out of the loop, it might come back to bite you. Always approach your supervisor with a possible solution when you address any issues or concerns related to your work. You also want to vocalize your personal and professional goals with your supervisor so they can help you shape your graduate fellowship experience to achieve your goals.

4. Take advantage of resources. When you begin a full-time job, you will most likely find yourself in a routine, so this may be your last opportunity to do many different things at once. Seek more to do outside of your job description. Volunteer for events in other departments, join various committees, or simply conduct informational interviews to learn more about other people’s positions and network with them.

5. Manage up. This is probably the most valuable piece of advice I gathered from multiple sources. The concept of managing up can be applied to graduate fellowships as well as full-time positions. By managing up, you essentially want to make your supervisor’s job easier. Take note of tasks on which they may be working and take the initiative to extend assistance on those tasks. By offering your skills and talents, you will become a more memorable employee and that may lead to your employer wanting to hire you full time.

Supervising Graduate Fellows “An ounce of practice is worth more than tons of preaching” —Mahatma Gandhi There are many ways a supervisor to an aspiring student affairs professional can support a grad’s growth and development. Here are five suggestions gathered from previous and current graduate students.

1. Provide clear expectations. Generational shifts are inevitable, so Millennials need more direction than members of the Gen X or Baby Boomer generations are accustomed to receiving. Don’t assume grads know everything. It’s important to give them clear expectations regarding job specific skills and tasks.

2. Hold them accountable. It’s important to understand that school comes first. However, a level of accountability for their work and actions prepares grads for the real world. If you notice a grad has shortcomings in their work, it’s important to resolve these APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


small problems before they become big ones. Creating a contract or set of requirements for what they should accomplish can be useful.

References All famous quotes referenced in this article were retrieved from www.brainyquotes.com.

3. Provide a level of autonomy. I understand that it can be difficult to give autonomy for tasks to graduate students because they are in the office only part time. However, letting them have ownership of tasks allows them to feel valued and challenged. Every grad wants to feel a part of the team and effectively contribute to the department. If they are involved early on in projects, they will quickly fit into the office culture.

4. Be supportive. Working with graduate students can be very rewarding to you and your office as they can bring in fresh perspectives. Understanding your grad students’ backgrounds and their goals will help you to determine how to work with them, how they can help improve the organization, and the types of tasks you assign them. This can also be helpful when you come across jobs or opportunities you think would be perfect for them. Discourage grads from taking on too much work if you believe it may impede their progress.

About the Author Sonam Shah is a Graduate Fellow in

Administration and Hallmark Programs at The George Washington University (DC), as well as a Graduate Assistant in the Center for Student Engagement at Georgetown University (DC). She previously served in the Student Internship Rotational Program at The George Washington University. She is Vice President of Communications for the Higher Education Student Association at The George Washington University. Active in NACA, she participated in the 2013 NACA® National Convention and was the recipient of the 2013 NACA® Multicultural Scholarship. She holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and is pursuing a master’s degree in higher education administration from The George Washington University.

5. Familiarize yourself with graduate policies Although graduate students should know about the rules and procedures related to their program and the institution, it is helpful to provide grads with information that may not readily be available. This will also make it easier for you when you are dealing with paperwork or processes at the institution.

Exciting and Challenging Think about what makes you happy and go after it. Pursuing a master’s degree can be challenging and exciting at the same time. However, it will be one of the greatest opportunities you’ll have for growth and development for your career. Keep the end goal in mind and make the most of your graduate experience.

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Don’t be afraid to take fellowship positions in areas you weren’t considering before. You may stumble upon a field you truly enjoy and would want to pursue further. It will also help you be more marketable during your full-time job search.

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NACA® SPOTLIGHT 2014 NATIONAL CONVENTION

NACA Recognizes Outstanding Volunteers and Programs During the 2014 NACA® National Convention, NACA announced award winners in a number of categories. The Association also recognized volunteers and special programs for their service and contributions to the student activities field. More coverage of the 2014 NACA® National Convention, which was held Feb. 15-19 in Boston, MA, will appear in the May 2014 issue of Campus Activities Programming®. Photography in this section is by Anita Brewer.

Janet Kirsch (left) and Brian Gardner of the NACA® Board of Directors

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C. Shaw Smith New Professional Award

Patsy Morley Outstanding Programmer Award

Janet Kirsch of Johns Hopkins University (MD) was awarded the C. Shaw Smith New Professional Award. Kirsch began her career at John Hopkins as a Graduate Intern in Student Life and so impressed administrators she was hired full-time as Campus Programming Coordinator, said Brian Gardner, Vice Chair for Programs on the NACA® Board of Directors, and a past recipient of the award. “In this role, Janet is responsible for advising the Hopkins Organization for Programming (HOP). She is also responsible for major university events such as Hopkins’ annual Commemoration Day and Lighting of the Quads Ceremonies and Welcome Back to campus programs that take place at the beginning of each semester,” added Gardner. “When Janet was hired, some of the University’s traditional events were foundering and the Hopkins Organization for Programming was on a decline. In the two years since she has served as Campus Programming Coordinator, she has made a significant impact on programming and improved campus events. The Hopkins Organization for Programming is now a thriving organization with enthusiastic co-chairs, and event attendance during each semester has increased tremendously. Janet has worked with the Hopkins community to challenge the status quo; introducing new ideas for programming, building new traditions, and revitalizing old ones. In a recent survey she initiated, 85% of student respondents reported that the events in which they participated enhanced their college experience,” Gardner concluded. The Award was established in 1994 to honor the memory of one of NACA’s most beloved founders. C. Shaw Smith’s influence, affection and energy in support of new professionals entering campus activities is reflected in this annual award to recognize individuals who demonstrate the potential and commitment for excellence in service to student leaders.

J.J. O’Toole-Curran, Director of Union Programs at The University of Kansas, was awarded the Patsy Morley Outstanding Programmer Award.

When O’Toole-Curran started at Union Programs, “it housed just a programming board and bowling alley,” said Kimberly Herrera, Coordinator of Student Life at Anne Arundel Community College (MD). “Now the office has expanded to include a studentrun radio station, two community service organizations and several leadership development activities.” O’TooleCurran’s “collaborative skills were evident when she recognized the need for more strong cultural programs on campus. She worked with the university’s Office of Multicultural Affairs to provide new ideas, partnerships and increased cultural education,” added Herrera. “Furthermore, she has been instrumental in establishing a formal process to evaluate and enhance student co-curricular learning. Regarded by students as a wise and caring mentor, she never stops trying to improve their experiences.” The Patsy Morley Outstanding Programmer Award is given each year to an individual who best exemplifies outstanding achievement in the field of campus activities advisement. The award honors the late Patsy Morley, a former NACA® Board Chair, who died in 1981.

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Frank Harris Outstanding Student Government Advisor Award Gregory Clement,

Assistant Dean of Students at Mount Wachusett Community College (MA), was awarded the Frank Harris Outstanding Student Government Advisor Award.

“This year’s recipient proves to be an invaluable source of encouragement and information to his students,” said Berri Cross, Director of Student Life at Guilford Technical Community College (NC) and last year’s recipient of the award. “As the Assistant Dean of Students, he has gone above and beyond his role as advisor to help students succeed. Upon his arrival on campus, there was little interest in Student Government. With his charismatic personality and ability to reach out to students, there has been a significant increase in Student Government interests. His impact on faculty is evident, as well. More faculty members now incorporate his activities into their classes and students have become accustomed to getting involved with activities outside of the classroom as a part of their education.” The award recognizes individuals who have the commitment to challenge and advise student government associations. It is named for the first Chair of the NACA® Board of Directors, Frank Harris, who served as Chair in 1968-69, and who advised student government associations throughout his professional tenure until his retirement in 1997.

Founders Award Michelle Delaney, Director of the Student Center and Student Activities at Eastern Connecticut State University, was presented The Founders Award.

The Founders Award is the Association’s highest honor, given to those individuals who, during the years, have given of their time and talents in such a way as to contribute significantly to NACA. It is presented to an individual or individuals who, throughout their affiliation with NACA, have given continued and outstanding service to the organization, have exemplified the standards of professional integrity and conduct, have achieved stature in their professional or academic pursuits, hold the esteem of colleagues and peers, and have worked to further the field of campus activities programming. In presenting the award, NACA® Chair of the Board of Directors Matt Morrin said Delaney “has volunteered with NACA over many years and in many roles. She is a strong leader and a well-respected student affairs professional. Many in her field and on her campus have cited examples of the work she has done on her home campus to enrich student life, support staff in their own professional development and make a difference in students’ lives. “One of her most prominent accomplishments is her role in the Ross/ Fahey Golf Tournament. She founded and created NACA® Northeast’s premier fundraising event, which has raised more than $100,000 for scholarships. To recognize her accomplishments and leadership, the Northeast region honored her with the region’s highest award. Also, the Staff Programmer Award in the region has been named for her.”

Legacy Award The NACA® Legacy Award, first presented at the 2010 NACA® National Convention during the 50th Anniversary Gala, provides a year of NACA® professional development opportunities for up to two deserving current NACA® leaders who have the potential to serve the Association at a significant level for a significant period of time. The award for 2014 was presented to Natalie Keller Pariano, Director of Campus Leadership and Involvement at Denison University (OH). Pariano “is considered by her colleagues as an outstanding advisor, mentor and individual who is truly committed to the field of higher education,” said Dr. Bill Smedick of Johns Hopkins University (MD) in presenting the award. “She has contributed her time and energy in a wide variety of roles, seeking new opportunities for professional development. “Her commitment to NACA is suggested not only in the evolution of her volunteer involvement, but also in her presentations and publications at conferences. She inspires others to serve NACA through her work on campus by encouraging students to create educational sessions in order to share the university’s best practices and build presentation skills among members. Her contributions have been recognized by NACA with several awards, and students and staff at her university have honored her with several additional nominations,” he added. APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

Natalie Keller Pariano and Dr. Bill Smedick

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Diversity Recognized During Diversity Dinner Diversity has long been an integral part of many events at NACA’s National Convention and in 2014, the Outstanding Diversity Achievement Award – Program was presented to honor a campus program that has helped move NACA’s diversity initiatives forward. Also, the Diversity Activities Group, which planned all diversity-related activities occurring during the Convention, was recognized.

Outstanding Diversity Achievement Award – Program The 2014 NACA® Outstanding Diversity Achievement Award – Program was presented to Wayne State University in Detroit, MI, for its program Thursdays in the D. The program was initiated in 2011, with its objective being to diversify students’ experiences at the university by exposing them to the various sights, sounds and cultures of Midtown and Downtown Detroit. The concept is to host a program, whether it entails students attending an event in the city or one planned in the city by the University, every Thursday evening during the semester somewhere in the city of Detroit. The student demographics allow for the university to bring students together at a planned cultural event, while also exposing them to different cultures and experiences within the city. The program has been very cost-effective for students, with approximately 90% of all Thursdays in the D events being free of charge. The university also provides shuttle transportation to and from the events. Since 20112012, attendance at the events has grown tremendously. In years one and two, the university averaged 50-100 students per event, whereas now, the school is averaging 200-250 student per event.

Diversity Activities Group • Thanh Le (Chair) – University of North Carolina-Charlotte • Jonna Greer – University of West Georgia • Natasha Hopkins – Emory University (GA) • Deborah Strahorn Allen – Winthrop University (SC) • Leana Zona – University of Maine • Jerrica Washington – Duke University (NC) • Heather Sprinkle – University of South Alabama • Natalie Fajardo – University of Central Missouri • Erica Schwartz – Rutgers University-Camden (NJ) • Tiago Machado – Westchester Community College (NY) • Colin Stewart – Illinois Wesleyan University • Andrea Junso – Gustavus Adolphus College (MN) • Kyonna Withers – Ripon College (WI) • Saville Harris – Stephen F. Austin State University (TX) • Turan Mullins – Maryville University of St. Louis (MO) • Kathy Andrade – University of Miami (FL) • Tearria Beck-Scott – University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign • Sam Al-Khoury – University of Washington Bothell • Eboni Turnbow – Wayne State University (MI)

From left to right: Wayne State University (MI) Campus Activities Team members Sailesh Ramalingam, Discover Detroit Chair; Kaushik Varadarajan, Films Chair; Kristen Crain, Warrior Pride Chair; and Jasaria Dorty, Student Activities Assistant.

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Foundation Honorary Trustees Each year, the National Association for Campus Activities honors individuals and businesses that have made lifetime contributions to the NACA® Foundation

totaling at least $1,000 and $5,000, respectively, by inducting them into the elite group of donors, the Honorary and Corporate Trustees. The

contributions from Honorary Trustees and from all other Foundation donors help fund scholarships for students, professional staff and associates, offsetting the cost of their education, books and/or registration fees for NACA® events. At the 2014 Convention, one individual was inducted as an Honorary Trustee – Duane A. Orloske. Orloske began his career in student activities/student union management as an undergraduate at the University of Bridgeport (CT) from 1969-1973. His involvement in NACA began when he created the monthly publication the New England Regional Coffeehouse Newsletter, which highlighted and networked popular campus coffeehouses and acts from across the former New England Region. Shortly after that, Central Connecticut State University hired Orloske as a graduate intern. During his 33-plusyear career at CCSU, he served as Pub Manager/Program Advisor, Assistant Director, Associate Director and then Director of the Student Center. He has held several leadership roles with NACA and ACUI. His directorship of the CCSU Student Center, from 1986-2004, was marked by a focus on converting its operation to an almost entirely student-run enterprise. After losing his wife, Margaret Quinn Orloske, to the terrorist attacks on 9/11, Orloske focused his energy on the redesign and renovation of the Student Center, which reopened in 2002 after being closed nearly four years. He ended his career at CCSU in July 2007 following a three-year post as Associate Dean for Student Affairs. During that time, he returned to his student activities roots and led the resurrection of the campus’s then nearly non-existent student recreation program, RECentral. It now boasts participation rates in the thousands, employing more than 100 students. In 2013, the NACA® Foundation brought in more than $28,000 in contributions, both cash and in-kind. With this support, the Foundation has been able to provide 26 awards through 16 different scholarships to the most deserving recipients. The contributions from Honorary Trustees and from all other Foundation donors have helped fund these scholarships for students, professional staff and associates by offsetting the costs of their education, books and/or registration fees for NACA® events for more than 30 years.

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NACA® SPOTLIGHT 2014 NATIONAL CONVENTION Institute Coordinators Volunteers who coordinated 2013 NACA® Institutes and those who will

coordinate them for 2014 were recognized for their service:

2013 Institute Coordinators: • Institute Series Coordinator – Amanda Horne – Stephen F. Austin State University (TX) • Huge Leadership Weekend – Kelsey Bratcher – The University of Texas at San Antonio • Programming Basics Institute – Jason Meier – Emerson College (MA) • Concert Management Institute – Bethany Wendler – Southern Illinois University at Carbondale • Student Government West Institute – Lacey Claver – Stephen F. Austin State University (TX) • Student Government East Institute – Jennifer Randolph – Friends University (KS) • National Leadership Symposium – Dr. Michael Preston – University of Central Florida

Kelsey Bratcher

2014 Institute Coordinators • Huge Leadership Weekend – Natalie Keller Pariano – Denison University (OH) • Programming Basics Institute – Donielle Bell – The University Jason Meier of Georgia • Concert Management Institute – Evan Schaefer – Arizona State University • Student Government West Institute – Sabrena O’Keefe – Florida International UniversityBiscayne Bay • Student Government East Institute – Vincent Bowhay – Fort Hays State University (KS) • National Leadership Symposium – Dr. Michael Preston – University of Central Florida

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2014 Graduate Interns, Mentors Recognized The NACA® Graduate Intern Program is a comprehensive program that provides opportunities for graduate students to be mentored by student activities professionals who have been in the field for at least five years. Through the program, interns learn about NACA and the National Convention program through a combination of experiential opportunities and educational activities.

Graduate Interns: • Katlyn Hamm – St. Cloud State University (MN) • Samantha Johnson – Clemson University (SC) • Samuel Frushour – Shippensburg University (PA) • Kayla Loper – University of Arkansas • Jonna Greer – University of West Georgia • Tolulope Taiwo – Colorado State University • Dave Gallander – Texas State University-San Marcos

Graduate Intern Mentors: • Jason Meier – Emerson College (MA) • Melanie Bullock – University of South Florida-St. Petersburg • Peter Pereira – Texas State University • Courtney James – University of Central Oklahoma • Mike Severy – University of North Carolina-Pembroke • Dan Ashlock Jr. – Arizona State University • Natalie Keller Pariano – Denison University (OH)

Leadership Fellows, Mentors Recognized The NACA® Leadership Fellows Program provides an opportunity for members of underrepresented ethnicities to become familiar with NACA’s governance, programs and professional development opportunities at both the regional and national levels. The program provides opportunities for graduate students or new professionals to become Fellows, as well as opportunities for seasoned professionals to become Mentors. Fellows are paired with mentors who guide them through the year’s curriculum and volunteer opportunities at institutes, regional conferences and the National Convention. They also contribute articles to Campus Activities Programming® magazine.

Leadership Fellows: • Kyonna Withers – Ripon College (WI) • Saville Harris – Stephen F. Austin State University (TX) • Turan Mullins – Maryville University of St. Louis (MO) • Kathy Andrade – University of Miami (FL) • Tearria Beck-Scott – University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign • Sam Al-Khoury – University of Washington Bothell • Eboni Turnbow – Wayne State University (MI)

Leadership Fellow Mentors: • Alicia Bates – Hartwick College (NY) • Shanna Kinzel – California State UniversityMonterey Bay • Robert Cooper – Frostburg State University (MD) • Thanh Le – University of North Carolina-Charlotte

Retiring Board of Directors Members Retiring NACA® Board of Directors members were recognized during the 2014 NACA® National Convention. From left to right: Dave DeAngelis, Immediate Past Chair; Cindy Kane; Chris Gill; Barry McKinney; Jenny Bloom, Guest Board Member; Cecilia Brinker.

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Retiring Program Leaders Retiring Regional Program Leaders were recognized for service: • Lyndon Pryor, Graduate Intern Program Coordinator – Texas A&M University • Lashaundra Randolph, Central RCPC Chair – University of Missouri-Kansas City • Dain Gotto, Mid America RCPC Chair – Northern Illinois University • Stacey Sottung, Mid Atlantic RCPC Chair – St. Joseph’s University (PA) • Matt Miller, Northeast RCPC Chair – Bridgewater State University (MA) • Nellie Hermanson, Northern Plains RCPC Chair – The University of Iowa [Term ends in May 2014] • Joshua Brandfon, South RCPC Chair – University of Miami (FL) • Andrea Ramirez, West RCPC Chair – University of Washington Bothell • Meghan Kenney, Leadership Fellows Coordinator – Suffolk University (MA) [Term ends in April 2014] • Kimberly Herrera, Mid Atlantic Festival Chair – Anne Arundel Community College (MD)

NACA® SPOTLIGHT 2014 NATIONAL CONVENTION 2014 National Convention Program Committee Chair Shanna Kinzel, Coordinator of the Otter Student Union at California State University Monterey Bay, was recognized for her service as the 2014 NACA® National Convention Program Committee Chair with a

framed copy of the Convention Program cover.

David W. Phillips Outstanding NACA® Office Service Award Judy Bailey, NACA’s Finance & Accounting Coordinator, was presented the David W. Phillips Outstanding NACA® Office Service Award. Bailey has been with NACA since September 2006 and is responsible for paying vendors, reimbursing travel expenses, balancing checking accounts and reconciling staff credit cards. She is a native of Atlantic City, NJ, and a graduate of Goldey Beacom College in Wilmington, DE, with a degree in accounting. Before joining NACA, she worked in the insurance industry for 28 years and has been working in the non-profit sector since. She was the first recipient of the Gayle O. Averyt Award in 1996 when she worked at Colonial Life. Her hobbies include bowling, administering youth bowling programs and tournaments, crocheting and traveling. Currently, she is President of the Midlands SC USBC (United States Bowling Congress) Association Board of Directors and Chair of the SC USBC Youth Committee. She is also in the SC USBC and Midlands SC USBC Halls of Fame. Judy Bailey (left) and Alan Davis

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Tribute Honors Alan B. Davis for Service as Executive Director Alan B. Davis was honored with a special tribute during the Volunteer Reception held Feb.14 just before the 2014 NACA® National Convention began in Boston. NACA® volunteers and leaders, including past Board Chairs, and associate members recognized Davis for his accomplishments during the 18 years he served as NACA® Executive Director. Representatives from a number of partner organizations also participated in the ceremony, which included a video presentation. Davis is leaving NACA in April to become Executive Director of the VTV Family Outreach Foundation. The Foundation, based in the Northern Virginia/Washington DC area, is a not-for-profit organization established by families and survivors directly impacted by the April 16, 2007, tragedy at Virginia Tech.

Fluent Announces Davis Scholarship In addition, Fluent, NACA’s marketing partner, announced the Alan Davis Scholarship, an annual, entrepreneurshipbased award for one outstanding undergraduate student nominated by an NACA® member or Fluent campus contact. The scholarship recipient should posses an inspired spirit and creative spark and be innovative and forward thinking with regard to the events and opportunities available to the student body. The recipient should also embody the core qualities of both NACA and Fluent: creativity, originality, pride for their school, and unparalleled ambition and vision. In announcing the scholarship,

“Alan envisioned a company that would provide valuable services to NACA member schools – paid internships, live events, speakers and experiential learning opportunities – while also creating a valuable new non-member revenue stream for the Association,” Bundrick said. Fluent now serves more than 700 campuses across the country, employs more than 6,000 students, and runs more than 1,000 campus programs per year that enhance campus life.

Fluent Vice President of University Relations Laura Bundrick said Davis

“has been committed to innovation and entrepreneurship throughout his tenure as Executive Director of the National Association for Campus Activities.” Bundrick also credited Davis for having a visionary role in helping create Campus Entertainment in 2007, which later evolved into Fluent.

Alan B. Davis and Laura Bundrick, Fluent Vice President of University Relations 56

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NACA® SPOTLIGHT 2014 NATIONAL CONVENTION

NACA® Your Best Campus Tradition™ Video Competition Awards Schools with 5,001-Plus Undergraduate Full-Time Enrollment: University of Arkansas for Freshman Pep Rally

Schools with Up to 5,000 Undergraduate Full-Time Enrollment): Drake University (IA) for Street Painting

The Freshman Pep Rally is a University of Arkansas event that University Programs facilitates each year to welcome incoming students and help them learn the institution’s traditions. The event includes a spirit competition; introduction of football, volleyball, and soccer team members; speeches by several athletic coaches; an opportunity to learn University of Arkansas athletic event traditions; and taking a freshman class picture in the shape of the Arkansas “A” on the football field. Two copies of this picture are distributed to every incoming student and their parents. The atmosphere created by the Freshman Pep Rally helps connect incoming students to the University community and establishes a bond with their fellow classmates.

Street Painting is an event that kick starts the famous Drake Relays track meet. Campus organizations submit unique square designs based on that year’s theme. From the submitted entries, 56 organizations are chosen to represent themselves and Drake through their square. The event is held the majority of the day. In the morning, students paint their square a solid background color. Later, they return to complete the sketching. The event concludes with painting their final design. However, while the street is being painted, students are also partaking in a large paint fight, as they paint themselves, each other and anything around them. The painted street is touched up in the upcoming days and then stays on campus for the following year. The Painted Street then serves as a permanent reminder to all students of the Relays’ tradition, instills campus pride and creates collaboration between student life and athletics.

Accepting the NACA® Your Best Campus Tradition™ Video Competition Award for the University of Arkansas is Angelica Puga, the Innovative Arts Chair with University Programs.

Accepting the NACA® Your Best Campus Tradition™ Video Competition Award for Drake University are, left to right, Mary Stang, Campus Impact Co-Chair, and Natalie Larson, President, of Drake’s Student Activities Board.

Advisory Groups Recognized

NACA® Chair of the Board of Directors Matt Morrin also recognized three groups of volunteers who worked with the Board of Directors, volunteers and students to support the Association’s mission during the year:

Education Advisory Group • Dr. Regina Young Hyatt, University of Alabama-Huntsville • Dr. John Dooley, Elon University (NC) • Chris Geiger, University of West Georgia • Cindy Kane, Bridgewater State University (MA) • Dr. Michael Preston, University of Central Florida • Dr. Jan Arminio, George Mason University (VA)

Associate Advisory Group • Gina Kirkland, Kirkland Productions (TX) • Brian Waymire, The Agency Coalition (TN) • Sue Boxrud, The College Agency (MN) • Kat Casler, Call Box Entertainment (WA) • Nikki Franklin, TalentPlus Entertainment (MO) • Jeff Hyman, DMS, Inc. (IL) • Coz Lindsay, The College Agency (MN) • Kate McGill, Sophie K. Entertainment (NY) • Robin Menier, Summit Comedy (NC)

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Student Advisory Group • Trevor Mullholland, Southeast Missouri State University • Thomas Blushi, Marymount Manhattan College (NY) • Aubrey Gould, Salve Regina University (RI) • Jenny Marquette, Gustavus Adolphus College (MN)

• Johnathan Morris, Stephen F. Austin State University (TX) • Kate Rousso, Eastern Washington University/ Eagle Entertainment (WA) • Phillip Tong, Salt Lake Community College (UT) • Tamira Williams, North Carolina A&T State University

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2014 NACA速 National Convention Block Booking Forms Total 1,483 as Schools Opt for Huge $avings Block Booking activity, the cornerstone on which NACA was founded, yielded 1,483 forms submitted by school delegates during the 2014 NACA速 National Convention, held Feb. 15-19 in Boston. According to NACA速 Block Booking Coordinator Evan Schaefer (Arizona State University-Tempe), Block Booking activity at the Convention saved schools an astounding $140,275.

Delegates examine Block Booking reports to compare interest trends among schools attending the Convention.

Amy Vaughan Deahl, Director of Student Activities and Campus Events at EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University (FL), gives her son R.J. an early introduction to the concept of Block Booking as they visit associate member booths during CAMP.

Breakdown of Forms Submitted By Category CR (Contract Requested On Site)..............................................316 CB (Commitment if Block Forms).............................................. 301 SD (Strong Interest for a Single Date)..................................... 341 SI (Strong Interest)........................................................................525 Total.................................................................................................1,483

Artists Receiving the Most Forms

(Artists/programs receiving 15 forms or more.) ARTIST CR CB SD SI Total Dakaboom...........................22............ 39...............7..............22...............90 Preferred Parking................ 9............ 23.............13...............21...............66 Comedy Tour Tracey Ashley......................13.............18.............14.............. 14............... 59 The Asia Project.................. 4............ 25.............12...............13...............54 The Well Reds......................14...............9...............7...............13............... 43 Cover Drive............................ 8............. 12............ 10...............13............... 43 Matthew Broussard............ 9...............6............ 10...............16................41 Frangela................................. 6...............2.............. 8..............24...............40 Austin Renfroe..................... 6...............9..............11................ 9............... 35 Jen Kober.................................7...............9.............. 9................ 9...............34 Rachel Brown....................... 9...............9.............. 6................ 8............... 32 Lyle Divinsky......................... 3...............7............ 10.............. 10...............30 Soul and R&B Troubador Branches...............................12...............8.............. 5................ 5...............30 California Folk-Rock Rudy Currence..................... 6...............4.............. 5.............. 10............... 25 58

ARTIST CR CB SD SI Total Preston Pugmire................15................1.............. 5................ 4............... 25 Justine Marino...................... 3.............10.............. 2.............. 10............... 25 Six Appeal.............................. 6...............3.............. 4...............12............... 25 Chris Jones............................. 8...............6.............. 3.................7............... 24 Justin Willman....................... 1...............2...............7...............12............... 22 Daniel Martin........................ 3...............8.............. 6................ 5............... 22 Joey Hyde................................2................1...............7................11................ 21 Jinahie......................................2...............5...............7.................7................ 21 The Muslims Are Coming... 0...............5...............7................ 8...............20 Paul Varghese...................... 3...............5.............. 3................ 9...............20 Dustin Ybarra........................ 1...............8............... 1.............. 10...............20 Rhett Price.............................11.............. 0.............. 3................ 4................18 Kris Allen................................ 3...............3...............7................ 4.................17 Byron Bowers........................2...............4.............. 3................ 8.................17 Josh and Larkin.................... 3...............3...............7................ 3................16 Levi Stephens........................5.............. 0.............. 4................ 6................ 15

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NACA® SPOTLIGHT 2014 NATIONAL CONVENTION Schools That Were the Most Active in Block Booking (Schools submitting 10 forms or more)

Agencies Receiving the Most Forms (Agencies receiving 15 forms or more)

AGENCY CR CB SD SI Total DMS, Inc................................. 42.............48.............22.............. 43.............. 155 Degy Booking......................30............. 33..............41............... 51.............. 155 International The College Agency............ 21............. 22..............19.............. 28................90 Sophie K. Entertainment,.....11................ 7..............21.............. 45................84 Inc. Bass/Schuler......................... 19............. 25..............14.............. 20................ 78 Entertainment CAA Comedy & Speakers.....6..............14..............13...............35................68 H2F Comedy Productions.....9............. 23..............13............... 21................66 Coalition Talent Agency....... 15.............. 16..............16................15................62 Jus’ Wiggin Entertainment....4............. 25..............12................13................54 KP Comedy............................. 11................6..............12...............23................52 The Barry Agency.................8..............10..............16................13................ 47 Auburn Moon Agency....... 23................6...............11..................7................ 47 Admire Entertainment,..........11................9..............12................12................44 Inc. Redd Promo..........................10................5............... 5............... 14................34 BE Colleges..............................3................6..............13................ 11................33 The Gersh Agency.................3..............10............... 2................13................28 Kirkland Productions............1................5............... 8................12................26 Metropolis Management....6................2............. 10.................6................24 & Entertainment Group GP Entertainment.................6................3............... 8..................7................24 William Morris Endeavor.....2.................1............... 8................12................23 Entertainment, LLC JOEY EDMONDS Presents..3................5............... 3.................9................20 Agency for the.........................1................4............... 6.................8.................19 Performing Arts Developing Artist................. 11................0............... 3.................4.................18 Booking, LLC Fun Enterprises, Inc..............9.................1............... 5..................1.................16 Summit Comedy, Inc............3................2................7.................4.................16 Neon Entertainment............5................3............... 4.................3.................15

Forms by Region for 2014 NACA National Convention REGION CR CB SD SI Total NACA Mid America......... 128....... 140.......... 97......... 166............531 NACA South.........................51......... 49......... 84........... 87...........269 NACA Northeast................45.........44..........38...........92........... 218 NACA Central...................... 37......... 22..........68............77.......... 204 NACA Mid Atlantic............. 37......... 32..........38...........66............173 NACA Northern Plains........7.......... 12............ 9...........30............. 58 NACA West............................11............2............ 5..............7............. 25 Grand Total..................... 316....... 301.......341........525........1483

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School CR CB SD SI Total Maryville University of Saint Louis (MAM : Saint Louis,MO)..................................0.............. 0..............0...........31............31 McKendree University (MAM : Lebanon,IL).................................................................1.............. 4..............2..........22...........29 Mount Ida College (NST : Newton,MA)...................................................................... 13.............. 2..............3............6...........24 University of Pittsburgh at Bradford (MAT : Bradford,PA)......................................1.............. 0...............1..........20...........22 The University of Akron (MAM : Akron,OH)................................................................6.............. 0............10............ 3........... 19 Bethany College (CEN : Lindsborg,KS)...................................................................... 18.............. 0...............1............0........... 19 University of Nebraska-Lincoln (NPL : Lincoln,NE)..................................................0.............. 0..............0...........19........... 19 Southern New Hampshire University (NST : Manchester,NH)...............................6.............. 9..............2............ 2........... 19 St. Charles Community College (MAM : Cottleville,MO)..........................................3...............7..............2.............7........... 19 Colby-Sawyer College (NST : New London,NH).........................................................4.............. 2..............3............9........... 18 University of North Carolina Charlotte (SOU : Charlotte,NC)................................0.............. 4.............11............ 3........... 18 University of North Carolina at Greensboro (SOU : Greensboro,NC)...................0.............. 0..............9............9........... 18 Xavier University (MAM : Cincinnati,OH)..................................................................... 7.............. 4..............5............ 2........... 18 University of Indianapolis (MAM : Indianapolis,IN)..................................................0.............14..............2............ 2........... 18 Aquinas College (MAM : Grand Rapids,MI).................................................................8.............. 5..............2............ 2............17 Lynchburg College (SOU : Lynchburg,VA)...................................................................4.............12...............1............0............17 Arcadia University (MAT : Glenside,PA).................................................................... 10.............. 2..............0............4........... 16 University of Mary Washington (SOU : Fredericksburg,VA)...................................4.............. 2.............. 7............ 3........... 16 Northwest Missouri State University (CEN : Maryville,MO)...................................4...............7..............2............ 3........... 16 Denison University (MAM : Granville,OH)...................................................................0.............12..............2............ 2........... 16 University of Alabama-Huntsville (SOU : Huntsville,AL).......................................12.............. 0..............2.............1............15 University of Houston-Main Campus (CEN : Houston,TX)......................................0.............. 4..............8............ 3............15 University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth (NST : North Dartmouth,MA)............0.............. 9..............2............4............15 The University of Scranton (MAT : Scranton,PA).......................................................1.............. 4..............6............4............15 Marshall University (MAM : Huntington,WV).............................................................8.............. 3..............3............0........... 14 Roger Williams University (NST : Bristol,RI)..............................................................0.............. 0..............5............9........... 14 Saint Anselm College (NST : Manchester,NH)............................................................0.............. 0..............9............ 5........... 14 Siena Heights University (MAM : Adrian,MI)...............................................................1.............. 3.............. 7............ 3........... 14 Simpson College (NPL : Indianola,IA).......................................................................... 7.............. 6..............0.............1........... 14 Oakland University/Residence Hall Programming (MAM : Rochester,MI)..........6.............. 2..............6............0........... 14 Illinois Institute of Technology (MAM : Chicago,IL)..................................................5.............. 5..............3............0............13 North Central College (MAM : Naperville,IL)..............................................................0...............7..............2............4............13 Randolph-Macon College (SOU : Ashland,VA)...........................................................0.............. 0...............1...........12............13 University of Richmond (SOU : University of Richmond,VA)..................................0.............. 0..............5............8............13 Saginaw Valley State University (MAM : University Center,MI)............................8............... 1..............3.............1............13 University of St. Francis (MAM : Joliet,IL)....................................................................0.............. 6...............1............6............13 Springfield College (NST : Springfield,MA).................................................................0............... 1..............0...........12............13 Angelo State University (CEN : San Angelo,TX)........................................................0.............. 0.............11.............1............12 University of Central Arkansas (CEN : Conway,AR).................................................0.............. 0..............0...........12............12 Knox College (MAM : Galesburg,IL)..............................................................................0.............. 5..............6.............1............12 Saint Joseph’s University (MAT : Philadelphia,PA)...................................................0.............. 8...............1............ 3............12 Texas Tech University (CEN : Lubbock,TX).................................................................0.............. 0..............6............6............12 Western Connecticut State University (NST : Danbury,CT)...................................9.............. 0..............0............ 3............12 Wittenberg University (MAM : Springfield,OH)......................................................... 7.............. 2..............2.............1............12 Lewis-Clark State College (WST : Lewiston,ID)........................................................ 11.............. 0...............1............0............12 Cleveland State University (MAM : Cleveland,OH)...................................................2.............. 4..............0............6............12 University of Arkansas-Fayetteville (CEN : Fayetteville,AR)..................................1............... 1..............3............6............ 11 Hartwick College (MAT : Oneonta,NY).........................................................................2.............. 2...............1............6............ 11 Longwood University (SOU : Farmville,VA)................................................................0............... 1..............4............6............ 11 Quincy University (MAM : Quincy,IL)............................................................................0..............11..............0............0............ 11 Rockhurst University (CEN : Kansas City,MO)...........................................................3.............. 0..............4............4............ 11 Ursinus College (MAT : Collegeville,PA)......................................................................0.............. 0..............9............ 2............ 11 Vincennes University (MAM : Vincennes,IN)..............................................................3.............. 2..............2............4............ 11 Texas State University-San Marcos (CEN : San Marcos,TX)...................................0.............. 3..............4............4............ 11 Vincennes University-Jasper (MAM : Jasper,IN)........................................................ 7............... 1..............0............ 3............ 11 Albright College (MAT : Reading,PA)............................................................................9.............. 0..............0.............1........... 10 Aurora University (MAM : Aurora,IL).............................................................................1.............. 3..............2............4........... 10 Drake University (NPL : Des Moines,IA)......................................................................0.............. 4..............4............ 2........... 10 Embry Riddle Aeronautical University-Daytona Beach.........................................2............... 1..............5............ 2........... 10 (SOU : Daytona Beach,FL) Indiana University-Southeast (MAM : New Albany,IN)............................................4............... 1..............4.............1........... 10 Pfeiffer University (SOU : Misenheimer,NC)...............................................................0.............. 4..............2............4........... 10 University of Toledo (MAM : Toledo,OH)......................................................................0............... 1.............. 7............ 2........... 10 Lesley University (NST : Cambridge,MA)....................................................................0.............10..............0............0........... 10 Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (MAM : Indianapolis,IN).....9............... 1..............0............0........... 10 University of Maine-Orono (NST : Orono,ME)............................................................0............... 1...............1............8........... 10

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NACA® Foundation Scholarship Opportunities Available for undergraduate students, graduate students, professional staff and associate members. Northern Plains Regional Student Leadership Scholarship NACA® Mid Atlantic Undergraduate Scholarship for Student Leaders NACA® South Student Leadership Scholarship Multicultural Scholarship Program NACA® Regional Council Student Leader Scholarship NACA® Mid Atlantic Graduate Student Scholarship NACA® Foundation Graduate Scholarships NACA® Mid Atlantic Higher Education Research Scholarship Lori Rhett Memorial Scholarship Barry Drake Professional Development Scholarship NACA® Mid Atlantic Associate Member Professional Development Scholarship Markley Scholarship Ross Fahey Scholarships Scholarships for Student Leaders Zagunis Student Leader Scholarship Tese Caldarelli Memorial Scholarship For qualifying information, application deadlines and more, visit www.NACA.org.

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K I NGS 2014速 NACA Foundation Trivia Tournament Einstein Sponsor

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NACA Implements Technology Upgrade New System Provides Improved Member Access

NACA has transitioned to a new database system and website. As of March 27, 2014, NACA® members have been able to access and maintain their member information more efficiently. The NACA® Office worked closely with a team of data experts from Protech Associates, Inc. (Protech), the world’s first and leading provider of cloud-based association management software (AMS) powered by Microsoft Dynamics® CRM, to implement more user-friendly technology. The database system allows a more fluid registration process, enhanced management tools and an improved renewal system. Based on member feedback, NACA® Board insight and Office staff research, NACA has also introduced a modern web interface and updated content that provides an improved user experience. With the new website launch, NACA is also rolling out new features for members and volunteers.

2014 NACA® Research Grant Call for Proposals

The National Association for Campus Activities is now seeking proposals for the NACA® Research Grant. The NACA® Research Grant is designed to encourage the development and dissemination of knowledge that has the potential to improve the experiences of college students. Completed applications must be received by the NACA Office by 11:59 pm ET, June 13, 2014.

Comprehensive Award Package One research team will be selected for the Comprehensive Award Package. This package includes a stipend of $2,500, paid travel to the NACA® National Convention and additional considerations.

Secondary Award Package Up to five research teams will be selected for the Secondary Award Package. This package includes a cash stipend of $500 and additional considerations

Eligibility The NACA® Research Grant competition is open to faculty, staff and graduate students who plan to conduct research on issues related to college student activities and campus engagement. Cross-institutional research teams are encouraged to apply.

Research Requirements & Selection Criteria Proposals will be evaluated on the extent to which they: • focus on issue(s) related to campus activities and/or campus engagement. Although all issues related to campus activities will be considered, special consideration will be given to proposals addressing one of the following topics: a. Impact of and involvement in campus activities on improving academic and student success

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b. Assessment related to campus activities and/or campus engagement c. Structures of programming boards d. Evidence of learning associated with working/volunteering in campus activities e. Impact of social networking on campus activities and involvement f. Impact of involvement and student activities on alumni giving/involvement g. Impact of technology and its increasing accessibility on students’ lives and their involvement in campus activities h. Impact of participation in campus activities on civic engagement and community service i. Impact of programming for non-traditional students or underrepresented populations • clearly articulate a strong research design. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method studies will be considered. Methodology must be appropriate for the research question(s). • produce results ready for presentation during the 20152016 NACA® Conference/Convention season. • explore unique issues subjects, analysis, participants and/or samples. Research must be original work of the investigators and may not have been reported elsewhere. • have potential to have a national impact on student success initiatives. Results of the research should be relevant to a wide audience. For more information and an application, visit: www. naca.org. If you have questions, contact NACA® Director of Education and Research Dr. Sandra Rouse at sandrar@ naca.org.

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NACA® SPOTLIGHT

Save the Date! NACA, Memorial University and NIRSA present

International Experiential Learning Institute May 21-23, 2014 Memorial University • St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada Scholar-in-Residence and Keynote Speaker: Susan R. Komives

Mark your calendars for this intimate learning experience where you will: • Meet with professionals from other institutions internationally that are engaging students with experiential learning • Learn how student engagement can be supported thorough experiential learning • Gain skills to develop effective experiential learning practices on your campus • Engage in hands-on experiential learning activities with the culture of Newfoundland • Learn best practices of experiential learning: reflection, assessment, activity development and engagement Visit www.nirsa.org for more information and updates. Early Bird Registration through May 1: $495 / After May 1: $565

2014 NACA® Institutes Announced NACA® offers leadership development, risk management, campus programming, and many other Institutes during the summer months. These Institutes provide higher education professionals with training and resources to effectively accomplish their on-campus goals. NACA’s 2014 Institutes, host sites and dates are listed below. For more information, contact Dionne Ellison at dionnee@naca.org or Morgan Grant at morgang@naca.org.

2014 Institutes

• Huge Leadership Weekend, John Newcombe Tennis Ranch (TX) – May 29-June 1 • Programming Basics Institute, Washington University in St. Louis (MO) – June 5-8 • Summer Leadership Event, Walt Disney World® Resort (FL) – June 19-22 • Concert Management Institute, Marquette University (WI) – June 24-27 • Student Organizations Institute, Washington University in St. Louis (MO) – June 25-27 • Student Government-West Institute, Colorado School of Mines – July 10-13

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• National Leadership Symposium, University of Tampa (FL) – July 14-17 • Student Government-East Institute, Old Dominion University (VA) – July 17-20

A scene from the NACA® 2013 Programming Basics Institute 63


NACA® National Convention Graduate Intern Program Application Deadline Announced The NACA® National Convention Graduate Intern Program provides opportunities for graduate students to be mentored by student activities professionals who have been in the field for at least five years, with a focus on developing mentors from the pool of previous NACA® Board members and other leadership. Seven graduate interns and mentors will be selected. Applications are currently being accepted for Graduate Interns (Grad Students) and Mentors (Seasons Professionals). The application deadline is June 2, 2014.

Graduate Interns will present educational sessions, network with NACA® past and present leadership, and communicate frequently with other interns, as well as their mentor and coordinator. Mentors will assist their assigned Graduate Interns in an acclimation into NACA and the field of higher education through providing feedback on programs and projects, routine correspondence and in-person meetings at conferences. For more information on how to apply, contact Dionne Ellison at dionnee@naca.org.

NACA® Northern Plains Regional Student Leadership Scholarship Awarded Katlyn D. Hamm, who is soon to complete work

on her master’s degree in higher education administration at St. Cloud State University (MN), is the recipient of the NACA® Northern Plains Regional Student Leadership Scholarship. Hamm, who previously earned a bachelor’s degree in graphic design, with a minor in journalism, from the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, currently serves as Program Advisor to the University Program Board at St. Cloud State University. She is also participating in a practicum in the LGBT Resource Center at the institution. Active in NACA, she was a 2014 NACA® National Convention Intern and is also serving in that capacity for the 2014 NACA® Northern Plains Regional Conference this month. At the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, she served as the Music & Variety Chair for the Reeve Union Board, as photo editor for the Advance-Titan student newspaper. She is also affiliated with NASPA – Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education and the Association of College Unions International. In 2012 and 2014, she participated in the Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference. The NACA® Northern Plains Regional Student Leadership Scholarship is designed to assist students pursuing graduate or undergraduate study leading toward a career in student activities or a related student services field. Scholarships go towards tuition, fees and related educational expenses.

Upcoming NACA® Foundation Scholarship Deadlines The NACA® Foundation offers numerous scholarships that are available to graduate students, undergraduate student leaders and associate members on an annual basis. Scholarship nominations are solicited each year. Upcoming scholarships and deadlines are: • Multicultural Scholarship Program: May 1, 2014 • NACA® Regional Council Student Leadership Scholarship: May 1, 2014 • NACA® Mid Atlantic Graduate Student Scholarship: May 30, 2014 • NACA® Foundation Graduate Scholarships: May 30, 2014 • NACA® Mid Atlantic Higher Education Research Scholarship: June 15, 2014 • Lori Rhett Memorial Scholarship: June 30, 2014 • Barry Drake Professional Development Scholarship: Aug. 1, 2014 • Markley Scholarship: Sept. 1, 2014

For additional information, contact Morgan Grant at morgang@ naca.org.

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NACA® SPOTLIGHT COMING IN MAY 2014:

Campus Activities Programming® Magazine The May 2014 issue of Campus Activities Programming® will focus on aspects of conflict resolution, team building, retreats and more. Also, be sure to check out special photo coverage from the 2014 NACA® National Convention in Boston. And remember that the digital versions of recent issues of Campus activities Programming® are always available online at www.naca.org.

Campus Activities Programming® 2014 – 2015 Content Concentration Areas Back to School 2014 • Regional Conference Preview • Budgeting and Low-Cost Programs • Recruitment and Retention

September 2014 • Organizational Development • Program Planning and Development • Program Boards

October 2014 • Engagement • Student Leadership Development • Careers in Student Affairs Month

November/December 2014 • Social Media • Technology • Promotion

January/February 2015 • Convention Preview • Alternative Programming • Non-traditional Students and Community Colleges

March 2015 • The Student Activities Career Track (Professional Development) • Communication • Networking

April 2015 • Contracts • Conflict Resolution • Customer Service

May 2015 • Wellness • Late-Night Programming • Retreats

In addition, each issue will include articles in the following categories: • Social Media (trends, updates and use of social media as it relates to campus activities) • Leadership Development Book Review Series (writers evaluate and recommend books they’ve read that apply to the student affairs field) • The Graduate Experience (Graduate Experience article in each issue) • Curtain Call (anecdotal humor/ reflection columns written by associate members) • 10 Questions with … (professional staff members are recognized for the work they do by answering 10 questions)

If you are interested in pursuing any of these topics as a writer, contact Editor Glenn Farr at glennf@naca.org.

SHARE YOUR GOOD NEWS! Share what’s going on with you professionally and personally in the Campus News section of the NACA® website, as well as in the NACA® Spotlight in Campus Activities Programming® magazine. This feature is designed for students and staff to inform others about what’s going on in their lives. It’s an easy way to announce a: New job or promotion • Marriage or civil union • Birth or adoption of a child • Graduation • Award or other recognition Thank-you to other members • And much more

To submit information, email it to Glenn Farr, editor of Campus Activities Programming®, at glennf@naca.org.

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NACA® LEADERSHIP 2013–2014 NACA® BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Chair

MATT MORRIN University of South FloridaSt. Petersburg

Member

CINDY KANE

Bridgewater State University (MA)

Immediate Past Chair

DAVID DEANGELIS

Chair-Elect

KEN BRILL

DAN FERGUESON

Linfield College (OR)

Vice Chair for Programs

BARRY McKINNEY

BRIAN GARDNER

The University of Texas at San Antonio

Maryville University of Saint Louis (MO)

Member

Guest Board Member

Guest Board Member

Eastern Illinois University

University of South Carolina

NASPA

Augustana College (IL)

Suffolk University (MA)

Member

Treasurer

CECILIA BRINKER

JENNY BLOOM, EdD

Executive Director

ALAN DAVIS

Member

CHRIS GILL

NACA Office

Culver-Stockton College (MO)

NACA® South

NACA® West

GWEN DUNGY

NACA® PROGRAM LEADERS

Leadership Fellows Coordinator

NACA® Central

NACA® Mid Atlantic

MEGHAN KENNEY

Texas State University-San Marcos

The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey/ The Campus Center

NACA® Northern Plains

NACA® National Convention Program Committee Chair

Institute Series Coordinator

PETER PEREIRA

Suffolk University (MA)

NELLIE HERMANSON University of Iowa

JOSHUA BRANDFON

JOSEPH LIZZA

NACA® Mid America

NATALIE KELLER PARIANO

Denison University (OH)

NACA® Northeast

ERIN MORRELL Albertus Magnus College (CT)

JESSICA BERKEY Furman University (SC)

MEGAN HABERMANN Western Oregon University

JASON MEIER

Emerson College (MA)

University of Miami (FL)

66

APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


NACA® ASSOCIATE AND STUDENT ADVISORY GROUPS 2013–2014 NACA® ASSOCIATE ADVISORY GROUP

Facilitator

BRIAN WAYMIRE The Agency Coalition

Facilitator

GINA KIRKLAND Kirkland Productions

Member

BRIDGET REILLY Sophie K. Entertainment, Inc.

Member

MELISSA BOYLE ARONSON Babco Entertainment LLC

Member

MARIE MONROE OnCampus Text DMS, Inc.

Member

MAT FRANCO Franco Talent

Member

SUE BOXRUD

The College Agency

Member

STEPHANIE ROBINSON

Neon Entertainment

2013–2014 NACA® STUDENT ADVISORY GROUP

Facilitator

TREVOR MULHOLLAND Southeast Missouri State University

NACA® Central

JOHNATHAN MORRIS

Stephen F. Austin State University (TX)

NACA® Mid America

NACA® Mid Atlantic

Salt Lake Community College (UT)

Marymount Manhattan College (NY)

PHILLIP TONG

TOM BLUSHI

NACA® Northeast

AUBREY GOULD Salve Regina University (RI)

NACA® Northern Plains

JENNIFER MARQUETTE

Gustavus Adolphus College (MN)

NACA® South

TAMIRA WILLIAMS

North Carolina A & T State University

NACA® West

KATIE ROUSSO Eastern Washington University/Eagle Entertainment

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TEN QUESTIONS with...

1. Leadership/management book you are currently reading?

6. Technology that most benefits you at work?

I recently finished Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg, which I thoroughly enjoyed! I learned a lot and would recommend it to others. I’m starting Identity and Leadership: Informing Our Lives, Informing Our Practice by Alicia Fedelina Chavez and Ronni Sanlo. I’m excited to read the various stories of different professionals and how their identity played a role in their experiences.

I don’t use any special technology, just my desktop computer and the Internet. Any time there are issues with either, all progress is halted.

2. What recent campus program most exceeded your expectations and why?

In January, we hosted a Create Your Own Blanket event as part of our U-Create “Make & Take” series, which is popular. However, the turnout for this event surpassed expectations, as I wasn’t sure how many students would be intrigued by making blankets. However, we ended up running out of fabric well before the event was set to end! 3. Favorite campus program in your entire career and why?

Our Thursdays in the D Program at Wayne State. My university is located in the heart of Detroit, so one of the program’s core missions is to help students engage with the surrounding culture while bringing them together with peers of various ethnic backgrounds. Every Thursday, we host an event between 7-11 pm in the city that is typically free for students. The program received the NACA® Outstanding Diversity Achievement Award – Program at the 2014 National Convention. It’s a wonderful program and students love it.

Eboni Turnbow Interim Student Conduct Officer

Wayne State University (MI)

4. Three things on your desk right now you couldn’t live without for work? •M  y desk organizer! It holds all of my daily

necessities like Post-it® notes, scissors, rubber bands, etc. and keeps it all organized for me. •M  y scanner! In dealing with contracts, I do a lot of scanning and emailing. Having one on my desk is very convenient. •M  y fan! It gets extremely hot in my office in the winter/spring and I will absolutely faint without it. 5. Best teaching tool for your students?

“10 Questions with …” is a recurring feature in Campus Activities Programming® that recognizes individual campus activities professionals for their outstanding work and gives readers a chance to know more about them. If you’d like to recommend a professional staff member to answer “10 Questions,” contact Editor Glenn Farr at glennf@naca.org. 68

I enjoy watching students have their “aha” moments regarding their skills and abilities. StrengthsQuest has been a phenomenal tool to help students realize core traits they had no idea they had, while also making them aware of what may not necessarily be their strengths. I use this assessment during personal goal setting for the year.

7. Most challenging aspect of your job?

Following up consistently with students regarding their leadership development. I prefer that students discover their skills and learn to enhance them while also learning to work within them. Because I am the only staff person over my area, it can become extremely time consuming to maintain consistent follow-up with each student individually. So, no matter how hectic things are, I check in with each student every six to eight weeks. 8. Tip you can share for balancing work with a personal life?

It may seem cliché, but make it a habit to use a calendar. I literally put everything on my calendar, including personal items such as working out, sorority events and family trips. Otherwise, I won’t give them appropriate priority. I see each personal entry as an appointment just as if it were for work. I use an electronic one so I can access it anywhere. 9. Best programming advice you’ve ever received?

“Listen to the students. They will tell you what they want and what will engage them.” That statement keeps the programming I do student focused, which is important because the programs are for them. I frequently poll students at events, as well as my student assistants, about programming and I incorporate their feedback into future events. I believe this helps keep ideas fresh and interest in programming high. 10. Something unique about your programming board?

The diverse makeup of our board chairs with regard to ethnicity, age, gender, geographic origin, commuter or residential, etc. Our represented ethnicities and races include Indian-American, African-American, bi-racial and Caucasian. Their ages range from 19-23 years old. About 60% are campus residents and 40% are commuters. Some are from within the city of Detroit, others are from the suburban surroundings, a couple are from out of state, and some are from other countries. I believe this allows us to program for a diverse student population with so many different perspectives around the table. The bonds they have built are truly amazing. APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®


CURTAIN CALL

Spring Farewells By

NANCY OESWEIN

I

’VE BEEN IN THIS BUSINESS AS AN AGENT FOR 21 YEARS THIS MONTH, plus a few years before that as a student. There is one thing on my mind every spring. While the world is celebrating the renewal of the season, for those of us who make our living in the university world, spring is a time of goodbyes. Every year, a fair percentage of you students are saying goodbye to a place that has been your home for four years, a place that has lead you through your transition to adulthood before sending you out into the world. If you are like most of us, student activities has been both the biggest part of that evolution and the hardest to leave behind. Every year, we invest our hearts in students, knowing they’ll move on in four years. Most we’ll never hear from, but a few will be a part of our lives forever. Some will enter this field. Some will visit once in a while. I’m not sure whom these spring rituals are harder for – students or the professionals who are staying. On the one hand, students have been preparing for this inevitability, and it is accompanied with excitement, enthusiasm, determination, and maybe a little fear. Tugging at the back of your hearts is the world and its inhabitants you’ll leave behind, but mostly you are ready to head out with barely a look back. There are many agents and artists who don’t invest in these relationships and don’t give a moment’s thought to students as they move on. Of those, I’m a tad envious. I think it’s harder for student activities advisors because you are with them every day, or at least every week, and are more a formal part of their development. For the past few years, I have reached a point where I don’t tend to develop attachments to students in the same way I used to, but there are some who creep into my heart, nonetheless. I’m always saying lately it’s the business that has changed, that technology has de-personalized our relationships, but maybe it’s me. Maybe I’d just seen too many good-byes and stopped connecting as deeply. But there is no steeling my heart against the loss this year of some of the legends of our field. This spring is also about renewals for some of them, as they retire to pursue new beginnings. It will come as no surprise to anyone who knows me that these thoughts I share here are about Boyd Jones. But I am also saying good-bye to other legends like Joe Mollo and a few more. As much as we know they’ll come back to visit, it won’t be the same. There is a certain finality to it that is unsettling. For my friend Boyd, I don’t believe there is a single soul on the planet who has had a bigger impact on NACA, on our industry, on his students, on all artists and agents, and most especially those of us honored to call him friend. He is the heart and soul of NACA for many of us. At a goodbye dinner for him recently in Boston, it was not surprising to hear artist after artist, as well as agents and students, tell their stories. It was amazing to hear how many credited Boyd with their being in the market in the first place, or sticking around, or at the very least elevating their careers to sustainable levels. And there were stories of how his spirit is capable of lifting everyone who comes in contact with him. There were several who noted it would be hard to imagine NACA without him, especially in the South. Aside from the countless former students who are in the field, it’s the associates who especially feel this

way. He puts every artist on a pedestal and sees every person for the best they can be. For many, he is the very spirit of this organization. But his lifetime of achievement goes so far beyond his impact on our industry. He embodies all those little clichés about what is really important in life. He has devoted himself to constantly making the world better in little ways every day through every person lucky enough to be in his path. If we are lucky in our lives and we open our hearts every day to the world around us, we might cast a hundred pebbles in the pond that ripple outward, touching the lives of others enough to change them. Boyd is a regiment of boulders, an asteroid belt dropped in the sea of storms. His ripples would make the rings of Saturn blush from inadequacy. Boyd opens his heart to every soul, his ears to every song and poem, his gut to every belly laugh, his eyes to every scrap of beauty and art, and reflects them to the world. We’ll all be telling Boyd stories for decades, and the mark he has left will never go away. For you students who are moving on, I hope you’ll focus more on going out into the world with that same open spirit and ability to focus on all that really counts, rather than on monetary or power-based achievement. I hope you’ll measure your lives in bear hugs, high fives, smiles, moments of beauty, songs, and the lives you touch. By every measure that counts, Boyd is the richest man on the planet. As I was writing this, I intended to rise early one morning before my deadline to finish it. I had stopped midway the night before because my dog was ill and needed me and I couldn’t get back into the words. I had trouble with the words because, while friends may move on due to retirement or graduation, they can all remain a part of our lives through social media, phone calls and visits. It won’t be the same, though. That casual everyday interaction – the stories, the words, the hugs, and the smiles – won’t be at our fingertips. So, there is a very real finality in these goodbyes, after all. The irony for me is I experienced a final goodbye in this midst of writing this. Sometime during the night, my dog passed away. I was very grateful to have had some inkling the night before and that I took time to hold and comfort him. I hope as this spring brings goodbyes for each of us, we’ll take a moment away from our rituals and craziness to let those people know how we feel, that we’ll show genuine gratitude to those who’ve changed our lives. You may not have another opportunity. Take time to write a few thank-you notes or share a few hugs with the teachers, advisors, students, parents, or even pets who have helped get you through your many winters to this spring of new beginnings. I know, Boyd Jones, that you will always be our friend and that you’ve left indelible footprints on our hearts. This is only farewell, not goodbye. Good luck to you all on your journeys. Nancy Oeswein owns Auburn Moon Agency (Campus Activities Magazine’s 2013 Agency of the Year) and lives in Rochester, MI, with her husband and two children. She leaves the frozen North as often as possible for adventures and exotic ports around the world or just anywhere, except Detroit.


SMOOTH

SAILING:

Navigating Collaborations By

Phillip Smith and Jabriel McIntosh, Georgia State University and

Benjamin Williams, Miami University (OH)

W

HEN IT COMES TO COLLABORATIONS, there are a number of ways your event can hit rough waters and sink like the Titanic. However, collaborations, if planned well, can lead to smooth sailing from start to finish for all parties involved. What are the positives and negatives to collaborations? All aboard! as we take a trip on the S.S. Collaboration Cruise line.

Integrating individual partners can create a larger event with lower individual resources, which provides all parties more opportunities to program. Compiling a list of what financial and human resources partners can offer can allow for the largest and best programs. And, when you understand the value of connecting offices on campus, you create a strong network that supports campus programs for our largest group of stakeholders, the students.

Synergy: a Crucial Tenet of Collaboration As we consider what it means to effectively collaborate on college campuses, we recommend thinking about synergy. Merriam Webster defines synergy as, “a mutually advantageous conjunction or compatibility of distinct business participants or elements (as resources or efforts)”(MerriamWebster online). Collaborations should be mutually beneficial as we work to serve the most students using as few resources as possible. Within higher education, we all find different administrative homes and are accountable to different people, yet collectively, we represent and provide for the entire campus, which includes students, faculty, staff, alumni and community partners. 4

Benefits of Collaboration A great example of the positive benefits of collaboration is Georgia State University’s Fall 2012 Homecoming event, Panther Nation at Atlantic Station. This event was a spirit rally for the Homecoming football game featuring live music by the GSU band, other entertainment, games, giveaways and food vendors. Atlantic Station is a 138-acre outdoor mall on the northwestern edge of Midtown Atlanta and a favorite spot for college students and tourists. To bring this event to life, we teamed up with Georgia State’s Athletics Department (Cheer Squad, Public Relations, and Marketing) and Band, as well the Student Government Association. Proper

APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING® WEB EXCLUSIVE


delegation of duties for all of the entities made the financial aspects of the event easier to manage and the amount of resources available and level of outreach available for the event phenomenal. Through this wonderful collaboration, we were able to have the funds to transport thousands of students to Atlantic Station, all while offering free food and games to create a night to remember for all involved. Large-scale events such as this show student programmers the true value of having connections to different departments on campus. When working as part of a team, you can utilize many strengths to accomplish things your organization would struggle to realize on its on own. Collaborating in this way also fosters campus unity.

Challenges of Collaborating Collaborations can become difficult if there are “too many chiefs” – when too many people working on a project want to be the boss while few people are actually doing work. When this happens, effective collaboration falls to the wayside due to everyone in the group wanting to lead and have the dominant point of view. However, not everyone working on a project can be the boss, so egos must be put aside for the sake of creating a successful event. True leaders must know when to lead and when to follow. To create successful relationships with other businesses and organizations, it is crucial to have smooth transactions regarding money. A common mistake is not making timely payment for services, which can sour a good relationship. If a client is slow to give you an invoice, continue to let them know how long it will take to process payment on your end so they will know exactly when they can expect to receive compensation. Our typical process is to receive invoices from clients at least six weeks prior to the event date to ensure that soon after a successful event, timely payment can be made. Communication is one of the most important aspects of collaboration. Communication is successful only if the message issued by the sender is properly received and interpreted by the receiver. Many barriers can destroy effective communication and it is up to the leaders of an organization to take all steps to remove impediments. Common problems include: an overload of information, lack of attention/retention, and emotions. In the process of producing an event, there are commonly large numbers of messages being sent back and forth, so it is crucial to organize them to ensure nothing is forgotten or overlooked. Organization also helps leaders retain more information and not forget important details. Lastly, emotions can greatly affect communication and may add stress to many situations. A receiver of business messages should never feel as if the sender is angry because it will impede everything you aim to accomplish. When producing an event, it is the student leader’s job to ensure messages are received clearly for the benefit of all parties involved. Every student leader should understand the importance of follow-through, as important opportunities can be lost when this doesn’t happen. Follow-through includes responding to emails, returning calls, and holding yourself accountable for what you agreed to do. A lack of follow-through will likely result in developing a bad reputation for yourself as a student leader and your organization as a whole, so you must give it priority. To counter a lack of follow-through, make sure you

give your all at every stage in event planning and strive to be timely in accomplishing tasks.

What Can Go Wrong? Sometimes in collaborations, things can reach a point where an event must be cancelled. An example of this involved our 2013 Greek Showcase, an annual event that typically takes place in the spring and is planned for months in advance. It has provided an opportunity for all of the GSU Greeks to come together as a community and battle for the title of Best Step, Stroll, or Skit. This event had historically been a struggle due to how it had been structured and organized, particularly since it relied on individual fraternity and sorority presidents to relay messages to their respective members. Consequently, it was difficult to avoid breakdowns in communication. As things progressed, we realized much work and funds were being put into an event that wasn’t coming together due to communication issues and unequal contributions of time and energy among collaborating partners. Ultimately, we cancelled the event and used the time we would have used in planning it to revamp it so that in the future, these problems would not occur again.

Smooth Sailing 101 Navigating relationships with campus partners, finding resources for programming, and working with a variety of individuals can create challenges. To ensure this process is a smooth as possible, it is important to create infrastructure to support collaborations. If staff or students are actively seeking or facilitating collaborations with the proper processes and support, any collaboration can be a successful one. So, how do we create infrastructure to support collaborations? One of the most important things to have is documentation all along the way, including appropriate correspondence. Collaborations typically require financial or human resources from various campus partner(s). By having a contract, agreement, or emails that document commitments, you will establish a basic foundation outlining who is responsible for what. This agreement between partners will help ensure that event expectations will be met. This is crucial, no matter whether the event is a $150,000 or a $1,500 collaboration. After responsibilities are agreed upon, meetings to update the group should be scheduled and accountability for moving the event forward should occur on a continuing basis. Many times, the large ideas behind programs take priority over the administrative tasks and other responsibilities that come with campus-wide collaborations.

T.R.U.E. Model of Collaboration One useful way to navigate collaborations is by using the T.R.U.E. Model of Collaboration, which provides a roadmap to the collaboration process. The T.R.U.E. Model of Collaboration, which we have developed at Georgia State University, can serve as a lens to view the collaboration being proposed and help ensure that partners are aware of what is being asked of them. T stands for thoughtful and reminds you to ensure that

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what you are asking of your partners, and the event itself, has been well considered. R stands for realistic and serves to help ensure that what is being asked of all collaborators is attainable and realistic. Asking for $10,000 for T-shirts in most cases is not realistic, but spending money to get shirts to promote the event that benefits all partners could be beneficial for all and would cost much less. U stands for utilitarian and reminds you that while it is important to ensure appeal for events, costs involved should remain practical and show appropriate stewardship of funds. E is for expectations. Having realistic and appropriate expectations is key to success when collaborating with others outside your organization or department. When you utilize the T.R.U.E. Model, you are on a step towards a strong collaboration that can be adapted to meet your needs. While this model has proved successful for us, other campuses may need to plan differently. Whatever your goal for creating collaborations on your campus, remember to ensure everyone’s needs are met. If you are simply looking for funding, you increase the likelihood that partners will not feel supported as part of the planning process for events and programs. Take the time at the early stages of planning to work with colleagues and create the best programs possible. When we bring different parts of our campuses together, we have the potential to create amazing experiences for all involved. Collaborations can be challenging, yet they also create events that meet so many different needs. After all, aren’t we here to provide the best journey possible for our students?

COLLABORATIONS CAN BECOME DIFFICULT IF THERE ARE “TOO MANY CHIEFS” – WHEN TOO MANY PEOPLE WORKING ON A PROJECT WANT TO BE THE BOSS WHILE FEW PEOPLE ARE ACTUALLY DOING WORK. WHEN THIS HAPPENS, EFFECTIVE COLLABORATION FALLS TO THE WAYSIDE DUE TO EVERYONE IN THE GROUP WANTING TO LEAD AND HAVE THE DOMINANT POINT OF VIEW.

6

References Merriam-Webster online. Definition of synergy. Retrieved from http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ synergy

About the Authors Phillip Smith is Assistant Director for Programs at Georgia State University.

He previously served as Assistant Director at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, as Activities Advisor at Wichita State University (KS), and as a Graduate Assistant in the Greek Life Office at the University of Akron (OH). Active in NACA, he served as the Diversity Initiatives Chair for the 2012 NACA® South Regional Conference. Also affiliated with the Association of College Unions International (ACUI), he is involved in its Community of Multi Ethnic Professionals and Allies (COMP). He holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Shaw University (NC) and a master’s degree in higher education administration from the University of Akron. Benjamin Williams is the Graduate Advisor for the Commuter Center at Miami University (OH), where he pursuing a

master’s degree in student affairs in higher education. He holds a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Georgia State University, where he received the 2013 Academic & Co-Curricular Excellence Award and where he served as Spotlight Programs Board Traditions Director in 2012-2013. He was named Omicron Delta Kappa Circle Leader of the Year in 2012. Active in NACA, he co-presented at the NACA® South Regional Conference in 2012. Jabriel McIntosh is Traditions Director at Georgia State University, where he

is pursuing a degree in marketing and real estate and where he served as Homecoming Director in 2011-2012. He co-presented at the 2012 NACA® South Regional Conference.

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Report and Executive Summary

Survey of Assessment Practices, Attitudes and Aptitudes in the Student Activities Profession

January 2014 (Revised February 2014)


Table of Contents

Abstract..................................................................................................... 3 Introduction........................................................................................... 3 Methodology...........................................................................................4 Results....................................................................................................... 5 Current Efforts............................................................................. 5 Learning Outcomes....................................................................7 Personal Aptitude....................................................................... 8 Attitudes toward Assessment............................................ 10 Barriers/Challenges towards Assessment................... 11 Discussion..............................................................................................12 Conclusions..................................................................................12 Limitations....................................................................................13 Recommendations....................................................................13 Appendices.............................................................................................14

= Key Findings

NACA Report and Executive Summary

2


Abstract This report highlights the results of the NACA-sponsored Survey of Assessment Practices, Attitudes and Aptitudes in the Student Activities Profession. The survey was conducted using a 68-item instrument designed to collect quantitative and qualitative data. The survey was established with the intent to measure the average capacity, familiarity, and attitudes that student activities professionals have in relation to managing and conducting assessment in their area, as well as to collect information on current efforts and challenges related to carrying out assessment-related activity. The survey targeted representatives from each NACA member campus where there was at least one current member affiliated with the association. Over a three-week period in November 2012, 236 respondents provided anonymous feedback through an online version of the instrument provided by the Campus Labs team at Higher One, Inc. Members of the NACA Educational Advisory Group and Campus Labs assessment professionals carried out a joint review of the findings and made several recommendations regarding NACA’s opportunities for promoting assessment in the field of student activities.

Introduction Since its establishment in 1960 to help increase the buying power of campus programming dollars, the National Association for Campus Activities (NACA) has brought together nearly 1,000 college and university members who benefit from the association’s wide variety of events, educational institutes, conferences, publications, and networking opportunities. The mission of NACA states that the organization “will be the recognized leader in higher education for providing members with innovative practices

The mission of NACA states that the organization “will be the recognized leader in higher education for providing members with innovative practices and access to programs that support campus engagement.

and access to programs that support campus engagement.” NACA often partners with other student affairs professional associations and industry partners such as Higher One in order to advance its mission, promote its educational goals, and increase awareness of its professional development efforts by creating thought-leadership in the profession of student activities and engagement. The Survey of Assessment Practices, Attitudes and Aptitudes in the Student Activities Profession is one such example of a collaborative effort that was designed to bring a best-practice concept—specifically, using assessment in student activities in order to achieve strategic outcomes—to the forefront of discussion and usage among those in the profession. The data collected by this survey will be used to help NACA identify the current “state of assessment” in the industry and to formulate a strategy for the delivery of educational content related to assessment best practices.

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3


Methodology The survey was established with the intent to measure the average capacity The survey was established with the intent to measure...

(i.e., time or focus required to carry out work), familiarity (i.e., requisite knowledge to carry out work), and attitudes (i.e., general interest in or willingness to carry out work) that student activities professionals have in relation to managing and conducting assessment in their area. The survey

Capacity

was also intended to collect information on current efforts and challenges or barriers to those efforts which related to carrying out assessment-related

Familiarity

activity. The survey was comprised of 68 mixed-method (i.e., qualitative and quantitative) questions that were divided into three sections: current assessment efforts and trends within the respondent’s student activities

Attitudes

area; personal aptitude to coordinate and conduct assessment; and personal attitudes towards the area of assessment and evaluation.

The study was announced and promoted via an e-mail from NACA that was sent to 923 representatives (one from each NACA-affiliated campus where there was at least one active NACA member). The survey, delivered through an online platform provided by the Campus Labs team at Higher One, Inc. was active over a threeweek period from November 7, 2012 to November 30, 2012. There were 236 anonymous respondents, yielding a 25% response rate for the study. The survey was completed in its entirety by 200 of the respondents.

Sizes of Institutions Represented by Respondents with Full-Time Enrollment (FTE) 50

49

48 44

Count of Respondents

40

36

30

20

12 10

6 3

Fewer than 2,000

2,000–4,999

5,000–9,999

10,000–19,999

20,000–29,999

30,000–39,999

2

40,000–49,999 More than 50,000

Institution Size (Students Enrolled Full Time)

NACA Report and Executive Summary

4


The size of institutions represented by the respondents included those with a full-time enrollment (FTE) count of fewer than 2,000 students (25%), those with a FTE count of 2,000-4,999 students (24%), those with a FTE count of 5,000-9,999 students (22%), those with a FTE count of 10,000-19,999 students (18%), those with a FTE of 20,000-29,999 students (6%), those a FTE count of 30,000-39,999 students (3%), those with a FTE count of 40,000-49,999 students (2%), and those who with a FTE count of more than 50,000 students (1%). The respondents represented four-year public institutions (45%), four-year private institutions (43%), two-year public institutions (12%), and also technical institutions (1%). The positions/titles of respondents varied across a span of levels within the aggregate set of institutions represented. All respondents held full-time positions in the area of campus activities and student engagement, with positions reported as being at the coordinator level (20%), assistant director level (21%), associate director level (12%), director level (45%), and assistant vice president level or higher (2%). Other responses (3%) on position level included mention of specific positions such as “professor,” “deputy director,” “associate dean”, or “department manager”. The level of educational attainment represented by the respondents included those whose highest level of education was a Ph.D., Ed.D., or J.D. (5%), those who had completed all doctoral work with the exception of a final dissertation (1%), those with a master’s degree and some doctoral-level work (9%), those with a master’s degree (79%), those with a bachelor’s degree and some master’s-level work (3%), and those with a bachelor’s degree (5%). No respondents reported an associate’s degree as their highest level of education.

Results Current Efforts This section focused on current efforts in assessment and evaluation at the area/departmental level. »»

Approximately 80% of respondents have direct responsibilities for assessment (defined as “gathering, analyzing, or interpreting data”) in their current position.

»»

Fifty-six percent (56%) of respondents have coordinated assessment plans, strategic plans, or similar guiding documents for their areas. Of those who are not engaging in assessment planning or strategic planning (44%), 87% are four-year institutions with a FTE count below 20,000.

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»»

On average, student activities areas are conducting about seven assessment projects during the course of a year. Most of the surveys (57%) used in these areas focus on student satisfaction, needs, and interests related to programs and services. Just over 20% of respondents indicated they collected data on student demographics and less than 20% reported conducting assessment related to learning outcomes.

7

average number assessment projects throughout year

»»

57

22

%

%

of surveys focused on student satisfaction/needs

collected data on student demographics

18

%

conducted assessment related to learning outcomes

Current students are the most common population with whom assessments are conducted (50%), followed by staff (15%), faculty (12%), parents and family (7%), alumni (5%), community members (5%), prospective students (3%), board members (1%), and employers (1%).

»»

Less than half of respondents (48%) indicated that their areas have collaborated with another office or department on campus when conducting assessment. The most common partners mentioned were offices of institutional research/effectiveness/planning and departments of residence life.

»»

The most frequently-used methods of data collection were reported to be online/web-based surveys (86%), direct observation of student behaviors or tasks (76%), and paper surveys (70%). Other methods of data collection used were pre/post-tests (59%), focus groups (50%), written reflections (46%), interviews (42%), rubrics (35%), mobile/handheld surveys (32%), portfolios (11%), and case studies (10%).

»»

Overall, 46% of respondents rate the quality of their student activities area’s assessment work as average, 28% as good, and 26% as below average.

Quality of Student Activities Assessment Work

Percentage (%) of Respondents

48

36

24

26%

46%

28%

12

Below Average

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Average

Good

6


Learning Outcomes This section focused on current efforts in assessment related specifically to learning outcomes assessment and evaluation. »»

Only 4% of respondents indicated that they have not and are not planning to articulate student

Institution plans for articulating learning outcomes

learning outcomes. Of these respondents who

4%

indicated that they would not articulate student learning outcomes, all were from four-year institutions with a FTE count under 20,000. Some respondents (16%) have not, but are planning to,

21%

16%

articulate student learning outcomes. Thirty-nine percent (39%) of respondents are currently in the process of articulating student learning outcomes.

20%

Twenty percent (20%) of respondents have

39%

articulated but have not systematically assessed those outcomes. Finally, only 21% of respondents have articulated and systematically assessed student learning outcomes. Forty-five percent (45%) of four-year institutions are in the process or planning to articulate learning outcomes and 33% of two-year institutions are in the process or

Have articulated and systematically assessed SLOs

Have not and are not planning to articulate SLOs

Have articulated but not systematically assessed SLOs

Have not but are planning to articulate SLOs

Currently in the process of articulating SLOs

planning to articulate learning outcomes. »»

Half (50%) of the respondents who reported having articulated or being in the process of developing outcomes based those outcomes on divisional/institutional student learning outcomes. Some respondents (25%) reported creating outcomes independent of divisional/institutional learning outcomes. A few respondents (9%) are not sure how learning outcomes are being articulated or developed at their respective institutions. Very few (4%) are using a combination of two or more sources for creating their outcomes.

»»

For those who have not and are not planning to articulate learning outcomes, over half (53%) of respondents feel that it is simply not a priority for their area; this was particularly true for fouryear institutions with a FTE count under 10,000 (62%). Other reasons for not articulating outcomes include not having enough resources (20%), not having enough time to create/assess outcomes (20%), and having a strategic plan that has other areas of focus (7%).

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»»

The most popular established frameworks that campuses utilize to create student learning outcomes include institutional mission/vision/value statements (24%), Council for the Advancement of Standards (CAS)/Framework for Assessing Learning and Development Outcomes (FALDOs) (23%), institutional planning documents/strategic plans (16%), and the NACA Core Competencies (14%).

»»

Very small institutions with a FTE count under 5,000 are twice as likely to use a combination of methods and frameworks in their learning outcomes assessment (24%) than their larger counterparts (10%). Forty-five percent (45%) of the very small institutions with FTE counts under 5,000 used more than one method or framework in their efforts, compared to 22% of institutions with a FTE count between 5,001-10,000 and 20% of institutions with a FTE count between 10,001 20,000 who used more than one method or framework.

»»

The NACA Core Competencies were most popular with mid-sized institutions (i.e., those with a FTE count ranging from 5,000 - 20,000) who accounted for 47% of the institutions represented by respondents in the study. Where the NACA Core Competencies were reported as being used, 49% of institutions were public and 44% were private.

Personal Aptitude This section focused on individual abilities to engage in assessment and personal understanding of assessment strategies. »»

Common activities that respondents identified as having previously done or are currently participating in include attending an assessment presentation (25%), utilizing online or print materials about assessment (21%), and having taken

Most respondents (53%) rated themselves as a “3”, or average, in assessment aptitude where “1” is an assessment “beginner” and “5” is an assessment “expert.”

an academic course on research or assessment (17%). Other activities include serving on an assessment

1

2

3

4

5

committee (13%), conducting research for graduate

11%

9%

53%

16%

1%

or doctoral work (12%), making a formal presentation on assessment at a conference or workshop (5%), preparing grant materials with evaluation or assessment components (4%), and publishing an article utilizing data from a research or assessment effort (2%).

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»»

The activities in which respondents feel most proficient are using assessment results to improve programs and services (53% feeling extremely or very proficient), explaining results to other parties (46% feeling extremely or very proficient), and creating survey questions (44% feeling extremely or very proficient). The activities in which respondents are feeling least proficient are conducting statistical analyses (56% feeling slightly or not at all proficient), incorporating assessment and evaluation into planning efforts (32% feeling slightly or not at all proficient), and conducting focus groups (30% feeling slightly or not at all proficient).

»»

Thirty-six percent (36%) of respondents spend 12 hours per year or less on assessment and evaluation-related activities, 42% of respondents spend one to five hours each month on assessment and evaluation-related activities, and 22% of respondents spend one to ten or more hours each week on assessment and evaluation-related activities.

»»

Over half (52%) of respondents have personally administered an assessment to students, 16% have personally administered an assessment to staff, and 11% have personally administered an assessment to faculty.

»»

When sharing assessment results 37% utilize formal reports, 36% utilize informal discussion, 19% utilize in-person presentations, and 5% utilize other forms of communication (newsletters, blogs, etc.).

»»

Respondents most commonly share assessment results with administrators they directly report to (25%), staff who are peers/colleagues (22%), and staff who report directly to them (19%). Fourteen percent (14%) of respondents share assessment results with administrators their own supervisors report to, 10% share with the student body, and 4% share with the overall university community.

»»

Over half (52%) of respondents rate the quality of their own assessment work as average and 20% rate their quality as below average. Only 28% of respondents rated their work any higher than average.

Quality of Respondents’ Assessment Work

Percentage (%) of Respondents

50

40

30

20

20%

52%

28%

10

Below Average

NACA Report and Executive Summary

Average

Above Average

9


Attitudes toward Assessment This section measured personal attitudes towards assessment, to better understand approaches to building capacity with individuals for assessment and attitudes towards their experiences with assessment efforts on their campus.

83

%

feel assessment is something that should be performed regularly

66

%

feel they need additional training in order to engage more fully in assessment

54

%

use the assessment process for decision-making

46

%

feel their student activities area and division regularly use data for planning and decision-making

NACA Report and Executive Summary

76

%

feel assessment is supported within their division

65

%

indicate that assessment has caused them to reconsider how their SA area implements activities and strategies

53

%

feel assessment is a priority for their area when it occurs

73

%

feel assessment is supported within their student activities areas

59

%

not concerned negative assessment results will reflect poorly on their area’s performance

50

%

feel assessment is integrated into the planning and implementation of their work

23

%

engage in assessment solely to satisfy requirements from outside the student activities area

10


Barriers/Challenges towards Assessment This section identified potential barriers/challenges encountered when engaging in assessment and personal needs for additional training. »»

Respondents identified a number of areas they would like additional assessment training on topics such as developing assessment plans (8%), choosing appropriate methods for data collection (8%), effective reporting (8%), and using benchmarking data (7%). Other areas desired for training include conducting program reviews (6%), developing learning outcomes and objectives (6%), using learning outcome frameworks (6%), basic data analysis (6%), integrating data from multiple sources (6%), creating and using rubrics (6%), using results effectively from national studies (5%), survey design and implementation (5%), interpretation of data and application to planning and decision-making (5%), educating others about assessment (5%), basic assessment overview (5%), and qualitative methods (interviews, focus groups) (5%). Only 3% of respondents indicated they were not interested in any additional training topics. Areas and Topics that Respondents would like Additional Assessment Training On

10

s s od th lan tP Me n t e n g sm me es tin ss ss or se A s ep g A R n g i e sin lop tiv oo ve ec Eff Ch De

ws s vie ks ce or Re ur m ew So s e ra m e l a g m o Fr ltip co Pr ics ata ut me br Mu ing gD Ru m gO tco ct s n o n i g i u u i ies r t s f O rk nd sin ud en ta arn aly ion St ma ing Co Le dU sm Da An al tat s rn n ch g g a n n e a a n n t i s in g Le tio Be me Da As rat lop tin Na ing iew ple ata ve eg ing sic ds on ea m Us Im fD rs Us Cr De Int Ba ho erv ro / e f et h n Ov no s t g t M t o i l i O n es at su ive ng me Re ret yD tat ati ss ali erp ing rve uc se u s Su Int Q Ed Us A

Percentage (%) of Respondents

8

6

d te res te n I t No

4

2

»»

In the previous question, every option was chosen by at least 60 respondents, indicating that every area listed was of reasonable interest to about 25% of respondents.

»»

Seventeen percent (17%) of respondents reported having limited to no time to conduct assessment as a challenge or barrier to carrying out assessment work. Fourteen percent (14%) reported limited staff or personnel as a challenge and others (16%) reported limited to no time to process results and take action as the biggest barrier or challenges in regard to assessment.

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Discussion Conclusions »»

While many student affairs professionals are utilizing a variety of data collection methods with students, they are doing so without fully articulating their student learning outcomes. Additionally, many professionals, while stating they are “moderately proficient” with assessment and its related activities, spend very little time on their campus with assessment activities or with assessmentrelated professional development.

»»

It appears that the NACA general population is not aware of some of the valuable efforts and programming coordinated for professionals through NACA, particularly the NACA Core Competencies. This framework is one of the most comprehensive learning outcome frameworks targeted to student activities professionals, but only 14% of respondents have utilized this resource.

»»

Reporting that they spend 0-12 hours per year on assessment, only 35% of professionals spend an average of 1.5 work days out of a possible 240 on assessment-related activities. Professionals indicate that assessment is important to them, but they are not devoting time to the process of engaging in assessment.

»»

Less than half (47%) of respondents indicated they are engaging in collaborative assessment strategies with peers in other areas or departments at their institution. Further research is required to understand why some professionals are averse to collaborating with their peers on assessment, and whether this issue extends to other areas of note or concern.

»»

Professionals may be over-rating their proficiency to engage in assessment efforts. Over half of the respondents rated both their proficiency and the quality of their assessment efforts as average, but when broken down into subset topics, respondents rated themselves as extremely or very proficient in each area.

»»

Learning outcomes assessment is not as common as believed or suggested. Respondents (40%) have articulated or are in the process of articulating learning outcomes, but only 20% have both articulated and systematically assessed learning outcomes for their student activities area. More research is required to understand how campuses are working on providing effective learning and engagement opportunities for students through coordinated campus programming.

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Limitations The study would have benefited from a greater number of respondents. Having a higher level of participation would have made the data more reliable and relatable to the overall NACA membership. It should also be noted that no graduate students or part-time professionals were included in the sample.

Recommendations »»

NACA should clearly-define its role in preparing members for assessment and evaluation. NACA should consider the role it wishes to take related to providing professional development opportunities to its members. The association is in a position to do anything from providing resources (e.g., a “getting started with assessment” guide) related to learning about assessment and evaluation to proactively training (at regional or national conferences) its members to acquire these skills. Clarifying the scope of NACA’s commitment to preparing members for assessmentrelated tasks in their daily jobs should be documented internally and externally so that members understand where they can turn in their efforts to grow and develop.

»»

NACA should strengthen its stance on the use of learning outcomes assessment. Learning outcomes assessment seems to be an area that the association’s membership struggles with. If NACA provided targeted information and training on learning outcomes assessment, it could not only provide additional professional development opportunity, it could reinforce the idea that assessment competency is important to the student activities profession. The association could highlight the NACA Core Competencies as a way to assist members in accessing an already established and strong framework in this targeted messaging as well, achieving both the goal of increasing emphasis on learning assessment but also increasing awareness of the Competencies.

»»

NACA should better-promote and highlight the NACA Core Competencies. While the NACA Core Competencies are a premier learning outcomes framework for student affairs professionals, it seems many members are not utilizing this when it comes time for them to create their learning outcomes-focused assessment efforts. A marketing campaign for the NACA Core Competencies could be an effective way to highlight this valuable resource.

NACA Report and Executive Summary

13


»»

NACA should create a tool that allows professionals to self-rate their proficiency to conduct assessment and evaluation so that they can more-appropriately identify where their personal competency and skill development should be improved. The study showed that student activities professionals struggle to determine their personal aptitude to engage in assessment and evaluation. It would be beneficial if a standard of measurement such as an official rubric was created for student activities professionals to use in order to selfdetermine their knowledge, skills, and abilities related to assessment. Such a tool could then direct an individual to the resources available that can help the person build capacity and gain familiarity with assessment and evaluation strategies.

»»

NACA should conduct further research into if or how assessment collaboration occurs between peer offices at an institution. The results of the study seem to show that student activities professionals are not collaborating with their peers on assessment efforts, but the reason why is unclear. Further research is needed to validate and understand this phenomenon. Additionally, it might be beneficial to identify whether a lack of collaboration extends to and impacts other assessment efforts typically administered or managed within the area of student activities.

Additional Resources For additional information, please contact Dr. Sandra Rouse at sandrar@naca.org

The National Association for Campus Activities (NACA) is a recognized leader in higher education for providing members with innovative practices and access to programs that support campus engagement.

13 Harbison Way, Columbia, SC 29212

NACA now has more than 950 college and university members and over

803-732-6222 | www.naca.org

550 associate members who represent artists, lecturers and performers.

NACA Report and Executive Summary

14


RENEW

ONLINE Thank you for your continued membership with NACA – The Network for Campus Engagement. NACA’s new membership year begins May 1, 2014. To renew, simply login to www.naca.org after April 1, update your demographic and contact information and pay online. Payments may also be submitted to payment@naca.org.

APRIL 2014 CAMPUS ACTIVITIES PROGRAMMING®

7

Campus Activities Programming® - April 2014  

The April 2014 issue of Campus Activities Programming® magazine.

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