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Help For Guys

June 2012

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Birmingham, AL

Bridging the Gaps |

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publishersletter

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n June 5, a solar system event called the Transit of Venus will occur, during which time the “Planet of Love” will be visible from Earth as a small shadow moving across the disc of the Sun. Astronomically, “The sight…is by far the noblest astronomy affords,” according to the man who named Halley’s Comet. Astrologically, the Venus Transit of 2012 will anchor the Divine Feminine energy on earth, in the form of the Feminine Christ Consciousness. What can males do to help raise the vibration in their own way? We want to help. We don’t want to be left out, and we are worried about being bypassed altogether. If we can’t make some small significant contribution to the Shift, we won’t fare well, I can tell you. You’re going to have to give us a task. A task is the least we ask. What we want is to help Heroically. We want to help hugely, and humongously. Not steal the spotlight—Not NOW! No. It’s your time to lead, and we need your help to heal. So to reassure ourselves that we’re worth helping we feel we must Help Immensely, and Impressively! So. What can we do as evolved, Nontraditional males...to impress Women...in a way that suggests we are more evolved than Traditional males traditionally only out to impress women? Look. It’s still our only Onus (Impetus?) (Animus?) to impress women. Nowadays, even, ever more than ever. Because we feel it, too. The rising Re-Energizing. Reality: Revitalized Regenerated. Rejoice! It is the Return of the Feminine Energies to Earth. We miss those energies, as a part of us, too. Probably as much as you! We need the Balance in a much more spectacular way, anyway. Alright, Men. Just try to be harmless and helpful. That’s harm-less, and help-full, and in that order. If you can only work on one, focus on the first. If you can really render yourself incapable of causing new harm, then you’re being very helpful, without having to do something. In truth, unless you’ve had some experience in Helping in ways that were actually helpful, before, don’t go looking to impose your assistance on anyone until they ask for your help. Often, this is not helpful. If often enough, it’s not harmless. That’s why Helpful is one of the highest honorifics a human can be handed. Because it’s hard. You need some skills. You need experience, judgment, balance, restraint. You also need luck. The Helpful are always Lucky, because Luck is always Helpful; and that’s their home turf. You need grace. And males don’t have it. Not under Patriarchy. They don’t. Even the ones who are not Patriarchical, or particularly so. “Not my idea,” we say, us Non-patriarchs, the nonprofessionals of the Piscean and its principles. “To downplay the divine feminine to the point where it’s pointless.” Some would say worse words. Downplay is bad enough as it was, because it caused our lives to be as they were. Unbalanced. Out-of-sorts. Off. “Off our game,” we’d say, when we’d play. Unhappily. Unhealed. “Venus eclipsing the Sun represents an awakening of the Divine Feminine energies in our world...love, beauty, and connection. As the Divine Feminine energy awakens and expands compassion within our hearts, emotional healing can occur for all of Humanity.”1 We’ve been looking a long time for her, and she’s here. Reference: 1

Govinda. “Who else is feeling the energies around the Venus Transit coming up on June 6th, 2012?” Galactic Free Press. Motherfathergod Amon Ra, 2012. Mt. Shasta, California, USA. Accessed May 19, 2012 <http://www.galacticfreepress.com>.

contact us Publisher Tom Maples Tom@AlabamaAwakenings.com Cell: 404-395-9634 New Business Development Advertising Sales Cindy Wilson Cindy@AlabamaAwakenings.com Cell: 256-476-6537 Design and Production Karen Ormstedt 256-997-9165 Natural Awakenings Birmingham 14 Woodland Ave. Trinity, Alabama 35673 Office: 256-340-1122 Fax: 256-217-4274 NABirmingham.com © 2012 by Natural Awakenings. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reproduced and reprinted, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing. Natural Awakenings is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. It is available in selected stores, health and education centers, healing centers, public libraries and wherever free publications are generally seen. Please call to find a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business. We do not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the articles and advertisements, nor are we responsible for the products and services advertised. We welcome your ideas, articles and feedback.

SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscriptions are available by sending $25 (for 12 issues) to the above address. Natural Awakenings is printed on recycled newsprint with soybased ink.

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June 2012

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contents 7 5 newsbriefs

Natural Awakenings is your guide to a healthier, more balanced life. In each issue readers find cutting-edge information on natural health, nutrition, fitness, personal growth, green living, creative expression and the products and services that support a healthy lifestyle.

7 globalbriefs 8 ecotip

10 MEN'S HEALTH 101 by Elizabeth Campbell Korcz, MD

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13 inspiration 14 fitbody 16 healingways 19 wisewords

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11 HEALTHY ESCAPES Unplugged Getaways Rebalance Our Lives

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by Judith Fertig

13 BORN TO EXPLORE by Joe Robinson

14 DO YOU PARKOUR? Using the World as a Fitness Playground

advertising & submissions HOW TO ADVERTISE Display Ads due by the 10th of the month prior to publication. Contact Us to advertise with Natural Awakenings or request a media kit. 256-476-6537 -or- Editor@AlabamaAwakenings.com

by Randy Kambic

16 HORMONE HELP FOR GUYS

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Natural Ways to Boost Vitality by James Occhiogrosso

EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS* Newsbriefs due by the 10th of the month. Limit 50-250 words. Content limited to special events and other announcements. No advertorials, please. Articles and ideas due by the 5th of the month. Articles generally contain 250-850 words, with some exceptions. No advertorials, please.

CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS Calendar of Events and Ongoing Calendar listings due by the 10th of the month. Limit 50 words per entry. Please follow format found in those sections.

ADVERTISE WITH US TODAY 256-476-6537 -or- Editor@AlabamaAwakenings.com *All submissions are subject to editing and will be printed at the publisherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s discretion. Article space often fills in advance. Deadline dates refer to the month prior to next publication and may change without notice due to holidays, shorter months, or printing schedules.

4 Birmingham NABirmingham.com www.NABirmingham.com

18 SALTY SITUATION by Molly Green

19 BRIDGING GENERATIONAL DIVIDES A Conversation with John and Ocean Robbins by Linda Sechrist

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newsbriefs Reiki Clinic to Open in Forest Park

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walk-in Reiki clinic is opening in Forest Park at Natural Forces Studio inside Birmingham Yoga. The clinic will be open on Friday afternoons from 2-4pm. The clinic is for those wanting to receive Reiki energy for health and wellness. Reiki is a Universal Life Force energy that brings the body back into balance by releasing old energy and bringing in new energy. It works on all levels of the body—emotional, mental, physical and spiritual. Reiki can be used for little aches and pains. It can also support the process of healing in cases of serious illnesses. It can be used in between cancer treatments to help with side affects and rebalancing the body. And, it can be used in birth as well as in the final transitions of life. It knows no boundaries but flows with the course of all life. Reiki is an integrative health practice that is used in conjunction with allopathic medicine. Rates are offered at $1/min. Please note that more than one treatment table will be set up in the room at a time. Treatments are received on a table and the client is completely dressed. Heal the body, mind and spirit to health, wealth and love. Replenish your frame of mind as you tap into your spirit. Rest and restore. For more information, contact Terri Heiman, Natural Forces Studio. 516-457-3885. NaturalForcesStudio.com/blog. See ad on page 7 and CRG on page 31.

Nurture Your Business

Arbonne Vitamins Promote Gender-Specific Nutrition with Better Absorption

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ll vitamins are not created equally. It’s not what you eat. It’s what you absorb. Arbonne’s daily nutritional packs contain five supplements with multivitamins, multiminerals, probiotics and digestive enzymes, along with bone health and antioxidant formulas targeted to address men’s and women’s needs. The probiotics help digestion and absorption. Arbonne’s easy to take power packs are gender specific. The men’s supplements contain extra prostate formula support to decrease problems and inflammation in that area. Everyone should be on a multivitamin that absorbs properly. Arbonne’s power pack promotes complete nutrition with 20 essential vitamins and minerals, delivering a broad spectrum of antioxidants, minerals and super fruits. They contain essential minerals and nutrients to support healthy bone tissue. Adequate calcium and vitamin D through life, as part of a well-balanced diet, may reduce the risk of osteoporosis and Arbonne’s power packs supply more than enough. The vitamins support a healthy immune system, energy, vitality, longevity and eye health. The antioxidant blend and ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) is 10,000 per packet. (The American Medical Association suggests between 5,000 – 8,000 per day.) The higher the score the more antioxidants a product contains thus more effective the product is at fighting free radicals. The antioxidant blend contains cranberry, pomegranate, green tea and other whole fruits, vegetables, herbs and the Swiss Alps water to promote nutrient uptake and high absorption. Get healthy, fit and earn residual income with Arbonne. Contact Area Manager, Wellness Coach and Independent Consultant Crystal Storey for a free consultation and discounted products at 256-510-2118, CrystalStorey@att.net. For more information about your health or wealth, visit CrystalStorey.MyArbonne.com. See ad on page 15.

Secure this special ad placement! Contact us for more information.

256-340-1122

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June at the Botanical Gardens Swami Nardanand Returns to Botanical Gardens offers fun and educational Birmingham in June Birmingham opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts of all ages throughout summer. On June 2-3, Glorious Gardens presented by Leaf & Petal returns to the Magic City, offering intimate views of six beautiful residential gardens and one public garden in Birmingham. All-access passes can be purchased at BBGardens.org for $25. At the site, you can also find locations where tickets are available for pickup, including each of Leaf & Petal’s three Birmingham stores. The Gardens also offers Children’s Summer Camps; an eclectic series of week-long, educational outlets for children to discover everything from their inner botanist to their inner chef. The series continues throughout June with “Flower Fairies” and “Southern Summer Chefs” June 4-8 and concludes in July with “Let’s Dig Up Some Fun” July 23-27. A day camp will also be offered on July 7 for middle-school children called “Kids ‘n Cameras,” an exciting opportunity for aspiring photographers to hone their artistic creativity. For a complete list of camp offerings, prices and to register online, visit BBGardens.org. Children’s Story Time in The Gardens with Miss Rita is a free series taking place in the new Arrington Plant Adventure Zone. Two events remain in June: June 10 at 3pm and June 20 at 10am. No registration is required. Birmingham Botanical Gardens is open from dawn until dusk, 365 days per year. Admission to The Gardens is free. Birmingham Botanical Gardens, 2612 Lane Park Rd, Birmingham. 205-414-3965. BBGardens.org.

Dads and Grads get Therapeutic Massages at Hoover Alt MD

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he innovative practice in Hoover is offering a treat for Fathers, Sons and Graduates all month long. Just call for an appointment with one of Hoover Alt MD’s massage therapists to set up a nice, relaxing Massage. Go and receive your hour-long relaxing massage for only $50 during the month of June. Not just Dads, but Grads as well—anyone facing that big new step needs a relaxation boost. Take advantage the entire month of June, or purchase a massage Gift Certificate at this discounted price, and use it anytime. And, don’t worry, they’ll even do it at this price for the ladies, in honor of their special Guys. See ad on Page 2.

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ave you ever wondered what it might be like to go to an ashram retreat in India, but don’t have the time or money? Interested in a higher level of spiritual awareness? You now have the opportunity in a local, safe, comfortable place to be taught, guided, and supported by a beloved, respected, and fun, Indian Swami. He is a master of Yoga and Meditation as well as Ayurvedic Remedies (“knowledge for a long healthy life” with an emphasis on plant-based medicine and treatment) and Kundalini Shaktipat (descent and transfer of spiritual energy.) Swami Nardanand explains that Kundalini Maha-yoga is a self-perfecting spiritual practice, in which the Kundalini power or the Shakti itself, performs the meditation. Like many spiritual leaders, Swami Nardanand left his childhood home at a very early age to study. He excelled as a scholar and was recognized for his scholastic excellence as a boy, with an award from the President of India. By the age of 14, Swami Nardanand became a monk. His life and work is timeless, reaching beyond religions, cultures, and ethnicity. With him comes humility, universal love and his inner practice which is expressed to the outside world as a guiding light to others. Swami encourages self-inquiry; supports those who look for a higher purpose in life; builds bridges between people, dogmas, and religions, and rekindles respect and love. You are invited to join our honored guest Swami Nardanand, who will be in Birmingham in early June, as part of his 2012 World Tour. Since his last visit in 2007, he has been busy completing the Paradeshwar Temple located in Siddha Ashram, where he welcomes visitors from all over the globe. Several people from the Birmingham area, have been to this Ashram along the banks of the Shipra River in Ujjain, UP, India, one of the holiest religious sites in India, for extended life enhancing retreats. They will be hosting Swami during his visit to Birmingham in June for a series of events. See ad on Page 8 for the schedule.

Nothing is impossible, the word itself says I’m possible. ~Audrey Hepburn~ 6

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globalbriefs

Many absent fathers try to compensate by communicating via email, social media or phone. Almost half say they are in touch with their children several times a week, but nearly one-third communicate less than once a month. Twenty percent say they visit their children more than once a week, but 27 percent have not seen their children in the past year.

Concerned Citizens Public Demands GMO Food Labeling A campaign by Just Label It (JustLabel It.org), a national coalition of 500 diverse organizations dedicated to the mandatory labeling of genetically engineered (GE) or modified organism (GMO) foods, has united 1 million Americans of all political affiliations to demand that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) require the practice. “Pink slime, deadly melons, tainted turkeys and BPA in our soup have put us all on notice that what we eat and feed our families is critically important,” says Ken Cook, president of the Environmental Working Group. “Americans overwhelmingly demand safety, transparency and labeling of genetically engineered foods. It’s time for the FDA to come clean and restore public confidence in our food system.” According to a political opinion survey conducted by The Mellman Group, pollster Mark Mellman explains, “Few topics other than motherhood and apple pie can muster over 90 percent support, but labeling of GE foods is one of those few views that are held almost unanimously.” Colorado author Robyn O’Brien, founder of the AllergyKids Foundation, remarks, “Americans want more information for their families. Like allergen labeling, GE food labels would provide essential and possibly life-saving information for anyone with a food allergy.”

Source: PewForum.org

Where’s Poppa? Dads’ Roles Changing with the Times A Pew Research Center analysis of the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) confirms the continuation of a 50-year trend leading to more than one in four fathers of children 18 or younger living apart from their children; 11 percent live separately from some of their children and 16 percent from all of them. Logically, the study further shows that fathers living with their children become more intensely involved in their lives, spending more time with them and taking part in a greater variety of activities, such as sharing meals, helping with homework and playing. Black fathers (44 percent) are more than twice as likely as white fathers (21 percent) to live apart from their children, while Hispanic fathers (35 percent) are in the middle. Among fathers that never completed high school, 40 percent live apart from their children, compared with only 7 percent of fathers that graduated from college.

Rev. Terri A. Heiman ...a healing arts studio

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Integrative Health - Spiritual Counseling Vinyasa Krama Yoga

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( i nsi de bi rm i ngham yoga) 6 0 5 3 7 t h st reet so ut h birming ham, al 3 5 2 2 2 516-457-3885 natural awakenings

NATURAL FORCES

S T U D I O at

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ecotip Mow, Mow, Mow Your Lawn… Or Mow Less, Sustainably by Paul Tukey For some, mowing is the bane of summer; a choking, chugging chore to abhor. For others, it’s an artistic expression—the chance to maintain and admire a property’s carefully crafted aesthetic look while logging some laps around the lawn. Whether we enjoy it or prefer leaving the task to someone else, several considerations can make the experience less laborious, less polluting and even lighter on the budget as fuel prices rise.

Start high and stay high. Resist the temptation to mow the family lawn to resemble a closely shaved golf green. Far better results are achieved by adjusting the machine’s blade to the top setting and leaving it there until after Labor Day. Taller grass in the spring shades the surface of the soil, so that crabgrass and other weed seeds can’t sprout as much. High levels in the summer conserve moisture and encourage deep root growth, so that the lawn becomes more drought-tolerant. The fastest way to harm a lawn is by mowing too low—less than three inches for most grass species. Exceptions are Bermuda grass or seashore paspalum in the South, or bent grass in the North, all of which do best when mowed at one to two inches high.

Release and resolve physical and emotional pain, anxiety, stress, depression, insomnia, and body weight imbalance. counseling and life transitions ~ yoga therapy energy medicine ~ nutrition & supplements ~ ayurveda

Blissful Heights INTEGRATIVE HEALING

{ 205-639-1062 | www. blissfulheights.com }

Teachings & Practice with Swami Nardanand Founder of Siddha Ashram in Ujjain, MP, India

Teacher of Kundalini Maha-Yoga, Meditation, Ayurveda

Free Lectures and Discussions

Three-Day Weekend Retreats

“The Path to Spiritual Freedom” Monday June 4, 7:45-9:15pm Birmingham Yoga

605 37th St S, Birmingham, AL 35222

“Vegetarian & Ayurveda Living” Tuesday June 5, 5:30-7pm Golden Temple Natural Grocery & Cafe 1901 11th Ave S, Birmingham, AL 35205

in Homewood

“Awakening and Deepening the Spiritual Practice” Friday June 1 at 8pm through Monday June 4 at 5pm Thursday June 7 at 8pm through Sunday June 10 at 5pm To register, email the address below

Contact Information: SwamiVisit2012@gmail.com 8

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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reports that a single hour of operating a new gas-powered lawn mower emits the same volume of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides as 11 new cars, each driven for one hour. Fertilize naturally. Organic fertilizers derived from plant or animal byproducts work with the soil’s biology to feed the lawn slowly and evenly. Leave the grass clippings on the lawn, which quickly biodegrade to provide more free, natural lawn food. The natural approach to nourishing a lawn requires less frequent mowing and makes it more adaptable to long dry spells. Synthetic chemical fertilizers, which are formulated to stimulate a lot of growth quickly, are designed to demand more mowing and watering. Get grass off of gas. If a lawn is a third of an acre (15,000 square feet) or less, consider this: Today’s “push” or motorless mowers are not our grandfathers’ heavy wood and steel models. Manufactured from high-grade plastics, lightweight metals and precision blades that rarely need sharpening, the modern mowers cut grass cleanly and are a breeze to use. They are the healthiest choice for people, lawn and planet. For larger acreage, new models powered by propane burn cleaner than gasoline-run engines. Paul Tukey is author of The Organic Lawn Care Manual and Tag, Toss & Run: 40 Classic Lawn Games. Find more tips at SafeLawns.org.


Healing Rainbow As I stand under the healing light of God my spirit expands with love, light and peace. Art and Text by Rita Loyd. Copyright Š 2012

Rita Loyd is a professional watercolor artist and writer. The message of her work is about the healing power of unconditional self-love. Rita began painting in 1996 as a way to cope with chronic illness and depression. Through this journey, the creative process became her teacher, healer and friend who would guide her to find the true meaning and experience of unconditional self-love. Rita writes about this experience and all that she has learned about unconditional self-love in her new book Unconditional Self-Love: What It Is, Why It's important and How to Nurture It in Your Life. You can purchase this book in Huntsville at Ruth's Nutrition, H. Raines Gifts or at www. NurturingArt.com, where you can view Rita's artwork and blog.


Men's Health 101 Elizabeth Campbell Korcz, MD

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ife is not a spectator sport. If you want to safely reach the “end zone”—living to a ripe old age and enjoying a happy, healthy retirement—you need to have a game plan for your physical and emotional health. The Man with the Plan is that Husband and Dad who takes care of himself and will be there for the future. Men today are more involved with the kids, more sensitive, and helpful with domestics, while still trying to be the strong protector. Many men put off their health concerns, and barely see a doctor from age 18 to almost 40 (except when the wife/girlfriend/mother pesters them). As I discussed last month in the women’s health article, Heart Disease is the #1 killer in both genders. Take care of your body, and get a checkup now. Things like high blood pressure and cholesterol lead to buildup in the arteries. This leads to poor blood flow and risk of heart attacks. So, take your doctor’s advice, and eat healthy and smart, lose that extra weight, and take your medications daily, if advised. We can often treat these issues with nutritional and herbal medications, and lifestyle changes. Around the same time as women go through Menopause, (and for many men, even earlier) a man might go through hormonal changes that are sometimes called “Andropause,” a big drop in the male hormone, Testosterone. This can cause decreased strength and muscle tone, low energy, depression, and overall decreased well-being. Low testosterone is also linked to apathy, poor concentration, and poor libido with sexual dysfunction (ED or impotence). Screening for this problem is quick and easy with some bloodwork, and

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replacement hormone may be just what you need. Just like sports, there are a variety of options for every guy, like topical creams and gels, or sublingual troches, both for daily hormone replacement. Don’t want to be bothered with daily upkeep? You can even drop in the office twice a month for a quick shot of long-acting testosterone. Be sure to monitor your levels, and remember that 55 and 22 shouldn’t have the same, top-end levels, either. You’ll also want to check for prostate problems (enlargement or cancer) with an exam and PSA test. Prostate health is very important, not only for cancer early detection, but for quality of life, as well. Enlarged prostates can cause urinary infections, waking in the night to go, and trouble emptying the bladder. Help can be as easy as a supplement of herbals to help shrink the prostate and make the flow better. Be careful with the PSA test, though, as it is prone to false-positives. A negative test is reassuring, but if your test comes back a little too high, it may just mean you have benign enlargement, or even a light case of prostate infection, and not cancer. Discuss this with your doctor, as you may want to consider holding off on an invasive biopsy, and just repeat the PSA in a few months. With their many demands, it is not surprising that men can fall prey to unhealthy habits, like smoking, alcohol, and substance abuse. Alcohol overuse is perhaps the most common, and has many health ill effects, like liver disease, vitamin deficiency, family problems, and addiction. Tobacco dip and smoking cause a variety of cancers and lung diseases, as well as contributing to heart disease. Finally, pain killer addictions have become an increasingly big problem, and cause liver disease, family and money issues, and often can lead to more serious addictions, overdose and death. At my practice, we help many people overcome addiction and dependency issues. We especially focus on the “functional” addicts or alcoholics that hold down a job, family, and more. Many men that fall into these problems are self-medicating deeper issues of depression, anxiety, and chronic pain. We live in hard times, but there is so much support with your doctor and caring team for any man who is suffering and struggling. There are many treatment plans available. To conclude, men can live long and strong lives with some good care and support, healthy eating habits, supplements and naturals, and quality healthcare from a compassionate, experienced doctor. At Hoover Alt MD, we care for many men, at all stages of life, and we welcome you to join us. Dr. Elizabeth Campbell Korcz has a growing, innovative practice in Hoover that augments Traditional Family Medicine with Complementary and Alternative medical therapies and practices. She is currently accepting new patients. Hoover Alt MD, 3421 South Shades Crest Rd, Suite 111, Hoover. Call 205-733-6676 to schedule an appointment today. See ad on page 2.


less time and energy we have to expend to place it in some larger context.” We can just simply be. Healthy vacation escapes help us do just that. We regenerate, reconnect with ourselves and others and re-imagine our lives in a more satisfying context.

Personal Growth: The Mind

HEALTHY ESCAPES Unplugged Getaways Rebalance Our Lives by Judith Fertig

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hen Jeanna Freeman vacationed at Earthshine Mountain Lodge, in Lake Toxaway, North Carolina, she wasn’t sure what to expect. Touted as a “techno-amenityfree property,” it specializes in off-thegrid getaways (EarthshineLodge.com), meaning no in-room TV and a chance to digitally detox. Guests are encouraged to ditch their cell phones and laptops in favor of a zip line adventure through the Smoky Mountains forest canopy and laid back log cabin informality. “Honestly, it was exhilarating being away from my cell phone,” admits Freeman, an interior designer from Collierville, Tennessee. “I hadn’t felt that good and ‘connected’ in a long time. I didn’t realize how much I needed that.” Her experience highlights the new buzzwords and phrases in vacation travel: unplug, reconnect, digital detox and healthy escape. What is it about

unplugging that seems so refreshing and like an ideal vacation? Nicholas Carr, author of The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains, explains that, “Using the Internet pushes us to a skimming and scanning form of thinking.” He occasionally unplugs to recover his attention span, noting, “A lot of our deepest thoughts only emerge when we’re able to pay attention to one thing.” For memoirist Pico Iyer, author of The Man Within My Head, “The urgency of slowing down—to find the time and space to think—is nothing new.” What is new is figuring out workable definitions of stillness and movement when we spend a lot of our time physically still, but mentally in motion. A noted travel writer for 20 years, Iyer likes to stay at monasteries around the world. He concludes, “Wiser souls have always reminded us that the more attention we pay to the moment, the

MJ Goff was on a magazine writing assignment the first time she visited the Omega Institute, in Rhinebeck, New York (eOmega.org). As a student of New Age theories and a potential yoga teacher, Goff says she welcomed the opportunity to learn more. Once she attended the women’s retreat she was researching, she was hooked. “Every year since, I find myself being drawn to Omega for its promotion of meditation and overall encouragement of ‘staying in the present,’” she says. “All the programs stem from one mission: to keep us on the right path.” Talks by internationally known speakers such as Joan Borysenko, Eckhart Tolle, Harville Hendrix and Daniel Amen are complemented by sessions in nurturing creativity, holistic health, and yoga practice. “People smile, but also keep to themselves,” explains Goff. “It’s a place for quieting your mind.” For shorter getaways, Hay House, headquartered in Carlsbad, California, sponsors weekend I Can Do It! seminars in various cities (HayHouse.com). Speakers such as Louise Hay, Gregg Braden, Wayne Dyer and Caroline Myss help attendees nudge closer to making milestone transformations, consciousness shifts and progress on their healing journeys. Sometimes, personal growth simply involves sufficient quiet time to walk, contemplate and reconnect with our muse. “The real meaning of the word ‘retreat’ in the spiritual sense,” says Brother David Steindl-Rast, a Benedictine monk, “is stepping back. When one steps back, one gets a better view of the world, others and our deepest self.” Iyer finds solace at New Camaldoli Heritage, a Benedictine community amidst the rugged terrain of Big Sur, California (Contemplation.com). More

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than 2,000 monasteries and other spiritual communities throughout North America offer off-the-beaten-path retreats at reasonable prices and generally welcome guests of all religions and spiritual practices. The one requirement is that guests not disturb others. At Ghost Ranch, in the high desert of Abiquiu, New Mexico, “The scenery alone is spiritual and healing,” relates Nancy Early, a New York film producer. Under the auspices of the Presbyterian Church, activities encourage individual and social transformation (NewMexicoGhostRanch.org). Early says the best part is, “There’s one pay phone, and cell phones don’t work here; no TV or radio. You walk away from everything that controls your life.”

Optimal Wellness: Mind/Body Sometimes the healthy escape we seek can be found at a destination spa, which combines enough structure to slowly wean us from daily busyness with sufficient soothing, quiet spaces and physical nurturing. For Debbie Phillips—who spends part of the year in Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, and the other part in Naples, Florida—one visit to a spa was all it took. As an executive and life coach, Phillips founded Women on Fire in 2003 to connect her “on fire” clients with each other via regional meetings and a free online newsletter, and discovered that the condition sometimes crosses the line into overwork. “My first visit to a spa more than 20 years ago was when I first learned about the life-changing benefits of taking better care of myself. In addition to the soothing amenities, the peace, calm and quiet usually found at a spa—space to think, nap, read a book or gaze into the sky—often results in ‘less’ becoming ‘more’ in your life,” Phillips says. “I have returned home feeling lighter and brighter and even more excited for what is next. The experience gave me just the boost I needed to keep going.” Recently, Phillips discovered simple techniques to nurture herself all year long by attending a breathing and meditation class at the Lake Austin Spa, in Texas. “Now I start each day with long, deep breaths before I 12

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even get out of bed,” she says. “It is so simple, so calming and establishes my day with peace.” Virginia Nelson, a San Diego, California, attorney, likewise revels in her twiceyearly visits to Canyon Ranch, in Tucson, Arizona. “The pace in southern California is like running a marathon every day. My visits serve as respites that have allowed me to keep up with it this long. “I first went in 1991 and saw a place to go and cocoon,” recounts Nelson, “but I also discovered incredible fitness and education classes.” The spa is essentially a reset button for her. “It’s rest, rejuvenation and reinvention.” Canyon Ranch has several U.S. locations (CanyonRanch.com). Some facilities feature niche mind/body experiences, such as the psychic massage or chakra balancing at Mii Amo Spa, in Sedona, Arizona (EnchantmentResort.com). Others specialize in holistic wellness. Tucson’s Miraval Resort, in Arizona, offers an integrative wellness program guided by Dr. Andrew Weil (Tinyurl. com/6p2l237). Chill-out spa services like a hot stone massage are often balanced by breath walking, qigong or desert tightrope walking.

Active Adventure: The Body Finding a clear stillpoint of one’s soul can also occur while moving and challenging our bodies. Exercise helps

us break through not only physical boundaries, but emotional and spiritual barriers, as well. Barbara Bartocci, a long-distance cycler and author of Meditation in Motion, maintains that moving keeps both our brains and bodies healthier. “Research at The University of Arizona found that regular exercise appears to preserve key parts of the brain involved in attention and memory,” she notes. “It is well known that exercise helps to reduce anxiety, allay depression and generally improve mood, by prompting our bodies to release more endorphins.” Bartocci has experienced the power of these connections firsthand. “Active vacations are truly transformative,” she says emphatically. “When I bicycled across Iowa on RAGBRAI [The Des Moines Register’s Annual Great Bicycle Ride Across Iowa], we cycled 76 miles one day on hills with a constant 20-mile-per-hour headwind. It was a tough day, but I made it! My divorce was becoming final that summer, and completing that day gave me the encouraging inner message: ‘If I can cycle Iowa on the toughest day, I can re-cycle my life after divorce.’” She’s still moving along. Recently, she joined 500 other cyclists doing 60 miles a day for a week in Wisconsin. Bill Murphy, of Annapolis, Maryland, made his breakthrough at the Boulder Outdoor Survival School (boss-inc. com). “While I wanted an adventure and to put myself out there, I also wanted


to know that I was in good hands,” he says about why he chose a guided trip. Murphy was already in good shape, having competed in a local Ironman event. Following an initial fitness assessment that involved testing his heart rate after running at high altitude, he was deemed fit to take part in an outdoor survival experience in Utah’s desert country. With a knife, wool jacket, cap, gloves, long underwear and suitable shoes—but no tent, sleeping bag or food—his group learned to live off the land with the assistance of three instructors in an initial phase of the program. “After two days we were given our backpack with the critical blanket, poncho and food rations. I have never been so happy to hear the words ‘1,500 calories’ in my life, and though I have eaten at some wonderful restaurants, the soups we made with those rations tasted better than anything I have eaten in my life,” he says. Murphy learned how to purify water, make a tent from his poncho, start a fire with minimal tools and bed down in the cold without a sleeping bag or blanket. A crucial part of the survival training was the need to go even further when the group thought their adventure had ended. “We didn’t know whether that would be in 10 miles or 30,” he recalls. His ability to physically push past the mentally established timeframe led Murphy to see that he could also move beyond his either/or boundaries: either family or business; either business or adventure. “I realized that I don’t have to choose one over the other. I feel a better sense of balance now.” In other parts of the country, Outward Bound Adult Renewal also offers new experiences that test physical limits and present breakthrough opportunities (OutwardBound.org). It’s also known for programs that help teens get a better handle on life. Participants often rock climb the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia or sea kayak along the Pacific Northwest or North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Options for growth and renewal appear endless. Nearby or far away, for a few days or longer, a healthy escape can be truly restorative. Judith Fertig regularly contributes to Natural Awakenings.

inspiration

BORN TO EXPLORE I by Joe Robinson

t happens to all of us. We wake up one day and realize that we have been here before—just like yesterday and the day before that. Today is destined to be the same as all the others: safe, comfortable… and boring. Often, we need to engage in new experiences to be more vital and happy. Research from psychiatrist and neuroscientist Dr. Gregory Berns, Ph.D., author of Satisfaction, shows that our brains benefit from new experiences so much so that the process releases the feel-good chemical dopamine. According to a study published in the journal Neuron, it is even triggered by the mere expectation of a new experience. Researchers call this the “exploration bonus.” We are born to explore. Dr. Norman Doidge, author of The Brain that Changes Itself, maintains that connections between brain neurons, called dendrites, develop in response to new experiences, and they shrink or vanish altogether if they’re not stimulated with new information. To keep our brains happy, we have to keep moving forward into the new. If novelty feels so good and does good things for us, why do we usually stick with what we know? The answer lies deep in the emotional center of the brain, called the amygdala, which perceives the unknown as potentially threatening. As a result, we often overestimate the potential risk inherent in a new experience and underestimate the consequences of playing it safe. The good news is that we can override this default. Here are some practical

ways to build the necessary life skills— our venture aptitude—to pursue new experiences and really start living. Do it to do it. When you approach an experience with this attitude, there is no harm to your self-worth because your objective isn’t the result, but the experience; the pursuit of knowledge, challenge or enjoyment—and that’s egoless. Advance into the fear. You inflame fear by running from it, and you reduce it with every step that you take facing straight at it. Make the unknown more knowable. Knowledge trumps irrational fears. Talk to others that have participated in experiences you wish to engage in. Do research. Don’t look at the mountaintop. Break down big goals (running a race, acting in a neighborhood play) into small, incremental goals (running around the block, taking a beginner’s voice class) to build competence and confidence. Dabble. Sample the offerings. Try several different classes or events to see which ones excite you the most. Judge your life by how much you try, not by the results. That removes the fear and alibis, and puts you squarely in the center of the place where you are at your happiest—absorbed in lifeaffirming experiences. Joe Robinson is a work-life-balance trainer and coach, and author of Don’t Miss Your Life. He shares motivational essays at DontMissYourLife.net.

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Coming in July

fitbody

Do You Parkour? Using the World as a Fitness Playground by Randy Kambic

A Summer’s Here! Make the most of healthy outdoor fun. We have marvelous ways to celebrate.

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thletes’ hunger for new ways to exercise, challenge and express themselves continually prompts the evolution of new sports, often rooted in earlier pursuits. Windsurfing, snowboarding and mountain biking are examples. Now, a growing number of parkour practitioners are springboarding and combining ingredients from multiple sports and activities in an effort to defy gravity using nothing but sturdy shoes and props. First popularized in France, parkour means “of the course” (specifically, an obstacle course)—a form of acrobatic freerunning, spiked with vaulting, somersaulting, jumping and climbing; even running up and over walls. Based on exacting training, street athletes overcome or use a creative range of obstacles in their immediate environment. Such moves have been popularized by movie stars such as Jackie Chan and Daniel Craig’s James Bond in the opening scenes of Quantum of Solace, as well as You Tube postings. First deemed an unconventional,

strictly urban, under-the-radar training method, parkour is increasingly viewed as a way for serious athletes in demanding sports to train and secure an edge. Adult men and women that competed in gymnastics, track and field or diving in their youth particularly enjoy reviving earlier skills.

Check it Out American Parkour (APK), headquartered in Washington, D.C., considers itself the leading such community in the world. Established in 2005 by Mark Toorock, its website now hosts 90,000-plus registered users and is visited monthly by 100,000 inquirers. It provides news, daily workout emails, training guides, advice for beginners, instructional tutorials, guidelines for local recreation, and photo and video galleries. Toorock, who played high school soccer and was then a serious martial artist in oom yung doe, kung fu and capoeira (which bridges dancing and gymnastics), was instantly hooked in 2003 when he saw a video of David Belle; the French native and acknowledged founder of parkour has appeared in 20-plus movies and commercials


since 2000. “It was so different and authentic, what he was doing,” he says. After opening the first parkour and freerunning gym at Primal Fitness, in D.C., in 2006, APK expanded to locations in Gainesville, Florida, and San Antonio, Texas. All offer an introductory session, full supervised parkour curriculum, boot camps, women-specific classes, summer camps and freerunning classes. Toorock co-created and co-produced Jump City: Seattle, eight, one-hour parkour action shows to introduce more people to the concept (G4TV.com). Other fitness centers that now focus on parkour include: Base Fitness, in Noblesville, Indiana; Apex Movement, outside of Denver; Parkour Visions, in Seattle; Miami Freerunning, in Florida; and Fight or Flight Academy, in Eden Prairie, Minnesota. More clubs are getting up to speed nationwide, with the San Antonio parks and recreation department currently adding a parkour park.

Tap Into the Energy “Parkour allows adults to either continue or learn gymnastics for the first time in a new, creative context,” Toorock says. Natalie Strasser, a competitive gymnast for 13 years, including at Kent State University, is a Los Angeles-based APK-sponsored athlete and conducts workshops. Travis Graves, head trainer for APK Academies, which trains teachers, says, “One of the first priorities for beginners is instilling a respect for the forces and impact of landings, so we work on rolling, balance and footwork.” He also emphasizes the importance of thorough warm-up and cool-down periods, as well as overall safety guidelines. “Some women might feel intimidated, as most of what they see on You Tube are teenagers or young men doing their thing,” comments Graves. “But anyone can experiment and develop his or her own parkour style at their own comfort level.” Lisa Peterson, of McLean, Virginia, was first attracted

to parkour’s creative movements, which represented a personal next step after years as a teacher and performer in ballet, ballroom and Argentine tango dancing. “As a victim of child abuse, I am always looking for ways to strengthen my confidence and self-esteem,” she says. “Parkour has done that for me.” APK regularly holds community gathering “jams” around the country. We encourage everyone to follow our guidelines, notes Toorock, although we can’t say that other methods are wrong. “Everyone has a sphere of capabilities. We help individuals expand safely and in proper progression,” he explains. “Some beginners may wear protective gear like gloves or shin guards but almost always relinquish them because they don’t want to rely on them, but take full responsibility for themselves and gain full freedom of movement. “The world is a playground,” he concludes. “Parkour just makes more use of more of it.” Learn more at AmericanParkour.com and DavidBelle.com. Randy Kambic is a freelance editor and writer in Estero, FL, and a copyeditor for Natural Awakenings.

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healingways

Hormone Help for Guys Natural Ways to Boost Vitality by James Occhiogrosso

W

ithout hormones, the body’s chemical messengers affecting every human biological system, nothing works correctly. Testosterone, in particular, is critically important for male development, starting in the embryo, through puberty and into old age. After reaching peak levels in a man during his mid-to-late-20s, his testosterone level begins a slow decline. From the age of about 35, it drops by about 10 percent per decade for the rest of his life, accompanied by a slight increase in estrogen levels. While women experience physical markers when they enter menopause, there is no specific point at which men typically enter andropause, the less extreme male version of the change of life due to low hormone production. Related changes usually cause minor problems at first and then tend to become more severe. Medical studies from Seattle’s Veterans Administration Puget Sound Health Care System, the University of Washington and Harvard University show that testosterone deficiency contributes to reduced muscle and bone mass, male breast enlargement, depression, atherosclerosis, anemia and diabetes.

Test First Hormones travel the bloodstream in bound and unbound (free) forms; only the free ones activate various body functions. When evaluating a man, a doctor will typically order a blood test for total testosterone, combining both forms. 16

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Older men often can show a normal total testosterone level, but have a low level of free testosterone. A saliva test brings clarity, because saliva only contains free hormones. Fifty-plusyear-old men with low free testosterone that show signs of hormone imbalance should consider natural supplementation, even when total testosterone is normal. It’s best to test before starting a rebalancing program and to retest after a few months. Establishing a record over time allows a man to monitor and adjust progress.

Hormone Help Starts Here Taking supportive steps in nutrition and lifestyle choices can make a big difference. Diet. Proper nutrition, embracing a full complement of vitamins and minerals, is essential. Eliminate red meat, cheese, fast food

“When a man with low testosterone restores his level back to its biological norm—he feels like a man again!” ~ Dr. Eugene R. Shippen

and processed snack foods, which can increase estrogen levels. Herbal supplements such as Tribulus (Tribulus terrestris), or puncture vine; ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), Korean red ginseng (Panex ginseng) and maca (Lepidium meyenii or Lepidium peruvianum) can help by increasing testosterone levels, sexual libido or erectile function. Some influence testosterone levels directly; others help enhance function by indirectly providing nutrients to improve circulation and general sexual health. Weight control. Excess fat, particularly around the abdomen, stores and produces estrogen. Reducing fat tissue can help both lower estrogen and enhance testosterone. Environmental exposure. Endocrine disruptors, called xenoestrogens, from everyday exposure to toxic estrogenic industrial chemicals, can mimic the effects of estrogen in a man’s body. These routinely appear in petrochemicals, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, dairy products, meats, canned foods, personal care products and plastics. BisphenolA (BPA) in the lining of metal food cans is particularly dangerous.


Avoid microwaving foods in plastic containers, even when they are labeled as microwave-safe. Research medications. Dr. Eugene R. Shippen, co-author of The Testosterone Syndrome, states, “High-dose statin drugs used to lower cholesterol definitely lower testosterone levels and are high on the list of causes of erectile dysfunction.” Exercise. Physically inactive people lose up to 5 percent of their total muscle mass per decade. Exercise helps to lower estrogen levels and enhance testosterone levels.

Testosterone Supplements Past incorrect beliefs that testosterone replacement therapy causes prostate cancer left many medical practitioners reluctant to prescribe it. The latest scientific research shows that a healthy man does not increase the risk by raising his testosterone level to the normal biological range for his age. Renowned medical oncologist and prostate cancer researcher and survivor, Dr. Charles “Snuffy” Myers, has stated, “There is absolutely no hint that testosterone at high levels correlates with prostate cancer.” He founded the American Institute for

To find a local compounding pharmacy for natural bioidentical testosterone skin cream, as prescribed by a medical practitioner, visit iacprx.org. Diseases of the Prostate, near Charlottesville, Virginia. Natural bioidentical testosterone cream labeled USP, for United States Pharmacopeia standard, is available at compounding pharmacies. Bioidentical means that a substance has the same chemical form as that produced by the human body. Other forms of testosterone therapy, including biweekly injections, skin patches and pills, typically employ synthetic chemicals that are similar, but not identical, to natural testosterone. Thus, such products are not completely recognizable by the body. About 15 years ago, bestselling author and hormone balancing expert Dr. John R. Lee published his startling conclusion that synthetic hormones

can cause serious side effects, including an increased risk of stroke, cancer and liver damage. His findings were subsequently confirmed by the Women’s Health Initiative study. Injections, skin patches and pills subject the body to unnatural fluctuations in testosterone and estrogen. In contrast, skin creams permit precise daily or periodic dosing as prescribed by a qualified health care practitioner. As they age, some men strongly feel the effects of a cumulative decline in testosterone levels and experience significant symptoms, while others barely notice it. Restoring testosterone to its biological norm can be rewarding. Remember that hormones are powerful and a little can go a long way. Beyond a prescribed amount, more is not better and can reverse benefits. James Occhiogrosso, a natural health practitioner and master herbalist, specializes in salivary hormone testing and natural hormone balancing for men and women. For a phone consultation, call 239-498-1547, email DrJim@ HealthNaturallyToday.com or visit HealthNaturallyToday.com.

natural awakenings

June 2012

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they seem like a person you can trust. Google “colored denim” and you’re bound to find options in overwhelming quantities at every price point imaginable. Few of these choices will win Sustainability Points from me. To be quite honest, colored denim stinks of disposability and synthetics. Not too salty. No. Many conventional dyes are carcinogenic and harmful to humans and the earth. I had to make a choice. Reject this trendy choice, and tell myself eventually it will fade...I’m sure next summer raw organic denim will be the very saltiest of super-salty options. Or...opt in.

Salty Situation by Molly Green

W

ith any work worth its salt, you have to trust the author enough to take its measure. And if you apply too many preconceptions, you are not taking its measure. –Art Spiegelman Take colored denim for example.

Widely considered the jean de jour and I’m hard pressed to single out the brave soul who started this kaleidoscopic phenomenon. In recent history, denim has taken a back seat. Public enemy number one: Leggings. These hip hugging, calf-sculpting pants put a major dent in denim sales. Women happily realized they could go in public in their pajamas and it was totally acceptable. Even recommended! Most of the denim world stood back and said…this is our place. Neutral and classic washes! However, there were a few that jumped ship. Colored denim came out of a movement that said follow the fashion. This colored denim thing is really an interpretation of the season’s true style and in the only interpretation denim can accomplish. In 2011, Pantone en18

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couraged us to embrace everyday challenges with confidence, courage and spirit by proudly wearing Honeysuckle, the color of the year. Only outdone by their own desire in 2012 that we emanate heat and energy with the color Tangerine Tango. Pure genius and an openness to change created an all-encompassing trend called colored denim. I was recently informed that any boutique worth their salt is heavy in colored denim options. This coming from a colored denim sales rep. But at the same time she’s right. It’s strange that somehow my warped mind relates a salt idiom and clothing manufacturing. I know this may seem silly to all you non-Industry folks, but it really got my noggin ticking. What does it really mean to be worth ones salt? Who Weighs the weight and worth? Especially in a category such as colored denim? I dare say that this Worth may be unworthy! Those Weights may not be so weighty, after all. It just depends on whose doing all this worthing and weighing (which sounds like a lot of work to me. Exhausting, even) and if

I couldn’t fail my customer. I had to find a compromise. I couldn’t be caught without the season’s most sought-after item. I decided. The elusive customer was going to buy into this trend with or without me. So, I committed myself to finding an eco-friendly option. Easy, right? After a bit of digging, I found two different lines with options that easily fit the bill. Denim made from all the bits that major lines would normally toss, making it 80% recycled. Also, a line that uses earth-friendly dyes certified by OEKO-TEX, a rigid 100-point testing by a lab in Sweden. Not to mention the fit and colors are fabulous for both of these styles and that they literally “fly out the door.” I find that my store must satisfy two totally conflicting worlds. Sustainable Fashion, a complete oxymoron. But I’m making it work. I’d like to think this is what makes us a bit savory. Okay: I’m just going to say it. Pass the salt! Molly Green is an eco chic boutique featuring fabulous earth friendly fashions. We carry sustainable, recycled, vintage and organic clothing for fashionistas with a style conscience. Our mission is to bring you classic collections attracting all devoted to style, fashion, and Mother Earth. Molly Green, 2817 18th Street South, Homewood. 205-637-7210. MollyGreenBoutique.com.


wisewords

Bridging Generational Divides A Conversation with John and Ocean Robbins by Linda Sechrist

J

ohn and Ocean Robbins have worked as a father-and-son team for more than 20 years. John, a pioneering expert on the dietary connection between the environment and health, is a bestselling author; his latest release is No Happy Cows: Dispatches from the Frontlines of the Food Revolution. Ocean, founder of the global nonprofit Yes! and an internationally renowned spokesman for an ethical and sustainable future, has helped improve the lives of people in 65 countries. Their latest collaboration is leading Intergenerational Healing workshops that are helping communities to bridge generational divides.

Ocean, how did you develop an identity independent of the family fortune and fame? Because my grandfather, the co-founder of Baskin-Robbins, was determined that my father would follow in his footsteps, my dad felt he had to rebel so that he could stand for his own values and pursue what he loved. My journey was different. Because my dad allowed me the opportunity to explore and discover who I wanted to be, I was free to focus my energy on rebelling against the

pervasive social injustices of the world rather than rebelling against my parents. Although our strategies and ideas differ, my dad and I have congruent values and work together harmoniously. In my work with leaders and others in many nations, I stand in awe of the congruency in people’s core values across generations. When I ask the citizens of any country to describe the world they want to live in, they state many of the same things: clean air and water, freedom to practice their faith, the opportunity to eat good healthy food, and safe places for children to play. These values are inherent in a global dream of how the world could be.

John, how did the two of you shift from a parent/ child relationship into a partnership? Our rare and vibrant relationship is a product of challenging assumptions about the present dominating parent model. As adults, we are equal partners, although in Ocean’s dependent years, I played a fathering role in guiding him in the development of his capabilities. But even then, I didn’t

insist that he think like me or comply with my wishes for his life. I see myself as a guardian of Ocean’s spirit, rather than someone that is here to tell him what to do. In educating him about how to become a capable and self-sufficient adult, my part was to discern how to awaken his inner fire, draw out his inner wisdom, pique his curiosity and expand his capacity to learn. My role as a parent, and now as a friend, is to help my son achieve and fulfill his destiny by honoring his vision for his life. In remaining attentive to his natural talents and special gifts, we discern what he needs to continue growing into his personal power. Intergenerational collaboration such as we have requires a bridge built of shared values, love, mutual respect, trust and support. I am in awe of Ocean, who doesn’t just stand on my shoulders; he flies from them as a courageous humanitarian responsive to the needs our times, as well as being a wonderful father himself.

How do your workshops help both elders and youths bridge the gap between the generations? We use creative, thoughtful activities that build heart-filled community. Basically, we create space for learning how each life stage brings its own gifts, challenges and valuable perspectives. We learn to recognize that we need each other, across the age spectrum, to grow, heal, have fun and create thriving lives and communities. Our children and grandchildren come into the world carrying the seeds of the future. They come endowed with new possibilities, new understandings and new energies. If as elders we wisely support them with the respect and assistance younger people deserve, they can accomplish things we cannot. They may be able to correct the errors of past generations, including our own. Then our children will not only be free to be themselves, they will bring a new breath of life into the world. Linda Sechrist is a senior staff writer for Natural Awakenings magazines.

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calendarofevents FRIDAY, JUNE 1 Summer Reading 2012: Dream Big READ! – All day through July 27. Registration through July 13. Read for fun, prizes, and a free book. For babies through rising 6th graders. Last day to redeem prizes July 27. Hoover Public Library, 200 Municipal Dr, Hoover. 205-444-7831. Teen Summer Reading 2012: Read, Perchance to Dream – All day through July 27. Registration through July 13. Read for fun, prizes, and a free book. For rising 7th through 12th graders. Last day to redeem prizes July 27. Hoover Public Library, 200 Municipal Dr, Hoover. 205-444-7831. Alabama Farmers Market – Owned and managed by the Jefferson County Truck Growers Association, Alabama Farmers Market is both a wholesale and a farmers market. The Market houses more than 500 farmers and vendors on its 49 acres of land, 33 of which consist of only produce, making it the largest market in the State. The summer hours for the markets are 24 hours a day, most vendors are open 7 days a week 5am-8pm, and farmers come in 24 hours a day. Alabama Farmers Market, 344 Finley Ave W, Birmingham. 205-251-8737. Pepper Place Saturday Market – 7am-12pm, rain or shine, through Dec 15. Visit our region’s farming families at the Pepper Place Saturday Market. They grow vegetables and flowers, bake breads and cookies, cakes and pies, tend the bees, and drive into the Lakeview District of Birmingham to sell the fruits of their labors. In addition to farmers, bakers and beekeepers you can enjoy local musicians on two stages while sipping a fresh cup of coffee or enjoying a light breakfast. There is a cooking demonstration at 9am every Saturday morning by Birmingham’s finest chefs. Pepper Place, 2829 2nd Ave S, Birmingham. 205-313-4120. East Lake Farmers Market – Saturdays 8am12pm, rain or shine, through Oct 13. The East Lake Farmers Market, established in 2005, makes fresh produce and other resources for healthy living available in South East Lake. We accept SNAP/EBT and Senior Nutrition Coupons. If you are over 60 and meet income eligibility requirements, you can apply for the Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program (SFMNP). East Lake Farmers Market, 7769 2nd Ave S, Birmingham. 205-836-3201. Valleydale Farmers’ Market – Saturdays 8am12pm, though Sept 8. Valleydale Farmers Market first opened in 2009 to bring fresh, regional produce to Jefferson and North Shelby County. Come by and check out our wide selection of fresh produce, arts & crafts, entertainment and tasty samples. Valleydale Farmers’ Market, 4601Valleydale Rd, Birmingham. 205-531-1521.

Mindfulness Meditation Group – 9-9:50am, through Dec 30. Come join us for a mindfulness meditation, reading, and discussion in the Zen tradition of Thich Nhat Hahn. No experience needed. Chairs are provided, or bring your own cushion. Childcare is provided from 8:50am. For more information, contact Sharron Swain at dre@uucbham. org, or call 205-945-8109. Unitarian Universalist Church of Birmingham, 4300 Hampton Heights Dr, Birmingham. 205-945-8109. Prenatal Yoga – 11:15am-12:15pm through July 18. Prenatal Yoga is a great way to cultivate strength, flexibility, and stamina, all of which will help you feel great throughout your Pregnancy as well as prepare your mind and body for Labor, Birth, and Motherhood. Along with breathing exercises and relaxation techniques, the Prenatal Yoga classes focus on poses that help ease the discomforts associated with pregnancy and prepare the body for childbirth. $10 for members/ $15 for non-members. Visit BabyBellyYoga.com or email KristaMartinJones@gmail. com for more info. Levite Jewish Community Center, 3960 Montclair Rd, Birmingham. 205-879-0411. The First Annual Farmers Market – 3-7pm Thursdays, through July 26. The Summit presents the first annual Farmer’s Market! Find market favorites like fresh local produce, handcrafted jewelry, coffee beans, pasta, breads, cheeses, sauces, soaps, lotions and more. Kid-friendly activities and entertainment make it fun for the whole family. The market takes place near Urban Cookhouse, 250 Summit Blvd Suite 102. The Summit, 214 Summit Boulevard, Birmingham. 205-967-0111. Farm Stands on the Railroad – 4-6pm, through Oct 31. Birmingham community gardens and urban farms will be selling fresh produce each week from April through October. Community gardens and urban farms that will be featured throughout the season include: Jones Valley Urban Farm, Rosedale Community Garden, PEER/East Lake Farmer’s Market, and West End Community Garden. Railroad Park, 1600 1st Ave S, Birmingham. 205-458-2168.

Magic City Brewfest – Fri 7-11pm; Sat 4-8pm. The 6th Annual Magic City Brewfest presented by Free the Hops is coming back to Sloss Furnaces. There will be over 200 beers from 60+ breweries including the debuts from Cahaba Brewing and Beer Engineers plus new breweries to Alabama this past year like Green Flash, Cisco, NOLA, Founders and more. Sloss Furnaces National Historic Landmark, 20 32nd St N, Birmingham. Jamme’s Crunk Fitness Club Classes – Mondays 7:30pm; Wednesdays 6:30pm; Thursdays 5:30pm. This amazing studio offers a euphoric experience where you’re drawn into a sweat-filled frenzy of music, swirling lights and addictive dance. This class is open to the public and is not dependent on membership at the UAB Rec Center. Check website for schedule changes and holidays. UAB Rec Center Building, 1501 University Blvd, Birmingham. 205-960-7763. Birmingham Ghost Walk – 8pm, Friday and Saturday evenings. The Birmingham Ghost Walk is a casual guided walk that lasts about 90 minutes or so through the heart of the downtown area. Spooky tales of the paranormal history of Birmingham are revealed on this exciting and fun tour. Reservations are strongly suggested. Reservations can be made at GhostMagick.com/ghost-walks.html or by calling 205-538-1853. Ghost walks are $15 for adults and $7 for children. Linn Park, 710 20th St N, Birmingham. 205-538-1853. Free Friday Flicks – 8:15pm, through July 27. Bring your lawn chairs and picnic baskets out to enjoy Homewood’s free summer movie series known as Free Friday Flicks. Movies are for the entire family and begin around sundown, which is approximately 8:15pm. Come early to enjoy the bounce house, shaved ice, pizza and much more. Homewood Central Park, 1604 Oxmoor Rd, Homewood. 205-332-6700.

SATURDAY, JUNE 2

BEYOND FIT With Ash – 5:20-6:20pm, through Dec 31. This total body, high intensity style program, utilizing free weights, resistance and body weight, masterfully combines the components of R.I.P.P.E.D.--Resistance, Intervals, Power, Plyometrics and Endurance as the workout portion along with Diet suggestions to help you attain and maintain your physique in ways that are fun, safe, doable and extremely effective. $5.00 per class. Bailey Dance Studio, 1853 Montgomery Hwy, Ste 103, Hoover. 205-212-4697.

West Homewood Farmer’s Market – 8am-12pm, though July 28. This is a small market with a great atmosphere—a place to buy exceptional locally grown food and a place to get to know your neighbor. In addition to growers the market features dairy, meat, eggs, arts and crafts, pasta, as well as local entertainers, food and drink, a variety of non-profit groups, and much more. West Homewood Farmers Market, 160 Oxmoor Rd, Homewood. 205-4275665. WestHomewood.com.

All In Casino Royale – 6:30pm. Presented by UAB Minority Health Young Professionals Board at Workplay. Benefitting the UAB Healthy Happy Kids Program. Casino-style games and entertainment, fabulous mystery prizes, tasty treats catered by the Fish Market Downtown and local celebrity dealers. Workplay, 500 23rd St S, Birmingham. 205-996-2960.

Alabaster CityFest – 9am. An all-day festival featuring music, kids activities and vendors. LoneStar and Everclear headline this year’s festival. Municipal Park, Warrior Dr, Alabaster.

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Story Time On the Mountain – 10am. Join Ms. Jerri in the Activity Hall of the Treehouse as she reads “The Wide-Mouthed Frog” by Keith Faulkner. Ever wondered what a frog, mouse, or alligator eats? This story will give you the answers with fun pop-up illustrations. Make frog finger puppets to take home and receive a copy of the book. Ruffner Mountain Nature Center, 1214 81st St S, Birmingham. 205-833-8264. Beyond the Basics Genealogy Workshop. Bring Out Your Dead: Cemeteries in Genealogical Research – 10am. The library’s Tutwiler Collection of Southern History and Literature at the Central Library has been recognized by Family Tree Magazine as one of the top ten public libraries for digging into your family roots. There are several BPL programs designed to teach people how to begin their do-it-yourself journey of researching family history, including “Beyond the Basics Genealogy Workshops.” Advance registration is required. Birmingham Public Library Central Branch, 2100 Park Place, Birmingham. 205-226-3655. Glorious Gardens – Sat 10-5pm; Sun 12-5pm. Glorious Gardens returns to Birmingham, showcasing six residential homes and one public garden. The biannual event allows ticket-holders intimate views of six private gardens from across the horticultural spectrum, from sprawling ranch style estate to quaint self maintained gardens. Please visit this page in the future for a list of stores to purchase your tickets from, addresses, images, and complete details. Birmingham Botanical Gardens, 2612 Lane Park Rd, Birmingham. 205-414-3965. BBGardens.org. Juneteenth Culture Fest – 11am-8pm. A free outdoor music concert and games for all ages take place at BCRI and in Kelly Ingram Park. Vendors supply a variety of great foods and other items for purchase. And a Sunday morning service at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church concludes the weekend. Celebration includes free admission to the museum. Birmingham Civil Rights Institute, 520 16th St N, Birmingham. 205-328-9696. Ozan Vineyard Wine & Train Excursion – 12pm. Join us Saturday afternoons through July 7 at Ozan Vineyard for the South’s wine and train excursion. This three-hour event includes a Souvenir Wine Tasting, Gourmet Box Lunch, and Heart of Dixie Railroad train excursion. Starts at OZAN at noon. $29 per person plus tax. Ozan Vineyard and Cellars, 173 Hwy 301, Calera. 205-668-6926.

SUNDAY, JUNE 3 Vulcan’s 108th Birthday Bash – 12-4pm. Vulcan Park and Museum will host a festive outdoor community celebration offering fun activities for the whole family. Admission will be charged and includes admission to the party, Vulcan’s Observation Balcony, Museum and a special exhibition in the Linn-Henley Gallery.Vulcan Park and Museum, 1701 Valley View Dr, Birmingham. 205-933-1409.

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MONDAY, JUNE 4 Leeds Summer Camp 2012 – 8am-3pm through June 29. The Leeds Summer Camp 2012 Program Includes: Breakfast, Lunch & Afternoon Snack served daily, Arts and Crafts, Reading Club, Character Building, Music, Swimming, Motivational Speakers, Organized Sports/Games, Community Garden, Field Trips, Dance/Drama, Review in Math, English, Geography and Bible. Registration fee $20.00 per family and donations are needed. Robert R. Moton Community Center, 1721 Moton St, Leeds. 205-249-5501. Introduction to Acrylic Painting – 6-8pm Mondays in June: 4, 11, 18, 25. Learn the basics of painting with acrylic paint in 4 2-hour classes at City Arts Boutique. Whether you are a beginner, or want to fine-tune your painting skills, this class is a great way to do either in a casual setting. Space is limited. Taught by Birmingham artist, Allison Rhea. City Arts Boutique, 5528 1st Ave S, Birmingham. 205-902-3181. Parent/Child Class for Children with Special Needs – 2:00-2:45pm, through Aug 4. This class is designed for 3 & 4 year olds with Down Syndrome and/or Autism and their favorite grown-up. Dancing together is an exciting and fun way for them to work on essential skills. A teaching artist will lead a class filled with creative movement, imaginative songs, fun props and live music. Children’s Dance Foundation, 1715 27th Court S, Birmingham. 205-870-0073.

TUESDAY, JUNE 5 This Magic Moment – 2pm. Join Magic Man Larry Moore for an afternoon of stories and tricks that are bound to leave you dreaming of Moore. Woodlawn Branch Library, 5709 1st Ave N, Birmingham. 205-595-2001. Calera Farmers Market – 3-6pm, rain or shine, Tuesdays through Aug 7. Help us spread the word that right here in the great City of Calera neighbors are coming together to buy fresh local produce straight from the great Alabama farmers who grew it. Calera Farmers Market. Oliver Park, 9758 Highway 25, Calera. 205-281-1975.

us support our mission. At our information session you will meet our staff, coaches, and volunteers. You will also learn more about the program and how you can sign-up to be a part of our group. The Trak Shak, 2839 18th St S, Homewood. Thyme to Read Book Group – 6pm. Thyme to Read will be discussing The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett. For more information about the group, please contact either Hope Long at the Botanical Gardens Library (205-414-3920) or Katie Moellering at Emmet O’Neal Library (205-445-1118). The Library at Birmingham Botanical Gardens, 2612 Lane Park Rd, Birmingham. 205-414-3920.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6 Brown Bag Lunch Program: Historic Landmarks of the World – 12:30. Dan Cruickshank’s informative travelogue continues with erotic cave paintings in the Australian outback, the grisly rituals of an Indonesian funeral, an ornate Thai heirloom and the majestic temples of Angkor in Cambodia. Please bring a sack lunch; drinks and dessert provided. All programs last one hour unless otherwise noted. For more information, contact Katie at KMoellering@ bham.lib.al.us or 205-445-1118. Emmet O’Neal Library (Mountain Brook), 50 Oak Street Mountain Brook. 205-879-0497. Miss Alabama Pageant – June 6-9, 7:30pm each night. Preliminary competitions in talent, evening wear, and swimsuit Wednesday-Friday. Final competition Saturday. Leslie S. Wright Fine Arts Center, Samford University, 800 Lakeshore Drive Birmingham. 205-871-6276.

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 Drumming Up Dreams – 10am. John Scalici’s dream of drumming has led him to become an award winning artist, musician, and drum circle facilitator. Come be a part of the library drum circle as John shares his passion for percussion. Woodlawn Branch Library, 5709 1st Ave N, Birmingham. 205-595-2001.

Sidewalk Salon: Distribution Trends with Amotz Zakai – 6-9pm. Amotz Zakai spearheads Echo Lake Production’s search for international directors looking to make English language films. Sidewalk Salon is a FREE monthly networking and educational event aimed at film makers and film fans alike. Join us the 1st Tuesday of each month to meet new people, learn something new and enjoy complimentary chips, salsa and queso from our friends at Rojo. ROJO, 2921 Highland Ave S, Birmingham. 205-324-0888.

The Literacy Council: Tutor Orientation – 11:30am. The Literacy Council is training adult literacy tutors and we need you. With more than 92,000 adults in Central Alabama who are illiterate, the need is greater than ever. To register for both Adult Basic Literacy and/or ESOL tutor training workshops you must first attend an orientation session. Orientation sessions are held on the first Thursday of each month with the exception of July and December. Orientation sessions are an hour and half and will outline the expectations of tutors and how the programs are conducted. Literacy Council, 2301 1st Ave N #102 Birmingham. 205-326-1925.

American Cancer Society’s DetermiNation Information Session – 6pm. The DetermiNation program is as endurance training program for the American Cancer Society that raises funds to help

Center Point Farmers’ Market – Thursdays 1-5pm, through Aug 30. Locally grown fruit and vegetables for sale every Thursday during the summer. Produce available on a seasonal basis: lettuce,


cabbage, collards, tomatoes, squash, okra, peppers, corn, egg plant, peas, green beans, cantaloupe, peaches, plums, muscadines, blackberries, blueberries, watermelons, honeydew, potatoes, onions and honey. Reed-Harvey Park, 335 Polly Reed Rd, Center Point, AL. 205-853-9711. Design Your Own Adinkra Symbol Cloth â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4pm. Adinkra is a hand-painted fabric made in Ghana. Developed by the Ashanti people, adinkra cloths were traditionally made for royalty to wear at religious ceremonies. Through the years, people have also decorated the cloths to tell a story or to express their thoughts and feelings. Join us as we complete a work of art using adinkra stamps and proverbs to design your very own masterpiece. Birmingham Public Library Central Branch, 2100 Park Place, Birmingham. 205-226-3655. An Evening with Kenneth Rowe (Lieutenant No Kum-Sok) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7-9pm. Set to the backdrop of the Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Korean War exhibit depicting the historic event, come see and hear the true story first hand as Kenneth Rowe recounts the amazing escape from North Korea and his flight to freedom on September 21, 1953. Mr. Rowe will also be signing his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;A MiG-15 to Freedom.â&#x20AC;? The event is free and open to the public. Southern Museum of Flight, 4343 73rd St N Birmingham. 205-833-8226. The Literacy Council: Tutor Orientation â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11:30am. The Literacy Council is training adult literacy tutors and we need you. With more than 92,000 adults in Central Alabama who are illiterate,

the need is greater than ever. To register for both Adult Basic Literacy and/or ESOL tutor training workshops you must first attend an orientation session. Orientation sessions are held on the first Thursday of each month with the exception of July and December. Orientation sessions are an hour and half and will outline the expectations of tutors and how the programs are conducted. Literacy Council, 2301 1st Ave N #102 Birmingham. 205-326-1925. .

FRIDAY, JUNE 8 Springville Road presents Zumba, The Latest Craze â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10am. Have you tried the Zumba craze yet? Nowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the time to join in and see what all the buzz is about. Come and participate in a Zumba class-no experience necessary. Springville Road Regional Library, 1224 Old Springville Rd, Birmingham. 205-226-4081. Florals & Landscapes in Acrylics with Sandra Washburn â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10-4pm. Chattanooga based artist, Sandra Washburn, will teach you to create surprisingly inventive floral and landscape acrylic paintings. Sandra will show you paint mixing and application methods to create the illusion of texture, depth, and light. As the painting progresses, you will learn finishing techniques such as subtle color shifting, paint pouring, and veiling. A class critique will wrap up the workshop, helping students identify when a piece is finished. $95, lunch included. Supplies needed. Forstall Art Center, 402 Palisades Blvd. Palisades Shopping Center Homewood. 205-870-0480.

British TV viewing: Doctor Who Fan Club â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2:30-5:30pm, second Saturday of each month. Homewood Public Library, 1721 Oxmoor Rd, Homewood. 205-877-8665.

SATURDAY, JUNE 9 Headwaters Festival â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10am-6pm, Saturday and Sunday. Festival will move along on a beautiful stretch of the Cahaba River at Trussville Springs. Get group dance instruction in zydeco, salsa, swing, contra, bop, and line dancing at the River Stage Dance Pavilion, then dance to great music by great live bands. Slow down with a leisurely stroll to browse and shop the Gallery Expo. Discover the talent of artist represented by great local and regional galleries and arts organizationsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;all in one place. Keep moving with multiple competitive games and activities like kickball, croquet and horseshoes, and enjoy delicious summer foods and treats. Trussville Springs, 6655 Gadsden Hwy Trussville. 205-595-6306. Kaul Wildflower Garden Volunteer Workday (Volunteer Opportunity) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9am-3:30pm. This volunteer session, while having a strong educational component, will be a work session allowing participants to gain hands-on experience with native plants and build upon much of the information learned in the CNPS program. Tasks will include planting, pruning, weeding and others. Birmingham Botanical Gardens, 2612 Lane Park Rd, Birmingham. 205-414-3965. BBGardens.org.

  

                                 

  

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Repticon: A Reptile & Exotic Animal Expo – 10-5pm. Our expo offers the opportunity to shop from a large mix of local and regional breeders and vendors offering reptiles, amphibians, other exotic animals, supplies, and merchandise. Prices are unbeatable and the health of the animals unmatched, while breeders and professionals are accessible for immediate advice. We provide hourly presentations covering a broad range of exotic animal topics. Birmingham Jefferson Convention Complex (BJCC) Arena and Exhibition Halls, 2100 Richard Arrington Jr Blvd N, Birmingham.

known and examine unimaginable places. Contact Audrey Ann Wilson. Aldridge Botanical Gardens, 3530 Lorna Rd, Hoover. 205-682-8019 ext 3.

Native Grasses and Grass-Like Plants – 12:30pm. Native grasses and grass-like plants dominate, yet their identification presents a challenge to beginner and experienced botanists alike. This workshop will introduce participants to the basics of grass identification and is appropriate for both beginners and those more advanced in their identification skills who want a refresher. $40 Members | $45 Non-Members. Birmingham Botanical Gardens, 2612 Lane Park Rd, Birmingham. 205-414-3965. BBGardens.org.

Art in the Afternoon – 1:30-4:30pm, through June 15. This week-long class is for students entering K-2. Instructor: Mary Jane Coker. Birmingham Botanical Gardens, 2612 Lane Park Rd, Birmingham. 205-414-3953.

Summer Schooler’s Club – 10:30am. McWane Center Program for 3rd-5th Graders. No younger siblings or guests. Must register to attend as there is limited space. Call 205-332-6619 for details or to register. Homewood Public Library, 1721 Oxmoor Rd, Homewood. 205-332-6618. HomeWoodPublic Library.org.

Altered Book Program – 2pm. Rip, puncture, paint, and glue old, discarded books to create masterpieces of art. We will alter the book’s appearance to turn it into a new work of art. This program is for incoming 6th-12th grade students. Pinson Public Library, 4410 Main St, Pinson. 205-680-9298.

SUNDAY, JUNE 10 Art From The Heart – 6pm. Presented by Studio By the Tracks at B&A Warehouse. Two hundred local artists as well as adults from the Studio will provide work for live and silent auction. A Student’s Room will feature hundreds of pieces of our students’ artwork for sale. All proceeds will support the programs of Studio By The Tracks, a non-profit art studio in Irondale that provides free art lessons to autistic adults and at-risk children in our community. B&A Warehouse, 1531 1st Ave S, Birmingham. 205-951-3317.

MONDAY, JUNE 11 Little Naturalists Day Camp – June 11-15. 9am12:30pm Morning Session; 12pm-3:30pm Afternoon Session. If you have a child that’s 4K–1st grade, then Little Naturalists Camp is the program to join. Your child will have a blast as they play sports and crazy games, hike trails, create wacky arts and crafts projects, learn about nature and wildlife, and everything else associated with summer day camps. Your little one will stay active while making new friends and learning about the natural world through exciting activities. You may sign your child up for either the morning or afternoon sessions, or both. Each morning and afternoon session offers different activities. All campers will eat lunch. Ruffner Mountain Nature Center, 1214 81st St S, Birmingham. 205-833-8264. Summer Camp Program: The Private Eye, Magical Closer Looks – 9am-12pm through June 15. For children entering 2nd and 3rd grades. Instructor: Amy Willis, B.S. Elementary Education, M.A. Guidance & Counseling. The Private Eye is a nationally acclaimed, hands-on learning process that rivets the eye and rockets the mind. We will get a super-close look at nature as we explore the Gardens using Private Eye jeweler’s loupes. Using these magical magnification tools, we will dive into a world un-

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Great Books Reading Group: V.S. Pritchett – 6:30pm. The Great Books Discussion Group (GBDG) will be discussing V.S. Pritchett’s “The Diver.” The GBDG reads from anthologies published by the Great Books Foundation and a limited number are available for checkout from EOL’s Reference Department. Reference Staff are happy to help you find readings in other books when/if copies of the anthologies are not available. Emmet O’Neal Library (Mountain Brook), 50 Oak Street Mountain Brook. 205-879-0497.

TUESDAY, JUNE 12 The Bookies Book Group: On Canaan’s Side – 10am. The Bookies meet in the Library’s Conference Room to discuss On Canaan’s Side by Sebastian Barry. Please plan to join us! New members are always welcome. Call the Library for more information at 205-445-1121. Emmet O’Neal Library (Mountain Brook), 50 Oak Street Mountain Brook. 205-879-0497. Recycled Book Arts Program: Collage and Image Transfers – 1-3pm. Give an old book new life by turning it into a beautiful work of art. Using appropriated images, participants will be given the freedom to explore instantly gratifying ways to add depth and richness to an altered book. Taught by Allison Rhea. East Lake Branch Library, 5 OportoMadrid Blvd, S, Birmingham. 205-836-3341. “Estate Planning Essentials” Workshop – 6-8pm. This educational workshop will sort out the facts from fiction about estate planning. This workshop will cover frequently asked questions and misconceptions on Wills & Trusts, Asset Protection, Nursing Home Issues, and Medicaid Qualification. Homewood Public Library, 1721 Oxmoor Rd, Homewood. 205-746-2465.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13 Hoop For Fitness: Teens – 10am. Hoop for Fitness will get you started on your new summer workout with their handmade fitness hoops and a Beginning Hoop Dance Class. Springville Road Regional Library, 1224 Old Springville Rd, Birmingham. 205-226-4081. Central Library Youth Department Presents Come See the Stars Shine – 10:30am. Come to the Youth Department Story Castle and watch some fun movies. Refreshments will be provided. Birmingham Public Library Central Branch, 2100 Park Place, Birmingham. 205-226-3655. Central Library Youth Department Presents Come See the Stars Shine – 10:30am. Come to the Youth Department Story Castle and watch some fun movies. Refreshments will be provided. Birmingham Public Library Central Branch, 2100 Park Place, Birmingham. 205-226-3655. Brown Bag Lunch Program: Common Sleep Disorders – 12:30pm. Chiropractor Beth Scherer and psychologist Dr. Jacqueline DeMarco will speak on sleep issues and ways to alleviate a variety of nighttime problems. Please bring a sack lunch; drinks and dessert provided. All programs last one hour unless otherwise noted. For more information, contact Katie at KMoellering@bham.lib.al.us or 205-4451118. Emmet O’Neal Library (Mountain Brook), 50 Oak Street Mountain Brook. 205-445-1121.

THURSDAY, JUNE 14 33rd Annual National Sacred Harp Singing Convention – 9:30am-2:30pm, June 14-16. The National Sacred Harp singing Convention was started here in Birmingham in 1980, and has been held here each June since. At last year’s convention we welcomed over 700 singers from 29 US states, Canada, Ireland and the United Kingdom. Visitors and listeners are welcome to attend. First Christian Church, 4954 Valleydale Rd, Birmingham. 205-879-1909. Central Library Youth Department Presents Mad Hatter Tea Party – 2-3pm. An afternoon of games, tea, and tasty treats. Birmingham Public Library Central Branch, 2100 Park Place, Birmingham. 205-226-3655. American Cancer Society’s DetermiNation Information Session – 6pm. The DetermiNation program is as endurance training program for the American Cancer Society that raises funds to help us support our mission. At our information session you will meet our staff, coaches, and volunteers. You will also learn more about the program and how you can sign-up to be a part of our group. Hoover Public Library, 200 Municipal Dr, Hoover. 205-444-7831. Hell and Back Again – 6pm for reception. 7pm for movie. This award-winning documentary and Oscar nominated movie will make its premier in Alabama


at the Pell City Center. A reception honoring several of the men and their families. There will be a question and answer session following the movie. Pell City Center, 25 Williamson Dr, Pell City, AL. 205-338-1974.

FRIDAY, JUNE 15 Viva Health Starlight Gala: Pacino, One Night Only – Reception at 6pm; performance at 7pm. American icon Al Pacino will grace the stage of UAB’s Alys Stephens Performing Arts Center as the guest artist for the center’s biggest fundraiser of the year, the 2012 Viva Health Starlight Gala. Alys Robinson Stephens Performing Arts Center, 1200 10th Ave S, Birmingham. 205-975-ARTS. AlysStephens.org.

a secret writing project. For more information, contact Holley at 205-445-1117 or HWesley@bham.lib.al.us. Emmet O’Neal Library (Mountain Brook), 50 Oak Street Mountain Brook. 205-879-0497.

SUNDAY, JUNE 17 Summer Film Series: Gone with the Wind (1939) 2pm. American classic in which a manipulative woman and a roguish man carry on a turbulent love affair in the American south during the Civil War and Reconstruction. $8. Tickets available at the door. Alabama Theatre, 1817 Third Avenue N, Birmingham. 205-251-0418.

MONDAY, JUNE 18

Frogs and Families – 7:30pm. Let’s go to the wetlands and hear the frog calls of those species that are active in June. We will hopefully hear Green frogs, the bellowing Bullfrogs, Green and Gray Treefrogs, and maybe even the high pitched call of Spring Peepers. We will look at some of these creatures upclose and learn more about them, their importance, and how to identify them. Meet herpetologist Nick Bieser at the Ruffner Road gate. $7/ $5 (member). Ruffner Mountain Nature Center, 1214 81st St S, Birmingham. 205-833-8264.

Summer Art Camp 2012 at the Birmingham Museum of Art – 9am-3pm, June 18-22 and 25-29. With our nationally celebrated Sculpture Garden, how appropriate it is that campers will focus on sculpture this year. In the Red Mountain Garden Club Memorial Garden, campers will be inspired by works created by artists, Rodin, Botero, and Alabama folk artist Charlie Lucas. To register, visit ArtsBma.org. All members receive a 30% discount. Birmingham Museum of Art, 2000 Rev Abraham Woods Jr Blvd, Birmingham. 205-254-2565.

Free Friday Flicks: Alice In Wonderland – 8:15pm. From Walt Disney Pictures and visionary director Tim Burton comes an epic 3D fantasy adventure “Alice in Wonderland”, a magical and imaginative twist on some of the most beloved stories of all time. Johnny Depp stars as the Mad Hatter. Homewood Central Park, 1604 Oxmoor Rd, Homewood. 205-332-6700.

Reading Roadies – 6:30-7:30pm, through June 25. The Springville Road Reading Roadies meet the third Monday of every month at the Springville Road Branch of the Birmingham Public Library to discuss a pre-selected fictional work. The book we will be discussing is Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks. All adults are welcome to come hear and participate in the discussion. It is not necessary to have read (or finished) the book. Springville Road Regional Library, 1224 Old Springville Rd, Birmingham. 205-226-4083.

SATURDAY, JUNE 16 Mediumship Training Intensive – 9am-5pm, June 16-17. This amazing 2-day intensive will provide you with the hands on experience, a greater knowledge base, and take you to a greater level of expertise and mastery in Spirit communication than ever before! You will receive the 270 page handbook as part of this Mediumship Intensive. Certification as a Medium is possible upon completing the handbook. Quality Inn Homewood, 155 Vulcan Rd, Homewood. 480-747-0811.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20 Brown Bag Lunch Program: Genghis Khan’s Tomb – 12:30pm. The lost tomb of Genghis Khan could be unearthed and destroyed at any time. Can

engineer and explorer Albert Lin, equipped with cutting-edge technology and just a handful of obscure clues from ancient texts, find and protect the tomb of the Great Khan before it is destroyed? Please bring a sack lunch; drinks and dessert provided. All programs last one hour unless otherwise noted. For more info, contact Katie at KMoellering@bham. lib.al.us or 205-445-1118. Emmet O’Neal Library (Mountain Brook), 50 Oak Street Mountain Brook. 205-445-1121. The Birmingham Fern Society’s 36th Annual Fern Show & Sale – 1-5pm. Entries must be received between 8-10am. Everyone is invited to enter their fern fronds in the show. Ribbons will be awarded. Vases will be provided. A great variety of hardy ferns will be available at very reasonable prices. Experts will advise you in selecting and growing ferns. For more information call Ginny Lusk. Birmingham Botanical Gardens, 2612 Lane Park Rd, Birmingham. 205-988-0299. Summer Solstice Celebration – 7-8:30pm. Celebrate the solstice with crystal and chakra meditation, kirtain and drumming. Heiman, Shannon Andrews Skipper, Jasper Elliot Wolfe. Birmingham Yoga, 605 37th St S, Birmingham. $10 advance registration $15/door. NaturalForcesStudio.com/blog.

THURSDAY, JUNE 21 Ready, Set, Grow: Tips for Creating a Successful Community Garden or Outdoor Classroom – 9am-3pm. Learn how to create a successful community garden or outdoor classroom. Basic gardening, funding sources, and marketing opportunities will all be covered. Lunch will be provided. Birmingham Botanical Gardens, 2612 Lane Park Rd, Birmingham. 205-414-3953. Hoop For Fitness – 10am. Looking for a new, fun activity that does not feel like exercise? Discover the NEW hula hoop—a professional fitness hoop. Hoop for Fitness will get you started on your new summer workout with their handmade fitness hoops and a Beginning Hoop Dance Class. East Lake Branch Library, 5 Oporto-Madrid Blvd S, Birmingham. 205-836-3341.

Reiki 2 Certification Class – 1-5pm. The seconddegree level of Reiki certification. Must be attuned to the 1st degree. Learn symbols and techniques for living Reiki in our daily life. Meditation and practice time offered. Usui Certificate awarded. Manual included. $275.00. Terri Heiman, Natural Forces Studio, 605 37th St S, inside Birmingham Yoga. $15 drop in or 4/$50. NaturalForcesStudio.com/blog. Adult Summer Reading: Potluck Movie – 4:308pm. Bring a dish (or dessert) to share and watch the film adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s bestselling book about very different, extraordinary women in the 1960s South who build an unlikely friendship around

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Chefs for the Cure – 6-9pm. Susan G. Komen has partnered with The Birmingham Originals, an organization of the Magic City’s elite locally-owned restaurants, to host the inaugural Chefs for the Cure. The exclusive tasting event, held at the prestigious Summit Club atop the Regions-Harbert Plaza, brings together ten local chefs, each partnered with a local celebrity, with the ultimate goal of raising funds and awareness of breast cancer. Tickets are available in advance or at the door for $100 per person or $150 per couple. The Summit Club, 1901 6th Ave N, Ste 3100, Birmingham. 205-263-1704.

FRIDAY, JUNE 22 North-South Skirmish Association – All day, June 22-24. The North-South Skirmish Association (N-SSA) was formed in 1950 to commemorate the heroism of the men, of both sides, who fought in the American Civil War, 1861-1865. The N-SSA promotes the shooting of Civil War firearms and artillery and encourages the preservation and display of Civil War materials. Planned activities for a typical skirmish weekend include children’s programs, dances, cook-outs, and trips to “Sutler Row,” where vendors display and sell Civil War firearms, accouterments, and clothing. Brierfield Ironworks Historical State Park, 240 Furnace Parkway Brierfield, AL. Episcopal Place 2012 Gumbo Gala – 11am-2pm. 40 cook-off teams will cook and serve gumbo and compete for awards at this fun-filled, seventh annual event. Over 2,000 people are expected to sample gumbo and enjoy live New Orleans-style music and entertainment at Sloss Furnaces’ historic landmark. Kids’ activities and concessions will be available, as well as select vendors selling Cajun and gumbo-related products. $10 per person; Children 12 and under admitted free. Sloss Furnaces National Historic Landmark, 20 32nd St N, Birmingham. 205-939-0085.

SATURDAY, JUNE 23 Reiki 1 Certification Class – 1-5pm. The firstdegree level of Reiki certification. This is the foundation class for all other levels. Learn the history, principles, and receive the sacred attunements. Excellent self-care techniques. Usui Certificate awarded. Manual included. $155.00. Terri Heiman, Natural Forces Studio, 605 37th St S, inside Birmingham Yoga. $15 drop in or 4/$50. NaturalForces Studio.com/blog.

SUNDAY, JUNE 24 Summer Solstice Concert with the Red Mountain Chamber Players at Steiner Auditorium – 3pm. This fall, the Museum will present Norman Rockwell’s America, an exhibition featuring over 300 images from Rockwell’s Saturday Evening Post illustrations and more than 40 of his paintings. On this Sunday afternoon, the Red Mountain Chamber Players, conducted by Yurii Henriques, will present a musical background for the era of the show with compositions by composers such as Copland, Ives

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and William Grant Still. Birmingham Museum of Art, 2000 Rev Abraham Woods Jr Blvd, Birmingham. 205-254-2565.

MONDAY, JUNE 25 Animal Encounters of the Furry, Feathered, Scaled & Tailed Kind Day Camp – 9am-3pm through June 29. Learn about and meet some animals that live in Alabama and compare them to some foreign species as well. Play games to help us understand how animals survive in the wild, the purpose of camouflage, and the adaptations that some have developed to better make it in the wild. For campers entering 1st-8th Grade. Morning and afternoon extended care available. Camp fee: $150/ $175 (non-member). Ruffner Mountain Nature Center, 1214 81st St S, Birmingham. 205-833-8264.

al.us. Emmet O’Neal Library (Mountain Brook), 50 Oak Street Mountain Brook. 205-879-0497. Alabama Orchid Society Monthly Meetings – 7:15pm, fourth Tuesday of each month. The aims of the Alabama Orchid Society are, generally stated, to extend the knowledge, production, use, perpetuation and appreciation of orchids of any kind and in any manner. Visitors welcome. Birmingham Botanical Gardens, Hodges Room, 2612 Lane Park Rd, Birmingham. 205-933-8688.

THURSDAY, JUNE 28 Learn to Quilt – 2-4pm. Different methods of hand quilting will be taught. A different method is presented each month. The class is open to anyone who can hold a needle safely. Leeds–Jane Culbreth Public Library, 8104 Parkway Drive SE Leeds. 205-699-5962.

TUESDAY, JUNE 26 Night Sky Wonders – 10am. Come and explore our solar system’s night sky with McWane Center’s Star Dome Planetarium. East Lake Branch Library, 5 Oporto-Madrid Blvd S, Birmingham. 205-836-3341. Smithfield Branch Library Presents Hoop Dance 10am. Discover the fitness hoop. This is the newest “cool” dance activity. You’ll learn some super fun tricks. Smithfield Branch Library, 1 8th Ave W, Birmingham. 205-324-8428. Intro to Genealogy Class – 11:30am. Want to do genealogy research? Come to this class. No registration is required. Go to Tinyurl.com/GenieIntro to print out the class handout and bring it with you. Birmingham Public Library Central Branch, 2100 Park Place, Birmingham. 205-226-3655. Adaptations AfterParty: Cowboys & Aliens – 6:30pm. Adaptations is Avondale Library’s bookto-film group. For each title, we host a screening party (where we watch the movie) and an AfterParty (where we discuss the book and film). Patrons are invited to attend either program, and may attend both for the full experience. Tonight we’ll be discussing the graphic novel “Cowboys and Aliens” and the film it inspired. Avondale Regional Library, 509 40th St S, Birmingham. 205-226-4000. Genre Reading Group: Foodie Fiction – 6:30pm. Epicures of the world, unite! Join us tonight for a discussion of books whose main character is the food. Readers will be able to really sink their teeth in to this genre. Emmet O’Neal Library (Mountain Brook), 50 Oak Street Mountain Brook. 205-879-0497. Adult Summer Reading: Trivia & Pizza Tasting Doors open at 6:30pm, trivia competition begins promptly at 7pm. Join us for our first Trivia Night. We’ll also have a tasting to determine the best pizza place in town. Prizes will be awarded to each member of the winning team. For more information, contact Amanda at 205-445-1119 or AmandaW@bham.lib.

Nonfiction Book Group: Hellhound on His Trail by Hampton Sides – 7-9pm. Join us for Hoover Public Library’s nonfiction book discussion group. One book is discussed each session. Snacks and drinks will be provided. Call 205-444-7816 for more information. Hoover Public Library, TheatreLevel Meeting Room, 200 Municipal Dr, Hoover. 205-444-7831.

SATURDAY, JUNE 30 Birmingham Heart Walk – 8am. Each year millions of people participate in Heart Walks around the country. Each walker is asked to raise money from friends and family, coworkers, business acquaintances, association members, etc. The money that is raised each year will be used to fund the valuable research, education and advocacy efforts of the American Heart Association. Linn Park, 710 20th St N, Birmingham. 205-538-1853. Non-Native Invasive Plants & Their Effect (Elective) 8:30-12:30pm. What is an invasive species and why are they invasive? This workshop will give a regional, in-depth and up-to-date perspective on invasive plants, their identification, modes of introduction, effects on native ecosystems, and management. We will begin in the classroom, and then move outside for a hands-on experience. The publication, A Field Guide for the Identification of Invasive Plants in Southern Forests, and other informative handouts will be distributed. $40 Members / $45 Non Members. Birmingham Botanical Gardens, 2612 Lane Park Rd, Birmingham. 205-4143965. BBGardens.org. Bird House Art Extravaganza – 10am-4pm. Join us at Ruffner and decorate whatever kind of bird house suits you. You are welcome to bring your own bird house to decorate, or buy one. Paint and other art supplies will be provided. Judges will pick winners for: Most Creative Bird House and “Greenest” Bird House (Children and Adults categories). All houses will then be displayed in the large tree next to the Treehouse. Ruffner Mountain Nature Center, 1214 81st St S, Birmingham. 205-833-8264.


ongoingevents you participate in this class. Railroad Park, 17th Street Section B, 1600 1st Ave S, Birmingham. 205-521-9933.

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Mindfulness Meditation and Discussion Group 9-10am. In the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh. Chairs are provided, or bring your own cushion. Childcare available. Contact Sharron Swain at Dre@uucbham.org. Unitarian Universalist Church of Birmingham, 4300 Hampton Heights Dr. 205945-8109.

Pilates Reformer Duet/Trio –7:45am and 4:15pm. Genevieve Ward. Blissful Heights Integrative Healing, 3100 Independence Dr, Homewood. 205-639-1062. BlissfulHeights.com.

Adult Sunday School – 10-10:30am. Facilitated by Mike Goins. Currently studying “Practical Mysticism of Joel Goldsmith.” Unity of Birmingham, 2803 Highland Ave. 205-908-2007. UnityBham.com. Healing Ministry – 12:30-1:30pm, first and third Sunday of each month. The Unity Healing Ministry offers healing through prayer and energy balancing to individuals following Sunday service in our upstairs Healing Center. Unity of Birmingham, 2803 Highland Ave. 205-908-2007. UnityBham.com. Power Pilates Mat – 2pm. Genevieve Ward. Blissful Heights Integrative Healing, 3100 Independence Dr, Homewood. 205-639-1062. BlissfulHeights.com. The Appalachian Trail Club of Alabama (ATCA) 2pm, first Sunday of each month. Alabama Outdoors (downstairs), 3054 Independence Dr, Birmingham. Pinhoti@bellsouth.net. Pinhoti.org. Chess: Scholastic Chess Club – 2-5pm. Schoolage players of all skill levels are welcome. Chess coach Michael Ciamarra hosts. Chess, Checkers, Go. Free. Books A Million, Brookwood Village. 205-870-0213. Course in Miracles Workshop – 5:30-7pm. Based on Kenneth Wapnick’s highly acclaimed workshop, “What It Means to Be a Teacher of God.” Facilitated by Angela Julian. Free, open to the public, and can be attended at any time. Contact Angela at AcimJulian@gmail.com to receive study material. Unity of Birmingham, 2803 Highland Ave. 205-908-2007. UnityBham.com. Sunday Service – 11am-12:30pm. Unity of Birmingham, 2803 Highland Ave. 205-908-2007. UnityBham.com. Meditation – 7pm. Birmingham Shambhala Meditation Center, 714 37th Street South. Free admission. 205-595-1688. Birmingham-ShambhalaMeditation.org. Spoken Word – 6-8pm. The Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame presents spoken word performances the third Sunday of each month. The Carver Theatre, 1631 N 4th Ave, Birmingham. 205-254-2731. JazzHall.com.

Vinyasa Flow & Restore Yoga – 9am. Jasper Wolfe. Blissful Heights Integrative Healing, 3100 Independence Dr, Homewood. 205-639-1062. BlissfulHeights.com. Core Barre – 12pm and 6:45pm. This fun, fatburning format of interval training quickly and safely reshapes the entire body. It is non-impact and targets all major muscle groups while improving posture. $18. Register online. Pilates on Highland, 2827 Highland Ave S, Birmingham. 205-323-5961. PilatesOnHighland.com. Martial Arts – 5-6pm. Books, Beans & Candles Metaphysical Shoppe, 1620 Richard Arrington Jr. Blvd, Birmingham. 205-453-4636. MHagood@ gmail.com. BookBeanCandle.com. Zumba® Fitness With Ashley – 5:20pm. Zumba® Fitness fuses hypnotic Latin rhythms and easy to follow moves to create a dynamic fitness program. The routines feature interval training sessions where fast and slow rhythms, and resistance training are combined to tone and sculpt your body while burning fat. $5 per class (cash or check only). No membership required. Bailey Dance Studio, 1853 Montgomery Hwy, Ste 103, Hoover. 205-212-4697. BaileyDance.com. Pilates Mat – 5:30pm. A series of floor-work exercises emphasizing core strength, breath control, flowing movement, the development of long, lean muscles and a decompressed spine. $15. No reservation needed. Pilates on Highland, 2827 Highland Ave S, Birmingham. 205-323-5961. PilatesOnHighland.com. Introduction to Pilates Equipment – 5:30pm. Become familiar with the equipment used in the Pilates method, including Reformer, Tower, and Chair. $30. Register online. Pilates on Highland, 2827 Highland Ave S, Birmingham. 205-323-5961. PilatesOnHighland.com. Chess Club – 6-7:30pm every Monday through April 30. Get a lesson from a chess coach and try your skills against other players. Ages 7 and up. No registration required. Emmet O’Neal Library (Mountain Brook), 50 Oak Street, Mountain Brook. 205-879-0497. Crunk Fitness – 6-7pm. A fun, high-energy, hip-hop dance workout for all levels. It involves a combination of basic aerobics movements and funky hip-hop dance moves, broken down so anyone can do it. Free. Please arrive 15 minutes early to register. You will be required to sign-in each time

The Magic City Toastmasters Club – 6:15pm. Trinity Medical Center, 800 Montclair Rd, the 820 Professional Building (Nursing School). ZSupport @TheToastMastersTornado.com. Meditation – 6:30pm. Twin Hearts meditation classes held every Monday. Free admission. Unity of Birmingham, 2803 Highland Ave. 205-908-2007. UnityBham.com. Circle of Champions Toastmasters Club –6:307:30pm, first and third Monday of each month (except holidays). Abundant Life Church, 1625 Kent Dairy Road, Alabaster. 205-218-8136. RCooperdtm@yahoo.com. BAO Bingo – 6pm, doors open; 7pm game starts. First Monday of each month. Cost to play is $15 for five games plus $1 for the bonus game and $1 for an ink dauber. You must be 19 to enter. Birmingham AIDS Outreach, 205, 32nd St S. BirminghamAIDS Outreach.org. Board Games – The J. Simpkins Gallery hosts Classic Monday each Monday after work, featuring classic board games, classic movies, and refreshments. 1608 Floyd Bradford Rd, Trussville. Admission $5. 205-957-5448. Afro Aerobics (African Dance Fused with Aerobics) – 6:30-7:30pm. A low impact/high energy workout designed to bring wholeness to the body, improve your fitness level, and cardiovascular system. If you want a great way to get in shape then this is the class for you. $8 per class. Bethesda Family Life Center, 1721 Dennison Ave, Birmingham. 205-218-2381. Are you Psychic? – 7-9pm. Exploring intuition. Learn and practice techniques to enhance intuition and psychic abilities. Terri Heiman, Natural Forces Studio, 605 37th S S, inside Birmingham Yoga. $15 drop in or 4/$50. NaturalForcesStudio.com/blog. Irish Dance – 7-8:30pm. Irish set dance classes for adults and mature teens. Beginners welcome. $5. Children’s Dance Foundation, 1715 27th Court South, Homewood. 205-678-8569. Meditation – 7pm. Birmingham Shambhala Meditation Center, 714 37th Street South. Free admission. 205-595-1688. Birmingham-ShambhalaMeditation.org. Swing Dance – 7pm lessons, 8-10pm social dancing. The Birmingham Lindy Dancers Association hosts “Just Gotta Swing.” $5-$7. Bella Prima Dance Studio, 3712 Lorna Rd, Birmingham.704-533-5017. JustGottaSwing.com.

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tuesday Alzheimer’s of Central Alabama (ACA) – Support group meeting for individuals and/or families on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month. ACA office, call for time and details. 205-871-7970. Alzca.org. Pilates Reformer Duet/Trio – 8am with Genevieve Ward and 5:45pm with Virginia Rives. Blissful Heights Integrative Healing, 3100 Independence Dr, Homewood. 205-639-1062. BlissfulHeights.com. Tuesday Tours of AWS – 9-10am, Tuesdays through May 31. Take a tour of Alabama Waldorf School and get a glimpse into the joyful learning experience of the Waldorf student. Alabama Waldorf School, 1220 50th St S, Birmingham. Yoga for the Back and Fibromyalgia – 9-9:45am. Iron Beach Gym, 1729 Crestwood Blvd, Irondale. Call or email Laura Thornton at 205-854-5683, YogaByLaura@att.net for current schedule and information. Beginning Yoga – 10-11am. Iron Beach Gym, 1729 Crestwood Blvd, Irondale. Call or email Laura Thornton at 205-854-5683, YogaByLaura@att.net for current schedule and information. Network Birmingham – 11:30am, first Tuesday of each month. Network Birmingham promotes communication among career-oriented women. Each meeting includes networking time, a businessrelated educational program, a full lunch, announcements, and door prizes. Harbert Center, 2019 4th Ave N, Birmingham. NetworkBham.net. Reiki Circle – 12-1pm, 1st Tuesday of each month. Experience hands of Reiki energy and meditation. Relax, refresh and release stress. No experience necessary. Terri Heiman, Natural Forces Studio, 605 37th St S, inside Birmingham Yoga. $15 drop in or 4/$50. NaturalForcesStudio.com/blog. Hatha Yoga Class – 4:30-5:30pm. The Integral Yoga approach is taught in an easeful, highly meditative manner. The student is guided to a deep level of physical and mental well-being, vitality, and relaxation, promoting flexibility, strength, and health for the entire system. Beginners always welcomed. $5.00 per class. pH Balanced Fitness, 3325 Rocky Ridge Plaza, Birmingham. 205-936-0820. pHBalancedFitness.com. VA Voices Toastmasters – 5-6pm. Birmingham VA Medical Center, Third Floor, 700 19th St S, Birmingham. PGresh@uab.edu. Zumba Dance Calorie Burn-Off Sessions – 5:30pm. Zumba is a Latin inspired dance/fitness class where you can easily have fun and burn 500-1000 calories per session. Ages 12-84+ have attended. No dance experience needed. $5 per class. Homewood Community Center, 1632 Oxmoor Rd, Homewood. Pilates Boot Camp – 5:30pm. A great mix of cardio and core strengthening interval training. $18. Register at PilatesonHighland.com. Pilates on Highland, 2827 Highland Ave S, Birmingham. 205-323-5961.

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Yoga for Beginners 6-Weeks Series – 5:30-7pm. A 6-class series beginning March 20. Instructor Adrianne Morrison. This series introduces the foundations of Hatha yoga with hands-on, “how-to” guidance. Traditional yoga poses and breathing exercises will be explored. Great for first timers, those finding their way back to yoga, or more experienced practitioners looking to reconnect with foundations of the discipline. Requires pre-registration. Villager Yoga, 3150 Overton Rd, Birmingham. VillagerYoga.com. The BE FIT Group Experience – 6-7pm. By using just your body weight, this workout routine will help tone muscles, build endurance, and boost metabolism. Free. Please arrive 15 minutes early to register. You will be required to sign-in each time you participate in this class. The Hillside at Railroad Park, 1600 1st Ave S, Birmingham. 205-521-9933. 21 Essential Lessons of Life – 6-7:30pm. Study group seeking answers to the basic questions of life. Facilitated by Pat Hahn, 205-337-6426. Unity of Birmingham, 2803 Highland Ave, Birmingham. 205-251-3713. UnityBham.com Sidewalk Salon: E.M.P.A.C.T Alabama – 6pm. Sidewalk Salon’s are free networking and educational events for filmmakers and film buffs. March’s Salon will feature Bobby Jon Drinkard, of AIDT, who will speak about the State’s new Entertainment, Media, Production & Crew Training (EMPACT) Program. First Tuesday of each month in the sideroom at Rojo, 2921 Highland Ave S, Birmingham. 205-324-0888. The Vulcan Hash House Harriers – 6:15pm. Weekly run. Affectionately known as “A Drinking Club with a Running problem,” Vulcan H3 is a non-competitive running group for people of every athletic ability. Starting at 6:15pm with a 3–5 mile trail somewhere around Birmingham concluding with general mischief and drinking. VulcanH3.com. Vestavia Toastmasters – 6-7pm, first and third Tuesday of each month. Vestavia Board of Education Building, 1204 Montgomery Hwy, Vestavia Hills. 205-937-4099. SpeakWithEase@gmail.com. Hatha Yoga – 6:30-7:30pm. Trussville Civic Center, 5391 Trussville Clay Road, Trussville. Call or email Laura Thornton at 205-854-5683, YogaByLaura@ att.net for current schedule and information. Meditation – 7pm. Free. Birmingham Shambhala Meditation Center, 714 37th St. S., 205-595-1688. Birmingham-Shambhala-Meditation.org. Ballroom Dance – 7pm. Ballroom dance lessons in various dance styles. $3. No partner required. South Highland Presbyterian Church, 2035 Highland Ave S, Birmingham. 205-933-0790. HPCbhm.org. Cha-Cha Dance – 7-8pm. Beginner level cha-cha lessons. No partner required, all ages welcome. $3. South Highland Presbyterian Church fellowship hall, 2035 Highland Ave S, Birmingham. 205-933-0790. The Society for Creative Anachronism – 7pm. A group dedicated to the sports, arts, and sciences of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Homewood Senior Center, 816 Oak Grove Rd, Homewood. BaronyOfIronMountain.org.

Course in Miracles – 7-8pm. New “Text Made Simple” Book Study with commentary provided by Pathways of Light (PathWaysOfLight.org). For more info contact Angela Julian, Facilitator at AcimJulian@blogspot.com or 205-370-5721. Unity of Birmingham, 2803 Highland Avenue, Birmingham. UnityBham.com. Folk Dance Classes – 7:30-9pm. Open to all. No experience necessary. $2. Levite Jewish Community Center, 3960 Montclair Road, Birmingham. 205-956-1735. Alabama Orchid Society Monthly Meetings 7:15pm. The Alabama Orchid Society welcomes all visitors and extends an invitation to attend monthly meetings which are held at Birmingham Botanical Gardens (Hodges Room) every fourth Tuesday of each month at 7:15pm. Birmingham Botanical Gardens, 2612 Lane Park Rd, Birmingham. 205-933-8688.

wednesday French Conversation: Daniel Rabourdin hosts an informal French speaking group the first and third Wednesday of each month at Barnes & Noble at the Summit. 205-370-3542. DRabourdin@ewtn.com. Pilates Reformer Duet/Trio –6am, 7:45am, and 4:30pm classes with Genevieve Ward; 6pm class with Virginia Rives. Blissful Heights Integrative Healing, 3100 Independence Dr, Homewood. 205639-1062. BlissfulHeights.com. Lupus Outreach Group – 10am, second Wednesday of each month. Homewood Public Library, Room 116, 1721 Oxmoor Rd, Birmingham. Kala485@yahoo.com. Spiritual Journaling –11:30am-1pm. Awaken your inner writer through exercises, meditation, Reiki, essential oils, chakra work, and the use of crystals and healing stones. Come experience the creative flow established through practice. Laurie M. Knight, Natural Forces Studio, 605 37th St S, inside Birmingham Yoga. $15 drop in or 4/$50. NaturalForcesStudio.com/blog. Noon Prayer Service – 12-12:30pm. For a midweek spiritual boost, come to the Wednesday weekly noon prayer service and meditation service at Unity of Birmingham, 2803 Highland Ave, Birmingham. 205-251-3713. UnityBham.com Farm Stands on the Railroad – 4-6pm. Birmingham community gardens and urban farms will be selling fresh produce each week from April through October. Community gardens and urban farms that will be featured throughout the season include: Jones Valley Urban Farm, Rosedale Community Garden, PEER/East Lake Farmer’s Market, West End Community Garden. Railroad Park, 17th St Plaza, 1600 1st Ave S, Birmingham. 205-458-2168. Disc Golf Birmingham 2012 Spring League – 5:30pm, March 21-May 9 on Wednesday evenings. George Ward Park. Tee Time 5:30 sharp. (Please be on-site with your bag tag turned in no later than


5:20 for the players’ meeting.) More info at Disc GolfBirmingham.com. Pilates Mat – 5:30pm. A series of floor-work exercises emphasizing core strength, breath control, flowing movement, the development of long, lean muscles and a decompressed spine. $15. No reservation needed. Pilates on Highland, 2827 Highland Ave S, Birmingham. 205-323-5961. PilatesOnHighland.com. Martial Arts – 5-6pm. Books, Beans & Candles Metaphysical Shoppe, 1620 Richard Arrington Jr. Blvd, Birmingham. 205-453-4636. MHagood@ gmail.com. BookBeanCandle.com. Belly Dancing – 6-7pm. Meeting room. Books, Beans & Candles Metaphysical Shoppe, 1620 Richard Arrington Jr. Blvd, Birmingham. 205-453-4636. MHagood@gmail.com. BookBeanCandle.com. Zumba at Railroad Park – 6-7pm. A Latin inspired dance fitness class that blends easy Latin dance moves with aerobic steps. Free. Please arrive 15 minutes early to register. You will be required to sign-in each time you participate in this class. Railroad Park, 17th Street Section B, 1600 1st Ave S, Birmingham. 205-521-9933.

thursday Pilates Reformer Duet/Trio – 6am and 7am with Sheri Kristjansson; 4:30pm, Genevieve Ward. Blissful Heights Integrative Healing, 3100 Independence Dr, Homewood. 205-639-1062. BlissfulHeights.com. Genealogy Workshop – 9am-12pm. This workshop will give you the basics on finding that elusive great-great grandpa so you can take him with you to your next family reunion. Pleasant Grove Public Library, 501 Park Rd, Pleasant Grove. Restorative Yoga – 9:30am. Blissful Heights Integrative Healing, 3100 Independence Dr, Homewood. 205-639-1062. BlissfulHeights.com. Book Discussion Group – 10am-12pm, first Thursday of the month. Just ask at the Fiction Desk for a copy of the current month’s title. Refreshments are provided. Hoover Public Library, 200 Municipal Dr, Hoover. 205-444-7820. CLICK! Basic Digital Photography for Youth – 4-5:30pm. Students will learn about how camera functions, how to create a correct exposure, how to get the best quality megapixels and how to change white balance and much more. Ages 12-17. A new class begins the first Thursday of each month. Call today to sign up. Instructor: Paris Farzad. Shelby County Arts Council Gallery, 104 Mildred St, Columbiana. 205-669-0044. Pilates Beginner Mat – 5:30pm. A series of floorwork exercises emphasizing core strength, breath control, flowing movement, the development of long, lean muscles and a decompressed spine. $15. No reservation needed. Pilates on Highland, 2827 Highland Ave S, Birmingham. 205-323-5961. PilatesOnHighland.com.

CLICK! Basic Digital Photography for Adults 6-8:30pm. Students will learn about how camera functions, how to create a correct exposure, how to get the best quality megapixels and how to change white balance and much more. Ages 18+. A new class begins the first Thursday of each month. Call today to sign up. Instructor: Paris Farzad. Shelby County Arts Council Gallery, 104 Mildred St, Columbiana. 205-669-0044. Yoga at Railroad Park – 6-7pm. For the beginning as well as advanced student. Free. Please arrive 15 minutes early to register. You will be required to sign-in each time you participate in this class. The Meadow at Railroad Park, 1600 1st Ave S, Birmingham. 205-521-9933. The Vocalizers Toastmasters Club – 6:15pm, first and third Thursday of each month. Hoover Public Library, 200 Municipal Dr, Birmingham. 205-6784599. Vocalizers.com. Hatha Yoga – 6:30-7:30pm. Trussville Civic Center, 5391 Trussville Clay Road Trussville. Call or email Laura Thornton at 205-854-5683, YogaByLaura@att.net for current schedule and information. Reiki Circle – 7-8:30pm, 2nd Thursday of each month. Experience the hands of Reiki energy and meditation. Relax, refresh and release stress. No experience necessary. Terri Heiman, Natural Forces Studio, 605 37th St S, inside Birmingham Yoga. $15 drop in or 4/$50. NaturalForcesStudio.com/blog.

and practical application ideas to put transformative spiritual tools to work in your life and the world around you. Rev Cindy has been studying New Thought/Ancient Wisdom for almost 30 years. She is a skilled presenter and facilitator with a knack for clarifying even the biggest ideas, a desire to draw out the wisdom in the group, and a conviction that God loves a good laugh. Presented on a Love offering basis. Unity of Birmingham, 2803 Highland Ave. UnityBham.com.

friday Core Barre – 12pm. This fun, fat-burning format of interval training quickly and safely reshapes the entire body. It is non-impact and targets all major muscle groups while improving posture. $18. Register at PilatesOnHighland.com. Pilates on Highland, 2827 Highland Ave S, Birmingham. 205-323-5961. Reiki Clinic – 2-4pm. This clinic will offer Reiki Healing—Universal Life Force Energy—on a first come basis. Rates are offered at this time $1/min. Please note that more than one treatment table will set up in the room at a time. Heal the body, mind and spirit to health, wealth and love. Replenish your frame of mind and tap into your spirit. Rest and restore. Terri Heiman, Natural Forces Studio, 605 37th St S, inside Birmingham Yoga. $15 drop in or 4/$50. NaturalForcesStudio.com/blog.

Crystal & Light Healing Circle – 7-8:30pm, 3rd Thursday of each month. Combine the energy of sacred circles with the energy and vibrations of Reiki and the elemental kingdom. This healing circle offers the body, mind and spirit an energetic clearing that balances and refreshes one into a state of rest and relaxation. Terri Heiman, Natural Forces Studio, 605 37th St S, inside Birmingham Yoga. $15 drop in or 4/$50. NaturalForcesStudio.com/blog. Angel Healing Circle – 7-8:30pm, 4th Thursday of each month. Angels are always around us offering us their love and support. All we have to do is ask and call on them. Join us for an evening of healing and heart linking with the angels. Find out which angels guide you, support you, and watch over your spirit. Angel empowerments offered to each participant. Terri Heiman, Natural Forces Studio, 605 37th St S, inside Birmingham Yoga. $15 drop in or 4/$50. NaturalForcesStudio.com/blog. Core Barre – 7pm. This fun, fat-burning format of interval training quickly and safely reshapes the entire body. It is non-impact and targets all major muscle groups while improving posture. $18. Register online. Pilates on Highland, 2827 Highland Ave S, Birmingham. 205-323-5961. PilatesOnHighland.com. Meditation – 7pm. Free. Birmingham Shambhala Meditation Center, 714 37th St S, Birmingham. 205595-1688. Birmingham-Shambhala-Meditation.org Science of Mind at UNITY – 7-8:30pm. Rev Cindy Shellum, licensed Minister of Religious Science with Centers for Spiritual Living, offers insight

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Friday Night P.E. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6-7pm. A mix of your favorite childhood games such as kickball, dodge ball, ultimate Frisbee, and musical chairs to help you burn calories and improve your health. Perfect for groups. Railroad Park, 17th Street Plaza Section B, 1600 1st Ave S, Birmingham. 205-521-9933. Bards & Brews: Birmingham Public Library Poetry Slam Series â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6:309pm, first Friday of each month. Live music and sign-up at 6:30; call time is 7pm. Check Bards & Brews on Facebook for updated schedule and location. Alabama Mineral and Lapidary Society â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6:30-8pm. Meets the 2nd Friday of each month (except June). Vestavia Hills Library, 1221 Montgomery Hwy, Vestavia Hills. LapidaryClub.com.

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saturday Pepper Place Saturday Market â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7am-12pm, rain or shine. Visit our regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s farming families at the Pepper Place Saturday Market. They grow vegetables and flowers, bake breads and cookies, cakes and pies, tend the bees, and drive into the Lakeview District of Birmingham to sell the fruits of their labors. In addition to farmers, bakers and beekeepers you can enjoy local musicians on two stages while sipping a fresh cup of coffee or enjoying a light breakfast. There is a cooking demonstration at 9am every Saturday morning by Birminghamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest chefs. Pepper Place, 2829 2nd Avenue S, Birmingham. 205-313-4120. Zumba Dance Party â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9am. Zumba is a Latin inspired dance/fitness class where you can easily have fun and burn 500-1000 calories per session. Ages 12-84+ have attended. No dance experience needed. $5 per class. Homewood Community Center, 1632 Oxmoor Rd, Homewood. Changing Lives One Mind At A Time Community Chess Class â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10am12pm. Free two hour Saturday chess class taught by Charles A. Smith of Magic City Chess U. Smith is the coach of the W. J. Christian state champion chess team, the Indian Springs Chess team, and has produced 11 individual state chess championships, as well as regional and national achievements. Birmingham Public Library Central Branch, 2100 Park Place, Birmingham. Pilates Reformer Duet/Trio â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:15am. Genevieve Ward. Blissful Heights Integrative Healing, 3100 Independence Dr, Homewood. 205-639-1062. BlissfulHeights.com. Belly Dance Classes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with Zivah Spahirah Troupe instructors. Meets every Saturday at Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dance Foundation, 1715 27th Court South, Homewood. Ages 16 and up. 205-978-5121. ZivahSaphirah.com. Bagpipe Lessons â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9am. Heritage Pipes and Drums offers bagpipe and Scottish side drum lessons. Riverchase Church of Christ, 1868 Montgomery Hwy, Birmingham. 205-427-1756. HPD-Pipeband.org. Downtown Running Club â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10am. Weekly runs on Saturday mornings. Runners meet in front of Paramount Cafe at 200 20th Street North for a social 3 or 6 mile run through the neighborhood streets of downtown, rain or shine. The club is free and open to runners of all speeds. For more info contact Brian Johnson at BemJohnson@gmail.com or search â&#x20AC;&#x153;Downtown Running Clubâ&#x20AC;? on Facebook. Meet in front of Paramount Cafe, 200 20th St N, Birmingham. 617-947-0692. Dancing for Birth classes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11am-12pm. Villager Yoga, 3150 Overton Rd, Birmingham. Email Kaleigh at Kaleigher@gmail.com to get a coupon for a free trial class and for more information. The Birmingham Genealogical Society â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2pm, fourth Saturday of each month (except November and December). Arrington Auditorium, Linn-Henley Building, Birmingham Public Library. 205-226-3665. BirminghamGenealogy.org.

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Birmingham

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CHIROPRACTIC CHIROPRACTOR & HERBALIST Dr. Jeanne R. Chabot 2116 Rocky Ridge Road Hoover, AL 35216 205-822-2177 ChabotChiropractic.com 35 years of chiropractic experience, certified herbalist, Reiki Master, Dr. Chabot provides physiological therapeutics, conventional Chiropractic adjustments, as well as gentle adjustments, according to your preference and need, private treatment rooms. Available at the clinic: massage, hypnotherapy, energy work, meditation classes, personal trainer. Most insurance accepted.

ENERGY HEALING REV. TERRI A. HEIMAN, RMT Natural Forces Studio, LLC 605 37th Street South Inside Birmingham Yoga Birmingham, AL 35222 516-457-3885 Terri@NaturalForcesStudio.com NaturalForcesStudio.com Reiki Certification Program, Energy Medicine, Vinyasa Krama Yoga. Crystal, Color & Light Therapy. Private sessions, classes and workshops.Walk-in Reiki Clinic.

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June 2012