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CONVENTION 2017

THE OFFICIAL NEWS MAGAZINE OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BASKETBALL COACHES

Final Four – Phoenix 2017 ®

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National Association of Basketball Coaches 1111 Main Street, Suite 1000 Kansas City, Missouri 64105 Phone: 816-878-6222 • Fax: 816-878-6223 www.NABC.org ______________________________________________ NABC EXECUTIVE STAFF Jim Haney Executive Director Reggie Minton Deputy Executive Director Carol Haney Senior Director of Internal Affairs Troy Hilton Senior Director of Corporate Relations and Association Affairs Stephanie Whitcher Chief Financial Officer Rick Leddy Senior Director of Communications Rose Tate Director of Membership Ebony Donohue Associate Director of Membership Mark Heatherman Senior Director of Special Events Janelle Guidry Director of Convention Wade Hageman Director of Corporate Relations Jenna Wright Director of Convention Housing Eric Wieberg Director of Digital & Social Media ______________________________________________ 2016-17 NABC BOARD OF DIRECTORS Jeff Jones, President, Old Dominion University Bill Self, First Vice President, University of Kansas Lorenzo Romar, Second Vice President, University of Washington Charlie Brock, Third Vice President, Springfield College Mike Brey, Fourth Vice President, University of Notre Dame Page Moir, 2014-15 Past President Ron Hunter, 2015-16 Past President, Georgia State University Mark Gottfried, Director, North Carolina State University Gary Stewart, Director, Stevenson University Jamie Dixon, Director, TCU Lennie Acuff, Director, University of Alabama in Huntsville Johnny Dawkins, Director, University of Central Florida John Calipari, Director, University of Kentucky Matt Margenthaler, Director, Minnesota State University, Mankato John Thompson III, Director, Georgetown University Tommy Amaker, Director, Harvard University Pat Cunningham, Director, Trinity (TX) University Bill Coen, Director, Northeastern University Ed Cooley, Director, Providence College Frank Martin, Director, University of South Carolina Matt Painter, Director, Purdue University Gary Waters, Director, Cleveland State University Dave Archer, Director, National High School Basketball Coaches’ Association-NHSBCA Bob Burchard, Director, Columbia College Thom McDonald, Director, Commissioner, Iowa Community College Athletic Conference Tom Izzo, Director Emeritus, Michigan State University Ernie Kent, Director Emeritus, Washington State University Phil Martelli, Director Emeritus, Saint Joseph’s University ______________________________________________ EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS NABC Executive Director: Jim Haney NABC Deputy Executive Director: Reggie Minton CPA: Brian Welch, Welch & Associates, LLC NABC General Counsel: Dennis Coleman, Daniel B. Adams, Ropes & Gray, LLP (Boston, MA) Board Secretary: Rick Leddy Board Consultants: Dan Gavitt, NCAA Senior Vice President of Basketball Dan Guerrero, Chair, NCAA Men’s Basketball Oversight Committee and Director of Athletics, UCLA Kevin Lennon, NCAA Vice President for Division I Governance

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CONVENTION

THE OFFICIAL NEWS MAGAZINE OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BASKETBALL COACHES

2017

COLUMNS From the Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Transitions Rick Leddy From the Executive Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 NCAA, NABC and NABC Ad Hoc Group Collaborating on Tournament Selection, Seeding and Bracketing Jim Haney NCAA Eligibility Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 The Academic Success of Student-Athletes National High School Basketball Coaches Association. . . . . . . 19 Scholastic Coaches Have A Comprehensive Role With Players National Center for Fathering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 A Coach’s Voice Carey Casey NABC Chaplain’s Corner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Anchors Pastor Donnell Jones

FEATURES Could This Be The Year For Few And Zags? NCAA Tournament Preview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Ken Davis 2017 Allstate NABC Good Works Team® A Showcase for Volunteerism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 NABC Division III Outstanding Service Awards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Preliminary 2017 NABC Convention Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 COVER The University of Phoenix Stadium and the last six coaches to cut the nets following an NCAA championship. (Stadium photo - Phoenix LOC; Coaches’ photos - KingShots, Fishbait Marketing) PHOTO CREDITS p. 8 (Gonzaga Athletics); p. 9 (Jeff Jacobsen, Kansas Athletics; Gonzaga Athletics; Arizona Athletics; Kentucky-Chet White); p.10 (Arizona Athletics; FSU Athletics - Bill Pearce; Jeffrey Camarati, UCLA Athletics - Katie Meyers); p.11 (Baylor Athletics; John Fetcho, Butler Athletics; Creighton-Corey Solotorovsky; Gonzaga Athletics; WVU–Pete Emerson); pages 13-15 (Princeton University Athletics; DePaul Athletics; Iowa State Athletics; Georgia Tech Athletics; Northwestern State Athletics; North Greenville Athletics; Graceland Athletics; Pitt-Bradford Athletics; Wingate Athletics; Susquehanna Athletics); pages 16, 17 (Franklin & Marshall Athletics; Amherst Athletics; Wooster Athletics). Time-Out is published quarterly by the National Association of Basketball Coaches. Printed by Allen Press.

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FROM THE EDITOR, Rick Leddy

Transitions Transition. The word is defined by Merriam-Webster as a passage from one state, stage, subject or place to another and as a movement, development or evolution from one form, stage or style to another. Transition is change. We’ve heard the term incessantly, especially since the November presidential election and the inauguration of President Donald Trump in January. A transition team was set to assist with the transition of power. One family transitioned out of the White House and another transitioned in, amazingly all in a matter of five or six hours. The NABC has a transition of its own in Phoenix. Old Dominion University head coach Jeff Jones completes his term as NABC president and will be succeeded by Bill Self of the University of Kansas. In a long tenure on the board of directors as the head coach at American University and ODU, Jones’ work with player selection for the annual Reese’s Division I College All-Star game has played an integral part leading to the game’s growth and success. The Reese’s Division I College All-Star Game will be played on Friday, March 31, at the University of Phoenix Stadium, following the practice sessions of the four teams. As we prepare for the upcoming 2017 NABC Convention and 2017 NCAA Men’s Final Four® in Phoenix, it will be exciting to see if Villanova is able to continue its incredible run and win a second consecutive national title. The last team to win back-to-back NCAA crowns was Florida in 2006 and 2007. Ken Davis previews the upcoming NCAA tournament and the Final Four in this issue of Time-Out. The Allstate NABC Good Works Team® program, which recognizes men’s college basketball athletes for their outstanding service work away from the court, is now in its fifth season and NABC coaches and sports information directors set a program record with 181 nominations. I strongly encourage you to read about the tremendous humanitarian efforts of the 10 young men selected as finalists for 2017, five from NCAA Division I and five representing NCAA Division II and III and NAIA Division I and II.

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We know that there are many more stories to tell about men’s basketball studentathletes across America and the selfless acts of kindness and service to those in need they perform locally, nationally and globally. The nomination process for the 2018 Allstate NABC Good Works Team® will begin in September and we hope to add to that number of 181 nominations for another record. Allstate representatives will be present in MARKETPLACE during the NABC Convention so that coaches may stop by and fill out a pre-nomination form. Watch for the team to be introduced on the court during this year’s NCAA Final Four games at the University of Phoenix Stadium. Our third feature in this issue is a virtual Mt. Rushmore of NCAA Division III coaches who will be honored at the convention in Phoenix with NABC Division III Most Outstanding Service awards. The trio, all still actively coaching, began this season with a combined total of almost 2,500 wins and a winning percentage of 74.8, ranking first, second and fourth in career victories among NCAA Division III coaches. For some local flavor while in Phoenix, some might enjoy a trip to nearby Cave Creek and the Buffalo Chip Saloon and Steakhouse (6823 E Cave Creek Rd, Cave Creek, AZ 85331). This combination steakhouse, saloon and dance hall also features bull riding on Wednesday and Friday nights. My wife and I went there a few years ago and it was a very entertaining evening. For those of you who think this might be something you might try, like a mechanical bull, these are real rodeo bulls being ridden by experienced amateur and professional cowboys. Finally, sandwiched between the NCAA semifinals on Saturday and Monday’s championship game is the Major League Baseball season opener between the Arizona Diamondbacks and San Francisco Giants on Sunday, April 2, at Chase Field at 1:10 p.m. That’s my idea of a perfect transition.

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FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, Jim Haney

Q&A with Executive Director Jim Haney NCAA, NABC and NABC Ad Hoc Group Collaborating on Tournament Selection, Seeding and Bracketing Study

The NABC Foundation Court of Honor Gala is honoring Mike Krzyzewski. Save-the-date cards have been sent out. What can you share about that Gala? This event to honor Coach K is focused on his 11 years as national coach of USA Basketball’s Senior National Team. He is the only men’s head coach in Olympic history to lead teams to gold medals in three Olympic Games. The fact that he did so is also special because Mike, as a college coach, was selected to coach NBA players in the aftermath of a series of less than successful efforts by previous USA Basketball teams to win at the World Championships and Olympic Games. It is my hope that another college coach has the opportunity to be a head coach on our senior national team but Coach K was the first. His success represented all collegiate coaches and brought added respect to our collegiate game. The Gala will be held in New York City June 21 to celebrate his success as national coach but also USA Basketball and its success during his years as head coach. It will be a special evening. We encourage our NABC coaches to attend. Additional information can be found on the Gala website, www.courtofhonorgala.com. There has been media attention paid to the recommendations of the NABC Ad Hoc Group on Selection, Seeding and Bracketing of the NCAA Men’s basketball championship. What can you share regarding the Ad Hoc Group’s recommendations? The Ad Hoc Group initially made 10 recommendations to the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball committee in early July, 2016.

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The members of the committee were quite gracious in receiving those recommendations and charted a course of action to address many of the proposals during the 2016-17 academic year. It is important to add that the Ad Hoc Group acknowledged the vital role the committee has played and continues to play in growing the popularity of men’s college basketball and specifically the NCAA Men’s Basketball Championship. The Ad Hoc Group believed its proposals would enhance what is already an outstanding event. Among the Ad Hoc Group’s recommendations was a proposal for the committee to reevaluate its use of advanced metrics during the selection and seeding process. The NCAA recently held an “analytics summit” in Indianapolis that brought together Ken Pomeroy of KenPom.com, Jeff Sagarin of USA Today, Kevin Pauga of KPIsports. net, Ben Alamar of ESPN’s analytics department, Jerry Palm of CBS Sports, Mike Decourcy of The Sporting News, and Andy Glockner, author of the analytics book ‘Chasing Perfection’. NABC staff member Eric Wieberg represented the NABC and the Ad Hoc Group at the meeting. To better understand the challenge these experts were addressing, we must first provide some context as to how the committee uses analytics now. The RPI rating has been used by the NCAA since 1981. While the RPI is not the sole evaluation tool utilized to select and seed teams, it is the only metric currently used when sorting data and results on teams’ resumes. For example, RPI is used to determine criteria such as top-50 wins and strength of schedule. More advanced metrics are available to the committee, but only the RPI has historically been visible on the official ‘Team Sheets.’

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The Ad Hoc Group recommended a change to this protocol, proposing that the RPI be replaced by a composite ranking of various advanced metrics. The composite would include both results-based metrics that judge teams based on wins and losses, and predictive metrics that judge teams based on criteria such as offensive/ defensive efficiency and scoring margin. In short, results-based metrics measure “best resume,” while predictive metrics measure “best team.” There have been some articles regarding the analytics discussions with the NCAA that there should be a rethinking of the cut lines of top-50, top-100, top-200, etc. What is the thinking behind this? Included in the Ad Hoc Group’s recommendation to reevaluate analytics was an observation that the current process undervalues road performance. Historically, wins against the RPI top-50 have been a common reference point for the committee to define quality wins. However, home wins over the top-50 and road wins over the top-50 were essentially treated as equals. The Ad Hoc Group felt that quality wins on the road should extend beyond the top50. For example, a quality win might be better defined as a home win over the top-50, neutral win over the top-75, or road win over the top100. One could even make the case that road conference wins should have an even broader definition of quality, given the difficulty of playing at league opponents. January’s analytics summit addressed this topic, and the NCAA plans to work alongside the Ad Hoc Group in determining the appropriate adjustments. How are these discussions taking place? Who is involved in these discussions? NCAA personnel led by Senior Vice President Dan Gavitt and Director of Media Coordination and Statistics Dave Worlock are working alongside NABC staff. There is also an eightmember working group – headed by Men’s Basketball Committee member Jim Schaus – that features four committee members and four Ad Hoc Group members (Phil Martelli, Ron Hunter, Mark Few and Bob Huggins.) These parties meet regularly via conference call, with the hope that

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the composite ranking and the home/neutral/ road adjustments can be implemented for the 2017-18 season. What are your thoughts on the NCAA March Madness Bracket Preview Show? The NABC Ad Hoc Group recommended that there be such a show where the top 16 teams were identified as of the date of the airing of the bracket preview show. The recommendation included that the show needed to be televised with the appropriate presentation commensurate with the prestige of the men’s basketball championship and the Final Four. With CBS airing the show and Greg Gumbel, Clark Kellogg and Seth Davis being the talent on the show, I believe that high level presentation was achieved. Obviously, there are many “experts” providing their insights into who the best teams are in the country and who should be in the 68-team field. The Ad Hoc Group believed that a show reflecting the thoughts of the Men’s Basketball Committee, the committee whose decisions really matter, as of a date in early February with a month or more of the regular season and conference tournaments left to be played would be insightful. The Ad Hoc Group did not favor the Basketball Committee projecting the entire tournament field believing it would not be in the best interest of studentathletes and coaches who are competing to make the tournament as an at-large team or as an automatic qualifier. Any final thoughts? There is a real collaboration involving the NCAA Men’s Basketball Committee, the NABC and the NABC’s Ad Hoc Group on working together for the best interests of the student-athletes, coaches and the game. We believe we are making meaningful progress and look forward to the future recommendations that will come forth from this collaboration.

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Could This Be The Year For Few and Zags? NCAA TOURNAMENT PREVIEW By Ken Davis


T

he pursuit of perfection remains an elusive chase in the world of men’s college basketball. Some say it will never happen again, so the discussion often generates a snicker, or sparks full out laughter, when we get to a point late in the season with a team that remains undefeated. Hello Gonzaga. We have been down this road before. How does coach Mark Few do it? Does it really take a Final Four appearance to award the Bulldogs with the stamp of legitimacy as one of the most successful programs in college hoops? It shouldn’t. The 2017 focus shifted to Gonzaga again on Jan. 24. That is when No. 1 Villanova, No. 2 Kansas, and No. 4 Kentucky all lost on the same night - something that had not happened to three of the top four teams since 2012. It’s an eye catcher. And it brought Gonzaga, 20-0 at the time, to the forefront once again. Jay Bilas, guru of college hoop observations, used the occasion to write that “Gonzaga is legit, no matter how many people dismiss the wins and success based upon falling short of the Final Four.” Don’t forget the stigma of playing in the West Coast Conference, which is not the Big 12 or the Atlantic Coast Conference. Other than Saint Mary’s, it is rare to see a West Coast team challenge the Bulldogs. It all adds up to a tremendous amount of naysayers. Despite the obstacles Gonzaga faces putting together a non-conference schedule, this season was different. The Bulldogs positioned themselves for a high seed in the NCAA tournament by defeating Arizona, Iowa State and Tennessee, the team that beat Kentucky on that big night on Jan. 24. For a little perspective, Wichita State was 34-0 in 2014 and the first team to enter the NCAA tournament undefeated since Jerry Tarkanian’s remarkable UNLV team in 1991. Of course, UNLV lost at the Final Four. The 1975-76 Indiana team remains the last undefeated national champion. If you know your NCAA history, that means there hasn’t been an undefeated champion since the tournament expanded to 64 (now 68) in 1985.

“People don’t realize how hard it is to do what we did, no matter what league you play in,” Wichita State guard Fred VanVleet said in 2014. Ten years earlier, coach Phil Martelli’s team at Saint Joseph’s didn’t lose for the first time until the Atlantic-10 tournament but earned a No. 1 seed and advanced all the way to the Elite Eight. Gonzaga received its only No. 1 seed in 2013 after a 31-2 regular season and then lost to Wichita State in the second round. Wichita State reached the Final Four that season and lost to Louisville in the national semifinals. Gonzaga’s best teams have had few holes. That was true in 2013 and this year’s Gonzaga team is even better defensively. In fact, as the spotlight fell on the Bulldogs with their 20-0 record, they were the only Division I team ranked in the top five in both offensive and defensive efficiency. Not Villanova. Not Kansas. Not North Carolina. Not Kentucky. With the losses that hit Few’s roster from last season’s Sweet 16 team, many thought Gonzaga would suffer a down season. But Few manages to reload and keeps his team focused on the future. This time around he found the answer through transfers. Nigel Williams-Goss (Washington) emerged as Gonzaga’s scoring and assist leader. Jordan Mathews (Cal) and Jonathan Williams (Missouri) were among the top scorers. Senior Przemek Karnowski, returning from a back injury, could be considered the nation’s top post-up player.


Perhaps Gonzaga’s 16th WCC title in 17 years didn’t get the attention it deserved because Kansas had the top storyline in the nation with its pursuit of a 13th consecutive Big 12 regular season championship. With Jayhawks coach Bill Self also in possession of the 2008 national championship, it was announced in mid-season that he has been nominated for induction into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. In a season filled with coaching milestones, Self proved again that he can adjust to his personnel and posted his 600th career victory as well as his 400th win since coming to Kansas in 2003. When he added top recruit Josh Jackson to his roster, Self found a starting lineup with a true rim protector. His adjustment? Use a four-man out, one-man design. Teams struggled to handle Frank Mason III, Devonte’ Graham and Jackson on the perimeter. Mason averaged around 20 points a game, was shooting better from 3-point range than overall and led the Jayhawks in assists to establish himself as a leading candidate for Player of the Year honors. Many saw that as a three-man race between Mason, Villanova’s Josh Hart

and Purdue’s Caleb Swanigan, who was good for a doubledouble almost every night he took the floor. Kansas lost its opener to Indiana and then rattled off 18 consecutive victories - including seven in the Big 12 - before that notable loss at West Virginia. The Mountaineers have now defeated KU four consecutive times at WVU Coliseum, earning coach Bob Huggins a $25,000 bonus each time. Earlier, Huggins became the 10th coach in history to record 800 or more victories. In his career, Huggins has been to 22 NCAA tournaments, including two Final Four appearances. Like Few, he’s still searching for a national championship. But the Mountaineers put themselves in the hunt by scoring close to 29 points per game off turnovers. The Big 12 wasn’t the powerhouse it was in 2016 when Oklahoma advanced to the Final Four but Baylor, scoring almost half its points inside the paint, emerged as the biggest threat to the Kansas streak. Big man Johnathan Motley had one of the great games of the season with 32 points and 20 rebounds against Texas. Looking for surprises? Try UCLA in the Pac-12 and Florida State


in the Atlantic Coast Conference. Dwayne Bacon of the Seminoles should give the NCAA tourney lots of offensive sizzle. On the West Coast, sensational freshman guard Lonzo Ball excited Bruins fans early in the season. He was one of six Bruins, including Bryce Alford and TJ Leaf, scoring more than 10 points a game in coach Steve Alford’s high-octane offense. Even so, Arizona and Oregon both started 7-0 in Pac-12 play and looked like prime time players for March. Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim called Roy Williams one of the best to coach college basketball - “no doubt about it” - after North Carolina defeated the Orange for Williams’ 800th career win. Justin Jackson, Joel Berry II, Isaiah Hicks and Kennedy Meeks could lead the Tar Heels back to the Final Four. Of course, the defending champs from Villanova are thinking in those terms as well. Villanova, led by the superman play of Hart, looked like the best team in the nation again and, once again, the Big East is the place to go for classic showdowns, night after night. Jay Wright’s team slipped at Marquette but the Wildcats are efficient and they are a family. No one in the NCAA field looks forward to playing Philadelphia’s finest. And no one has won back-to-back titles since Florida in 2006 and 2007. In a record-breaking season of milestones and lofty goals, perhaps Villanova will add another chapter to NCAA history. It wouldn’t be perfection, but it would be pretty close. Ken Davis is a freelance writer/author and frequent contributor to Time-Out.


2016-17 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Jeff Jones, President Old Dominion University

Bill Self, First Vice President University of Kansas

Lorenzo Romar, Second Vice President University of Washington

Charlie Brock, Third Vice President Springfield College

Mike Brey, Fourth Vice President University of Notre Dame

Page Moir, 2014-15 Past President

Ron Hunter, 2015-16 Past President Georgia State University

Mark Gottfried, Director North Carolina State University

Gary Stewart, Director Stevenson University

Jamie Dixon, Director TCU

Lennie Acuff, Director University of Alabama in Huntsville

Johnny Dawkins, Director University of Central Florida

John Calipari, Director University of Kentucky

Matt Margenthaler, Director Minnesota State University, Mankato

John Thompson III, Director Georgetown University

Tommy Amaker, Director Harvard University

Pat Cunningham, Director Trinity (TX) University

Bill Coen, Director Northeastern University

Ed Cooley, Director Providence College

Frank Martin, Director University of South Carolina

Matt Painter, Director Purdue University

Gary Waters, Director Cleveland State University

Dave Archer, Director National High School Basketball Coaches' Association-NHSBCA

Bob Burchard, Director Columbia College

Thom McDonald, Director Commissioner, Iowa Community College Athletic Conference

Tom Izzo, Director Emeritus Michigan State University

Ernie Kent, Director Emeritus Washington State University

Phil Martelli, Director Emeritus Saint Joseph’s University


2017 Allstate NABC Good Works Team A Showcase for Volunteerism With another scintillating men’s college basketball season about to culminate with the 2017 NCAA® Men’s Final Four® April 1 and 3 at the University of Phoenix Stadium in Phoenix, there is much to celebrate with all that has been accomplished on and off the court.

“The incredible growth of this program over five years is a great tribute to all of these caring and conscientious student-athletes,” said Jim Haney, NABC executive director. “Thanks to the generosity of Allstate, these terrific stories of good works are being shared across America.”

In its fifth year, the Allstate NABC Good Works Team® program garnered a record 181 nominations from college sports information directors and basketball coaches across the country for a very select group of men’s basketball student-athletes who exhibit exceptional leadership skills and an unwavering commitment to volunteerism.

Allstate assembled a high-profile voting panel to select the members of the 2017 Allstate NABC Good Works Team® including former college basketball student-athletes Grant Hill (Duke University), Clark Kellogg (Ohio State University/CBS Sports) and Len Elmore (University of Maryland/FOX Sports/ESPN); media members Seth Davis (Sports Illustrated/CBS Sports) and Dana O’Neil (ESPN); former head coaches Bobby Cremins (Georgia Tech/College of Charleston) and Seth Greenberg (Virginia Tech); and Thomas Clarkson, president of the west territory for the Allstate Insurance Company.

This partnership between Allstate and the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) was created to recognize this most outstanding group, which has shown dedication to service in their local communities, nationally and globally. From establishing nonprofits that provide youth with the necessary tools to become leaders of tomorrow, to raising awareness around pertinent issues that could save lives, the student-athletes nominated for this prestigious award exhibit leadership skills both on and off the court. NABC

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The student-athletes selected for the 10-member team, five from NCAA® Division I, and five from NCAA Divisions II, III and NAIA Divisions I and II, have been invited by Allstate, an official corporate partner of the NCAA®, to the 2017 NABC Convention and 2017 NCAA Men’s Final Four® in Phoenix,

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where they will participate in a community service project benefitting the city. Through its partnership with the NCAA, title sponsorship of the Allstate® Sugar Bowl®, and the Allstate “Good Hands®” Field Goal Net program, Allstate has become one of the most recognizable sponsors in college sports. Since 2008, Allstate has partnered with the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) as a sponsor of the Allstate AFCA Good Works Team®, which shines a spotlight on the positive, off-the-field impact college football student-athletes have on their communities. This year will also mark the fifth Allstate WBCA Good Works Team®, a partnership between Allstate and the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA) to recognize women’s college basketball studentathletes for their good works off the court and in their communities. NCAA and Final Four are trademarks of the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

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Student Athletes selected to represent NCAA Division I

Steven Cook - Princeton

Steven Cook may be the perfect model for Princeton University’s unofficial motto: “Princeton in the nation’s service and the service of humanity.” Over the last two years, the senior forward and economics major has worked as an independent fundraiser for the Gidel Mother of Mercy Hospital in Sudan, working with the only American physician there to help provide desperately needed resources. In the summer of 2015, Cook served as an intern for the Heartland Alliance in Chicago, helping reorganize business operations at the organization’s largest health clinic for the homeless. In the Princeton community, the two-time All-Ivy League honoree and Academic All-Ivy selection routinely volunteers with the YMCA and other local organizations. His senior thesis is an examination of indicators and interventions that might lead to educational success and advancement in K-12 students in underserved communities, hoping that research may lead to successful programming and policies to help students enroll in college. DePaul senior Billy Garrett, Jr., has enjoyed a great deal of success in his career with the Blue Demons. The senior guard was the 2014 BIG EAST Rookie of the Year, ranks near the top in several career categories, and is a threetime BIG EAST All-Academic selection. All of this is greatly amplified by the fact that he battles Sickle cell disease, a genetic blood disorder with no widely available cure that can cause extreme pain and organ damage. Garrett, with his platform as a standout basketball player, has become an advocate and example for children with the disease that they may accomplish whatever they want to do in life. Before a game at Stanford last season, Garrett met with Mekei, a young boy with Sickle cell who knew Garrett’s story. After talking about basketball and living with the disease, Mekei told his mother that meeting with Garrett was one of the best days of his life.

Billy Garrett, Jr. - DePaul As a two-time All-Big 12 selection and Bob Cousy Award finalist, Monte Morris has made quite an impact in his four seasons at Iowa State. He has participated in various community events, helping children with disabilities in a Miracle League, worked with Wounded Warriors and Special Olympics, and visited hospital patients in Ames. The senior guard has also spoken to local schools about being a Division I athlete and taking care of your academics. But the former Michigan Mr. Basketball also remains devoted to his hometown of Flint. Morris used social media during the city’s recent water crisis, seeking any donations. With the help of local grocery store Hy-Vee, 11 semi-trucks delivered bottled and gallon water on Morris’ behalf. He has spent time talking with foster children, visiting high school athletic teams at his old high school and has worked at Mateen Cleaves’ “One Goal, One Passion” basketball camp.

Monte Morris - Iowa State

Rand Rowland - Georgia Tech

Sabri Thompson - Northwestern State (LA)

When Rand Rowland arrived at Georgia Tech in 2013 as a non-scholarship player, it was quickly apparent that he would do whatever he could to help his team. He has done that and much more in his four seasons, initiating programs to aid and improve the community. He became a leader on the StudentAthlete Advisory Board (SAB) at Tech and in the Atlantic Coast Conference. He was co-founder and chair of the campus Peer-to-Peer Mentor program and led the implementation of the Project Life Movement to increase the potential pool of bone marrow and tissue donors by testing and registering college students with a simple cheek swab. Around the campus and Atlanta, Rowland has helped in an annual toy collection, delivering toys and monetary donations to Atlanta Children’s Shelter, and volunteered at Ronald McDonald House, serving dinner to families staying there while their children were being treated at a local hospital. A top defender and sharpshooter on the basketball court for Northwestern State University of Louisiana, Sabri Thompson is scheduled to graduate Magna Cum Laude this spring with a degree in accounting. He has participated in a number of community events including flood relief and is an active participant in both the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and NCAA Champs/Life Skills program on campus. Thompson traveled on a basketball mission trip to China, playing basketball and teaching bible study. Working with the NABC’s Stay In To Win program, which encourages at-risk middle school students to remain in school, he has shown an uncanny ability to connect with students in seven different schools. Thompson was asked to mentor one young troubled student and quickly established a relationship with him and shared activities including attending some early morning team practices. The young man is now on a solid educational path and acknowledged Thompson’s influence in achieving that goal.


Student Athletes selected to represent NCAA Division II, III and NAIA

North Greenville University sophomore Bryce Allen had been involved in service activities on campus and in his hometown but took his commitment to help others to another level in the summer of 2015. He traveled to the Wade Center, a Christian non-profit organization in Bluefield, W. Va., one of the state’s poorest cities. Over a nine–week period, Allen assisted each Sunday in acclimating and training mission teams from all over the United States coming to help. Children arrived each day at 7 a.m. for breakfast before breaking into three separate age groups for various activities, including sports. Allen instructed the children on a variety of sports including basketball, along with teaching scripture that they could memorize and use daily. Each child would receive lunch and a snack to take home, which often was the only food for them daily. The afternoon sessions mirrored the morning with Allen working with a different age group.

Bryce Allen - North Greenville University As a child, Jeremy Deemer had experienced the works of AmeriCorps, whose goal is to help others and meet the critical needs of a community. Over the summer, the Graceland University junior center was involved with an AmericaCorps summer program in Lamoni, Iowa, home to Graceland, working to provide a positive environment and activities for children ages four-to-eight. Each week was themed, ranging from sports week, cooking week and DIY week, etc. Deemer played an integral part in planning and organizing an intergenerational festival for AmericaCorps to bring all generations together in unity. He is a member of Graceland’s community unity team of ENACTUS (Entrepreneurial Club), which works to unite the Graceland community and the town of Lamoni (pop. 2,300). Deemer helped coordinate one event at the local high school where more than 750 people attended to better inform the town’s citizens about the University community. Over the course of his career, Evan Greening has been a force in the Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference (AMCC), earning newcomer of the year honors as a freshman as well as all-conference recognition as a sophomore and junior. The Eagle Scout is also known for his service on campus and in the community. The senior forward at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford has volunteered for the American Red Cross, donating blood and installing smoke detectors for Bradford citizens; worked in his home community of Fredericksburg, Va., labeling storm drains to prevent dumping of toxic waste in waterways; volunteered for Read Across America, reading to elementary school students; participated in “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” walk to end sexual violence; worked at free basketball clinics for young athletes unable to attend elite (paid) clinics; and performed community service at a local federal correctional institution, playing basketball with inmates. You might call Keith Griffin “dogs’ best friend.” In August of 2015, the Wingate University senior began his own non-profit dog rescue, Griffin K-9 Rescue. Since that time, he has rescued and arranged adoptions for more than 30 dogs to different families across the country. The six-foot-nine center has invested $200 and four hours per day on each dog, bringing them back to health, ensuring that each canine goes to the best home possible so as not to return to a shelter. All of Griffin’s service hasn’t gone to the dogs as he has been active with Habitat for Humanity, the Fellowship of Christian Athletes at Wingate and is a regular participant at reading days for local elementary and middle schools. He has also volunteered with the Boys and Girls Club of Monroe after school program, mentoring and assisting with homework. On the court, Griffin helped his team reach the second round of the 2016 NCAA Division II tournament. When Susquehanna University head coach Frank Marcinek was diagnosed with throat cancer in the fall of 2015, Steven Weidlich knew that he and his team had to take action. Weidlich initiated a program to raise awareness and funds for the Throat Cancer Foundation in support of the Crusaders’ coach. Burgundy/ Ivory bracelets marked “No One Fights Alone” were sold to current students, alumni and staff. With a college career marked with service, Weidlich assists the University’s priest with transportation of patients to and from weekly Mass, which includes picking up patients in their living area. The Crusaders’ captain organized, advertised and administered a canned food drive for the Sunbury Salvation Army and prepared, served and cleaned up for a lunch at Elijah Bowl for the Sunbury Soup Kitchen. He and his teammates read to kindergarten students at a local school and Weidlich was one of three students answering questions for 50 incoming freshman students and their parents in September.

Jeremy Deemer - Graceland University

Evan Greening - Univ. of Pittsburgh (Bradford)

Keith Griffin - Wingate University

Steven Weidlich - Susquehanna University


NABC Division III Coaches To Honor Three For Longevity, Service and Success

Moore

Hixon

Robinson

2017 Outstanding Service Awards

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In five-card poker, your chances of winning are pretty good with three of a kind, especially if those three cards are aces. Three coaches in NCAA Division III, all “Aces”, have shown what three of a kind can do in college basketball, combining for an incredible 2,458 wins and just 828 losses for a winning percentage of 74.8 entering the 2016-17 season*. With a combined 119 years experience and all three still actively coaching, this threesome has averaged 21 wins and seven losses, holding three of the top four highest career victory totals in Division III history. On Saturday, April 1, during the NABC Convention in Phoenix, the remarkable trio of Glenn Robinson of Franklin & Marshall College, Amherst College’s David Hixon and Steve Moore of The College of Wooster will receive the 21st annual Division III outstanding service awards from the National Association of Basketball Coaches. These awards recognize those who have contributed significantly “inside and outside the lines” of coaching as distinguished members of their communities. The NABC is extremely pleased to honor these gentlemen who, throughout their careers, have been outstanding coaches, great teachers, and significant leaders in their communities. They have done a terrific job in communicating strategies and techniques to their respective teams, distinguished themselves as wonderful role models to their players and associates, and embody the spirit of coaching.

Glenn Robinson, in his 46th season coaching the Diplomats, ranks first in Division III and fourth all-time in games won in all divisions of NCAA college coaching with 912 victories and 333 losses (.733). He ranks third among active coaches behind Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski and Herb Magee of Philadelphia University. Joining the F&M basketball program in 1968, a year after graduating from West Chester University where he was a collegiate standout in baseball and basketball, Robinson served as an assistant to Chuck Taylor before being named head coach in 1971. He became the second coach in Division III to coach in 1,000 games in 2008-09. The Diplomats have reached the NCAA Division III tournament 24 times, including semifinal berths five times (1979, 1991, 1996, 2000 and 2005). Robinson has earned national coach of the year awards in 1991 from the Basketball Times and in 2009 from D3Hoops.com. Inducted into several halls of fame, he was one of 12 members of the Class of 2013 for the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame, a class that recognized those whose achievements brought lasting fame and recognition to the State of Pennsylvania. F&M teams have won 18 conference championships under Robinson, whose greatest legacy may be off the court as all but three players who have earned a varsity letter have earned a degree.

*All records and totals do not include the 2016-17 season

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Over the last 23 seasons, David Hixon has positioned Amherst on the national stage for Division III basketball programs, winning at least 20 games in all but four seasons. His teams have reached the NCAA Division III tournament 18 times, including 10 trips to the national quarterfinals.

Steve Moore’s tenure is the shortest of this trio but his body of work has the same spectacular results. Now in his 30th season as head coach at Wooster following six seasons at Muhlenberg, Moore ranks third in all-time wins for Division III coaches with a 779-224 record, a winning percentage of .777.

Amherst has earned seven spots in the semifinals of the Division III championship, winning the national championship in 2006-07 and 2012-13. Hixon’s team lost in the NCAA title game in 2013-14.

Moore has directed the Fighting Scots to 24 NCAA tournament berths, a league-leading 17 North Coast Athletic Conference titles and a superb 692-159 won-lost record (.813).

A two-time NABC national coach of the year and a three-time NABC Northeast district coach of the year, Hixon has guided his alma mater to an overall record of 767 wins and 271 losses. His career victory total ranks third among all Division III coaches and 22nd among coaches in all divisions while his .739 winning percentage is the fifth highest in Division III men’s basketball history.

Wooster, which has won 25 or more games 11 times over the last 18 seasons, won a team record 31 games in 201011 and reached the NCAA Division III national championship game. The Scots had another 30-win season in 2002-03, reaching the NCAA semifinals, which Wooster did again in the 2006-07 season.

Amherst has also enjoyed significant success in the New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC), winning a record seven conference championships and also became the first program to win three straight titles from 2012-14. Hixon has been active with the NABC as a member of the Division III All-America Committee for many years, including serving as the current chairman. He was the recipient of the NABC Guardians of the Game Award for leadership in 2013.

Moore has earned NCAC coach of the year honors eight times and has been the NABC district coach of the year five times. He was selected as the Ohio College Basketball Coach of the Year by the Columbus Dispatch following the 2002-03 season. Moore serves on the NABC Division III Congress, has been a member of the NABC ethics committee and the NCAA rules committee. He was the recipient of the NABC Guardians of the Game Award for Education in 2008 and has participated in the NABC Dream to Read program in local elementary schools. The Wittenberg University graduate leads several Wooster charitable initiatives each year, including Coaches vs. Cancer fundraisers, basketball clinics for local youth and encourages fans to donate food and clothing in lieu of admission at Wooster’s two annual tournaments, benefitting People-to-People ministry and Goodwill Industries.

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As you and your athletes enjoy watching the passion and incredible plays of the NCAA championship basketball, remind them that more than 1,100 colleges and universities in three divisions participate in NCAA sports. While NCAA schools differ in size, location and profile, they share one focus. . . If your athletes are looking to play basketball at the Division I or II level, they need to be certified by the NCAA Eligibility Center. As coaches, you play an important part in helping spread the word about what students must do to meet the NCAA standards. We need your help in emphasizing that from the beginning of ninth grade, courses and grades are more important than ever. The NCAA Eligibility Center is now offering two registration paths at eligibiltycenter.org, giving high school athletes the opportunity to make the best decision about their college choices earlier in their high school careers. Students may now sign up for a traditional certification account for Division I and II schools, or a free profile page for those attending Division III schools and students who are not yet sure where they want to compete. Remember this simple formula for initial eligibility: 4x4=16. If your high school students complete four (4) English courses (one per year), four (4) math courses, four (4) science courses and four (4) social science courses, with the required core course grade point average, they should meet the Division I requirement for 16 core courses. Any summer school classes taken through nontraditional programs must be approved by the NCAA to count toward the 16 core-course requirement.

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. . .THE ACADEMIC SUCCESS OF THEIR STUDENT-ATHLETES.

Your student-athletes have a special opportunity in high school to earn the grades and test scores they need to realize their dreams to study and compete at an NCAA school.

Below is a checklist that will help your students as they go through the NCAA registration and certification process. Grade 9 • Students should ask their counselor for a list of your high school’s NCAA core courses to make sure they are taking the right classes. Grade 10 • Students should register with the NCAA Eligibility Center at www.EligibilityCenter.org. Grade 11 • Students should again check with their counselor to make sure they will graduate on time with the required number of NCAA core courses. • They should take the ACT or SAT and submit scores to the NCAA using code 9999. • At the end of the year, they should ask their counselor to upload official transcripts to the NCAA Eligibility Center. Grade 12 • Study hard and finish their last NCAA core courses. • They can take the ACT or SAT again, if necessary, and submit scores to the NCAA using code 9999. • Complete all academic and amateurism questions in your NCAA Eligibility Center account at www.EligibilityCenter.org. • After they graduate, ask their counselor to upload the final official transcript with proof of graduation to the NCAA Eligibility Center.

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school and ensure those players are meeting the school, the district and state eligibility requirements. These scholastic coaches have to work to incorporate their basketball programs into the culture of the school and community. In many cases they have to cooperate with other sports’ coaches at the school to allow players to participate in multiple sports and after school activities.

Scholastic Coaches Have a Comprehensive Role With Players Greg Grantham, NHSBCA Board Member & Executive Director, North Carolina Basketball Coaches Association Dave Archer, Director of Operations, NHSBCA & Executive Director Basketball Coaches Association of NY

Over the past 10 years, a disturbing trend has surfaced in There are many levels of basketball coaches in our nation from those who coach in the professional leagues to those who work with Kindergarten kids. Currently those coaches who work with school aged players seem to fall into two categories: those who coach in schools, (education based programs) and those who coach for AAU, community, church, club, travel, and for-profit organizations (non-education based programs.) In today’ s society there seems to be confusion at times as to what roles coaches in these categories have in regard to the young people they work with. Unfortunately, at times there can be a tug-of-war over a young person’s time and commitment. This article is not meant to disparage either group, but to simply delineate the difference between the two types of coaches. We will operate on the assumption and the hope that all coaches, regardless of the type of league or level of team they coach, care about their players and want to help them. Scholastic coaches are educational-based coaches that in most states are bound by strict eligibility rules and guidelines that limit much of what they are allowed to do with and for their players. Most state associations prohibit blatant recruiting of athletes; require student-athletes to meet certain academic, attendance and residence requirements; have both student-athlete and coach’s codes of conduct that expressly prohibit certain actions; and in many states the actual amount of time scholastic coaches can spend working with players out of season is limited. Scholastic coaches have to monitor their players’ grades, their attendance, monitor their behavior at

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Scholastic coaches understand that the athletic experience is an extension of the educational day and that the goal is to help players become their best -- the best student, best teammate, best husband/father and best member of society they can become. This means enforcing team rules and disciplining players when they fail to comply with those rules. In other words, holding the players accountable- accountable to their teammates, to their school and academic requirements, and to their community. As a result of the differences in the goals of nonscholastic basketball programs, many players are being held less accountable each year. A coach whose sponsorship contract is dependent upon constant success and attracting the top players to that program can’t afford to refuse to suit up a top player at a major tournament. A skill trainer whose income is dependent upon the number of players he is training can’t afford to be too brutally honest about players’ ability levels for fear of running off clients. There is no great motivation for either of these non-scholastic coaches to be greatly concerned about a player’s grades, school attendance or conduct in school. It’s no fault of theirs, it is simply a consequence of the market they are in. Education-based coaches need to understand and embrace that your role is different than that of noneducation based coaches. Scholastic coaches must still be in the business of teaching what it means to be a good teammate. Teaching life lessons about dealing with adversity, putting others above self for a common goal, and sacrificing for some entity bigger than self. This requires implementing discipline and tough love in some cases. The result is the development of character qualities that go far beyond basketball-related skills. As coaches, we are competitors, we want to be the best and take on all challengers. However, scholastic coaches need to accept that your role is more important than just winning tournaments and producing Division I caliber players. Embrace the differences between the roles, invest deeply in the lives of your players and make the most of your opportunities to produce citizens that will improve our society. About NHSBCA The National High School Basketball Coaches Association is an organization uniting the 30-plus states that have State Basketball Coaches Associations to work for the betterment of the game. The NHSBCA also serves as the High School Congress within the NABC. The NHSBCA is the national voice for high school basketball coaches, working to foster high standards of professionalism and to support coaches.

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A Coach’s Voice by Carey Casey, CEO, National Center for Fathering

When I played football in high school, I returned punts and kickoffs. I can vividly remember a few times when our team was behind or it was a close game, and our coach instilled great confidence in me through his words. As I stood there waiting to return a punt or a kick-off, despite all the other noise going on, my coach’s voice stood out. He would say, “We need one, Carey. Run it back for us. You can do it.” Of course, I didn’t need to be told why I was out there. But for some reason, hearing the voice of someone who had earned so much of my respect gave me great confidence. I focused even more and dug a little deeper. I would do everything in my power to help the team win. As you seek to shape the players on your team and help them be all they can be on the court and off, your voice is a powerful tool. Voices of strength and character are so needed in our world today. Whenever I hear about horrible tragedies where young people go off the rails and hurt others or destroy property, I always wonder, “Whose voices were they listening to?” “Did they have men of character speaking truth into their lives?” I really believe that if the fathers and father figures in their community had been doing their job, the tragedies wouldn’t have happened.

As coaches, we can’t escape the fact that we’re role models. We have the power and the responsibility to shape young people. We show them how to carry themselves and stand up for what’s right. We coach them about self-discipline and self-control, and model strong character. And yes, we speak words of encouragement and direction into their lives. It’s likely that your practices are all about repeating fundamentals and rehearsing game scenarios. You hope that, when your players get into intense game situations, they hear your voice echoing in their two-and-a-half-pound sponges, their brains. Or even better, you hope they play smart basketball by instinct, without even really thinking about it. But if there’s any doubt about what to do next, you want them to have lots of your words in their heads to help them. And just like my coach, you’re there with short reminders from the sideline and during time-outs. I hope you have similar goals with them off the court. So many young people need direction and leadership. Wouldn’t it be fantastic if your players had some of your words in their heads as they deal with difficult situations and make decisions about how to act? Because they’ve heard and watched you, they can say, “This is how Coach would respond right now,” or, “No, Coach warned me about that. That’s not how we roll.” Of all the messages you convey to your players, here are three positive messages to include:

There’s no room for shrinking back from a challenge or making excuses. They need to show their strength—not to be haughty or domineering, but to be effective in their roles. It takes strength to sacrifice their own desires for the greater good or the needs of others. Be courageous. Even when they might feel overmatched or defeated, they should be confident in who they are. It takes courage to step out and take a chance, but often that’s what it takes to win a championship. People who become great in life are the ones who overcome their fears and weaknesses and learn to take appropriate risks. Do the work. Too many in our society are looking for the easy road, but you know that success requires a lot of dedication and effort. No one just shows up on game day and expects to win; those who do win rely on months of preparation to help them succeed when the time comes. If your players can learn the value of hard work, you will have given them a great gift for life. Use your voice to speak into your players’ lives, coach. It can make a huge difference for your team and for each individual, for years to come. Carey Casey is CEO at the National Center for Fathering (NCF) and author of Championship Fathering. He is married with four children and nine grandchildren. The vision of NCF is to have an actively engaged father or father figure in the life of every child. See more articles and resources for dad at www.Fathers.com or contact NCF at Dads@Fathers.com.

Be strong. You want players—and people—who are strong physically, mentally, and spiritually.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the NABC.

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ANCHORS Life’s roughest storms prove the strength of our anchors.

Donnell Jones Pastor, Grace Covenant Church DC www.GraceCovDC.org

All of us need anchors; people or things we rely on for support, stability or security.  I have four primary anchors in my life. I think of them like the major stores in a shopping mall.  In a mall, there are all kinds of stores.  Starbucks, Footlocker, and Claire’s are just a few.  In addition, there are larger stores that anchor the mall like Macy’s, Nordstrom, and Target among other major anchor stores.  Anchor stores utilize 60-80% of the square footage of the mall. If Starbucks or Footlocker go out of business, the mall continues without interruption.  However, if Macy’s and Nordstrom go out of business, the mall is not sustainable. Anchor stores sustain the mall, generate more revenue and attract customers to themselves and minor stores.  Similar to the mall, our lives have four primary anchors including faith, family, friends and fitness. Together these anchors sustain us and everything else in our lives.  Each anchor is essential to maintain life well.  Faith is the anchor that maintains our life spiritually. “A life without God is like a boat without an anchor.” Billy Graham. The greatest X & O strategy of human history was executed by God himself.  He turned the X up on a single edge and died on the cross. The O is the empty tomb from which he rose from the dead three days later. Today he is neither on the cross nor in the tomb. He ascended to heaven and is seated on the throne. We are encouraged to come to him to receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need. Our greatest need is to engage with God at the throne regularly. 

Family is the anchor that maintains our life relationally and emotionally.  Making the most of family moments creates a healthy, secure place for parents and children. Emotional and relational health affect us deeply. Our future is shaped individually and collectively by family.  A healthy family is an extraordinary anchor.  A healthy family strengthens and preserves us in challenging moments. Family is an anchor we all need.  In addition to or in absence of natural family, ask God to give you spiritual family in a community of faith.  Friends are another anchor that maintain our life relationally and emotionally. Friends can be thought of in at least three ways. There are friends who lead us, friends who lead with us and friends we lead.  All of these friends are equally important. Friends who lead us pour into our lives. They provide wisdom and counsel about major and minor decisions. Friends who lead with us are peers of mutual influence and inspiration.  They encourage us as much as we encourage them. Typically we share the same season or place in life. Friends we lead receive wisdom and counsel from us. We pour into them as they look to us to lead them in some helpful way. Fitness is the anchor that maintains our life physically.  Fitness reduces stress, increases strength, and provides a context for discipline that benefits the total person. Walking, biking, training among other activities are just a few ways to be fit.  Our diet is an important part of fitness. When we are unfit physically, we usually end up working harder in other areas of life.  Take a close look at your life. Do you have these four primary anchors in your life? If not, begin to develop them. Without them, everything else is non-sustainable. With them, you will be greatly strengthened even in the storm.

Pastor Donnell Jones is pastor of Grace Covenant Church in Washington, D.C., Character Coach for the Maryland Terrapins and Chaplain of the NABC.

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WE ARE PHX SPECIAL PRICING AT:

BOOKER | 1

HARDEN | 13

SUNS.COM/NABC

Join the Coyotes on 3/31 to Celebrate Pat Tillman’s Legacy On Friday, March 31, celebrate March Madness Eve at Gila River Arena. The Arizona Coyotes will take on the Washington Capitals on Pat Tillman Night, honoring the legacy of one of the most celebrated college athletes in Arizona’s history.

NABC OFFER:

Upper Level: $32 (20% off) Lower Level: $76 (20% off) FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO ORDER YOUR TICKETS: ArizonaCoyotes.com/finalfour - Offer Code: FINAL4 or call 480-563-PUCK (7825)


PRELIMINARY 2017 CONVENTION SCHEDULE Thursday, March 30 10:00 am 11:30 am 12:15 pm 1:30 pm 3:00 pm 4:00 pm 5:00 pm 7:00 pm

Convention Registration MARKETPLACE & Locker Room Hospitality PDS X&O Clinic PDS Personal Clinic PDS X&O Clinic PDS Personal Clinic Mid-American Conference Meeting NAIA Executive Committee Meeting USA Basketball Certification Clinic ** PDS X&O Clinic Summit League Meeting Assistant Coaches Committee Meeting USA Basketball Certification Clinic ** Nike - NABC Welcome Reception

Friday, March 31 8:30 am 9:00 am 10:00 am 10:30 am 11:30 am 12:45 pm 1:30 pm 2:15 pm 2:30 pm 3:00 pm 3:30 pm 4:00 pm 4:30 pm 5:30 pm NABC

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Division I Congress Meeting (NEW TIME) Division II All – America Committee Meeting Division III All – America Committee Meeting NAIA Coaches’ Meeting Convention Registration MARKETPLACE & Locker Room Hospitality Academics Committee Meeting PDS X&O Clinic PDS Personal Clinic NHSBCA Meeting Assistant Coaches Meeting Hillyard NABC Champions Luncheon (NEW TIME) PDS Personal Clinic NABC Ministry Team Coaches Forum PDS X&O Clinic General Membership Meeting PDS X&O Clinic PDS Ethics Clinic Division I Coaches Meeting (NEW TIME) Division II Coaches Meeting Division III Congress Meeting Junior College Coaches Meeting Research Committee Meeting PDS Personal Clinic NABC Reese’s College All-Star Game PDS X&O Clinic Asian Coaches Meeting FCA Coaches Dinner (NEW TIME)

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Saturday, April 1 8:30 am 9:00 am 9:15 am 10:00 am 11:00 am 3:09 pm

Division II Congress Meeting High School Coaches – Rules/Roundtable Discussion PDS Personal Clinic PDS Personal Clinic NABC Foundation Meeting (NEW TIME) MARKETPLACE & Locker Room Hospitality Division III Coaches Meeting Maui Invitational Meeting NABC Alumni Reception (NEW TIME) PDS Ethics Clinic PDS Personal Clinic High School Coaches Meeting PDS X&O Clinic PDS Coaching Clinic NCAA Semi-Final Games

Sunday, April 2 8:00 am 10:00 am 12:00 pm 1:00 pm 2:00 pm 3:00 pm 4:00 pm TBD

Big Ten Conference Meeting Ministry Team Worship Service Catholic Mass PDS X&O Clinic PDS Personal Clinic PDS Ethics Clinic USA Basketball Certification Clinic ** International Coaches Forum PDS X&O Clinic PDS Personal Clinic USA Basketball Certification Clinic ** PDS X&O Clinic NABC Guardians of the Game Awards Show & Reception

Monday, April 3 8:30 am 9:30 am 10:30 am 11:30 am 6:18 pm

PDS Personal Clinic PDS X&O Clinic PDS X&O Clinic PDS Personal Clinic NCAA Championship Game

* Meetings Pending 1/27/17 ** Registration with USA Basketball required

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