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Phil Martelli

Celebrating a Decade of Service as Chair of the Coaches vs. Cancer Council

THE OFFICIAL NEWS MAGAZINE OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BASKETBALL COACHES


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THE OFFICIAL NEWS MAGAZINE OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BASKETBALL COACHES

2018

COLUMNS

FEATURES

From the Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Saint Joseph Would Be Proud Of This Coaching Duo Rick Leddy

NABC Code of Ethics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

From the Executive Director. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Commission on College Basketball Recommendations Moving to NCAA Legislative Actions Jim Haney NABC Chaplain’s Corner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Win The Men Pastor Donnell Jones

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National High School Basketball Coaches Association. . . . . . . 18 Productive NHSBCA Annual Summer Meeting Held in Raleigh, NC Greg Grantham

Phil Martelli: Celebrating a Decade of Service as Chair of the Coaches vs. Cancer Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 13

Coaches Play Key Role in College Basketball Reforms. . . . . . . Eric Wieberg FDU’s Greg Herenda Survives Life-Threatening Scare at 2018 NABC Convention in San Antonio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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NABC Coach’s Clinic Mastering Offensive And Defensive Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Tony Bennett, Head Coach, University of Virginia

NCAA Eligibility Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Time To Register Championship Fathering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Be One Another’s Greatest Fans Carey Casey

National Association of Basketball Coaches 1111 Main Street, Suite 1000 Kansas City, Missouri 64105 Phone: 816-878-6222 • Fax: 816-878-6223 www.NABC.org ______________________________________________ NABC EXECUTIVE STAFF Jim Haney Executive Director Reggie Minton Deputy Executive Director Carol Haney Senior Director of Internal Affairs Troy Hilton Senior Director of Corporate Relations and Association Affairs Stephanie Whitcher Chief Financial Officer Rick Leddy Senior Director of Communications Rose Tate Director of Membership Ebony Donohue Associate Director of Membership Mark Heatherman Senior Director of Special Events Janelle Guidry Director of Convention Wade Hageman Director of Corporate Relations Jenna Wright Director of Convention Housing Eric Wieberg Director of Digital & Social Media

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2018-19 NABC BOARD OF DIRECTORS Charlie Brock, President, Springfield College Mike Brey, 1st Vice President, University of Notre Dame Jamie Dixon, 2nd Vice President, TCU Gary Stewart, 3rd Vice President, Stevenson University Johnny Dawkins, 4th Vice President, University of Central Florida Lennie Acuff, Director, University of Alabama in Huntsville John Calipari, Director, University of Kentucky Matt Margenthaler, Director, Minnesota State University Tommy Amaker, Director, Harvard University Pat Cunningham, Director, Trinity [TX] University Bill Coen, Director, Northeastern University Frank Martin, Director, University of South Carolina Matt Painter, Director, Purdue University Bob Huggins, West Virginia University Cuonzo Martin, University of Missouri Bill Self, 2017-18 Past President, University of Kansas Jeff Jones, 2016-17 Past President, Old Dominion University Tom Izzo, Director Emeritus, Michigan State University Phil Martelli, Director Emeritus, Saint Joseph’s University Ernie Kent, Director Emeritus, Washington State University Bob Burchard, Director, Columbia College Dave Archer, Director, National High School Basketball Coaches Association Thom McDonald, Director, National Junior College Athletic Association

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS NABC Executive Director: Jim Haney NABC Deputy Executive Director: Reggie Minton CPA: Brian Welch, Welch & Associates, LLC NABC General Counsel: Dennis Coleman, Ropes & Gray, LLP (Boston, MA) Board Secretary: Rick Leddy, NABC Senior Director of Communications Dan Gavitt, NCAA Senior Vice President of Basketball Dan Guerrero, Director of Athletics, UCLA Jeff Hathaway, Chair, NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Oversight Committee Kevin Lennon, NCAA Vice President for Division I Governance COVER: Saint Joseph’s University head coach Phil Martelli (photo courtesy of Saint Joseph’s University athletics) PHOTO CREDITS: Pages 11-13 (Courtesy of Saint Joseph’s University Athletics); pages 16-17 (Courtesy of Greg Herenda, Fairleigh Dickinson University); pages 21 (Courtesy of the University of Virginia Athletics). Time-Out is published quarterly by the National Association of Basketball Coaches. Printed by Allen Press.

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OTIS BIRDSONG

DANNY MILES

MARVIN WEBSTER

SEAN ELLIOTT

SIDNEY MONCRIEF

PAUL WESTPHAL

JOHN KRESSE

SAM PERKINS

HOUSTON

ARIZONA

CHARLESTON

OREGON TECH

ARKANSAS

MORGAN STATE

USC

NORTH CAROLINA

CLASS OF 2018 INDUCTION CELEBRATION NOVEMBER 18 | KANSAS CITY, MO PRESENTED BY


FROM THE EDITOR, Rick Leddy

Saint Joseph Would Be Proud Of This Coaching Duo You don’t have to spend very much time with Phil Martelli to witness the passion of the Saint Joseph’s University head coach. He’s passionate about his family, his faith, his university, his team and men’s college basketball. In this issue of Time-Out, you will also learn how passionate Martelli is about crushing cancer, having served the last decade as chair of the Coaches vs. Cancer Council. As a co-chair of the Philadelphia Coaches vs. Cancer program with Temple’s Fran Dunphy since 1999, they formed the Philly Six CvC group and have raised over $14 million for cancer research. That passion, dedication and willingness to serve has also been a great benefit to the NABC and men’s college basketball. A long-time member of the NABC Board of Directors, Martelli was the NABC president in 2014 and has remained active as an emeritus board member. He has been an instrumental voice over the last few years as a member of numerous committees within the NABC and NCAA for the good of the game. Martelli has tirelessly committed his time and offered insight to the NCAA Transfer Working Group, the NABC Committee regarding the Commission on College Basketball, the NABC Ad Hoc Committee for Seeding, Selection and Bracketing for the NCAA Tournament and the NCAA Men’s Basketball Oversight Committee. In 2013, the NABC Foundation, Inc., created a Benevolent Fund, intended to provide financial and other assistance to members of the NABC who suffer severe economic or emotional strain due to various circumstances, including job loss. To be eligible for assistance from this Coaches Helping Coaches group, the individual must be a current member of the NABC in need of assistance due to job loss, serious illness, death of a family member, disaster or other similar circumstances. Martelli is one of five Benevolent Fund committee members who review applications to assist coaches who meet the qualifications and receive a disbursement of funds from the NABC Foundation. To date, the Benevolent Fund has assisted close to 40 NABC member coaches.

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“When you see what some of our member coaches are up against and read their stories, you not only realize how fortunate you are but how much these applicants genuinely need our help. It’s heart-wrenching,” said Martelli. Any members who wish to make an application for assistance or wish to donate to the Benevolent Fund, may obtain information at http://www.nabcfoundation. org/benevolent-fund/. Transitioning to another Saint Joseph reference, it’s great to see Hall of Fame coach Jim Calhoun back on the court as the University of Saint Joseph (West Hartford, CT) begins its first season of men’s basketball this fall. Calhoun signed a three-year contract with the Division III startup program, which recently admitted men for the first time. The 76-year old was energized in television interviews about being back on the court and working with his players. Calhoun, whose Huskies won three NCAA championships, will be assisted by long-time UConn assistant Glen Miller as director of operations for the Blue Jays. Other highlights in this issue: Fairleigh Dickinson University head coach Greg Herenda’s life-threatening experience while attending the 2018 NABC Convention and NCAA Men’s Final Four in San Antonio. NABC Director of Digital and Social Media Eric Wieberg provides a perspective on the results and implementation of the recommendations from the Commission on College Basketball and the role NABC coaches played in the process, which is still ongoing. Tony Bennett, the 2018 NABC Coach of the Year from the University of Virginia, has provided a clinic article on Mastering Offensive and Defensive Fundamentals. Those were certainly working last season when Bennett guided the Cavaliers to a 31-3 won-lost record. Finally, best wishes to all of our NABC member coaches for health and success in the upcoming 2018-19 season!

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FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, Jim Haney

Commission on College Basketball Recommendations Moving to NCAA Legislative Actions

Men’s college basketball has the been the focus of much discussion and change based on the work of the Commission on College Basketball and the recent adoption of NCAA legislation to activate the Commission’s recommendations. If you were asked to identify the biggest challenge facing the NABC when the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) announced its indictments back in late September 2017, how would you answer? In the aftermath of the DOJ press conference, men’s college basketball and the coaching profession were branded as the problem. Every coach was either involved in illegal recruiting or was aware of cheating and did nothing about it.  Media and others speculated that the four assistant coaches indicted were just the tip of the iceberg.  There was a huge black cloud over the game.  Some corporate sponsors distanced themselves from being associated with our game.  An independent commission was named to investigate the game and make sweeping changes to rid the game of the cancer before the patient became terminal. The NABC Board of Directors named an Ad Hoc Committee on Men’s Basketball.  Fifteen (15) coaches representing the breadth of DI basketball began a series of discussions on how to respond and assist in having a voice in

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the changes to come. The top priority became turning the perception that coaches and the coaching profession were the problem to be BEING PART of the solution! Because coaches are the consistent face of the game, if we could be seen as part of the solution, the game would benefit as well. This was the biggest challenge!

In the Commission report of its recommendations in April, there is a section titled “NABC RECOMMENDATIONS”. What was your reaction when you read that listing? We are keenly aware a number of organizations were asked to meet with the Commission as well as many provided written documents that included recommendations.  However, the NABC was the only one the Commission recognized in its report.  That recognition in the report and the media reports leading up to the Commission report pointed to the influence the NABC had on the Commission’s recommendations.  We had changed the perception from coaches being the problem to coaches being part of the solution! 

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Coaches have been quoted in the media as not being pleased with some of the outcomes of the Commission. Does this surprise you?  Does it disappoint you? There are 351 DI head coaches.  The natural perspective when considering change impacting our lives is considering how does it impact me, my life and my career.  The Ad Hoc Committee and NABC Board had to consider what is critical to the good of the game and profession as a whole.  They each had to shed the perspective of what is best for me and my program. Am I surprised with some negative reaction?  No, we expected it.  I expected it as executive director.  It’s not possible to keep 351 coaches happy in response to significant changes to our game.

There has been great disappointment among coaches over the fact that the two non-coaching staff members were not approved to coach. What can you share about this initiative? The Ad Hoc Committee recognized that the pipeline to fill fulltime assistant coach positions the past 15 years has come increasingly from non-scholastic, grassroots basketball.  Many of those hires were for recruiting prospective student-athletes.  There is a recognition that we need to do a better job preparing entry level staff and assistant coaches to become head coaches 10, 15 and 20 years from now.  The NABC has a significant role but so do head coaches have an important role in mentoring and building future coaches.   The Commission “endorsed” the NABC recommendations in its report.  The Commission “recommended” other proposals in its report.  The NCAA Council overwhelmingly voted to support all of the Commission’s recommendations.

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However, the “endorsed” NABC recommendations were targeted by the Council as open to opposition. Two of the three NABC proposals failed to receive Council support including the two noncoaching staff members allowed to coach. There is encouraging news however.  The NCAA Board of Directors did acknowledge the need to develop coaches and asked the Men’s Basketball Oversight Committee (MBOC) and the Council to come back with recommendations that would accomplish that goal. The MBOC will be meeting soon to begin consideration of how to develop the next generation of full-time assistants and head coaches.  The proposal will not be authored by the NABC.  There are some administrators who believe that the NABC name on the proposals by the Commission worked against their approval by the Council believing there continues to be distrust of coaches.

Any final thoughts? Change is coming is coming to recruiting in April, June and July. It will be different and we, as coaches, will need to adjust and make it work.

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WIN THE MEN

Donnell Jones Pastor, Grace Covenant Church DC www.GraceCovDC.org The athletic arena is one of competitive fervor. Endurance, hard work and toughness; this is the oxygen of athletes.  The air gets thin going from high school to the collegiate ranks.  It’s not easy to breathe at this elevation.  The heart pounds, the quads burn and sweat drops thick.  These are the symptoms of the pursuit of greatness.  It’s hard to make the transition.  A freshman student athlete once said, “the warm up in college makes the high school work out seem like a walk.”   It’s like the treadmill gets pushed from 4.0 to 10.0.  It takes a moment to catch your breath.  This is athletics at the next level. At this level, winning is everything.  The fact that coaches have the pressure of winning games in order to keep their jobs places the emphasis on a team’s record.  This is not to suggest that coaches do not care for our young men.  It simply means that often importance on winning games is placed ahead of winning men. Athletes are coached to win games.  There is something spectacular about winning; the level of play, the roar of the crowd, the competition, the energy, the passion, and so much more.  Winning can mean a selection to the NCAA tournament.  Winning can result in money for the university. The pursuit of greatness however is much more.  We must resolve that true greatness is more than a game-winning buzzer-beater shot.  True greatness is more than ensuring that our student athletes beat the negative statistics of drop out, unemployment and crime. True greatness is making sure we give the time and attention necessary to train young men to come to a new level of life off the court while coming to a new level of play on the court.

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It is clear in our culture that the need to win men is greater now more than ever. Coaches are not paid to win men.  They are paid to win games.  So the end goal is winning games.  The means are young men. Even so, many lives are changed in great ways.  However, imagine a culture where winning men is the end goal and the game is the means. The effect would be transformational on a grand scale.  This would result in a societal shift beyond basketball.  The athletic arena is full of young men with enormous potential on and off the court.  If we would give ourselves to training them just as well off the court as we do on the court, we would produce a generation filled with wisdom, humility, patience and self-control. True greatness is equipping young men with the kind of character that influences them, not just during the 4 years of college, but shapes them for the next 40 years of life.  True greatness is coaching them to be great men not just great athletes; the kind that will be faithful and loving husbands and encouraging fathers.  True greatness is coaching men to be servant leaders; the kind who prefer others above themselves. True greatness is coaching men to honor women with the utmost respect.   Making the transition into this kind of man is not easy.  One must learn to live at this elevation. The air is thin.  The heart pounds.  It takes a moment to catch your breath, but this is the oxygen of young men of great character.   May we passionately win men and win games.  This is the pursuit of greatness.  Pastor Donnell Jones is pastor of Grace Covenant Church in Washington, D.C., Character Coach for the Maryland Terrapins and Chaplain of the NABC.

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CODE OF ETHICS Updated 2018

Preliminary Statement

Principles

The National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) established its original Code of Ethics in 1987 to serve the following functions: allowing basketball coaches to maintain autonomy and establish guidelines for the protection of coaching; furthering the development of basketball coaching as a profession; ensuring that coaching will be carried out with the highest possible standards; informing member coaches of acceptable behavior in order to provide self-regulation of conduct; and reassuring the public that basketball coaches are deserving of public trust, confidence and support.

Coaches are accountable to the highest standard of honesty and integrity.

As the basketball landscape has evolved in the years since, so too has the visibility and influence of coaches. The conduct of coaches increasingly has the ability not only to shape the overall reputation of the profession, but of the game itself. The incentives to win at all costs have also never been higher and will only continue to grow. Now more than ever, it is imperative that coaches at every level of the game reaffirm a commitment to ethical and lawful conduct. The internal and external standing of our profession and the health of our game are at stake.

Coaches observe the letter and intent of the rules of the sport and insist that student-athletes and staff under their direction do the same.

Preamble The Code of Ethics of the basketball coaching profession sets forth the principles and standards of basketball coaching and represents the aspirations of all members of the NABC. Ethics are defined as principles for right action. These principles are not laws, but standards and are intended to guide basketball coaches individually and collectively in maintaining the highest professional level of ethical conduct.

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Coaches treat all persons with dignity and respect, providing a model of fair play and sportsmanship. Coaches act in full accordance with applicable all local, state and federal laws, and insist that student-athletes and staff under their direction do the same. Coaches act in full accordance with all applicable institutional, conference and national governing body rules and insist that student-athletes and staff under their direction do the same.

Coaches accurately represent the competence, training and experience of themselves and their colleagues. Coaches honor all professional relationships with student-athletes, colleagues, officials, media and the public. They avoid conflicts of interest and exploitation of those relationships, especially by outside parties. Coaches have an obligation to respect the confidentiality of information obtained from persons in the course of their work. Coaches carry out all obligations of employment contracts, unless released from those obligations by mutual agreement. When considering interruption or termination of service, appropriate notice is given.

Implementation

Coaches recognize the value of an education, and establish an environment within their programs that prioritizes academic success and aligns with the educational mission of their institutions.

The Code of Ethics will be provided to new members of the NABC during the membership application process. Additionally, the Code of Ethics will be re-distributed annually to all active members of the NABC.

Coaches have a primary concern for the health, safety and personal welfare of each student-athlete.

Enforcement

Coaches serve as advocates for diversity at their institutions and avoid any and all actions that may violate the civil rights of others. Coaches are responsible for assisting student-athletes in acquiring the necessary knowledge and skills of basketball, as well as promoting desirable personal and social traits in student-athletes under their direction.

The coaches of the colleges, universities, high schools and other institutions that are members of the NABC are also members of various governing bodies (NCAA, NAIA, NJCAA, NHSBCA, etc.). The enforcement of a violation of the Code of Ethics will be executed by the rules, regulations and procedures of the governing bodies.

Coaches perform their duties on the basis of careful preparation, ensuring that their instruction is current and accurate. They use practices for which they are qualified and continually acquire new knowledge and skills.

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Phil Martelli

Celebrating a Decade of Service as Chair of the Coaches vs. Cancer Council

Coach Martelli has spent over a decade as chair of Coaches vs. Cancer, helping to raise over $115 million for the American Cancer Society.

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Saint Joseph’s University coach Phil Martelli often says that the three most important things in his life are his family, his team, and the fight against cancer. An ardent supporter of the American Cancer Society, Martelli spent a decade serving as chair of the Coaches vs. Cancer Council, a role he was passionate about as he shared his desire to crush cancer and recruit others in the basketball community to join the fight to save lives from cancer. He stepped down from that role earlier this Fall, turning over the duties to University of Oklahoma coach Lon Kruger, also an enthusiastic and generous supporter. “Coach Martelli has such a passion for crushing cancer and helped grow our program in so many important ways,” said Reggie Minton, NABC deputy executive director. “We are grateful to him for leading us in recent years and we’re fortunate he’s going to stay an active member of the Council. It’s a great group of coaches and supporters committed to helping the American Cancer Society crush cancer.” During Martelli’s tenure, Coaches vs. Cancer has grown to include thousands of college and high school coaches, new sponsors and partners, and helped raise over $115 million for the Society’s mission to save lives, celebrate lives, and lead the fight for a world without cancer. Martelli has also served as cochair of the Philadelphia Coaches vs. Cancer program since 1999. Under his leadership with Temple

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University coach Fran Dunphy, the program in Philadelphia has raised over $14 million dollars since its inception; including events such as the BasketBall Gala; Tip Off Breakfast; Jim Maloney Golf Classic; Preseason Luncheon; and School Initiative Program. He has leveraged his role as a community leader to raise awareness, build lasting partnerships, recruit participants, and secure sponsorships and donations for each of these events. He continues to motivate and inspire the community each day to make a positive difference in the lives of others. He extends his network, attends sponsorship meetings and has helped secure and maintain relationships with some of the region’s most influential players.

“Phil embodies the spirit of a true cancer advocate and acts as a champion for people affected by cancer. He solicits his personal and professional network to identify other supporters to help crush cancer and connects with people from across the country to join the fight,” said Natalie Morrison, director, Coaches vs. Cancer and Sports Alliances. Phil’s wife Judy is also a champion for the American Cancer Society and Coaches vs. Cancer. She has raised awareness and funds, and organized team events at the American Cancer Society’s

Hope Lodge in Philadelphia, a free home away from home for cancer patients and a caregiver to stay when cancer treatment is needed in another city. Judy and Ree Dunphy, Fran Dunphy’s wife, started and continue to lead Philadelphia’s BasketBall, engaging the Philadelphia community for the mission of the American Cancer Society. She has also been instrumental in the Coaches vs. Cancer Friends and Family initiative, which is currently raising $100,000 in a nationwide campaign for the Society’s Hope Lodge program before the Final Four in 2019. https://www.crowdrise.com/ coachesvscancerhopelodge Phil Martelli’s fight against cancer is personal, having lost family members to the disease and witnessed friends and family members undergo challenging cancer treatment. His empathy and personal connection to patients and their families have left an indelible mark, and he regularly shares his hope that one day cancer will ‘no longer be the bully’. “Phil is the gold standard of a cancer fighter. He is selfless and giving to those that need him most, when they need him most. We are incredibly fortunate to have Phil as our leader and are grateful for him every day.” Ruth Ann Dailey, vice president of Distinguished Partners. “Phil has helped create something unique in the Philadelphia market. The Philly Six Coaches are fierce competitors on the court, but off the court they come together as one for the mission of the American Cancer Society. The Philly Six Coaches vs. Cancer is

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a special group, and it makes all the difference for cancer patients and their families.” In 2004 Martelli received the Coaches vs. Cancer Champion Award, and in 2017 he was honored with the Coaches vs. Cancer Circle of Honor Award with Dunphy. “Leading our Coaches vs. Cancer team has been one of the most important roles I’ve had during my career,” Martelli said. “It’s been an honor to serve as Chair, working with so many great coaches, American Cancer Society staff and volunteers. We have accomplished a lot, but so much more needs to be done. I’m looking forward to staying involved with Coaches vs. Cancer and continuing to crush cancer, which continues to take too many lives.” As past chair of the Council, Martelli will continue his involvement, and assist Kruger in continuing the success of the program. “We are truly grateful to coach Martelli for his leadership and passion in leading the Coaches vs. Cancer Council as its chair for nearly a decade,” said Sharon Byers, chief development and marketing officer, American Cancer Society. “His contributions and commitment to crushing cancer inspire us, and we will do everything we can to continue the momentum he shared, aided by the fact that he is followed by coach Kruger, a passionate advocate who has raised the bar in terms of awareness and fundraising to help us continue attacking cancer from every angle.”

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Coaches vs. Cancer has been a critical part of Kruger’s career. At Kansas State, he played and coached against Missouri’s Norm Stewart, who helped create the program. Kruger will remain chairman of the annual Coaches vs. Cancer Las Vegas Golf Classic presented by Sanford Health, which he founded 11 years ago. He is also a past recipient of American Cancer Society’s prestigious St. George National Award. “It’s a privilege to follow Phil’s lead and serve as the new chair of the Coaches vs. Cancer council. He was so impactful in this position because he is genuine in his care for other people and knows the devastating impact cancer has on lives,” said Kruger. For the last 25 years, Coaches vs. Cancer has united basketball coaches and fans nationwide in collaboration with the American Cancer Society and the National Association of Basketball Coaches to defeat a common enemy: cancer. With your passion and dedicated support, the impact has been felt in communities nationwide. Through fundraising and education initiatives Coaches vs. Cancer has worked together with the Society to help increase the number of cancer survivors to more than 15 million strong. The fight isn’t over, and we need you on our team. To learn more about the Coaches vs. Cancer program, visit coachesvscancer.org or visit us on social media at @CoachesvsCancer. This feature was contributed by Coaches vs. Cancer.

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Coaches Play Key Role in College Basketball Reforms by Eric Wieberg

College basketball had never seen a year quite like this. In the aftermath of an investigation into the college and grassroots game last fall by the U.S. Department of Justice, the basketball community mobilized to enact unprecedented reform. The efforts congregated the likes of university presidents, directors of athletics, Hall of Fame players and even former government officials. Every layer of the basketball ecosystem was examined. And at each part of the process, the perspective of coaches was crucial.

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The first step was the launch of the Commission on College Basketball last October. In its charter, the Commission was charged to “fully examine critical aspects of Division I men’s basketball.” Chaired by former U.S. Secretary of State Dr. Condoleezza Rice, the independent 14-person Commission included on its roster longtime college coaches Mike Montgomery and John Thompson III.

Coupled with the face-to-face meeting, the Ad Hoc Committee’s report – which factored in feedback from the NABC Board of Directors, the NABC Division I Congress and numerous additional interactions with coaches throughout the sport – would prove to be quite impactful. “The constant communication back and forth between the Commission and the NABC really shows how important the voice of the NABC and its membership was,” said Hofstra administrator Jeff Hathaway, who served on the Commission and chairs the Men’s Basketball Oversight Committee. “Those coaches really gave great perspective to what happens in the world of college basketball, day-in and day-out, on campus and off campus,” Hathaway added. “The basketball coaches informed and enriched the conversation for everybody there.”

For Thompson, who remains an active member of the NABC Board of Directors, the job was clear. “As a coach, I wanted to make sure that coaches were represented as we made the necessary changes,” said the former Princeton and Georgetown head coach. “That the perspective of a coach was always in the room – the good, the bad and the ugly that comes with that.” “It was an extremely brilliant group of people, from various aspects of athletics and education,” Thompson added. “It was my role to be a coach in the room, and to be someone that expressed the views of the NABC.” In November, the NABC formed an Ad Hoc Committee populated by coaches from every level of Division I to support the Commission’s efforts. Then following a series of conference calls and an in-person meeting between the Commission and Kansas’ Bill Self, Washington State’s Ernie Kent and NABC Executive Director Jim Haney, the Ad Hoc Committee submitted its list of recommendations to the Commission in late January.

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After several more months of deliberation, the Commission formally presented its recommendations in April, to which the NCAA responded with a promise of expedited action. The Commission’s report – which included direct references to the NABC proposals - was extensive, touching everything from the summer recruiting calendar to the NCAA’s enforcement model. It was also purposefully light on details, leaving the minutiae of implementation to the NCAA membership. What followed in the spring and summer months was considerable work by eight topical NCAA groups and the NCAA Men’s Basketball Oversight Committee to turn the Commission’s recommendations into legislation. And once again, coaches would have a prominent seat at the table. Self, Haney and Saint Joseph’s coach Phil Martelli all served on the recruiting working group, while Martelli and Haney also held positions on the nonscholastic basketball working group. Missouri’s Cuonzo Martin joined the Men’s Basketball Oversight Committee in the spring, offering yet another coach’s perspective. And in June, NCAA administrators and members of the Men’s Basketball Oversight Committee met with the NABC Ad Hoc Committee to analyze various legislative models.

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“There was not one topic, not one meeting, not one subject matter where we were not asked what the coaches think,” said Martelli. Finally, in early August, the NCAA Board of Directors and Division I Congress approved a series of sweeping changes that made the Commission’s proposed reforms official. The June and July recruiting calendars will be modified moving forward. Select players not taken in the NBA Draft will have the opportunity to return to college competition. Elite prospects will now be permitted to enter formal relationships with agents. The NCAA’s enforcement arm will be structured differently, and penalties for rule breakers will be harsher. In many ways, the inner-workings of the sport will look much different when the ball tips in November than it did when the nets were cut down last April. Several of the NABC’s recommendations – notably a career development-focused proposal that would allow current administrative staff members the opportunity to assume coaching responsibilities – were deferred back to the Men’s Basketball Oversight Committee for further discussion. Led by Martelli, Martin and Haney, the NABC will continue advocating for that proposal during the upcoming legislative cycle.

“The world is changing, but it’s fluid, it’s an evolution,” Thompson said. “As Dr. Rice has said, we weren’t going to make these changes and then fix everything. This was the first part of slowly turning the ship around.” From the outset, coaches chose to address the issues head-on, vowing to be part of the solution. And indeed, they were. “The most significant thing I would say is that the NABC and its membership were prominently involved throughout the conversations of the Commission on College Basketball,” said Hathaway. “It was crucial,” added Thompson of the role coaches played. And as a new season approaches and the reform process continues, expect coaches to remain at the forefront.

Perhaps the most significant, if not unheralded, outcome from the Commission’s proceedings is an improved relationship between the game’s key stakeholders. “The lines of communication between the NABC, the NCAA, the NBA, the Players Association, USA Basketball, the shoe companies – that’s one thing that came out of this commission,” said Thompson. “It’s not perfect, but the lines of communication are better.” The work to rid basketball of its ills is far from over. The Commission itself concedes that a fixall doesn’t exist. Growing pains are inevitable with change and will be felt by coaches at schools big and small. But nearly a year later, the game is no doubt in a better place.

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“We listened to a lot of our brethren in coaching. There’s no one raising their hands and saying they’re good with everything,” Martelli said. “But for all of us coaches, we have to work through this, and we have to continue to own it so we can improve the game.” Eric Wieberg is the director of digital and social media for the NABC.

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FDU’s Greg Herenda Survives Life-Threatening Scare Attending the 2018 NABC Convention in San Antonio   by Jim Hague It was going to be the typical way Greg Herenda usually celebrates his birthday -- at the crowning moment of March Madness, namely the NCAA Men’s Basketball Final Four. For the last decade or so, Herenda has taken his family – namely wife Jill and son Trey -- to the Final Four, soaking up the festivities that coincide with the National Association of Basketball Coaches convention that takes place during the last weekend of the college basketball season. Herenda, the North Bergen, N.J., native, has spent most of his adult life coaching college basketball. For the last six years, Herenda, a coaching nomad for most of his 35-year career, has found a home literally in his backyard, serving as the head coach at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck. It was always Herenda’s dream to return to his roots to coach and now he has entrenched himself firmly with his own NCAA Division I program just a stone’s throw from where he grew up and where he currently lives in Bergen County. The 57-yearold Herenda is living the dream. So the sojourn to San Antonio in April was a way to enjoy the end of another season, a campaign that wasn’t as successful as hoped. But for Herenda, being with Trey and Jill in a great town like San Antonio was going to be a perfect retreat. Or so he thought. Herenda had a sense that something was wrong even before he arrived in the Lone Star State. “Before I got on the plane, I was at the airport with [former Villanova and New Jersey Nets star] Kerry Kittles,” Herenda said. “And my leg didn’t feel very good. I joked with Kerry that I was going to stay home. But when I got off the plane, I felt fine.” The first day in San Antonio, Herenda began to do basketball activities with his teenage son. “We went for a walk on the Riverwalk,” Herenda explained. “I walked about 100 yards and told Trey that I had to stop for a second. I walked another 100 yards and I had to stop again. I noticed that my leg was really swollen and felt heavy. I told Jill that if I didn’t feel better, I was going to have to go to the ER [emergency room].” Sure enough, a few hours later, Herenda was indeed in the emergency room of Metropolitan Methodist Hospital in San Antonio. “I couldn’t pick the heel of my foot off the bed,” Herenda said. “I knew something was wrong.”

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Doctors performed an ultrasound of Herenda’s entire body. They found two blood clots, one in his thigh and another in his abdomen.

ticket holder,” Herenda said. “He came to check on me all the time. I got great care. I knew that I would eventually be okay.”

“I never had been in the hospital for anything, not for even a day,” Herenda said. “And now they were admitting me.”

After 15 days, Herenda was given the medical clearance to fly back home to Newark. He thought about taking a train home, but eventually was able to get on a plane.

And he wasn’t about to leave, either. Herenda remained in Metropolitan Methodist for 15 days, including April 2, his 57th birthday. He wasn’t able to attend the Final Four games with his son. Jill and Trey went to the semifinals, while Rev. James Hamill, the priest that married Greg and Jill almost 25 years ago and is now a resident of San Antonio, took Trey to the national title game to see Villanova defeat Michigan. Herenda was not only battling the blood clots, but also had a dangerously high fever, reaching 104.5 degrees at one point. “I was lying on a bed of ice for a day,” Herenda said. “They were trying anything to break the fever. It would go down and then go right back up again.” Through the odyssey, he naturally thought of his own mortality. “It was scary,” Herenda said. “Of course, I had those thoughts. I thought that the clot could possibly break off and hemorrhage.”  Part of the reason why Herenda was concerned is that his father, Anthony, died in 1977 of an apparent heart attack when he was only 50. Anthony Herenda’s true cause of death was never determined, but it was sudden, while Anthony, an accountant, was on his way to work one morning.

“I just wanted to get home,” Herenda said. “Every day, I felt a little better.” But recovering from blood clots is not an easy task. Herenda is taking blood thinner medication, so he has to monitor his daily activities. “I’m able to swim and walk now,” Herenda said. “When I first got home, I was in a wheelchair, then walking with a cane. It’s a process. The doctors said it’s going to take like 3 to 6 months. But I’m on the road to recovery.” And he had solid motivation. “I just wanted to get back out on the floor again and be with my team,” Herenda said. “It was definitely a jolt. You learn to cherish everything.” FDU’s assistant coaches have been doing most of the grunt work while the head man recovers. But Herenda misses the recruiting trips, the pursuit of players. He knows he cannot rest on the trip to the NCAA Tournament that his FDU team took two years ago. After two sub-.500 seasons, that trip to the NCAAs and all the attention that came with participating in March Madness has almost all vanished. “Maybe this was God’s will, sending me a message that I have to take better care of myself,” Herenda said. “I’m strong enough to recover, but this hit me hard.”

“Naturally, I thought of my father,” Herenda said. “I thought of a lot of things. I thought of my team a lot. Every time I got the fever down a little, I thought it was like a TV timeout and I was coaching my team.”

So Herenda’s back at work, trying to find players to come to Teaneck and play for him. Most of his team, including former St. Peter’s Prep and St. Anthony power forward Kaleb Bishop, return for the upcoming season, so the expectations are high.

Through the ordeal, he and his family were well cared for.

“Every day is a blessing,” said Herenda, who also has a weekly talk show on WFDU-FM every Saturday at 12 noon.

“The hospital was incredible and the people were awesome,” Herenda said. “We eventually sent Trey home because he had to go to school, but Jill stayed with me. She was awesome and tough through it all. I made so many new friends. The people there were incredible, magical.” Greg Seiler, the chief executive officer of Metropolitan Methodist, became a regular visitor to the coach’s bedside. “He’s a huge basketball fan and a [San Antonio] Spurs season

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“It sounds like a cliché, but I treat every day like it’s a gift. I mean, this was scary. Sure, my wife and son were with me, but my team, my friends, my family were all 2,000 miles away when this happened. The people at that hospital made me feel a lot of love and they got me through it. I was where I needed to be. It was a team effort.” This story was reprinted from editions of The Hudson Reporter Newspapers.

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Productive NHSBCA Annual Summer Meeting Held in Raleigh, NC By Greg Grantham NHSBCA Executive Board Member The National High School Basketball Coaches Association (NHSBCA) held its annual summer conference in Raleigh, North Carolina, during the week of July 9-13. Over 50 representatives from 23 different states attended this year’s meetings. The meetings began on Tuesday evening with introductions of all attendees and each state sharing accomplishments or progress made by their state association over the past year, as well as issues and concerns that high school coaches face in their respective state. Representatives also received reports on progress made by the NHSBCA regarding involvement with the NFHS, the NABC, the WBCA and USA Basketball. Reports from the NABC and the NFHS dealt a great deal with the anticipated changes in the NCAA men’s Division I basketball recruiting calendar as a result of the Rice Commission’s recommendation. The NHSBCA’s Senior Director of Operations, Dave Archer, serves on the NABC Board of Directors. From these positions, Dave was able to provide much valuable information and guidance on the possible reforms the NCAA may be considering. Much of the time in meetings was spent with attendees working collaboratively in committees developing different models for the possible “scholastic events” that hopefully will become part of the new June recruiting calendar. The NHSBCA is working very hard to restore the high school coach to a position of importance in the recruiting process. Models and formats were developed by the NHSBCA for individual states to conduct showcase events and team camp formats, as well as multi-state regional events. These models/formats have since been shared with all stakeholders.

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In addition to the valuable committee work done by attendees there were also productive sessions to exchange ideas to help strengthen state associations. Those state representatives in attendance were treated to visits to historic college basketball venues along North Carolina’s Tobacco Road. There were guided tours of the Smith Center on the campus of UNC-Chapel Hill, Cameron Indoor Stadium at Duke University, as well as Reynolds Coliseum and the Dail Basketball practice facility on the NC State campus. State representatives were also treated to a Durham Bulls Triple A baseball game on Thursday evening. The highlight of the week was the annual Court of Honor induction luncheon on Thursday. Former NC State star Derrick Whittenburg was the guest speaker at the ceremony that saw Arkansas’ Cliff Garrison and Ohio’s Tom Barrick become the 19th and 20th inductees into the NHSBCA Court of Honor. The 2018 Summer Congress concluded on Friday. Committee work was submitted and adopted. The transition of the Presidency occurred with President Nalin Sood (Washington) relinquishing that position after two years of outstanding leadership to Chris Nimmo (Missouri). Tom Barrick became the new Vice President. Finally, the group approved Seattle, Washington, as the location of the 2019 Summer Congress and set the dates of July 9-12, 2019 for next summer’s meetings. For additional information about the NHSBCA, visit www.NHSBCA.org. About the NHSBCA

The National High School Basketball Coaches Association also serves as the High School Congress of the NABC. About thirty-five state basketball coaches’ associations and representatives of some states that do not have a basketball coaches association work together to improve scholastic basketball and scholastic coaches. The NHSBCA is the national voice for high school basketball coaches, working to foster high standards of professionalism and to support coaches. The NHSBCA conducts two general meetings per year, one at the NABC Convention and the other in July. Additionally, the NHSBCA Executive Committee conducts monthly phone conference meetings. For additional information about the NHSBCA, visit www.NHSBCA.org.

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It’s time to get registered! The start of a new school year is a great time for student-athletes to take a critical step in their journey toward collegiate athletics. Getting registered with the NCAA Eligibility Center ensures your studentathletes are getting the information and guidance they need to become certified and ready to play when they step foot on campus. We have two different accounts at eligibilitycenter. org to help college-bound student-athletes move toward their collegiate athletic goals: • Certification Account: A student must be registered with a Certification Account before they can make official visits to a Division I or II school or sign a National Letter of Intent. The registration fee for a Certification Account is $90 for domestic students, $150 for international students. Registration typically takes approximately 30 to 45 minutes. • Profile Page: If a student-athlete is currently unsure about which division they want to compete or plans to compete at a Division III school, they should create a Profile Page. Creating a Profile Page is free and easy. Students should plan for 15 to 30 minutes to complete a Profile Page. If at any time the student wishes to play at the Division I or II level, they can transition to a Certification Account and pay the registration fee to begin the certification process. Please encourage your student-athletes who want to play college sports to complete their NCAA registration at eligibilitycenter.org. Students can find more information and resources about registering at ncaa.org/student-athletes/future/how-register. High School Timeline Registering with the Eligibility Center is just one step in the process. The following timeline outlines the most critical steps required during each year of high school, starting with the ninth grade. Grade 9: Plan

Begin the process...

Please encourage your studentathletes who want to play college sports to complete their NCAA registration at eligibilitycenter.org. Students can find more information and resources about registering at ncaa.org/student-athletes/ future/how-register.

Grade 10: Register • Register for a Certification Account or Profile Page with the NCAA Eligibility Center at eligibilitycenter.org. • Ask your counselor for help with finding approved courses or programs you can take if you fall behind. Grade 11: Study • Check with your counselor to make sure you are on track to graduate on time. • Take the ACT or SAT, and make sure we get your scores by using code 9999. • At the end of the year, ask your counselor to upload your official transcript. Grade 12: Graduate • Request your final amateurism certification after April 1. • After you graduate, ask your counselor to upload your final official transcript with proof of graduation. Core Courses The NCAA Eligibility Center calculates a student’s grade-point average (GPA) based on the grades he or she earns in NCAA-approved core courses. The following is an easy way to remember how to plan your classes to meet NCAA initial-eligibility requirements.

• Start planning now and earn your best grades. • Ask your counselor for a list of your high school’s NCAA core courses to make sure you take the right classes. Or, find your high school’s list of NCAA core courses at eligibilitycenter.org/ courselist.

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Be One Another’s Greatest Fans by Carey Casey, CEO & President of Championship Fathering Recently I was part of a team-building exercise during a staff gathering. Sitting in a circle, we had everyone take a piece of paper and trace an outline of their hand. Then we all wrote our names at the top and passed it to the right. As each paper went around the circle, we all wrote words of encouragement to that person—just a positive word or a short phrase to describe the person’s character, what we appreciate, or possibly, what he or she means to us. I’ve done these kinds of exercises before, but this one was powerful. My hand outline was filled with words like “encouragement,” “faithful,” and “father.” I truly am like a father to some of those people, and one of the people who wrote that on my sheet came to me the next day and confirmed that he had written that. He thanked me for being a father to him, which is a need I’ve tried to meet in his life. I treasure the way this whole experience affirmed me and those relationships, and I know it did the same for many others. As you might guess, that handprint sheet is now on the wall in my office. Things change for the better when a team takes on an atmosphere of encouragement, when the members become each other’s greatest fans. Most people don’t know this, and don’t function that way. They see the world from a glass-half-empty perspective, where others are trying to push them down in order to get ahead. Life will beat you down, discourage you, make you think you can’t. And so many people walk through life thinking about their faults and shortcomings, believing they aren’t good enough for whatever challenges they face. Although I have much more experience with football coaches, I have had the privilege to know some basketball coaches who really seem to be positive and encouraging as they do their business. Dean Smith, Tubby Smith and Bruce Weber come to mind. I’ve had

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opportunities to watch them be cordial and patient as they interact with fans and be encouraging with their players— even becoming father figures to young men, some of whom didn’t grow up with a dad. I know there’s a place for discipline and high expectations in coaching, but I hope all coaches will also appreciate the power of encouragement and building strong personal connections. Because no matter how big the arena is or how much noise the fans make, if the players and coaches don’t know that they are important to each other and have mutual respect and trust—if they aren’t one another’s greatest fans— then they won’t perform at their peak. Coming out of the locker room, trust and togetherness are hugely important. When teams believe in each other and are committed to doing their best for one another, it’s a special and often winning situation. Find ways to encourage your players, staff and other coaches, to create an atmosphere where they regularly encourage each other. Try this handprint activity with them, making sure each person writes something positive on every paper that comes around. Then have them put up those pages in their locker or some other prominent place, where they’ll see them every day. Let them be reminded that the people who are really important and close to them see good things in them. It’s worth a try! Build stronger trust with your team. Turn them into each other’s greatest fans and see what happens over the course of the season. Carey Casey is CEO, President, and the author of Championship Fathering. He has also authored the book Championship Grandfathering: How to Build a Winning Legacy and is the general editor of the book 21-Day Dad’s Challenge: Three Weeks to a Better Relationship with Your Kids. Carey and his wife Melanie live in Chicago. They are the parents of four children and have nine grandchildren. www. CareyCasey.org.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the NABC.

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C O A C H’S

C L I N I C

MASTERING OFFENSIVE AND DEFENSIVE FUNDAMENTALS Tony Bennett, Head Coach University of Virginia 2018 NABC Division I Coach of the Year At the University of Virginia we are committed to mastering the fundamentals of the game. Developing each player’s skill level is one of our program’s highest priorities. We intentionally focus on the details of shooting, finishing and both half-court and transition defense on a daily basis. We believe our consistent, systematic, basic attention to these building blocks produces habits that stand up in the most pressure packed situations. Below are four examples of drills we use to perfect our players’ skills in the areas listed above. Please keep in mind that we expect every pass, cut, dribble, shot, closeout, slide and repetition to be executed at game speed. Shot Builder: Objective: To have players “systematically” master shot mechanics. Particular emphasis is placed on straight shot-line delivery, strong legs, consistent hand placement/follow-through and shooting rhythm. (Each shooting segment typically lasts 30-45 seconds) Description: (1) “Shot-Line Drill”: Player shoots the ball off the side of the backboard beginning at 10-12 feet and working out to the limit of his range. An “on-line” shot will return directly to the shooter. (2) “Feet Set Drill”: Players shoot from the limit of their range. Drill begins with shooters’ feet set (no stepping into the shot) with right foot slightly ahead of left foot (for right handed shooter) and knees bent (don’t wait to bend knees until after the ball is caught). The player catches and shoots without dipping the ball. (3) “Step and Shoot Drill”: This drill is very similar to the “Feet Set Drill” except the shooter starts with his shooting foot back and moves it into shooting position while the pass is in flight. (4) “Jab Shot Drill”: Again, similar to “Feet Set Drill” except the shooter adds a quick jab fake before delivering the shot. Emphasis is placed on going as quickly as possible from the jab fake to the shot. (5) “Jab, Shot Fake, One Dribble”: Similar to “Jab Shot Drill” except shooter adds a shot fake after the jab then takes one dribble before pulling up for his shot. (6) “Scissors Dribble Drill”: Shooter makes two scissors dribbles in place before taking a shot. Emphasis is on shooting as quickly as possible after the two dribbles. 2 on 1 Finishing: Objective: To help players develop dexterity and decision making skills around the rim versus live defense. Description: The team is divided into two lines. The first two in each line begin at the three point line, lane line extended, one of the two has a ball. One defender positions himself just above the charge circle. The goal is to make 10 consecutive shots without turnovers or deflections. Each player is limited to two dribbles and each pair is limited to two passes (one or zero is preferred). The offensive players are not allowed to pumpNABC

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fake the defender. TEACHING POINT: It is imperative that the ball handler attack the basket before making a decision. Force the defender to commit. 3 on 3 Closeout: Objective: To develop an understanding of basic “Pack” principles and to provide maximum repetitions of basic “Pack” techniques (close-outs, vision, stance, on-ball discipline and talk). Description: This drill is 3 on 3 live! Coach starts with a ball underneath the rim. Three offensive players are positioned outside the three-point line; one at each wing and one at the top of the key. Each of three defenders begin with one foot in the charge circle. The drill begins with the coach throwing the ball to any of the offensive players. “Stationary Offense”: Offensive players are immediately trying to score HOWEVER each must stay within their third of the court (no cuts to another third nor screening for each other) and are limited to 2 dribbles each time they touch it. The drill ends when the offense scores or the defense gets a stop (defensive rebound or turnover). “Moving Offense”: Same offensive rules as above but offense is allowed to move anywhere on the court after making a pass. Transition Defense: Objective: To train our players to convert from offense to defense. As we deliver a shot we immediately expect our 1 and 2 men to sprint back, our 4 and 5 men to attack the offensive glass and our 3 man to “make a good decision”…if he is in a position to get to the glass he should go; if he is not in a position to rebound he should sprint back. Description: Before the drill begins we position the “offensive transition team” in the following positions: two guys on each sideline (FT line extended) and the post player out of bounds under the basket. A coach has a ball and positions himself on the baseline. The drill begins with 5 guys executing their ½ court offense (5 vs 0). As soon as a shot is taken the players convert to defense as described above (1 and 2 man back on the shot, etc). As soon as the ball hits the rim the coach with the ball throws it to the PG on the 2nd team. The 2nd team pushes the ball in transition while trying to get the best quick shot possible. The defensive transition team is working to get the ball stopped as quickly as possible, establish match-ups and settle into their half-court defense. The drill ends when the 2nd team scores or when the first team gets a stop (forced turnover or defensive rebound).

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SHOT BUILDER

1 Shot Line Grooving Remainder of Shot Builder

2 vs 1 Game Finishing

2

REBOUNDER

x5

Shot Line Grooving

Coach Passing

Coach Remainder of PassingShot Builder

1 2 3

1 2 3

As the player gradually extends his range o n "Shot Line Grooving", they will stay at the edge o f their range f o r the proceeding shots i n "Shot Builder"

After 1 0 straight makes, move the lines t o start f r o m the elbow f o r more quick & challenging finishing f o r another 1 0 consecutive makes (can change which line the ball starts i n too).

3 ON 3 CLOSEOUT

3 ON 3 CLOSEOUT (Cont...)

COACH PASSING

x2

x1

2

x3

3

2

2

x3

3

x1

1

Coach can pass t o any o f the 3 lines. Closeout t o ball i f man receives pass. Closeout t o gap i f man is o f f ball.

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1

On pass t o wing, X2 closeouts f r o m help t o ball. X1 Jumps f r o m o n ball t o o f f ball 1 pass away and X3 moves slightly over t o be closer t o the ball than his man 2 passes away. First time through offense hold spots. Next progression offense can pass, cut and move.

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FULL COURT TRANSITION DEFENSE x5 Coach Outlet Passing

x1 x2

2

4

5

3

x4 x3

1

Offense runs 5 o n 0 . On flight o f ball, 1 & 2 sprint back o n defense. 3 "makes a good decision" either crashing the glass o r sprinting back. 4 & 5 attack the glass before sprinting back. When the ball hits the rim, coach outlet passes t o 1 o n 2 n d team as rest o f 2 n d team pushes f o r early basket.

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NABC TimeOut Magazine - Fall 2018  

The Official Magazine of the National Basketball Coaches Association

NABC TimeOut Magazine - Fall 2018  

The Official Magazine of the National Basketball Coaches Association