Page 1

A

lthough gardeners complained early i n 2012 because a hosepipe ban had been imposed, we who were regularly on the rivers realised that the situation was serious enough to encourage people to use less water. The d r a s t i c a l l y l o w r a i n f a l l for the previous 18 months together w i t h the extraction o f water at A x f o r d to supply south Swindon, had left the Kennet at a critically l o w level.

Martin Salter being interviewed on the dried up riverbed o f the Kennet at Overton i n Wihshire early 2012

B y A p r i l our weather was being dominated b y l o w pressure over or close to the U K . This brought cooler days, very large rainfall totals and strong winds. This resulted i n the wettest June i n England and Wales since 1766. T h e l o w pressure continued to dominate and resulted i n the wettest summer since 1912. D u r i n g the autumn the most intensive September l o w since 1981 brought w i d e s p r e a d f l o o d i n g and w i n d damage to the U K . Widespread flooding occurred again i n November as more heavy rain overwhelmed the already saturated ground. A s we go to press the extent o f the damage to our fisheries is not quite k n o w n but there w i l l certainly be a great deal o f s w i m building and bank repairs on the cards.

River Kennet flooding onto Speen Moors later i n the year

Ken H u n t


Working Parties ^ I "^he wet weather and flooding has wiped out most I o f the river working parties this year. Martin J - Pallet and his team did manage to clear the dangerous crack willows down towards the Norfcroft end o f Speen Moors before the whole o f the fishery flooded and it is estimated that it w i l l be well into the late spring or summer before the water level and ground conditions are such that the Land Rover, quad bike and other equipment can be safely used there. I n the meantime the team have carried out some essential work on Brimpton including a lot o f cutting back and repairs to pegs 6 and 12. Other essential work to be carried out as conditions permit is to repair the many eroded and breached banks at Speen Moores and to rebuild swims at Cothrop. With the lakes this year the work parties have had to content w i t h floods, torrential rain, snow and

mechanical breakdown and that was just i n the first four weeks! Despite this, Nigel Westall, Fisheries Manager, and his volunteer team Darren, Jim, Alastair, Tom, Michael, James F, James S, Keith, Gareth and Johnny have tackled numerous trees, re-built swims and collected litter across the Widmead complex. I n mid A p r i l , assisted by Dave Fiske our professional tree climber, the team tackled a 70ft example o f our most common enemy Salix Fragilis aka the crack willow. B y the time you read this the team w i l l have repaired and barked all the viable swims on our lakes ready for the new season, and doubtless tackled many more dead trees which are hazardous. The volunteers do a great job keeping our fisheries in top condition and accessible to all, so i f you would like to j o i n them give Nigel a call. The number is in your permit.

^

The size of the task The 70ft crack willow before and after


Editor's Note

Contents

I am pleased to say that we are back up to 20 pages, and I very much hope that you enjoy this bigger issue of Fins.

Page 1

Drought to Floods

I would like to thank Mervyn Burrows, Alison Dumford, fellow Editors Ken Hunt, Bob Warwick, Dave the printer, and all other club contributers for their excellent input, as without their help this issue would not have been published.

Working Parties

2

Editor's Note: Index: Letters

3

It has been an extraordinary year with fishing conditions going from one extreme to the other. We have experienced drought with the threat of a hosepipe ban, promptly followed by the wettest summer and spring for nearly a hundred years. With conditions such as these it has proven very difficult to maintain the fishery, so a big thanks to our fishery working parties, they have been brilliant yet again.

Club Specimen Trophies

4,5

Over 70s Rover Championship/

6

Over 60s Series/Ron Benjamin and

7

Keith Scrivener/Norman U n w i n Memorial Newbury Junior Angling Club

8

Junior Christmas Event/New Year's Day Shield 9

On a negative note 1 have been very disappointed with the lack of pictures submitted by the membership for use within the magazine, so come on guys see what you can do for the next issue. M y email address is keith_moores@btintemet.com Have a great new season

Blooming Algae/Weed Cutting

10,11

Article by Martin Salter/Adverts

12,13

Club Championship

14

Obituries/Picture Gallery

15

Environmental A l e r t / A G M Notes

16

A Night to Remember/ Message

17

from the Chairman

Tight Lines

Keith M^oores

The Lutra Lutra Threat/Adverts

(Editor)

Committee Social Evening/Christmas Match

18

Trophy & Cup Winners

19

Notice Board

20

Letters Swan Lifeline Cuckoo Weir Island South Meadow Lane Eton, Berkshire SU 6SS

m

2 ft) V-

30 August 2012 Dear Bob

ÂĽ N D cJlc

Many thanks for the Club donation and the latest copy of 'Fins'. In turn I enclose a copy of the latest newsletter which always keeps me personally very busy.

-

31 February 2013

Dear Mrs Dumford Thank you for the very kind donation of ÂŁ72.00 to the Newbury & District Cancer Care Trust. Please pass on my thanks to the members of The Newbury Angling Association.

With the weather being so strange this year I did not seem to see the usual fish coming into the shallows by the backwater to breed, there are some young around so maybe they just went elsewhere. One day I did see what to me was an enormous fish almost tucked under the landing stage of the flat next door it looked as though it would have qualified for one of the pictures if anyone had caught it.

We are a local charity for local people providing volunteer drivers to escort patients to hospital appointments, equipment loan, financial grants, overnight nursing care, bereavement counselling through the 14:21 youth counselling service, aromatherapy, physiotherapy, hydrotherapy, support for the Rainbow Rooms and assistance with a Patient Information Point at West Berks Hospital.

Yours sincerely

We are so grateful for your support in fiirthering our work. Kay Web (Chairman)

Yours sincerely

www.swanhfe.org.uk Patrons: Sir Richard Branson. Paula Hamilton. George Michael. Helen Milroy Executive Officer

3


The Lutra Lutra Threat

U

p until the 1950s and into the early 1960s a healthy otter population existed throughout the country including waters fished by the Newbury and District Angling Association as it was then called. They were rarely seen by daylight but as a youngster I remember seeing one occasionally on the bank and swirling i n the water of the Kennet and Avon canal at Enbome. The otter p o p u l a t i o n throughout the country dramatically declined from the m i d 1950s to the 1970s to a level where they were considered to be under threat of extinction i n most o f Britain except in parts o f Scotland and Wales. brown or grey in colour and move in a more slinky, head down manner.

From early times the otter had been hunted with hounds for sport and trapped for their fur but i n 1976 a b i l l was passed that protected the otter and made it illegal to k i l l one. In the early 1980s the Nature Conservancy Council (now Natural England) began a programme to repopulate parts o f Eastem England w i t h captive bred otters. A t that time there was no evidence o f a natural recovery but this situation soon changed to show a slow natural recovery that has been sustained and now grown.

On the matter o f re-location, the Environmental Agency website shows that the release o f otters by the Otter Trust since the m i d 1980s was very low. Some 117 captive bred otters were released up to 1999, the last release being 17 on the upper Thames over a six month period i n 1999. The release programme was then wound up. However other organisations including the RSPCA and other rehabilitation centres take a few orphaned and injured otters into care each year. There is a legal requirement to return these otters to the w i l d once they are fit or mature enough, to a site as near as possible to where they were found. But judging by the number of otters seen, particularly the ones that appear to be familiar with human contact, it does appear that otters are being released locally illegally. Indeed more evidence o f this is the way they are becoming urbanised and being seen i n city centres as locally as Winchester.

Their return to most parts o f the country now has been claimed as a major success by many conservationists and is truly a good indicator o f the health o f our rivers and lakes. Recent surveys (in 2010) showed a 10 fold increase i n sites surveyed since the 1970s. Although this is not welcome news to the angler it is partly due to our own success. The improvement i n water quality, reduction i n toxic pesticides, improved habitat and increased fish stocks have all contributed to the healthy state o f the otter population. But that is not the whole story. There now seems to be many more sightings and much more evidence o f otter activity than there ever was before their decline. One difference now seems to be that many of them are very much less shy of human beings. Indeed one fisherman on Dobson's reported an otter swimming across the lake, getting on the bank and watching h i m fi-om about 30 feet away. This suggests that the otter was used to human contact and had most likely been re-located fairly recently.

Otters do only k i l l for food but they have a high metabolic rate which result i n a food intake o f 15% to 20% o f their body weight daily. Their diet consists o f small mammals and frogs, aquatic vertebrates including crayfish, water foul but unfortunately 80%o of their diet is fish. This equates to each otter eating 2 -5 lb o f fish each day. To make this matter much worse, the otter does not consume the whole fish but just the soft tissues in the throat area o f its pray as seen i n the photograph o f a large pike killed by an otter on a local stretch o f the river Kennet. So, because only a small part o f each fish that is killed is eaten by the otter, several fish must be killed daily to satisfy the necessary intake o f each otter. Unfortunately, weather it is from rivers or lakes they generally take the larger slower fish. This could devastate any o f our fisheries as it has already done to commercial fisheries up and down the country. Otter proof fencing is available but the cost for the amount that we would need would be prohibitive and its appearance is not really conducive w i t h the attractive appearance of our fisheries, particularly the SSSIs.

Just to clear up any identity issues between otters and mink. Both are members of the Mustelid family which include badgers, pine martins and polecats. There has always been a small presence of native European mink in this country but the vast majority o f mink found i n this area are American mink that have been released or escaped from captivity where they have been bred for their valuable pelts. Both mink are similar i n appearance varying from 0.53 to 0.61 meters (21 to 24 inches) in total length and generally dark, sometimes almost black i n colour although may vary w i t h some individuals. The big identifying factor between otter and mink is the size. Otters vary from 1 to 1.3 meters (39 to 51 inches) i n total length and weigh between 7.4 kg and 14 kg (15 to 31 lb). They are generally a m i d

The U K Otter Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) Steering 4


Group is a national steering group that co-ordinates and advises on actions for the recovery o f the otter population. Unfortunately its membership is heavily weighted i n favour o f groups dedicated to the conservation and wellbeing o f the otter population rather than that o f fish stocks. I n fact the lack o f understanding is illustrated by a conciliatory comment on one o f the conservation group's website that 'Generally otters do not take game fish but the more slow moving non-game fish'. Does that help us? Another consideration is that the growth o f still water fisheries and o f fish stock has occurred while otters were scarce. Because the sustainable population o f the otter depends largely on food supply it is likely that unless controlled, the density o f the naturally reproduced otter population could really explode to levels vastly above those o f the 1960s.

such as the Angling Trust and the EA, whose responsibilities include the development o f fisheries, our sport is about to receive another body blow.

Public opinion is strongly i n favour o f the otter and without strong representation to the B A P from bodies

Hi WHS

Ken Hunt

Newbury Angling Association will be hosting a charity match in aid of Help the Heroes. A l l proceeds from the match will be donated to the charity, which will take place Sunday 15"" September on Avington Canal stretch. This will be an open match. For further information contact Ade Agar on 0 7 7 7 8 3 7 4 8 6 9 or e m a i l matchsecretary@newburyaa.org.uk. or your permit. Further updates will be posted to website.

HELP/or HEROES /

^EXPEllEiCE Tel: 01635 31116 www.experiencefishing.com

t e u s t ;

Call or visit our new store for lots of great offers. Most leading brands available. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

ukwolfconservationtrust@googlemail.com www.ukwolf. org

NAA Permits & Guest Tickets available

For details cgpaddick99@hotmail.co.uk or 07774 673 562

Norman House, Hambridge Road Newbury, Berks. RG14 5XA

5

:


Over 70s Rover Championship

O

Warwick's in October can be difficult and cold rain showers made it more so. Eric Goswell came to the fore with 51b 4oz, Mike Shore next on 31b 9oz and Ken Hunt was third with 21b 15oz, mostly carp.

Dobson's in July was very hot at 28 degrees, and Eric Goswell coUected 10 points with a catch of 41b 11 oz. Ken Hunt was second with 41b 7oz followed by Mike Shore on 3 lb 3oz. A Bream and a Carp were caught but, the rest of the nets were made up of shiny things.

We asked for an extra match on the 7'" of November (granted by the Committee), to be fished on Dixon's Mere. Only five members turned up on a very cold, windy day. Unfortunately this was the day that all fish therein were on hunger strike and despite the tasty morsels offered, none were tempted.

ur season began at Alders in June, on an overcast hot day with rain following later Five members failed to weigh in but, the two Kens, Hunt and North, took the top two positions with 81b 12oz and 31b 13oz respectively and Mr AThing was third with 1 lb 8oz.

Willows was the venue for our August match which Brian Canning won with five Carp for 311b 13oz, Mike Shore, second, had 141b 2oz and Alec Pearce was third with 1 lib 8oz. Only two members failed to weigh in on what was another hot day.

I've fished hundreds of N . A. A. matches in nearly sixty years but, never one that all participants failed to land anything. Maybe we should formulate a piscatorial version of Duckworth/Lewis for any such occasions in the fiiture! Congratulations to Ken Hunt, our worthy winner.

Our September match was held on Knott's. Ron Dumford topped with 91b 12oz, Jim Knott, second on 71b 13oz then Stuart Dyer third with 61b 13oz. A l l bags were silver fish taken under broken cloud and with a cold wind from the West.

I f you were bom in or before 1943, please come along and join our friendly group

W. Dixon

Final Table KHunt M Shore A Pearce E Goswell J Knott K North SDyer B Canning R Dumford G Goodliff A Thing B Dixon

Alders 10

Dobsons

Willows

9

4 9

Knotts 5 7 6

Warwicks 8

9

10

9 6V2

-

8

7 -

-

10 7

8 7 3

9

4'/2

6

8 -

-

5 10 -

10

-

4

6V2 -

-

-

-

41/2

6

3 8 -

Dixons -

Total Points 36 33 27/2 27

25Vi

-

221/2

-

13 10 10

-

8 6

Club Specimen Trophies ^he Club Specimen Cup was not awarded this year because no entry had been received . I n recent years there has been a definite apathy i n entering fish for any o f the specimen trophies and i n some ways this devalues the achievement when awards are made.

T

The trophies where entries are required are:•

Club Specimen Cup - One o f the Associations premier trophies first presented i n 1940 for the best specimen entered during the season.

Graham Swait Cup - For the best specimen entered by a junior member

Vicky Prater Pike Trophy - For the best pike entered

Alan Belts Carp Trophy - The biggest carp entered

Newbury Weekly News biggest bream

Barrie Page Chub Trophy - A new trophy donated by Barrie's widow, Sylvia to be awarded for the 2013/14 season.

Bream Trophy -The

In recent years the awarding o f these trophies has been taken from match sheets but this is not the idea o f the awards and often leads to bigger fish missing out. I f you catch a good fish and have two witnesses please get the details of the catch and the witnesses to a committee member within two weeks of your catch. I f possible include a photograph as well.

6


The Over 60s Series The series got off to a great start for Steve Myres who won the first two matches, but as the series went on, he dropped down the pecking order when Billy Lowe and the late Ray Jones won the next three matches between them. Brian Pallett and Colin Gore secured max points in the next two matches and Dave Smith, after collecting one second and three thirds in the opening matches and winning the next two, set the final match up for a last match shoot out between Dave and Billy for the title. With the best six matches out of ten to count, Dave was out in front by 6 points, so when Dave could not make the last match the gate was open for Billy to finish in the top four to take the title. Unfortunately, Billy had a family bereavement and couldn't make it either, so 'King Dave' rules again with 53 points. Eighteen of us took part in ten matches, with Brian Cripps joining us in September for the last four and finishing in thirteenth place with 17 points. Me, I finished in eighteenth

spot with 7 points. Roll on next year! Bob Warwick

Back Row: R Wiggins S. Myers B. Cripps A. McGarry G. Knapp Front Row: R. Jones B. Pallett M . Burrows H . Sadler M . Frank

The Top Seven Avington Dobson's Willows

Alders

Dobson's Hambridge Alders

D

Canal 9

-

Total

Canal

D

-

10

10

-

53

8

8

Billy Lowe

-

-

10

2

10

9

9

-

7

-

47

Ray Jones

5

0

0

10

3

6

8

6

8

9

47

3

7

4

5

8

1

7

45

6

9

8

5

Avington

E

Dave Smith

Richard Wiggins

8

Avington Enborne

Steve Myers

10

10

2

-

4

8

-

4

6

5

43

Henry Sadler

9

5

1

6

6

0

-

0

3

6

35

Brian Pallett

-

0

4

8

-

10

0

-

2

10

34

Ron Benjamin & Keith Scrivener/Norman Unwin IVIemorial IVIatches Ron Benjamin Memorial

Keith Scrivener/Norman Unwin Memorial

This match organised by Chris Wilson of Kintbury Fishing Club was fished on the canal at Kintbury and raised ÂŁ255 for Cancer Research.

These matches were fished together as pairs matches on Willows and Alders and was well attended with Karen and Paul Smyth the eventual winners.

Joyce, Ron's widow, attended the presentation to present the prizes to the winner, Carl Eland, runner up, Dave Hutchins, third place, Vinnie Bonnick and Matt Herbert who finished fourth.

Bob Warwick

Vinnie Matt Chris Carl Bonnick Herbert Wilson Eland

Joyce

Dave Hutchins

V. Bonnick A.Ager S. Myers J. Cox B. Low M . Tarrant R. Wiggins M . Burrows Seated the Winners: Karen & Paul Smyth


Newbury Junior Angling Club

2

012 was one o f our most successful years for new junior members joining Newbury Angling. This was proven when we held the National Fishing Month Event on Alders i n August, where we were supported by the EA, who provided us with qualified coaches to introduce juniors to fishing. We had over 30 participants take part that day and now come along to other junior events. The day finished with a 2 hour match that was w o n by Michael Marshall. A l l prizes for this match were donated by the E A.

fly fishing to carp and match fishing. We would love to see old faces and new attend this event where you w i l l find a warm welcome. Newbury Angling Association would like to take this opportunity to thank the volunteers who made this happen, Ixom Richard Wiggins and Matt Tarrant who kindly cut weed and grass on Alders ready for Martin and Linda Pallet to provide B B Q and refreshments on one o f the hottest days o f the year. A big thank you to Dan Horsley from the E A who provided the coaches and the goodie bags that were issued to each participant. We would also like to thank everyone else who helped to make it a very successful event.

This current season the event w i l l be held on the 13th July 2013 on Bellwood, River Kennet and Hambridge canal, this is to introduce a varied range of angling from

What a lovely net of tiddlers!!

The winners and runners up from the Match

Coach Phil Smith with one of the juniors 8

An excited youngster didn't fancy putting the maggots on the hook


Junior Christmas Event (held in January!!)

I

t was decided that the Junior Christmas Event would be held at the bowling alley, where participants o f the junior matches were invited along to the prize giving. They bowled and winners o f the bowling event were Tom Pallet and Jordan Savage. Prizes were awarded to our young anglers who attended the matches during the season. Well done to all those that attended and gained new skills and made new friends. We would like to take this opportunity to express our sadness that Ken Mowforth passed away on the day o f this event. He was going to be presenting the trophies, which we knew he was looking forward to, as he has been an inspiration to many juniors with tips and valuable time given to assisting them with their angling over many years on Newbury Angling waters. He was a key asset assisting the juniors w i t h Pete Purton and followed on w i t h Ade Agar. The following dates are booked for the junior matches so book them i n your diaries as we would like to see you all again i n the following fishing season. Remember i f you did not attend last year you are always welcome to come and j o i n i n the fiin. We can help with any aspect o f your angling requirements as we always have a varied selection o f anglers

Prize giving for the season to all winners, runners up and improvers. supporting our juniors, as we must always remember they are the fiiture.

Junior Dates Saturday 6th July Alders meet at 12.00 Saturday 10th August Alders meet at 12.00 Saturday 7th September Enbome Canal Meet 12.00

New Year's Day Shield ue to the floods on Speen Moors this match was fished on the canal at Enbome and I went along to see how they got on.

D

It proved to be a dangerous assignment to stand on the towpath on New Years day with all the pedestrian traffic that was out for a stroll together with the bikers, mnners and dogs. I ' m not a pole fisherman but it must have been very frastrating for those who are.

The wirmer o f the match was John Cox who fished i n Guyer's lock and weighed i n 171b. Josh Purton on peg one down at Egypt point weighed i n 91b 2oz to finish second. Dave Smith fished the big tree to finish third with 81b 12oz. Ade Ager fished just down from Guyer's lock and weighed in 6 l b to finish fourth. Other hazards encountered when members fish the canal include the following :-

Bob Warwick


Blooming Algae

I

n the recent years there have been several incidents on our lakes when algal blooms have been blamed for the decrease i n dissolved oxygen levels that have resulted in either fish seen i n distress or i n extreme cases, fish deaths. I n September 2005 the entire fish population of Alders was lost, later in 2009 we suffered the loss of mainly silver fish from Warwick's Water and this year we had an incident i n Willows Lake and thanks to prompt remedial action we did not suffer any losses. The loss o f fish from Bellwood was due to parasitic infection and not depleted oxygen levels. I f we think back to the more distant past other such incidents have occurred and i n each case we have enlisted expert advice from the Environment Agency (EA) and most o f these occurrences have been attributed to algal blooms which can result i n deoxygenation o f the water. So what is happening and can we prevent such incidents affecting our precious fish stocks.

daylight hours than during cloudy weather and darkness. During very hot weather, super-saturation o f the water w i t h oxygen can occur in the late afternoon, but after nightfall the concentration o f dissolved oxygen falls rapidly and can become so depleted by dawn that fish survival is jeopardised. This phenomenon is particularly pronounced i n fisheries affected by blooms of suspended algae. In a lake that is fiinctioning normally, for instance where there are lots o f fish, lots o f algae and/or rooted plants and large quantities o f organic matter i n combination with high temperature it is important to realise that only a small change i n the balance between consumption and replenishment o f oxygen can trigger a catastrophe. Such a change could be a further rise i n temperature a decrease i n light levels due to a period o f cloudy weather, an increase i n the availability o f organic matter such as an algal crash or the introduction of extra fish. When de-oxygenation does occur the

Why does an algal bloom occur?

T

he main cause o f excessive algal growth is a process known as eutrophication. This process occurs when a body o f water acquires a high concentration o f nutrients, especially phosphates and nitrates. These typically promote excessive growth o f algae. Eutrophication is a natural, slow build up process as a lake ages, but human activity can greatly speeds up the process this may be by pollution, run-off from agricultural land, excessive anglers bait or high concentration o f fish stocks. Some algae can be toxic especially the blue-green type and have been known to cause vomiting and other symptoms i n animals and humans, the majority of blooms seen on our lakes have not been of this type. How do algae cause de-oxygenation? A body o f water gets its oxygen from photosynthesis carried out by submerged green plants including algae and from wind action on the lake surface. A fishery that is always coloured, ranging from brown to light green, has a rich and abundant algal community. This does not automatically mean that de-oxygenation problems w i l l result. Some enrichment is beneficial to coarse fisheries, particularly for very young fish, and algae are also a vital component o f a healthy aquatic environment. De-oxygenation problems caused by algae are often initiated by a sudden reduction i n the algal community known as a crash. Because, as the algae die the high levels of organic matter created decompose and deplete the water of available oxygen, causing the death o f fish i f oxygen levels get extremely low. However, there is also a normal day-to-night (or diurnal) variation i n oxygen levels, this is because photosynthesis is more vigorous during strong sunlight, hence the diurnal effect is more pronounced i n sunny conditions and

most dissolved oxygen w i l l be available i n the surface layers and hence the fish congregate there and this is what was seen on Willows, Alders and Warwick's. A t the time o f the Willows incident oxygen levels were low at 5mg/l Other factors affecting de-oxygenation Algae are not the only culprits as we have seen it can be a complicated combination o f effects that have such a disastrous result. One o f the main problems is the decomposition o f any organic matter that w i l l use up oxygen as bacteria break it down. Organic matter can be leaf litter, fish and bird faeces, anglers uneaten bait, ground bait and dead plant material. Normally, organic material i n water is broken down quickly by bacteria and used in the natural processes of the aquatic environment. I f the amount of organic matter entering water is greater than the amount that can be broken down, it w i l l accumulate on the lake bed, forming deep layers o f silt. The silt can provide bacteria w i t h ample supplies of food and bacterial action can be significant

10


during the summer months. Ordinarily, this process w i l l cause only slight changes to the amount o f dissolved oxygen in the water, though this may be more pronounced i n autumn when leaf-fall and dieback o f water plants contribute towards the organic load, and photosynthesis is reduced. This is w h y these incidents of low oxygen levels usually occur in autumn. Shallow lakes are also more likely to be affected as climatic conditions such as thunderstorms can cause excessive movement in the body of water which stirs up the silt.

a bit drastic at first but the vegetation soon grows back but it's important that it is managed efficiently. We can also put a restriction on the type and amount o f bait that is used (as we did after the Warwicks incident) but this is difficult to enforce and compared to commercial waters most o f our vulnerable lakes are not heavily fished all year round. There have been reports that the introduction o f barley straw can help to reduce the amount o f algal growth i n ponds but its quite an undertaking to scale up to the size o f lakes that we would like to treat but this is under investigation. We also w i l l have a rapid response team on hand to react to any emergency as we have some oxygenation pumps available and the E A are always w i l l i n g to help where possible. We also have an Oxygen meter which is being used regularly to monitor the levels i n the lakes so that we can have an early warning o f any potential problems. This is something that w i l l probably reoccur at some time but by taking some preventative measures we can only attempt to reduce the risk.

The number and size o f fish i n a lake also has an effect as the more fish present the more oxygen is required to sustain that population. Most o f our waters are not heavily stocked but the more fiy that survives each year adds to the total number o f fish present so the populations are increasing year on year. Preventative measures. So how can we help prevent these types o f events affecting our fish stocks? The main objective is to get as much oxygen into the water as possible and we have employed air pumps as an emergency measure when these incidents have occurred. However, this is not a long term solution and not particularly effective when the area to be oxygenated is large and unlike commercial fisheries cannot be maintained all year round.

Mervyn Burrows.

What we have done is to remove trees from around some areas of the lakes that have been affected, this has two effects, and the first is to increase the air flow across the surface o f the water which allows more oxygen to be introduced. The second is to reduce the amount of leaf litter that falls into the lake each autumn which in turn reduces the amount of silt. This may look

Weed Cutting at Alders

T

he abundance o f weed was a continual problem at Alders during last summer. However thanks to the weed cutting efforts o f Nigel Westall, Ade Ager, Josh Purton, Roger Dumford, Richard Wiggins, and Matt Tarrant, swims were cleared several times and the lake provided some good fishing i n the later part o f the

summer w i t h decent bream, perch and silver fish showing. I n spite of this, not many members fished the venue. Come on you silver fishermen get fishing. I f you want to volunteer for weed cutting contact Nigel, his number is on your permit.

A swim at Alders in May 2012, before and after the weed had been cleared for the new season.

11


Article for FINS by Martin Salter, Angling Trust National Campaigns Coordinator

I

can't remember exactly when I first joined Newbury A A but it was sometime i n the eighties when the alder trees that now adorn the banks of Dixon's, Knott's and Collin's lakes were mere bushes and low enough to often pass m y float rod over when a rogue carp charged off with a bait intended for roach or tench. Having retired from Parliament i n 2010 and returned from a fishing sabbatical i n Australia I get to appreciate fishing my local waters even more these days. O K the Kennet is not what is was i n terms o f numbers o f fish but there's still some pretty impressive specimens to be had i n the river and the club lakes are looking better than ever in m y view. TheAngling Trust in 2012 I now spend much of my time working for the sport we all love as national campaigns coordinator for the Angling Trust o f which N . A . A . is a valued member. I thought it might be helpful to provide an update on our work for fish and fishing and perhaps encourage some of youjoin as individual members.

one of the largest cases i n its history with an injunction against the Small Hydro Company and the Canal and Rivers Trust to stop a damaging hydropower turbine being installed on the River Trent. We also settled several other significant cases for members and provided more advice than ever to our member clubs. It's difficult to try to describe concisely everything that the Angling Trust and Fish Legal does, and to list our main recent achievements i n a way that w i l l encourage anglers to j o i n our ranks. Even though it costs less than 5 Op a week to play your part our individual membership is nothing like what it should be. I was a longstanding member o f the old A C A because I believe in putting something back into our sport and to the environment on which it depends. N o w we have one unified voice there's even more reason for anglers to join. The more members we have the more we can do and the stronger our collective voice w i l l be. Take a look at what we do for you and tell me why you shouldn't be a member this year. You can j o i n online at www.anglingtrust.net or by calling 0844 7700616.

After a rocky start, caused i n part by inheriting the debts o f our predecessor organisations, 2012 was the year when the Angling Trust really came o f age. The Trust now a well-established organisation which is formally recognised by government, its agencies and the angling community as the legitimate representative and governing body for angling i n all its forms. The merger with the Angling Development Board created significant new opportunities for the Angling Trust to achieve its objectives, but i n a more unified way that w i l l bring our campaigns to protect fish stocks and our management o f competitions much more closely together. This integration led the drawing up o f the National Angling Strategy - Fishing For Life which was launched by Richard Benyon M P i n November to provide the framework for much o f our work over the coming years. M y job is to sharpen up our campaigning and boost our media profile and I think i f s fair to say that last year the Angling Trust achieved a completely new level o f influence w i t h government ministers including: exclusive interviews with Secretary o f State Owen Paterson and Environment Minister Richard Benyon i n The Angle, our members magazine; attending meetings at Downing Street; giving evidence to Select Committees; hosting receptions at all the party conferences and close liaison with the A l l Party Parliamentary Angling Group. We made good progress with many campaigns in particular our efforts to allow clubs and fishery managers to effectively control cormorants who have done such damage to our silver fish stocks. Fish Legal Our pollution busting legal partners - Fish Legal, formerly the A C A , had a very successful year winning

Martin with some nice Upper Kennet dace that the cormorants have missed Angling Trust & Fish Legal: Fighting for Fish and Fishing •

Improving and protecting fish stocks

Providing a strong and unified voice for angling

Promoting the benefits of angling for all

Standing up for the environment

Making polluters pay

Supporting excellence i n angling

12


What have we achieved? •

Won an injunction to stop a major hydropower scheme on the River Trent that was licensed to k i l l over 100 fish a day.

Won a judicial review o f the government's river basin management plans i n 2011 and secured £ 100m of new funding for improving rivers.

Won significant new government funding to get more people fishing.

Consulted 30,000 anglers and 780 organisations i n bringing forward the first ever National Angling Strategy.

Reduced poaching by educating Eastem European anglers about how to fish legally.

Recmited 100 volunteer bailiffs i n a pilot scheme that w i l l be rolled out nationally.

Won review by DEFRA o f cormorant licensing and the bass minimum landing size.

Fought o f f accusations by the M M O that recreational sea anglers sell their catch.

M a n a g e d and d e l i v e r e d over 200 m a j o r competitions and won dozens o f medals at intemational level in 2012.

Beat off angling bans and restrictions and fought against the sell-off o f C E M E X lakes and other waters to non-angling interests.

Trained 1,300 coaches and helped introduce approximately 100,000 people to angling in the past four years. Set up 35 County Angling Action Groups to organise projects to get more people fishing more often.

Helped 91 clubs get Clubmark accreditation to help them get funding for angling participation work.

Secured a ban o f the sale o f invasive plants such as floating pennywort (not public until 29th January).

This cracking 2 lb roach from the Hants Avon was the highlight of Martin's Season

> Won 7 cases and provided free legal advice to 220 Fish Legal member clubs and fisheries i n the last twelve months. •

Introduced new benefits and discounts for members which you can find here on our website

http://www.anglingtmst.net/page.asp?section=35&se ctionTitle=Angling+Trast+Member+Benefits Whatever you do I hope to see you on the bank in the coming year and i f you are interested in reading more I publish a regular blog at http://fightingforfishing.anglingtmst.net/ You might even recognise some o f the swims in the pictures! Tight Lines

Martin Salter

r

Thatcham Angling Centre 156 Sagecroft Road, Thatcham 01635 871450 E: thatchamangling@btconnect.com W: www.thatchamanglingcentre.com

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13


Club Championship J went along to witness the weigh-in of the last match of this competitive competition held on Section E o f the canal at Avington, but I was disappointed, to say the least, w i t h the results after expecting huge catches from some o f our top anglers. O f the eleven anglers taking part, 3 blanked and apart from a decent perch and a non-scoring trout, only tiddlers were weighed in. But I did witness one achievement which w i l l take an exceptional feat to be equalled, let alone bettered and that was Dave Smith becoming the Club Champion for the fourth year in succession well done Dave. Throughout the matches there were some notable catches w i t h Ashley Blunt, Ade Ager and Dave Chandler weighing i n 391b 5oz, 311b 8oz and 301b respectively on the first match on Willows in June. This was followed by Matt Tarrant on the second match over Speen Moors w i t h 101b 9oz, Martin Pallett was second w i t h 51b 13 oz and Ade Ager third w i t h 3 lb 12oz. Back on Willows for the third match and again big weights showed up w i t h Dave Smith weighing 371b Soz w i t h Martin Pallett again the runner up w i t h 321b 13oz and Brian Cripps third w i t h 261b 7oz. The fourth match, held on dobsons saw Dave weigh i n 181b 14oz w i t h Ade on 131b9ozand J o h n C o x w i t h l U b loz. John won the next match on the Enbome Canal w i t h 121b. Dobsons, the venue for the sixth match saw Dave weigh in 131b w i t h Vinnie Bonnick on 111b 12oz and

W i l f Squires third w i t h 51b Soz. From then on the weights on the final matches were not so good, w i t h the exception of Martin Pallett who weighed in 61b 1 Soz on the seventh match held over Speen Moors. When the best ten results were added up, Dave Smith was top o f the pile, a clear 10 points i n front o f mnner up Vinnie Bonnick w i t h Martin Pallett i n third place. Congratulations to Dave Smith our Club Champion

Bob Warwick

Final S c o r e s

Match Number Name Dave Smith Vince Bonnick Martin Pallett Ade Ager John Cox Brian Pallett Richard Wiggins Roger Durnford Les Durnford Brian Cripps Dave Chandler Henry Sadler Linda Pallett Steve Myers Matt Tarrant Wilf Squires

1 7

14 11 6 10 4 9 13 5

2 3 7 14 13 8 11 12 3 9 11 6 15

3 15 11 14 10 9 12 8 6 13 7 5

4 15 8 12 14 13 11 11 6 9

7 5

5 6 11 13 8 15 12 9 4 3

6 15 14

7 13 14 15

8 11 11 6

12

11 10

10 1

10 5 3 9 12 11 6 8 4

12 8 9 15 5 13

7

9 13 14 6 5 11 8 12 14 7 10 2 4

10 3 14 11 5 12 10 6 7 8 4 15 13

14

4 5

13

14

7

9 3

9

11 13 9 14 11 8 5 6 10 8 12 15

12 13

11 11 9

12 8 14 15

Total 123 113 105 103 100 88 85 82 81 78 77 56 48 44 37 28


Obituaries ' ince the last issue o f FINS' the Association has lost a few of its most recognisable and respected anglers and Newbury * A A will be the poorer at their passing.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

^^^^^^^^^^^

Ray Jones

Bryan Canning

Alan Betts

Ray was a regular in the over 60's and finished third in last seasons competition.

Bryan was a regular in the over 60's before moving up to the over 70's. Last year he won the match on Willows

Alan will be remembered by the 'Alan Betts Carp Trophy' that he donated to the Association for the largest carp caught during the season

Marion Scrivener, widow of the late Keith Scrivener also passed away. Marion used to attend Keith's memorial matches to present the trophy next to the seat at Alders that was erected in his honour. Other notable members who passed away include Barrie Page who will be remembered by a new trophy donated by his wfe Sylvia, awarded for the best chub caught during the season. Also K e n Mowforth who was a helper in the junior matches and teach-ins, Doug Boeg, a regular on Willows and Dave Thompson who had been a regular on the Over 60s matches.

Picture Gallery

Alan Cooper with a 35lb Soz Linear Carp caught on Collins 1st May 2013

Matty Ross with 27lb Mirror I Carp an original caught on Collins.

Josh Purton with 23lb + common Carp caught on Collins.

15


Environmental Alert Biosecurity & Non-Native Species NON-NATIVE SHRIMP In 2010, a highly invasive non-native shrimp, Dikerogammarus villosus, was found i n Grafham Water. It has since been found at a handful of other sites around the U K . Another species of non-native shrimp D. haemobaphes has recently been found on the inland waterway network. Like its cousin, it is a voracious feeder and has a very high reproductive rate. It is the first time that this species has been recorded and the potential impacts are currently unclear. Unlike D . villosus, which prefers rocky substrates, this species is thought to be more suited to the conditions within the waterway network. However, it is currently thought to be confined to the South West and West Midlands.

However, i n general it is essential that everyone using the waterway network takes steps to ensure they do not inadvertently spread this species and that we all implement the following "biosecurity" measures to reduce the likelihood of this happening.

WHAT WE A R E DOING The Canal & River Trust are working together w i t h the Environment Agency to develop a coordinated response. We hope to monitor the known populations of this species and survey the wider area to track its spread. We w i l l also raise awareness o f this species with staff, volunteer groups, partners and waterway users so that they a can do their bit to help reduce its spread.

• Waterway staff, contractors and volunteers, anglers, kayakers and other recreational users should always "check, clean and dry" their clothing and equipment between uses. They should check their equipment before they enter the water and again when they leave site. • Managers or representatives o f clubs and associations should ensure that their members are aware of the need of the for biosecurity measures.

WHAT Y O U CAN DO TO H E L P Human activity is one o f the main ways that this and other non-native invasive species spread. There is a national govemment-backed campaign on "biosecurity" measures" to encourage recreational water-users to take action to help stop the fight against invasive non-native species.

• Boaters should ensure that they do not transfer potentially contaminated water by emptying bilge pumps before moving locations. • Reports any suspected sightings o f non-native shrimps to alertnonnativeAceh.ac.uk

Specific advice on biosecurity measures for different user groups can be found through the links below.

AGM Notes The A G M is an opportunity for the committee to update the membership on the years activities and for the members to put their views to the committee via the Open Forum. The Chairman and Secretary both gave a resume of major events over the previous year with the adverse weather and high water levels being the main influence especially over the winter months when many venues were imfishable. The bad weather affected the planned fish stocking and will impact on the maintenance bill. N A A had an opportunity to purchase another lake but after much deliberation declined the offer as it was felt that the expense would limit our resources and a bid on a stretch of canal was also unsuccessful. The main issue to address was still access to our fisheries via Muddy Lane this is particularly difficult as NAA do not own the land but only have a right of way. Negotiations were on going with all users including the local council and Network Rail, Southem Electric and the Canal and River Trust, were are hopeful that this will lead to

a positive conclusion. It was reported that membership numbers remain strong and tribute was paid to our past Vice president Terry Collins and other prominent members who were no longer with us. Grateful thanks were extended to all those who attend working parties, meetings and give up their time to support NAA without whose efforts it would not be the successful Association that it is today. From the proposals put forward by the committee the meeting agreed in an increase in the joining fee from £5 to £10 and the increase some concessionary permits from £15 to £20. Also a new regulation that states all unharmed brown trout to be retumed was also adopted. The main talking point in the Open Forum was the Muddy Lane issue and the members were assured that the committee would do all it could to make the necessary improvements. Let's hope we see a few more members next year and that all will enjoy the coming season.

Mervyn Burrows 16


A Night To Remenber T ^ h e r e isn't an angler living that does not like to tell a tale J . or two, lam no exception. It was already a gloomy afternoon but with the promise of a clear moonlit night to come, I put the last of my tackle into the back of the van and after calling into the local One Stop store to buy a few goodies, set off for the lake complex at Widmead.

my haven of safety, my van. Just as I rounded the Island I could see a soft glowing eerie light in the distance. Its moving I thought, don't be an idiot your on your own. I moved slowly and cautiously towards the light. Suddenly the light faded and again panic grabbed me and my heart

1 do not do much night fishing and don't even own a bivvy but I was determined to catch one of those large carp or tench that are present in Collin's Lake. 1 set up my gear having chosen what I thought looked to be a suitable swim, checked the buzzer and after casting to the island I sat back in anticipation. The light almost immediately began to fade and I became very aware that I was the only soul on the lake. Where are all the other carp boys? I thought. I do not normally fish on my own let alone at night but on this occasion, having been let down by a friend I decided to face my demons. At about lam the moon disappeared behind the clouds and within seconds I could not see the end of my rod. I had this horrible feeling of being alone and vulnerable. I began to feel clammy just as a large bat crossed the sky and something touched my foot. 'Oh My God' I exclaimed. 'What the hell was that'? From that moment onwards every sound became amplified. I became more panicky and I was just about to pack up having not faced my demons when an unearthly screech filled the air. I suddenly looked up and my eyes became entranced upon something ghostly white and bright dancing across the lake and disappearing out of view behind the island. I could feel every twitching part of my anatomy tighten as I continued to stare in disbelief What was that, was I hallucinating? I know I saw something. The buzzer remained quiet and I became almost paranoid. Another screech filled the air and I was sure I was being watched. Oh heck, time to go. I quickly packed up my gear having got my light to work and stumbled my way along the bank towards

pounded. I continued along the lake edge and felt a cranch below my boots. Agh !! I cried and immediately flimbled to feel that which I had trodden on. I picked up a limp wet, white object and suddenly my ghostly horrors ended in sublime relief It's a mddy Chinese Lantem. That's what I saw across the lake. I immediately felt much more relaxed and continued to walk to the van. I scrambled the padlock shut and felt comfortable as I drove off under the dark railway arch but a shiver ran through me as I looked back in my side mirror and thought saw ghostly eyes shrouded in a white figure watching me over the gate, or did I imagine it. That's the last time I go night fishing on my own, never again. Keith Moores

Message from the Chairman What a difficult season it tumed out to be. I remember at the A G M waming of the problems the continued drought was having on fisheries and asking everyone to be on the look out for fish in distress. I don't think a week has gone by since without significant rainfall which has challenged us with flooding problems, damage to swims and making several of the venues unfishable. We are currently assessing the damage and hopefully we haven't lost too much of the good work carried out in previous years,by our working parties.

We again suffered dangerously low oxygen levels, this time in Willows, but following a quick response by our team backed up by the EA we managed to save the fish. Regrettably it was necessary to close the lake for several weeks. On a positive note our membership continues to hold steady and we still have a very active working party team. Lets hope we get a bit of stability this season and the opportunity to fish with the sun on our backs. David Marshall

17


Committee Social Evening ^ ^ r e You Ready

Lets Play Darts

Seventeen members and guests took part in a game o f 'Killer' at the Bowlers Arms where you were knocked out on threes, fives, sevens and nines. Seven o f us, including yours truly got off to a bad start, failing to score on ones, but we all managed to score on twos and felt confident o f at least getting one three to progress to the next round. But disaster, I failed along with Ken Hunt, Mervyn Burrows and guest John Colley from Sutton's estate, so we were all out.

Richard Sylvester was out i n front at this stage with a score o f 12, closely followed by Nigel Westall on 11 and John Cox on 9 with last years winner, Keith Moores and Paul Smj^h on 8. So on to the fours where Keith and Paul forged into the front and were both -on 16 going into the next knockout number, but as it tumed out the match wasn't going to go on much longer. Up to the ocky stepped John Cox (Little John) and plonked his arrows into a single, double and treble five for Shang-Hi GAME OVER

Bob Warwick

John Cox receiving the trophy from David Marshall

Champion - John Cox

Christmas Match

T

hose o f you who didn't enter the 2012 Christmas Match missed out on a fabulous buffet served up at the Bowlers Arms with the presentation afterwards. Due to floods all over Speen Moors we met at the Enbome canal. The car park and butty van were on the south side o f Higgs lock and after the usual bacon and egg butty, washed down with mug o f tea or coffee, the draw was made. O f the 22 anglers who tumed up, 3 did not fish and the rest divided themselves between the river and canal, with the canal at the end o f the day producing the top 3 weights.

The Associations chairman, David Marshall was first away and not knowing where to go was advised to fish below the old railway bridge and guess what, he won the match with 221b 12oz with Richard Wiggins i n second place weighing i n 151b 6oz and Brian Cripps third with 91b 12oz. I n fourth place was Dave Smith with 4 l b 11 oz 8drms from the river The whole event was a great success so please support it next year.

Bob Warwick.

Brian Cripps David Marshall Richard Wiggins The Magnificent Three

18

David Marshall Winner on the Canal

Dave Smith Winner on the River


2012/2013 Trophy & Cup Winners

2012/2013 D. Smith

Club Champion Shield Runner up

V. Bonnick M . Pallett

Third place Ladies Champion

No Winner

Runner up

No Winner

Junior Champion

No Winner

Runner up

No Winner D . Smith

Rover Trophy

M . Pallett

Runner up

D. Smith

Twilight Trophy Club Specimen Cup

No Winner

Graham Swait Cup

No Winner

C.R. Sutton Trophy

D. Taylor

Mary Newman Cup

No Winner

Sam Buxey Memorial Trophy

R Smyth

Col. Maxwell Trophy

A . Blunt D. Marshall B. Pallett

Bernard Pallet Roach Cup Reg Ashton Barbel Trophy

No Winner

Reg Davis Perch Trophy

L . Dumford

Alan Betts Carp Trophy

No Winner

Buckingham Pike Cup

N . Wheeler

Ben Smith Trophy

N . Wheeler

Vicky Prater Pike Trophy

N . Wheeler

Seton Trophy

No Winner

Silver Trees Trophy

M . Pallett

N W N Bream Trophy

No Winner

D, Marshall Dick Taylor Trophy

J. Cox

New Year's Day Shield Crownmead Shield/Norman U n w i n Trophy

K . Smyth

Field & Stream Veterans Trophy

D . Smith

Ladies Christmas Match Trophy

L . Pallett

Junior Christmas Match Trophy

No Winner

Winter Pairs

M . Pallett Club Championship - Third Place Rover Trophy - Runner Up Silver Trees Trophy Summer Pairs (with Linda Pallett)

D. Smith

Match Carp Cup

Summer Pairs

Club Champion: D. Smith Runner Up: V. Bonnick Third Place: M. Pallett

D. Chandler

Keith Scrivener Memorial Trophy

Dick Taylor Trophy(Christmas)

N A A Club Championship

L . Pallett & M . Pallett R. Wiggins & B . Pallett

Committee Trophy

No Winner

John Major Schools Trophy

No Winner K . Hunt

Over 70s Trophy

J. Cox

Committee Darts Trophy

19

N. Wheeler Buckingham Pike Cup Ben Smith Trophy Vicky Prater Pike Trophy


Parking for Enborne Canal 8.2 Parking is allowed at First Bridge, Enbome for one disabled Member's car at a time.

CAfi P A R M N S ON

mme

FOR

Two Rod ÂŤ& Keepnet Regulations 5.5 Anglers are permitted to use only one rod except on Aldermaston, The Arrowhead, Bellwood, Brimpton, Collins, Cohhrop, Dixons, Dobsons, KNotts & Palletts Pool where those with a Specimen Permit may fish with two rods.

You m u ^ t have .-n E n v i i c m " 4 ! H Agi-ncy

ma licence if you I'.-Jt im

r r e s h v ÂĽ a t e r fish, eels, t r o u t or s a l m o n i n England o r Wales (ot ttie

Border Esk and its tributaries in Scotlarid) and are 12 years old or o Hod licences expire on 31 March.

5.6 Anglers fishing with a single rod permit may use an additional rod for pike fishing. The two rods must not cover more than 10 metres of water and must be placed within 2 metres of each other. It is not permissible that both rods should be equipped and baited for pike. Anglers fishing with two rods on a Specimen Permit may use two rods for any fishing method but may not use a third rod for pike fishing. 5.9 On all lakes the use of keepnets is restricted to the retention of small fish such as Roach, Rudd and Perch or any other small fish. On all waters carp must not be placed in a keepnet or carp sack or retained by any other method except during a Match or for a short time to allow fish to recover from capture.

THE SPREAD Are you unknowingly spreading invasive spBoie.5 on your water sports equipment ani Bioihitig? Invasi\fe species can affect fish and other wildlife, restrict nawigatlon, clog up propellers and be costly to manage. You can help protect the water sports you love t>y following three simple steps when you leave ttie water.

% Check your equipment and clothing for live otganisins - particularly ,n areas that are damp or hard to inspect. Clean ano wash all equipment, footwear and clothing thoroughly. If you do come across any organisms, leave them at the water body where you found them. Dry all equipment and clothing - some species can live for many days in moist conditions. Make sure you don't transfer water elsewhere. For more information go to Sfirssw.directgov.uk and search for Check Clean Dry

am del 20

Fins 2013  

Journal of Newbury Angling Association

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