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potential for idolatry or an invitation to sin; trivialize it as childish or irrelevant; or spiritualize it away from its rootedness in matter. A sanctified art can show us who we are and who we are meant to be. Janet Walton, “About God and What We Expect from Prayer.” The presentation, “god, without domination,” explored ways of relating to god that are emerging from the realities of this historical moment. Such understandings of divine mysteries will change our participation in worship. They will demand more from each person. They will not exist comfortably with inequality. While Walton realizes that familiar words for god provide comfort, she believes that new ways of connecting to god are urgent now. Jill Crainshaw, “‘She Un-names Them’: Reflections on a Place-based Liturgical Theology.”  How are we to be differentiated individuals and at the same time surrender ourselves to communal ways of living, to a kind of radical intersubjectivity that eliminates differentiation between hunters and the hunted? What is the difference between generic identifiers and personal names? How is “giving back a name” different than “losing a name”? These are questions that Ursula LeGuin takes up in her short story, “She Unnames Them.” This paper explored liturgically-centered alternatives to linear approaches to salvation history. The emphasis was on connections between “unnaming” as narrated by LeGuin and place-based perspectives on liturgical practices and theologies.  Carol Cook Moore, “The X Factor: Tracing Feminist Methodologies in Current Theological Pedagogy.” As liturgists, we dwell in the world of symbol creation and transmission. Those who are committed to a feminist pedagogy are committed to transcribing symbols into conveyors of God’s justice. A feminist pedagogy applied to the study of liturgy will include particular texts, ask particular questions, and engage particular methodologies. Our task as feminist scholars and teachers is to embody justice in what we teach as well as the way we teach.

Other Work and Plans for the Future In our work next year, we will address the theme, “An Alternative Anamnesis: The Marks of Women on Liturgical Studies.” Questions will include: What has the contribution been of feminists to the work of this academy? What if we had not had the contributions of women for the past forty years? What does it mean to do anamnesis in a feminist way? Our plan is to revisit four papers that have been pivotal, inviting reflections on them from members of the group as well as from those who have not participated in the past. We particularly invite the Womanist members of the academy to meet with us for at least one session. Questions should be addressed to our new convener, Carol Cook Moore (ccookmoore@wesleyseminary.edu).

74 NAAL Proceedings

North American Academy of Liturgy Proceedings 2014  

The North American Academy of Liturgy (NAAL) (http://www.naal-liturgy.org/) is an ecumenical and interreligious association of liturgical sc...

North American Academy of Liturgy Proceedings 2014  

The North American Academy of Liturgy (NAAL) (http://www.naal-liturgy.org/) is an ecumenical and interreligious association of liturgical sc...