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Church, with its authoritarian accent on literal and Latinist translation, would make the Lutheran study—of all things—one of the very few places where—for a while, at least—Chupungco’s expression of these ideas could be free and effective. I am thinking that the more recent accent on “the joy of the Gospel” would be a note that he would welcome, as do I. In any case, I always found very moving his ability to be honestly critical while still faithful, while still hoping for the work of inculturation to be revived. May the work go on. It is indeed, as he would say, not too late to start. As we seek to continue to reform Christian liturgical communities—in all of the churches, and not simply among Lutherans and Roman Catholics—so that the Gospel of Christ stands forth in clarity in every culture and context and language, calling us all to active participation in Christ’s mystery—we will miss his voice. I think that both Christian and Jewish liturgists together in this academy may also miss his voice frequently and very usefully quoting Augustine: “In essentials unity, in opinions freedom, in all things love.” Still, once again in this meeting of the academy, as also in his several books and in the forthcoming volume I have mentioned, we do continue to have that voice. It is the voice of the Constitution of the Sacred Liturgy made personal and, at least in this one case, turned indeed toward its ecumenical purpose. It is the voice of a beloved, gracious, honest, gently humorous, faithfully Roman Catholic, honorarily Lutheran, fully ecumenical man. May we learn to follow this example. And may Anscar, in the mercy of God, rest in peace. Notes 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Anscar J. Chupungco, What, Then, Is Liturgy? Musings and Memoir (Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2010), xiv–xv. Wilton Gregory, “Foreword,” Liturgy for the New Millenium, ed. M. Francis and K. Pecklers (Collegeville, MN: The Liturgical Press, 2000), ix. Chupungco, What, Then, Is Liturgy, xv. 1998–2000 Report of the Episcopal Board to the Member and Associate, Member Conferences of the International Commission on English in the Liturgy, ICEL archives. See Frederick R. McManus, “ICEL: The First Years,” in Shaping English Liturgy: Studies in Honor of Archbishop Denis Hurley, ed. Peter C. Finn and James M. Schellman (Washington, DC: Pastoral Press, 1990), 435. Ibid., 447. Ibid., 451. Letters of 2 October 1981 and 9 November 1981 from John Page to Anscar Chupungco in Chupungco file, ICEL archives. Personal correspondence from John Robert Page, 24 December 2013. Letter of 28 February 1986 from John Page to Anscar Chupungco thanking him for the report he had sent in a letter of 15 February 1986, ICEL archives. Personal correspondence from James M. Schellman, 17 December 2013. In a letter of 26 May 1993, John Page informed Anscar that the Episcopal Board “has unanimously confirmed the Advisory Committee’s vote to make you a member of the AC.” ICEL archives. Personal correspondence from Gil Ostdiek, 21 December 2013. Personal correspondence from John Page, 24 December 2013.

52 NAAL Proceedings

North American Academy of Liturgy Proceedings 2014  

The North American Academy of Liturgy (NAAL) (http://www.naal-liturgy.org/) is an ecumenical and interreligious association of liturgical sc...

North American Academy of Liturgy Proceedings 2014  

The North American Academy of Liturgy (NAAL) (http://www.naal-liturgy.org/) is an ecumenical and interreligious association of liturgical sc...