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and Culture Study of the Lutheran World Federation, she had the brilliant idea of inviting the participation of the person who was most known in the world as a scholar of Christian liturgical inculturation, even though this person was not a Lutheran. (Would that we, Christians and Jews, would more often make such invitations across our usual lines! I know that this academy has actually fostered these invitations. I think of the invitations Larry Hoffman has given to me to speak with his best rabbinical students on matters of faith!) In any case, already deeply aware of Anscar’s important books, Pastor Stauffer traveled from her Geneva office to Rome to talk with him about joining the study. To her surprise, she succeeded. Ultimately, there were to be several other fine ecumenical participants from around the world who took part in the study, but Chupungco’s agreement to serve as resource person from the beginning ensured that while the study would be anchored in Lutheran theology and practice, it would also be concerned profoundly with an at least somewhat wider Christian conversation, with a broader and deeper unity amid cultural diversity. The study would also, with Fr. Chupungco as resource, be making use of the thought of the contemporary scholar who was most known for his engagement with the issues of liturgical inculturation. It would be thinking with the very best. Chupungco himself, in his 2010 book What Then is Liturgy? Musings and Memoir, recalls his participation in the meetings of the study.25 But he does not nearly fully enough represent how beloved he was by the other participants, how important his reflections and lectures were, how much he influenced the widely read “Nairobi Statement” of the study, and with what joy the participants acclaimed him an “honorary Lutheran.” His repeated chuckling over his sharing a birthday—10 November—with Martin Luther, as if that fact were a kind of private joke or perhaps a joke on the Roman authorities, was an endearing pleasure to everyone. He became important to all of those involved with the study, and I am sure I speak for all of them in saying that we give thanks for his life and mourn his death, commending him in confidence to God: “a sheep of your own fold, a lamb of your own flock, a sinner of your own redeeming,” as we say in our funeral rite. In Anscar we heard a living voice from the Roman Catholic liturgical movement. In him we saw how important a profound liturgical inculturation was to the vision of the Second Vatican Council. And in him we came to trust that the ecumenical goals of the council—“to foster whatever can promote union among all who believe in Christ,” as the first statement of the council said fifty years ago—were actually real. Alongside Fr. Chupungco, I was the other regular resource person for the LWF Study. It is true that our shared work on this study did indeed lead to Fr. Chupungco and me being invited to work together in the Faith and Order Studies on worship and Christian unity sponsored by the World Council of Churches. It also led to our common work in a remarkable gathering called together by the Council of Churches of Sweden, held in Sigtuna, Sweden, in October 1995, and focused on the wonderfully honest Swedish question, Varför firar vi gudstjänst? (“Why do we celebrate liturgy” at all?). How do we answer that question? But that report of our teamwork and cooperation in various events also does not begin to represent how deep the friendship between us had become and how serious our 50 NAAL Proceedings

North American Academy of Liturgy Proceedings 2014  

The North American Academy of Liturgy (NAAL) (http://www.naal-liturgy.org/) is an ecumenical and interreligious association of liturgical sc...

North American Academy of Liturgy Proceedings 2014  

The North American Academy of Liturgy (NAAL) (http://www.naal-liturgy.org/) is an ecumenical and interreligious association of liturgical sc...