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that “the resulting translation into the receptor language is not always accessible to the audience, because the method of formal correspondence does not take the culture of the audience as a primary consideration.”23 Here we see both Anscar’s sensitivity to issues of culture and his pastoral concern that people should be able to receive the message that is being proclaimed in liturgical texts. This is certainly in keeping with the principles set out in the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy. On a final note, Anscar’s work with ICEL disclosed him as a wonderful human being as well as an excellent scholar of liturgy. All three of my correspondents remember his sense of humor. As John Page said, “He shared his enormous knowledge generously, graciously, gently. And always with humor.”24 In addition to the wonderful memories I gathered from my colleagues, I remember Anscar’s gracious hospitality and his selflessness when the Advisory Committee met in Rome in 1996. He invited us to Sant’Anselmo for a wonderful lunch and he was a gracious host. The day after our meeting ended, we went to the Vatican to attend morning Mass in Pope John Paul II’s private chapel. When the Vatican official counted us before admitting us into the building, he discovered that there was one more person in the group than he had on his list. Someone would have to stay behind. Immediately Anscar offered to be that person and, as the rest of us went on to the chapel, Anscar went home. May he now be at home with God and with all the saints who have gone before us.

Anscar Chupungco, OSB: One Face of the Council Gordon Lathrop

You know this, I am sure (you know it the more from what you have just heard from my colleagues here): Anscar Chupungco was a learned and gracious Roman Catholic priest and Benedictine monk, long a teacher in Rome, long an inspiring Christian leader in Asia, and long an important voice, listened to in many churches, especially when “inculturation” and translation were at stake. You may not know this: he was also a beloved participant in and scholarly resource for the Lutheran World Federation Study on Worship and Culture, from its very beginning in 1993 until its final meeting in 1998. Indeed, he will now posthumously make yet further contributions in a forthcoming volume in which many different people from different churches around the world will reflect on the continuing ecumenical significance of that study, a volume edited by Gláucia Vasconcelos Wilkey, called Christian Liturgy and Culture: Foreign Country or Homeland, soon to be published by Eerdmans. More: to many of us, Anscar was personally one important face of the Second Vatican Council, for us a kind of personal encounter with the “true Christian spirit” that flows from the liturgy and with the liturgy constitution’s considerable accent on inculturation. He was also a dear friend. It is an honor for me to speak of him here, believing our remembering him to be a fine, appropriate and quite specifically human way to celebrate fifty years of the constitution—including fifty years of its original ecumenical intention. When Pastor Anita Stauffer, who was long a member of this Academy and who died at the far too young age of 59 in 2007, was first organizing the Worship Plenary Sessions 49

North American Academy of Liturgy Proceedings 2014  

The North American Academy of Liturgy (NAAL) (http://www.naal-liturgy.org/) is an ecumenical and interreligious association of liturgical sc...

North American Academy of Liturgy Proceedings 2014  

The North American Academy of Liturgy (NAAL) (http://www.naal-liturgy.org/) is an ecumenical and interreligious association of liturgical sc...