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Church were associated with the school: Cipriano Vagaggini, Salvatore Marsili, Burkhard Neunheuser, and Adrien Nocent, just to name a few. The PIL, then, was a school that came to life during the heady days of the early 1960s and to a large degree owes its raison d’être to Vatican II. The method of study proposed at Sant’Anselmo was what is called scientific in Italian, essentially textual and historical. Thorough knowledge of the history of the Roman Liturgy—its theology, history—and scrupulous attention to the texts of the liturgical books comprise the larger part of the courses. During Anscar’s tenure as professor and then preside, this classical approach would be pursued, but he also opened the door to the study of complimentary disciplines such as anthropology and missiology. It was this that attracted me to Anscar as both professor and director. I first met Anscar Chupungco when he welcomed me to the Pontifical Liturgical Institute in Rome to begin graduate studies. Not knowing what to expect and relieved to be able to speak English with him instead of my rudimentary Italian, he invited me to take a seat in his office. With a smile, he asked if I had any questions about the institute. His approachable, warm demeanor made it easy to talk to him, and he had a way of calming any fears I had of studying in Rome. One of my concerns at the time was an edict that had been published by the Cardinal Vicar of Rome that all clerical students, when out in public, were to wear a cassock or at least a Roman collar. I asked Anscar about this—and he just smiled and said something to the effect, “Oh . . . are they saying that again? I wouldn’t worry too much about it.” From that moment on, I knew I was gong to like him! As a teacher, Anscar came across as very learned, but he “wore his learning very lightly.” He was unpretentious, invariably kind yet never lacking a witty comment from time to time. His lectures were always well prepared—and instead of reading his notes (which was the pedagogical method used by some of the professors at Sant’Anselmo)—Anscar really lectured and even took questions! More importantly, though, in many ways, I think he summed up the best of the Benedictine tradition because it was obvious that his life was formed and informed by prayer—personal and liturgical—and at the same time he was very aware of what was happening in the world and the church. He brought these concerns to his teaching and his dealings with students as an administrator—as preside of the Pontifical Liturgical Institute and later as rector of the Athenaeum. When it came time for me to choose a dissertation director, Anscar was the obvious choice. He was a very popular director because he was always organized, would always be ready to offer helpful comments on the organization of the work, and was a great proofreader—especially in Latin. I also realized that in being directed by Anscar, I was joining a distinguished list of others—especially Americans—who had the good fortune to have had Anscar as their director. The first doctoral dissertation Anscar directed was that of Wilton Gregory, now archbishop of Atlanta. In the 2000 Festschrift for Anscar on the occasion of his sixtieth birthday, Liturgy for the New Millennium, Archbishop Gregory wrote that Working with Anscar in doctoral studies was a marvelous exercise in being introduced to critical thinking, to careful research, and to intellectual character building which he always both demonstrated and 44 NAAL Proceedings

North American Academy of Liturgy Proceedings 2014  

The North American Academy of Liturgy (NAAL) (http://www.naal-liturgy.org/) is an ecumenical and interreligious association of liturgical sc...

North American Academy of Liturgy Proceedings 2014  

The North American Academy of Liturgy (NAAL) (http://www.naal-liturgy.org/) is an ecumenical and interreligious association of liturgical sc...