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Problem solving consists of identifying the core causes of a problem and implementing actions to correct the situation. Problem solving techniques is very essential for all the organization. There are simple four steps approaches to problem solving which can be applied to a lot of situations or conditions. Step 1: Define the problem- defining the problem is first and main step. Without defining you cannot think to solve any problem. Step 2: In this step, search for the root causes of the problem. There is a propensity to jump to the first cause that comes to the mind. This is dangerous as it can focus on the incorrect cause or simply correct a warning sign. In many cases the root cause can be found by brainstorming. More difficult problems require more sophisticated techniques, such as cause/ effect diagrams or system breakdown analysis. Step 3: Once the probable causes of the problem have been found one should identify a variety of potential solutions and select the best to implement. There is a ranking for selecting solutions. The best solution is one that eliminates the difficulty in total, making the system fail-safe. In some cases the problem cannot be eliminated so one may unwind the necessities. When these solutions are not possible the problem may be resolved by training staff to control the situation that contribute to the main problem. A least favored solution is to resort to inspection and testing to sort high-quality products from bad. Step 4: The last step in the problem solving sequences is to evaluate the efficiency of the solution. This is done after it has been implemented to ensure that the solution actually does work. It is also a learning experience for the company so that employees can learn from the success and pitfalls experienced by others. Teams are to be used for these problem solving steps. Teams are better option than individuals. A correctly constituted team has a much better-off mix of abilities to bring to bear on a problem. Most work processes cut across functional limits, so a cooperative attempt is required to solve process problems. Management needs to have a structured move toward to problem solving. While it is important to give confidence to everyone to suggest areas for improvement, especially at the working stage where employees are in good position to see the problems and the improvement opportunities, one should avoid a disperse approach. Copyright Š Nick Mutt, All Rights Reserved. If you want to use this article on your website or in your ezine, make all the urls (links) active. ™

Visual Management is often lumped together with 5S, and visual standardization is certainly and important part of an effective 5S system. Does this mean the terms should be used interchangeably? Certainly there is a difference; otherwise we would not have different names for these systems. Let's go over each of these Lean concepts to see where they overlap and where they don't. This should give you a bigger perspective of Lean management, the principle of Kaizen, and the value of visualization. 5S This is such a well-known system, that many non-Lean organizations use this method on its own (or at least they think they are using it). 5S stands for: Sort, Set-in-Order (Straighten), Shine (Sweep), Standardize, and Sustain. Far from a list of steps or a list of mottos, these S's form a cohesive system of action, improvement and problem solving. As you can see, none of the S's stand for visualization, and yet all of them require it to some extent. So, what is 5S Visual Management? 5S Red Tags are one of the most well-know visual management tools. These tags are used during the sort phase to identify and categorize unnecessary items. Beyond this first phase, Visual


Management is used to define proper storage positions, create a baseline for cleanliness, communicate standards, and encourage continuous improvement and problem solving. Visual Management ties it all together.

Visual Management We've just seen how Visual Management impacts every part of the 5S process, but its' scope is much larger. Visual cues like color coding, sequencing, and spacing have a huge impact on any process. Equally important is the use of visual displays to communicate key metrics that are used to identify areas for improvement, measure results, and manage daily workflow. Although 5S Visual Management is a great way to get started, you must also consider Lean Visual Management, and Kaizen Visual Management if you want your efforts to affect all parts of the organization. Remember that, while these techniques originated on manufacturing floors, their application can benefit any kind of work and any kind of workplace. Offices, schools, and healthcare providers are now discovering these techniques like never before; so are software developers and online startups. Soon it will all be common sense. You virtual business can't be left behind and you also don't want progress to stagnate, so get onboard and start continuously improving your system.

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From Around the Web: 20 Awesome Photos of small business revolution  

Business Management boost the growth of your Business

From Around the Web: 20 Awesome Photos of small business revolution  

Business Management boost the growth of your Business

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