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uE t ss cke l i ntu vA Na ti Es Ef in W

May 2014

N

Adrift At sEA A Sailor’s Journey

The Local Magazine Read Worldwide

Surviving

typhoon yolAndA Eric Asimov New York Times Wine Critic Spring

fAshion

skylEr Wright Nantucket’s Next Movie Star

Murray’s Toggery Shop

2 Harbor Square · 508.325.9600

62 Main Street · 508.228.0437

| 1.800.892.4982

Nantucket Magazine

vineyard vines

Nantucket Magazine May 2014


Gary Winn, Broker gary@maurypeople.com 508.330.3069

Craig Hawkins Broker 508-228-1881, ext. 119 craig@maurypeople.com

SOL D

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.

Broker 508-228-1881, ext. 203 bernadette@maurypeople.com

37 Main Street, Nantucket Island, MA 02554 SOL D

SOL D

SOL D

SOL D

TOWN 5 BR and 5.5 bath classic 19th Century Federal style home on Fair Street. Garden apartment with its own kitchen, living room, patio and entrance. Front yard and parking for two cars. Approx. 4050 sq ft. Partially furnished. 4 wood-burning fireplaces. $3,565,000 SOL D

BRANT POINT Well executed restoration of a classic, bungalow style beach house – open, full length covered porch. New guest cottage. Walk to Children’s Beach, Town, The White Elephant, Brant Point and Jetties Beach. $2,975,000

SHAWKEMO The quality and finish work throughout this property is exceptional and absolutely must be seen to be appreciated. This incredible main dwelling offers several living areas and views out over butting conservation land. This is an extraordinary execution of a brilliant design. $10,800,000

TOWN Situated on one of the most charming, quiet streets in the heart of the historic district and just steps to Main Street, this 4 bedroom jewel has tons of potential. Lovely gardens and outdoor space, and pretty architectural details. $1,262,500

CLIFF Beautifully restored 1747 antique home on desirable Cliff Road, a five minute walk into town. Many original features including four fireplaces, wide pine flooring, moldings and raised paneling. Magnificent, private yard and gardens, and covered dining patio. Wonderful views of Sound from roof walk. $4,875,000

MID ISLAND 4 BR all en-suite, excellent floor plan. Located in a sub-division bordering Nan. Land Bank and Conser. Fndtn. land. Access to bike paths, Town and ‘Sconset Village. Great outdoor living and entertaining areas. Detached barn/1 car garage/storage $1,799,000

TOWN The George C. Gardner House - one of the premier properties in the town of Nantucket. Over a half acre of magnificent gardens and landscaping. Restored in 2004-05 maintaining its historical integrity and original moldings, finishes, ornamental trim, replacing plumbing, electrical and new systems. $7,900,000

MONOMOY Stunning Monomoy compound with views of Nantucket Sound, Brant Point Light and Coatue. House, garage with studio, pool and spa, and pool house. Beautiful reclaimed oak floors and bead board coffer accents are only the beginning of the wonderful detail contained within this home. $5,795,000

TOWN Renovated antique with large back yard and beautiful landscaping. Three finished floors plus basement. Wonderful floor plan for families and large groups. Bright kitchen with French doors leading to patio and yard. Two off-street parking spaces. $3,875,000

CLIFF Appealing home on a quiet stone lane off of Cliff Road. Open floor plan w/ half walls & columns defining common rooms - bright, open feel. First floor BR, full bath, wrap around covered porch and a beautiful landscaped yard. Original owner. $2,845,000

SCONSET An incredibly unique offering of over a half acre with a 4 BR fully furnished main house along with a two car garage - guest apartment above for family and friends. 1/4 mile to the ‘Sconset Casino in the heart of the village. Expansion capabilities. $3,350,000

SHAWKEMO Sweeping, 180 degree views spanning from Nantucket Town to the Harbor, Coatue, Pocomo and Great Point. Well built 4 BR home with a wrap around deck, full basement and attached garage. Lot is approved for a second dwelling. $4,975,000

TOWN Orange Street restoration, 1/4 mile to Main Street. 4 finished floors of approx. 5,000 sq/ft of living space. Original wide pine floors, beams, fireplace mantles and doors; large, private yard; roof walk with harbor views; full finished basement; finished third floor. $4,295,000

BRANT POINT Spectacular renovation on oversized lot in desirable Brant Point! 5 BR, 4.5 baths, custom kitchen, tiled baths, garage, wraparound decks, and private tennis courts. Walk to Town, Brant Point Lighthouse, or Jetties or Children’s Beaches. $3,995,000

TOWN Large, totally restored barn. 5 bedrooms, 5 ½ baths, three finished floors, custom kitchen with Sub Zero, granite counters, etc. Large rooms throughout. Two patios, yard, garage and off street parking. $2,250,000

SURFSIDE Large custom home in Surfside with a private path out to the beach and views out to the South Shore. Built on 2.78 very private acres. The perfect beach house for a large family or entertaining. Extremely private location. Original owner, never rented. $2,995,000

TOWN Beautifully restored in-town antique on an oversized, corner lot. Everything has been replaced; foundation, plumbing, electrical, roof, shingles, fireplaces, etc. All original moldings, flooring, mantels saved, stripped and refinished. A beautifully restored home with all of the amenities in a most convenient location. $3,875,000

POLPIS Beautifully sited, attractive Gwynne Thorsen designed home, overlooking and abutting acres of conservation land and the Creeks. Approx. 490 sq. ft. of ground cover remaining for expansion of the existing house or the addition of another structure. $1,795,000

TOWN Two beautiful houses, one restored antique, the other new construction, on a large in-town lot. There are a total of 9 bedrooms, and 8+ baths. Each house has a private, outdoor patio area and off-street parking. Walk to Main Street, bike to the beach. $1,995,000

TOWN Comfortable 4 BR home with nice yard and offstreet parking. Owned by the great grandson of original owner/builder and has always been in the same family. Generous size rooms, high ceilings and original details. Excellent rental history. $1,525,000

TOWN 4 bedroom/3.5 bath home in the Old Historic District. Large deck and gardens compliment the interior living spaces. Top end kitchen appliances, marble counter tops, surround sound system, A/C, central vac., two fireplaces and custom built-ins and molding throughout the home. Move-in condition. $2,975,000

TOWN Renovated five bedroom, five and 1/2 bath home on Fair Street with original historic details throughout the house. Pine floors, chair rails and original doors are still intact. There is parking for one car with entryway off of parking area. $2,395,000

TOWN Tucked in at the end of a private shell lane, this storybook 3 BR, 2 B home is hidden in the heart of town just off Main Street. This historic property is totally renovated including central A/C, storage shed, and off-street parking. $1,195,000

Maury People Sotheby’s International Realty | 37 Main St, Nantucket, MA 02554 | maurypeople.com

Bernadette Maglione

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.

WAUWINET Beautiful custom home with detached cottage/ studio in Wauwinet, abutting over 400 acres of conservation land. Cherry floors, magnificently landscaped, room for pool, many custom features. Bike to Polpis Harbor, Pocomo, and Squam beaches. $1,975,000

TOWN Two beautiful houses on a large, in-town lot. Total of 9 bedrooms, 10-1/2 baths. Each house has outdoor area and off-street parking. Walk to Main Street, bike to the beach. Acquire a large family compound adjacent to the Historic District. $2,295,000

SOL D


ker om 069

We build our business one relationship at a time.

160 Federal Street (617) 330-1288

772 Boylston Street (617) 859-8888 One Post Office Square (617) 423-2888

(866) 810-8919 or visit www.firstrepublic.com New York Stock Exchange Symbol: FRC

Investment and Advisory Products and Services are Not FDIC Insured, Not Guaranteed and May Lose Value.

NantucketMag Issue 1 2014 WeBuildPWM-P ND2014.indd 1

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First Republic Private Wealth Management includes First Republic Trust Company; First Republic Trust Company of Delaware LLC; First Republic Investment Management, Inc., an SEC Registered Investment Advisor; and First Republic Securities Company, LLC, Member FINRA/SIPC.

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3/3/14 6:33:47 PM


Great Point Properties is excited to add Sconset Real Estate to our family. The same smiling faces will be at the same location at Post Office Square in the heart of Sconset. Our team will continue to provide clients with exceptional service in Sales, Vacation Rentals or anything Sconset. Please stop by to visit us in the refreshed office and if you are not on Island you’ll love our new user friendly website.

Chandra Miller, Bernie Coffin, Paula McAuley, Debbie Willet & Sarah Maneikis

P.O. Box 860 • Post Office Square • Siasconset, 02564

508.257.6335 • www.sconsetrealestate.com


Kathleen hay Designs awarD-winning interior Design Firm

t: 5 0 8 . 2 2 8 . 1 2 1 9

www.kathleenhaydesigns.com

N magazine

Functionally inspireD interiors

Photo by Jeffrey Allen

got thirst? 5


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Nantucket resident Joe Donelan believes in creating wines of quality over all other factors. Crafting multiple 100 point wines1, his sons and winemaking team share this vision.

Join Donelan Family Wines at the Nantucket Wine Festival Harbor Gala

Donelan Family Wines – Wine Dinner

The Grand Tastings

Thursday May 15

Friday May 16

Saturday May 17 - 2pm · 3:30 - 5:30pm

6 - 9pm

7 - 11pm

Sunday May 18 12:30 - 2:30pm

The White Elephant Resort

Donelan Family Residence

The White Elephant Resort

Join us at www.donelanwines.com

D o n e l a n Fa m i ly Wi n e s 1

N magazine

Wine is a Journey.

7

Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate

D o n e l a n Fa m i ly Wi n e s


How Do You View the World?

Eco-Elegant interiors by Dujardin Design. Creating rooms as crisp and natural as the ocean breeze that inspires them. Trudy Dujardin, ASID, LEED Accredited Professional +ID + C

508.228.1120 Nantucket, MA. | 203.838.8100 Westport, CT. | dujardindesign.com


Where dreams come true... and memories begin.

CLIFF WATERFRONT

N magazine

Revel in the ever changing views of Nantucket Harbor and the Jetties from this exquisite Cliff waterfront property. Designed by Lyman Perry and built by Winters Construction with extensive attention to detail and quality. The spacious well designed kitchen is a chef ’s delight while the views from the dining and living rooms are captivating. A large family room/library offers a private getaway or gathering area. The views from the second and third floor bedrooms evoke a feeling of floating above the sea, as if one were sailing. Office, garage, beautifully finished studio with full bath, private beach stairs and much more…. Exclusively listed at $14,000,000 Views - Priceless

8 Federal Street • Nantucket, MA 02554 • Sales & Rentals • Independently Owned and Operated • 508.228.4449

jordanre.com | raveis.com

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ket Design Showroo c u t ms n Na MARINE HOME CENTER

Home F ishings urn

SERVING NANTUCKET SINCE 1944

Designing modern custom shutters while maintaining the historic home aesthetics is a challenge the team at Marine Home Center often face.

N magazine

David and Mary Beth decided the Lafayette ‘Woodland Harvest’ panel cafe double-hung shutters would work beautifully with these original windows that were over one hundred years old. They were painted in Lafeyette Snowflake, although the vendor will custom color match. For custom window treatments, you can trust the Marine experts.

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NM

marinehomecenter.com 134 Orange Street, Nantucket 508.228.0900


d

r te

t

PLANESENSE TRAVEL MAKES UP TIME, SO YOU CAN ENJOY THE WINE. ®

The PlaneSense® fractional share program offers all of the ownership benefits of private air travel, but without any of the hassles. Our friendly, knowledgeable teams will accommodate your specific flying preferences, and we will prove our commitment to exceptional personal service and safety – on every flight. The versatile PlaneSense fleet, flown by highly

18 YEARS

Most Popular Destination

N magazine

NMagazine_Full.indd 1

The PlaneSense PC-12s also have extra room for passenger comfort, and the cargo areas offer enough space to store larger items, such as bicycles and golf clubs.

In our 18 YEARS of operation, Nantucket has been the most popular travel destination for PlaneSense® program owners. We look forward to celebrating The 18th Annual Nantucket Wine Festival with you.

Call us today at 866-214-1212 or visit us at planesense.com for more information. ©2014 PlaneSense, Inc. PlaneSense is a registered trademark of PlaneSense, Inc.

trained pilots, can land at up to four times as many airports as similarly sized jets. We will get you closer to your family vacation, business meeting, or The 18th Annual Nantucket Wine Festival!

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3/17/14 12:29 PM


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N magazine


Your Club Around The Corner Join Now…Summer and Year-Round Family & Individual Memberships Available. The Nantucket Club offers members a convenient Downtown location, friendly staff & many amenities: • Two outdoor heated pools (family/kiddie & adult lap) • Fitness and yoga classes • Outdoor hot tub • Breeze Bar and Café; poolside dining & bar service • Drop-in Children’s Day & Evening Programs • 4,500-square foot fitness facility with cardio & weight equipment (ages 3 to pre-teen) • Massage treatment rooms, locker rooms and saunas Renters staying in homes of Club members are also welcome guests. To join, or for more information: Carolyn Hills, Membership Manager 508-901-6780, concierge@thenantuckethotel.com

AT THE NANTUCKET HOTEL 77 EASTON STREET, DOWNTOWN NANTUCKET, MA 02554

www.thenantucketclub.com


W a t e r J e W e l s Gallery Publisher & Editor-in-Chief Bruce A. Percelay Editor Robert Cocuzzo Art Director Paulette Chevalier Chief Photographer Kit Noble

openinG

Operations Consultant Adrian Wilkins

MAY 15th

Contributors Sarah Alcequiez Susan Browne Mark Crosby Holly Finigan Elizabeth Hunt Jen Laskey Justine Paradis Emma Rosenberg Peter Sheppard Clinton Terry Denis Toner

14 Centre street   nantucket, Ma 02554 508 228 0825 14 st albans Grove london W8 5Bp 44 207 368 6367

Photographers Maria Carey Michel Joly Brian Sager Terry Pommett Zofia & Co. Photography Advertising Director Fifi Greenberg Advertising Sales Audrey Wagner Publisher N. LLC Chairman: Bruce A. Percelay

N magazine

Nantucket Times 17 North Beach Street Nantucket, MA 02554 508-228-1515

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©Copyright 2011 Nantucket Times. Nantucket Times (N Magazine) is published seven times annually from April through December. Reproduction of any part of this publication is prohibited without written permission from the publisher. Editorial submissions may be sent to Editor, Nantucket Times, 17 North Beach Street, Nantucket, MA 02554. We are not responsible for unsolicited editorial or graphic material. Office (508) 228-1515 or fax (508) 228-8012. Signature Printing and Consulting 800 West Cummings Park Suite 2900 Woburn

VIOLA

ASSOCIATE S , I n c.

SPRINKLERS

POOLS

LIGHTING


The

Great thaw

If ever there were a spring for us to look forward to, this is the one. With near record cold in the Northeast and Nantucket being at the wrong end of numerous snowstorms, we simply deserve a deep thaw this spring and summer. Nothing brings more light than a new star shining from Nantucket, which in this case is up-and-coming actress Skyler Wright, who

will be lighting up the silver screen with John Travolta in an Publisher & Editor-in-Chief

upcoming movie, The Forger. The daughter of longtime island regulars, Amber and David Cantella, Skyler’s budding career is

profiled in this issue as our cover story. Another source of warmth this spring will be generated by the 18th annual Nantucket

Wine Festival. In its second year under the ownership of island summer resident Mark Goldweitz, the festival will feature over a hundred wineries from around the world, and

will continue its evolution in celebrating both wine and food. To help us prepare our palates for the Grand Tasting, we chatted with New York Times Chief Wine Critic Eric Asimov, who gave us some pointers on getting the most out of our festival experience.

Based on last year’s success, the festival should be a complete sellout and will attract an ever-increasing number of oenophiles to the island. From the calm of Nantucket, we feature two extraordinary tales of survival. This past November, longtime island photographer Terry Pommett found himself in the Philippines during the devastation of Typhoon Yolanda. Pommett was separated from his girlfriend

after the storm and the heart-wrenching story of their reunion sheds light on the deep human toll suffered at the hands of the storm. In another gripping tale of survival, we cover the fate of island summer resident Eric Johnson’s sailboat Zulu, which was adrift at sea after it lost its rudder in the Gulf Stream. Manned by Nantucket sailor and N Magazine photographer, Brian Sager, and captains Nate Oberg and Scott Zaminer, Zulu called upon the Coast Guard for rescue. Their ordeal reminds us of the power of the sea. The Wine Festival deserves an extra toast this year for reaching new heights, as do all of us who endured what seemed to be an interminably long winter. To all Nantucketers, let us raise a collective glass to toast the spring and summer season. Salute! Sincerely, N magazine

Bruce A. Percelay

15


2014 N by numbers 24

A numerical snapshot of spring on Nantucket

N Ndulge 26

Mixology genius Clinton Terry of the new Nautilus stirs up something tasty for your Daffodil Festival picnic.

Neat stuff N 28

Pour through the newest technology in extending the life of a bottle of wine.

N Nbuzz 30

News, tidbits and gossip from around town.

N Nosh 32 BBQ on ACK

Chef Fred Bisaillon and Denise Corson bring new life to the former space of Cap’n Tobey’s and it’s finger-licking good.

33 Fresh Fusion

The three men behind the new Nautilus restaurant on Cambridge Street give us a sneak preview of what’s to come in the former space of 12 Degrees East.

35 hAuTe Cuisine

Wine Festival founder Denis Toner speaks with Chef Erin Zircher of Cru during her winter cooking apprenticeship in France.

N magazine

Nvestigate

16

39 MushrooM MAn

Take a mycology class with the mysterious man behind Nantucket Mushrooms, Todd Leftwich.


N magazine

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N Nspire 44 sky’s the limit

Nantucket’s own Skyler Wright makes her big screen debut in a film starring John Travolta.

N Ndepth 52 Adrift

When the Nantucket sailboat Zulu left port last November, it had no idea of the rough seas that lay ahead.

80 surviving yolAndA

Longtime Nantucket photographer Terry Pommett shares his story of love, loss and devastation at the hands of Typhoon Yolanda.

Nvogue 60 spring AwAkening

N photographer Brian Sager pulls off the shroud of winter and reviews new spring styles for him and her.

N Nquiry 90 tAsting with the times Revered New York Times wine critic and Nantucket Wine Festival luminary, Eric Asimov, talks about eating, drinking, and getting the most out of your festival experience.

N NHA uE t ss cke l i ntu vA Na sti E Ef in W

N

97 the mAn & the seA

As a preview to his presentation at the Whaling Museum this May, author Philip Hoare talks about chasing whales around the world.

Adrift At sEA A Sailor’s Journey

Surviving

typhoon yolAndA

N Nuptials

Spring

fAshion

skylEr Wright

N magazine

Nantucket’s Next Movie Star

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Nantucket Magazine May 2014

Nantucket-raised actress, Skyler Wright, appears on the cover of this Spring 2014 issue in a photograph taken by Chief Photographer, Kit Noble. Makeup by Sarah Alcequiez of Darya Salon. Art Direction by Paulette Chevalier.

102

Longtime Nantucket locals Sarah and Carl Lindvall tied the knot this winter in a beautiful ceremony in the Bahamas.

N Nscene 104

Holly Finigan of the Nantucket BlACKbook is back for another season to give you the low down on what’s hot, hip and happening on the island.

Photo by Juan Patino

Eric Asimov

New York Times Wine Critic


“HArBor WAtcH”

This one of a kind property with outstanding views of Nantucket Harbor from almost every room is ready to be enjoyed this summer! Located across from Children’s Beach Park and close to Main Street, this exceptional turnkey, 7 bedroom home offers cool breezes from your front veranda as well as the ever changing boating landscape. This spectacular home in this ideal location is a

Jeanne Hicks | 508.680.6587 | jeanne@leerealestate.com 10 South Beach Street | Nantucket, MA 02554 | 508.325.5800 | leerealestate.com

N magazine

Photo by Juan Patino

perfect Nantucket retreat for summer or year round enjoyment at its best!

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S DENIS TONER denis toner is the founder of the nantucket Wine festival and the tanglewood Wine & food classic. he is a commandeur of the Commanderie de Bordeaux, a chevalier of the Confrérie des Chevaliers du Tastevin, and has been awarded the prestigious Mérite Agricole for his efforts on behalf of the french wine industry. toner was the sommelier of the grand award-winning chanticleer restaurant on nantucket for nine years. he has produced and narrated six wine and food films for plum tv. he currently divides his time between nantucket and Beaune, france. for this Wine festival issue, toner met up with cru executive chef Erin Zircher to discuss her experience training under a revered master chef in france this winter.

M I C H E L J O LY A self-taught photographer living in france, michel Joly began his career in the studio. After several years working in commercial photography, Joly branched out into photojournalism and traveled throughout france and beyond, shooting for regional and national magazines. since 2004, Joly has devoted himself entirely to photographing the french region of Burgundy where he works for national and international magazines in the world of wine. making his N Magazine debut, michel Joly photographed chef Erin Zircher for “haute cuisine” (page 35).

JUSTINE PARADIS Justine paradis is a nantucket native and recent graduate of vassar college, where she worked at their art museum and studied earth science and ecology. she loves exploring the natural world, and has hiked the hills of the patagonian steppe, bicycled along the canals and coasts of Europe, and sailed on a tall ship across the pacific ocean. no matter where she goes, paradis always returns to this faraway island. today, she lives on nantucket working as a freelance writer, radio producer, and hired

N magazine

hand. for this Wine festival issue, paradis profiled

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todd leftwich in “the mysterious man behind nantucket’s mushrooms” (page 39).


Nantucket to New York

Providing a level of service unique in today’s world, Lydia can help you navigate any sized transaction with personal care that extends way beyond the closing. Lydia Sussek, luxury service at every price... • Full-Service in Sales, Foreign investment, Rentals, Commercial and Residential Property Purchasing and Negotiation • Member of the Multi-Million Dollar Club • Cartus-certified broker qualified to work with Fortune-500 Executives and top international Relocation firms from around the world • Market expertise - with experience and referrals, ranking in top 1% out of 48,000 NRT brokers nationwide • Member of Corcoran Cares • Winner 2011 REBNY Deal of the Year

The Lydia Sussek Associati Team at The Corcoran Group I Licensed RE Salespersons I m: 917.721.7853 I lyd.sussek@corcoran.com The Corcoran Group is a licensed real estate broker located at 660 Madison Ave, NY, NY 10065. Real estate agents affiliated with The Corcoran Group are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of The Corcoran Group. Photograph is Virtually Staged.

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Photographs by Wayne E. Chinnock Photography.

NANTUCKET’S PREMIER WATERFRONT OYSTER BAR This premier restaurant and oyster bar offers casually elegant cuisine in the visually stunning waterfront setting of Nantucket harbor. Guests will enjoy fresh, innovative seafood and an expansive oyster selection complemented by two sleek bars that feature an extensive wine and champagne list and inspired cocktails.

CRU WILL REOPEN FOR THE 2014 SEASON THURSDAY, MAY 8. Serving lunch, dinner and weekend brunch.

N magazine

ONE STRAIGHT WHARF

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www.AnneBeckerDesign.com

|

508.228.9CRU (9278)

|

I N F O @ C R U N A N T U C K E T. C O M

|

W W W. C R U N A N T U C K E T. C O M

Nantucket 508.228.1441


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NUmbers

Nantucket by the

Numbers

62

4.33

98

Average temperature in May

Dollars a gallon — average price for gas in town

(mph) Top wind gust recorded during the March 26th blizzard

O

1922

Funeral parlors on Nantucket

Year of the oldest car in the Daffy Antique Car Parade

800+ Pre-Civil War buildings on Nantucket

2,009,000

$

Average selling price of a Nantucket home in 2013

40 26 Daffodil Festivals since its founding

3,000,000+ N magazine

Daffodils will bloom around the island in spring

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750 100+ Internationally acclaimed wineries featured

Passengers fit on the Steamship Authority’s slow ferry Nantucket

(miles) the furthest distance Sankaty Lighthouse can be seen from sea


Tickets Now on Sale! WWW.NANTUCKETWINEFESTIVAL.COM

Š 2014 Kerry Hallam

2

One Island, Five Days... a collection of over 50 prestigious events


NDulge “i Dream of iDa” l

2 oz Dre’s Meyer Limoncello

l

1 Meyer lemon wedge

l

Hearty dash of lemon bitters

l

4 oz Veuve Clicquot

l

1 Meyer lemon twist

Combine the Limoncello, bitters and squeezed lemon wedge in a mixing glass. Top with ice and stir until chilled. Strain into chilled glass. Top with champagne. Garnish with the lemon twist.

Dre’s LimonceLLo l

4 oz Everclear or high proof clear spirit (the higher the alcohol percentage the better)

l

1 medium-sized Meyer Lemon

l

1 large mason jar

l

1 square cheesecloth

Pour the alcohol in the bottom of the mason jar. Suspend the lemon in the cheesecloth, leaving a little space. Cover and let sit for sixty days. Discard the lemon, strain.

PHoToGraPHy by Kit Noble

A Toast to

Daffy A Cocktail by Clinton Terry

Clinton Terry is a classically trained chef who turned his culinary skills toward becoming a mixology master on Nantucket. In celebration of spring, Terry mixed us up something special for the Daffodil Festival picnic. Enjoy more of Clinton Terry’s creations this spring at the newly opened restaurant, The Nautilus (See Nosh News, page 32).

I


I

N TOWN HISTORIC ESTATE

WITH MAJESTIC HARBOR VIEWS

A Very Rare Offering: One of Nantucket’s premier properties, “Long Hill,” is perched majestically at the crest of historic upper Orange Street and enjoys expansive, panoramic views of the Harbor, Coatue and town. The beautifully landscaped grounds include a formal English garden with brick walkway rimmed by manicured boxwood, lovely rose gardens, specimen trees, a two-car garage and a towering privet hedge which surrounds the entire estate. NOTE: There is a separate building lot on the property that is included in the sale. $20,000,000

Gary Winn, Broker gary@maurypeople.com | 508.330.3069 | 37 Main St, Nantucket, MA 02554 | maurypeople.com Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated.


NEAT STUFF

POUR PERFECTION

N magazine

How to savor your wine for weeks at a time

28 dlareme

For those looking to extend the life of their wine after the bottle has been opened, your answer has finally arrived. Enter Napa Technology’s Wine Station 3.0, “the world’s first intelligence-based, automated, temperature-controlled wine dispensing and preservation system.” Typically a big, robust red wine will last between one to five days after it’s opened. Now with the Wine Station that wine will stay fine for months, not days.

The mad scientists over at Napa Tech spent the better part of a decade developing this system that will extend the life of an opened bottle up to sixty days. Not only will it stay fresh, but the wine will be poured perfectly every time, bringing out its optimal flavors even weeks after opening. The owners of The Nautilus restaurant (see Nosh News, page 32) have purchased the first Wine Station on Nantucket. Will your cellar be next? For a mere $6,000, your wine can remain in its prime long after its time. (www.napatechnology.com)

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live

on Nantucket.

Sophisticated Design Landmark neighborhood Secluded courtyard High-tech amenities

76main.com

1-800-nanTUcKET (626-8825)

A Mount vernon Company Property navy yvacobalt n

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N magazine

Live Life weLL at Main Street’s only boutique hotel.

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N NBUZZ WINE FEST LUMINARy

OF THE yEAR

Renowned winemaker Paul Draper of Ridge Vineyards has been crowned the 2014 Nantucket Wine Festival Luminary of the Year. Draper is known in the wine world for putting California on the map after he led Ridge Vineyards to taking 5th place in the revered Judgment of Paris wine competition in 1976. The victory proved that American wines could compete with those of Old World Europe. Since then, Draper has produced top-rated cabernets, chardonnays and zinfandels. On the evening of May 15th, Draper will be hosting an extravagant dinner with Chef Dean Corbett of An American Place. Tickets can be purchased for $750 at www.nantucketwinefestival.com

40!

DAFFy TURNS

MUSIC FEST PUMPS UP THE VOLUME! The

April 25th marks the fortieth anniversary of the

Festival is getting

nies Bill Ferrall will be returning to the mike for

ready to rock this

his eleventh year presiding over the Classic Car Pa-

summer on Tom

rade on Main Street. While attendees can look for-

Nevers Field from

ward to many of the same Daffy Festival events as

August 2nd to 3rd.

years past, there will be one slight change of venue Salem Street, nonprofit vendors will be located at Children’s Beach, allowing

festival-

goers to buy food and

merchandise

while also enjoying the waterfront festivities.

annual

Nantucket Musical

Nantucket Daffodil Festival. Master of Ceremo-

this year. Instead of setting up in the parking lot on

first

While the acts were still being dialed in at press time, confirmed headliners include Bruce Hornsby, Guster, Donavon Frankenreiter, Chadwick Stokes, Lukas Nelson & P.O.T.R., Ben Taylor, Freddy Clarke and Entrain. The two-day event will be sweet music to the ears of the Nantucket Community Music Center, which is the festival’s beneficiary. N Magazine has signed on as the local media sponsor and we will have more Music Fest news as it comes in, so stay tuned!

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BUILDS AN ADDITION B

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In a major move this past March, Great Point Properties acquired ‘Sconset Real Estate, the oldest continuously operated real estate firm in Siasconset. In addition to offering a physical presence in ‘Sconset Village, the acquisition expands Great Point Properties’ number of brokers and agents to twenty-four. “We are thrilled to have ‘Sconset Real Estate join Great Point Properties,” said GPP principal Edward Sanford. “They have a great niche in Sconset and really know the market, so we know this will be a good fit for both offices.”


THIRD TIME’S A CHARM?

HOUSING CRISIS Local island business owners are lamenting that their seasonal employees cannot find housing for this upcoming summer. As a result of the real estate boom in recent years, properties that once served as seasonal rentals for workers have either been purchased as private summer homes, or are now being rented out on a week-to-week basis. “The tightening of the housing market for seasonal workers in the 2014 season is as bad as I have seen it in the past fifteen years,” says Greg McKechnie of Great Point Properties. “The rental rates have spiked and the supply is extremely limited.” Justin Quinn of Windwalker Real Estate agreed with this contention, indicating that some local business owners were able to buy foreclosed properties as well as dormitories and high-capacity homes for their employees in years past, but now there are few, if any, remaining on the market. One can only wonder if the “Nantucket Shuffle” is now a thing of the past.

Yet another restaurant is trying its luck at the Jared Coffin House this season. After both Brick Bistro and the Essex Room closed their doors after just one season each, Nantucket Prime is checking into the space on 29 Broad Street. Prime’s owner Matthew Sullivan also owns Blue on Highland in Needham, which offers modern American cuisine ranging from seared salmon and grilled sirloin to a Thai bowl and baked brie. Sullivan did not respond to calls for comment on his upcoming menu, so only time will tell if his Nantucket Prime has what it takes to make the cut.

TURNING THE pAGE

The Nantucket Book Festival will celebrate its third year this June with an exciting lineup of events. The

SIXTIES REVIVAL

AT THE NHA

When you think of the sixties on Nan-

weekend will kick off under the golden dome of the

tucket, you usually think 1860s—not

Unitarian Meeting House on Friday

1960s, but come April 25th, the Nan-

June 20th, followed by expanded

tucket Historical Association and the

events and readings under the tent

Artists Association of Nantucket will

in the Atheneum Garden on Sat Sat-

change all that. Through a unique col-

urday. Bestseller Jodi Picoult

laboration between these two island

will host a Sunday brunch

institutions, the Whaling Museum will

at the White Elephant Ho-

be showcasing a selection of stunning

tel (one of the only ticketed

art collected by two legendary islanders

events), and the festival will

from this era: Andrew Oats and William

close out with a big pig roast

Euler. This major exhibition entitled

at Cisco Brewery. For more

Nantucket Cottage Style: Drawing In-

information go to www.Nan www.Nan-

spiration from the Oates-Euler Collec-

tucketBookFestival.org

tion reveals the great works of art and fine crafts that emerged from this creative period. Curated by AAN’s Robert

VIRTUAL REALITY

This summer, Kristen Kellogg, founder of Border Free Productions and the newly launched travel site Border Free Travels, is bringing the very first interactive film

Frazier, Nantucket Cottage Style will be on display until November 2014. For more information on the exhibition and the story behind Andrew Oats and William Euler visit www.NHA.org.

experience to Nantucket. Designed for those discovering or rediscovering Nantucket, Border Free Nantucket will allow users to explore the island virtually ded anywhere. Kristen indicated that Border Free Travels will highlight local businesses and activities as well as hidden island gems to enhance your Nantucket experience. This type of virtual technology is the first of its kind on the island, so you’ll have to see it to believe it. Sign up at www.borderfreetravels.com to be notified for the early summer launch.

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through a fun interactive film that can be accessed for free online and embed-

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BBQonAck WRITTEN bY JeN lasKey

PHOTOS bY Kit Noble

With classic rock and blues streaming from

Filipino bacon, and cherrywood-smoked foie

the speakers and the Red Sox on the screens,

gras. Meats and poultry will be prepared in a

B-ACK Yard BBQ seeks to revive the laid-

wood-fired smoker and finished with home-

back congeniality that made Cap’n Tobey’s a

made sauces that he’s perfected over the win-

favorite no-frills haunt for decades on Straight

ter. New England classics such as lobster rolls

Wharf. “We want to hit a common thread with

and hearty clam chowder will pay homage to

everyone, whether they’re in fishing gear or

the old chowder house, while vegetarian op-

golf gear, chef pants, or even whale pants,”

tions and a full takeout menu will cover the

says Denise, who used to sling drinks and

bases for breakfast, lunch and late night dinner.

manage Tobey’s in its heyday. “We want eve-

After sitting empty for over a year, the former space of Cap’n Tobey’s on Straight Wharf has been transformed into a saucy, Southern-style barbecue joint at the hands of two Nantucket food and drink veterans, Chef Fred Bisaillon and Denise Corson. B-ACK Yard BBQ will

N magazine

be serving up brisket, ribs, pulled pork, and

32

chicken with a side of down-home hospitality that will have you licking your chops for more.

ryone to feel at home with us.” B-ACK Yard’s

To prep for their new venture, Chef Fred and

twelve-seat bar will be stocked with an ec-

Denise headed down south over the win-

lectic selection of bourbons, whiskeys, ryes,

ter on a research trip to Virginia, Kentucky,

and beer. “We’ll have all of the ones that you

Tennessee, Texas, and the Carolinas. With its

know and love, and some that you may not

soul-stirring blues and delicious barbecue,

have fallen in love with yet.”

the duo says that Memphis might just be the muse behind the restaurant they’re bringing

Trading fine dining for finger food, Chef Fred

to Nantucket this summer. Beyond that, Chef

will bring flair to traditional barbecue fare as

Fred and Denise say B-ACK Yard BBQ will

he fires up the grill down on the harbor. The

be about rolling up your sleeves, getting a bit

former Brandt Point chef intends on pushing

messy, and enjoying a laid-back dining expe-

the boundaries of barbecue with internation-

rience that’s becoming increasingly rare on

ally inspired specials like curried mutton,

Nantucket.

Korean short ribs, Chinese char siu pork,


Nosh news

Fresh Fusion Written by RobeRt CoCuzzo

Photos by Kit Noble

A sneak peak at the new Nautilus restaurant on Cambridge Street

The former space of 12 Degrees East has be- from Makey’s menu include tempura fried East

points, but even more intriguing is the new tech-

come the new home of three budding restau- Coast oyster tacos and a duck feast for four.

nology he’s bringing to pouring a glass of wine.

rateurs. Chef Liam Makey, sommelier Stephen

The first of its kind on Nantucket, the Napa

Bowler and mixologist Clinton Terry are fusing Behind Nautilus’s twelve-seat bar, the musta-

Technology WineStation (see Neat Stuff, page

the skills they honed under Angela and Seth chioed mixologist Clinton Terry will be shaking

28) allows Bowler to serve expensive, high-end

Raynor to open The Nautilus on Cambridge up drinks you simply can’t find anywhere else

bottles by the glass. “The machine hermetically

Street. If the success of other Raynor protégés on the island. A classically trained chef, Terry

seals the bottles of wine, and replaces the liquid

such as the Cru proprietors is any indication, has poured his culinary expertise into his cock-

with inert argon gas as the wine is dispensed,

Nautilus will be bringing a lot to the table this tails. He treats each drink as an elaborate meal,

allowing it to stay fresh for up to six weeks,”

spring.

complete with hand-carved ice, homemade bit-

Bowler explains. Now you can taste some of the

ters, muddled seasonal fruits, twists, floaters,

best wines Nautilus has to offer, without spring-

Chef Makey describes his cuisine as a “melt- and even flames. Watching him create a drink is

ing for the whole bottle.

ing pot” of big, bold Asian flavors and more like watching a mad scientist with all the bravatraditional coastal cuisine. He laments that do of a magician. “My goal is to create a boozy

In keeping with the fresh energy these three

somewhere along the line “fusion” became a playground, a place to experiment and indulge

young restaurateurs are bringing to their new

dirty word in the culinary world, and his menu your senses,” Terry says. But not to worry, if

venture, the Nautilus space has undergone a

seeks to right this wrong. “In a modern world a “Nauti-Dog” with vodka, tequila, fresh cran-

complete transformation from its former 12 De-

where we can eat Korean barbeque in a taco, or berry juice, lime bitters, mint and “lots of island

grees East existence. At press time, the doors

have wok fried lobster over Chinese noodles in love” doesn’t strike your fancy, Terry is happy

were slated to open late April.

a fancy restaurant on Nantucket, why should I to mix you up a classic. not want to experiment with different flavors and how they complement each other?” the chef Further distinguishing Nautilus from Nansays. “So with my food, I do not care if you call tucket’s competitive culinary scene is Stephen it fusion, melting pot, or even new American, I Bowler’s approach to the restaurant’s wine just hope people call it good.” Early highlights program. His list covers all regions and price

N magazine Photo by MaRK RaNNey

33


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N magazine

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e house

I 508.241.0862 MOBILE ediaSystems.com

Haute

N Nosh

Cuisine Written by Denis Toner

PhotograPhy by Michel Joly

Nantucket Wine Festival founder Denis Toner met up with Cru’s Executive Chef in Beaune to get a taste of her most recent experience cooking in one of the top restaurants in France. In a hidden valley just over the hill from Burgundy’s greatest red wine estate, Domaine de la Romanée Conti, there exists a tiny truffle “plantation,” L’Or des Valois, where I met visiting Nantucket chef Erin Zircher for lunch. Zircher was nearing the end of a fourteenday apprenticeship at Levernois, a Michelin one-star restaurant just east of Beaune that is at the top of the region’s culinary hierarchy. As we sat for lunch in this rustic twelve-seat truffle shrine, the Nantucket chef described the joys and terrors of toiling in a worldclass kitchen with its brigade of twenty uniformed chefs.

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their clogs when walking through a kitchen’s swinging doors. A Michelin-starred restaurant is a big deal in France—as it is in the US— and sometimes the pressure to retain the star results in autocratic and abusive behavior by the chef. Horror stories of head chefs berating cooks and throwing pans across the kitchen are not uncommon. Zircher was quiet and ready for the games to begin. She was introduced to Chef Philippe Augé who gave her instructions. Although he rules with a firm hand, Zircher saw that Chef Augé was more mentor than autocrat, and the kitchen ran harmoniously with all eyes kept on the prize. As she got into the mix, Zircher was quickly reminded why the French are revered for their cuisine. “Everything came into the restaurant in its entirety—fish, chicken, pheasant, rabbit, suckling pigs—you name it,” she said. “The cooks would then break down the proteins and utilize everything they could. They would make stocks and sauces with the bones, terrines and mousses with the organs. Even the Swiss chard stems were blended into a delicious sauce for a pasta dish. It was incredible to see all of the ooking in France was not a new experience to Chef

ingredients treated with such respect.” Some of

Zircher. In 2003, she spent the summer in the north

these ingredients, Zircher noted, you’d be hard

of France at La Fleur de Sel / Ma Petite Folie in Brest,

pressed to find on a Nantucket menu. “Snails,

which combined a formal restaurant with a more casual

snails and more snails! In Burgundy you will

bistro. It was one of the hottest summers on record, and Zircher

find them on every menu. They’ve been eaten

remembers cooking alongside chefs with cigarettes hanging from

for centuries and are an incredibly sustainable

their mouths wearing only aprons over their shorts. Returning to the

food source.”

States, she made her mark on Nantucket at the Boarding House from 2004-2011, and then went on to open Cru, where she is now execu-

The plates were clean in design, filled with

tive chef and a co-proprietor. After two intense seasons, Zircher

concentrated flavors, and were often re-

decided it was time to return to the idyllic Burgundy countryside to

workings of old classics, much like Zircher’s

sharpen her skills for the upcoming summer. I was excited to learn

approach at Cru. “The normality of using local

what tricks of the trade she would be taking back to Nantucket this

and seasonal ingredients seems to be ingrained

upcoming season.

in the French,” Zircher said. “The results of

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a seemingly simple and straightforward dish

36

Entering the kitchen of a French master can be a nerve-wracking

transcend into something magical when made

experience for any visiting chef. I have seen chefs visibly shaking in

with fresh, perfect ingredients.”


As Zircher and I moved through our truffle-laden lunch, I couldn’t help but imagine what effect the chef’s time in Burgundy would have on her Nantucket menu. She mentioned that there would be a renewed emphasis on a great cheese plate that, no doubt, would feature such Burgundian beauties as Epoisses, Brillat-Savarin, Delices de Pommard, or perhaps an eighteen-month-old French comté. When the evenings are still chilly in June, Nantucketers can look forward to a hearty plate of beef cheeks braised in red wine, a Burgundy classic she saw perfected at the hand of Chef Augé. “Many island chefs are introducing a global twist on the island’s offerings,” Chef Zircher said. “They are incorporating their winter travels into their menus, which ties in perfectly with our welltraveled, well-fed clientele.” So it is that diners on Nantucket can enjoy a flair from afar without leaving the comfort of this island paradise.

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Nvestigate

The Mysterious Man

behind Nantucket’s

mushrooms WRITTEN bY JustiNe PaRaDis

PHOTOGRAPHY bY Kit Noble

Even on an island, Todd Leftwich is a pretty tough guy to track down. The top purveyor of gourmet mushrooms on Nantucket, Leftwich’s public sightings are as rare as some of his mushrooms. So after several unreturned phone calls, I decided to drop by his mushroom lab behind the barn at Moors End Farm to see if I could catch him at work. With his door unlocked, I found Leftwich in the back, quietly sharing a pot of coffee with one of his students. He apologized for not calling me back, but confessed that he’s wary of the spotlight. “I don’t feel very interview-able right now,” he said. Still, he agreed to N magazine

a conversation, and the next morning we sat down across from each other at his lab table.

39


day in your life that you don’t interact with fungi.” Some types of fungi, he tells me, grow on our skin and in our bodies, while others grow in forests, dunes, deserts, even the deep ocean. Scientists have discovered less than a tenth of total estimated species of fungi, and if you want a specific number, you’ll get a laughably broad range. Kew Botanical Gardens says there could be between 700,000 and five million species in the world. We just don’t know. Leftwich’s vast mushroom knowledge is entirely self-taught. A high school dropout, by his early twenties, he was studying mycology independently, fashioning an improvised lab out of recycled glassware. Today, his work has caught the eye of mycologists around the globe. “It’s kind of like having a cult following,” he says. Leftwich serves as a consultant for those building their own spawn labs, and he sells his designer strains to other growers. Leftwich is dressed casually in a

He collects most of his strains from the wild, many from Nantucket. The island’s ecosystem

t-shirt and jeans. His lab is bright,

is unique, seated above a fragile aquifer. “Some of the most choice gourmet edible mush-

shelves crowded with glass beak-

rooms grow here,” he says, “and some of the most poisonous.” (And, yes, Nantucket also

ers, graduated cylinders, and plas-

has hallucinogenic “magic mushrooms,” but Leftwich doesn’t grow them.) Some mush-

tic bags filled with wood shavings

rooms, like morels, Leftwich’s particular favorite, are impossible to cultivate in his lab, and

coated in mycelium. Each bag

so he goes out hunting for them around the island. “Those are the places I don’t tell people

will produce clusters of gourmet

about…my stash!” he laughs.

mushrooms—oysters, shiitake, hedgehogs, and lion’s manes—as well as medicinal varieties used for increasing blood flow and as a holistic cancer treatment. His mushrooms are sold exclusively at the Moors End summer farmstead, and it’s first-come, first-served. Leftwich sells out every day. Originally from Colorado, Leftwich found his way to Nantucket in the early eighties and launched Nantucket Mushrooms in 2007. Even within the obscure world of gourmet mushrooms his work is unusual. Most growers order strains from other labs, but Leftwich propagates his own designer varieties that he nurtures to grow in unique shapes and colors. Mycology is not just a science for Leftwich—it’s also an art form. Bursting with Latin names and N magazine

technical details, Leftwich gives

40

me a crash course in the fungi kingdom, and I can hardly keep up. “It’s on us, it’s in us, it’s everywhere,” he says. “There’s not a


Leftwich is a big picture kind of guy. He relates every part of his work to the state of the global environment, especially to climate change. He wants to spread awareness, which is partly why he offers mycology courses to the Nantucket community. “I don’t care if you want to grow poisonous, gourmet, or hallucinogenic,” he says, “as long as you understand its role in nature.” Leftwich’s eightweek class is free, but there’s a long waitlist, so I’m delighted when he invites me to attend a session later that day.

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todd’s tips for BEginnEr forAgErs

“Watch your books.” Bring more than one guide with you, and cross-reference your findings between them.

When I return that afternoon, Leftwich greets me with a cheerful, “He-ey!” He’s visibly at ease, confidently moving between lab table and ventilation hood. He lays out a dozen bags of wood chips, a blend of oak and poplar sawdust fortified with recycled coffee grounds. The class is preparing to mix inoculated rye grain

Start with easy varieties like chanterelles or oysters— species that are relatively simple to identify and difficult to confuse with poisonous lookalikes.

into the bags, where the mycelium will establish itself and, after a few weeks, bloom. As I approach the table, Leftwich hands me a list of species and invites me to pick one. I tell him I like shiitakes. “Oh, yeah!” he exclaims. “We’ll get you

Pay attention to your surroundings. Some mushrooms are associated with certain tree species or ecosystems.

growing ‘em.” He opens a few containers for me to sniff, explaining that every type of fungi smells unique. I take a whiff, and he’s right: bricktops are subtle and earthy, while golden oysters are lighter, with tones of citrus and even honey.

Tag along with an experienced mycologist and have them double-check your finds.

Although Leftwich doesn’t charge for his classes, he asks his students to participate in his side project, a bioremediation study. Some fungi are excellent absorbers of toxins, and can glean heavy metals, nitrates, and even petroleum from contaminated soil. Leftwich and his friend Frank Dutra, a local naturalist, are conducting trials on water samples from Consue Springs, the duck pond by the harbor. The area is severely polluted with heavy metals, and they’re hoping that

Be careful the first time you try a specific variety. Like any food, some people are naturally allergic to different fungi, so start with a small serving. “It really comes down to people and their chemistry,” Todd says.

their project can help restore the wetland. Cleaning up Nantucket’s wetlands isn’t Leftwich’s only side project. He’s also starting another business on Cape Cod, a mushroom farm in Harwich, with his business partner Wes Price, leader of the Cape Cod Mushroom Club. They plan to ship mushrooms across the Cape and to high-end restaurants in Boston. But not to worry, even though Nantucket Mushrooms is expanding to the Cape, Left-

Don’t drink alcohol with certain varieties like morels and inky caps. The pairing creates a chemical combination that can induce nausea or worse.

wich will continue to have a presence on island—at least for this summer, mushroom lovers can still buy his products at the Moors End farm stand. Plus, his lab is still here, and his door is always open. “I’m not the person who goes to the cocktail parties and mingles,” he says. “I’m

N magazine

the guy in the lab.”

42

As class wraps up and I start to leave, Leftwich stops me to press a bag of wood chips and mycelium into my arms. “They’re golden oyster mushrooms,” he tells me, “and they’re about to pop.”

Even experts can make mistakes. If in doubt, don’t eat it. It’s just not worth it.

Enjoy yourself—foraging is great fun, and can be very rewarding!


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sky’s thE limit WRITTEN bY JeN lasKey

PHOTOGRAPHY bY Kit Noble

nAntuckEt’s oWn skylEr Wright mAkEs hEr silvEr scrEEn dEBut in A film stArring John trAvoltA. Not every sixteen-year-old can say they’ve done a feature film with John Travolta, but Nantucket-raised actress Skyler Wright can. The young performer, who honed her acting, singing, and dancing skills on island stages throughout her childhood, recently wrapped up her first principal role in The Forger, a movie starring John Travolta, Jennifer Ehle, Abigail Spencer, Christopher Plummer, and Tye Sheridan. Wright plays

N magazine

Sheridan’s girlfriend.

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NSpire

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Wright admits that working alongside such big stars was intimidating at first, but she says that both Travolta and Sheridan were very welcoming and put her at ease on set. “John could not have been more amazing,” the young actress says. “The second I met him, he had a big smile on his face.” She adds that between takes Travolta chatted her up, asking questions about school and her parents, and if she was having a good time.

Breaking into film as a teenager may seem daunting, but this young starlet already has years of acting experience under her belt. Wright has played the lead in more than a dozen plays, many of them on Nantucket. “My first ever acting experience was in a musical theater class on Nantucket taught by Laura Gallagher Byrne,” she says. At the end of the term, the class put on a short musical. “To make the [casting of the] show fair, we picked our parts out of a hat.” As luck would have it, Wright ended up pulling the lead role. At the end of the show, Gallagher Byrne was so impressed with Wright’s performance that she walked up to her mother, Amber Cantella, and exclaimed, “Where has this girl been all my life?” And with that, a

N magazine

star was born.

46


It wasn’t long before Wright started acting in full-length plays. She was cast by Jordana Fleishut as Brigitta Von Trapp in the Nantucket Dreamland Foundation’s production of “The Sound of Music” when she was just eleven years old. The following summer, when the Theatre Workshop of Nantucket presented “Blackbird,” a controversial play by David Harrower revolving around the dark subject of pedophilia, John Shea approached Cantella about allowing her daughter to be in the show. “It was then that we all knew this was not just a hobby for Skyler, that she was indeed an actor,” says Cantella.


or Wright, working with John Shea was transformative. The experience entirely changed the way she approached character development. “He made me think about my choices as a character, something I never thought to do before.” Now, she says, she has the confidence to make “really strong, sometimes out-there, character choices.” Wright draws inspiration from old Hollywood. She admires actresses like Marilyn Monroe, Betty Grable, and Elizabeth Taylor. “I’ve always loved the forties and fifties. The style, the music, everything about it is very inspiring to me.” Wright herself possesses a classic, timeless beauty and a flair that harks back to another era. Observing her, you can almost imagine her among those grand dames of the silver screen. Wright and her family moved to Duxbury the day before her freshman year of high school. As hard as it was to leave old friends and the Grey Lady behind, she says she wouldn’t have been able to accomplish all that she has professionally if she were still commuting to auditions from the island. “Duxbury is what I like to call my ‘Nantucket away from Nantucket.’ It’s still a sea-side town, just closer to the city.” She still has another year of high school left, but this rising star is shooting up fast. This summer, she’ll be spending two weeks at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York City studying musical theater and directing “Dear Edwina Jr.” at the Laura’s Center of the Arts in Hanover, MA. Skyler was also accepted into NYU’s Summer Musical Study Program, a three-week intensive workshop reserved for the country’s top aspiring actors. Beyond that: “Who knows,” she says. “I just hope to be successful and happy doing what I love most.”


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N magazine

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51


Adrift WRITTEN bY RobeRt CoCuzzo

PHOTOGRAPHY bY bRiaN sageR

when the crew of the sAilboAt Zulu cAst off its bowlines from nAntucket hArbor lAte lAst fAll, they hAd no ideA of the ordeAl thAt lAy AheAd. The crew of the sailboat Zulu was itching to get to sea. After three weeks waiting for a lull in the weather, they found themselves docked six hundred nautical miles south of Nantucket in Hampton, Virginia—but not a mile

N magazine

closer to their final destination in the British Virgin Islands. The wind was gusting from the north, standing up

52

waves in the Gulf Stream that made a late fall crossing anything but smooth sailing. And so they waited. Every square inch of their fifty-four-foot Alden sailboat had been checked and rechecked. Apart from a finicky generator, the Zulu was the definition of shipshape when it finally left port on Wednesday, November 6th. A day later, all this would change.

b


Ndepth

t

he three

men hired to deliver Zulu to the

island of Tortola were all seasoned sailors. Brian Sager, a twentysix-year-old photographer living on Nantucket, had made this voyage once before and was well versed in the rigging of this particular vessel. Zulu was a handsome sailboat with sleek lines and sophisticated electronics, and Sager considered it the most seaworthy craft he’d had the pleasure of sailing. He was a family friend of the boat’s owner, Nantucket resident Eric Johnson, who had originally planned on making the crossing with the crew. But when the weather postponed their departure week after week, Johnson was forced to return to work and hire another hand. Filling his spot was Captain Nate Oberg, a thirtytwo-year-old professional sailor who just so happened to be in Hampton after delivering the Westmoor Club’s sailboat Bell to its winter digs in the Chesapeake. Oberg had made a career of hopping from one boat to another, so climbing aboard the Zulu on such short notice was nothing out of the ordinary. At the helm was Captain Scott Zaminer, a retired schoolteacher who delivered boats for Johnson several times before and was asked back for this crossing. With cobalt eyes and a salt-and-pepper beard, Zaminer had the sea in his veins. In the hours and days to come, each man would ponder the twists of fate that brought them together aboard Zulu on this late fall crossing. November is a popular month for sailing across the Gulf Stream, which runs in a northerly direction from the tip of Florida and along the East Coast before moving out to deeper water around Cape Hatteras. Pumping three hundred times faster than the Amazon River, the warm Gulf Stream continues what’s known as the North Atlantic Drift. Sailing across the Gulf Stream can be as pleasant and painless as tacking across Nantucket Sound—that is, of course, if the weather is in your favor. The Gulf Stream’s warm current can quickly become a fueling station for tropical storms and hurricanes, and if the wind blows against it from the north, violent waves wreak havoc like rogue wrecking balls.

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northward until it hits cold water flowing down from Labrador, thus sending its current out over to Europe in

53


ith the hurricane season now behind them, many sailors picked November to make their Caribbean migration. Weather aside, insurance premiums for covering such a voyage go down markedly after hurricane season. So when Zulu set sail for the BVIs on the first week of November, it joined 115 other vessels in what was known as the Salty Dawg Rally, a “grassroots non-profit” for blue water sailors that provided members with free weather reports, routing advice, as well as the peace of mind of not being alone on the open ocean. Whether the fault lay in the rally, the skippers, or just bad luck, of the 116 vessels in the Salty Dawg flotilla, seven would not make it across. One would sink. On Thursday, November 7th, a voice crackled over the Salty Dawg’s VHF radio transmission. “Is there an emergency?” the operator inquired. “Roger, has anyone heard from Zulu this afternoon?” “Don’t think I see Zulu. St. Jude, can you tell me where they are and what they need? Over.” “Roger. I just got a phone call from the wife of the crewmember on board. They have lost their rudder and lost their steering.” One hundred twenty-five miles off the coast of North Carolina, Brian Sager was busy stuffing survival gear and small personal effects into ditch bags in the Zulu’s cabin. If they had to abandon ship, Sager could only take what personal N magazine

belongings he could fit in the pockets of his foul weather gear. He double-bagged his passport, his camera’s memory

54

cards, a small Swiss Army knife and his lucky baseball cap. Suddenly a wave slammed the boat, launching all six-feet six-inches of him into a mounted armchair in the saloon, snapping it at the base. Zulu had been rag dolling like this ever since its crew watched in horror as their rudder inexplicably snapped off and floated away in their wake. Controlling the boat by sail proved futile in the worsening sea state, and with no way to steer, the three men were now at the mercy of Mother Nature.


Unbeknownst to them, Zulu wasn’t the only

even a question. Savage seas had ravaged the

boat in the Gulf Stream in danger. Two hun-

boat for hours, and after radioing the Salty

dred thirty miles east of Virginia Beach, the

Dawg officials, Bruce and Becky, seasick and

forty-one-foot Ashima was taking on water

exhausted, called upon the Coast Guard for

and had sent out a distress signal to the Coast

rescue. Bruce watched as Becky plunged into

Guard. Approximately forty-five miles away

the ink-black waves, kicking hard to reach the

from the Ashima, the thirty-eight-foot Nyapa

open arms of rescue swimmer Petty Officer

had also sent out a distress signal after los-

2nd Class Chad Watson. As she reached Wat-

ing their mast and taking on water. Another

son’s embrace and was plucked from the sea,

distress signal was made by the Aurora, 230

Bruce, the last on board, prepared to leave his world behind.

miles east of Elizabeth City, New Jersey, but its crew later called off the Coast Guard when

Marathon when two explosions on Boylston

conditions improved. Aboard the sailboat

Street stopped her in her tracks. She walked

The 110-foot Coast Guard cutter Block Island

Brave Heart, a sixty-seven-year-old crew-

away unscathed, but the tragedy left the Sager

arrived at 11 p.m. to the great relief of every-

member lost his purchase on the deck and

family rattled. Now, six months later, as Sager

body aboard the Zulu. They’d been disabled

broke his arm, and now the crew was request-

said hello to his father from the middle of the

for eight hours, and the sight of the Block Is-

ing assistance. The Coast Guard responded by

Gulf Stream, he did everything he could to as-

land’s running lights cutting through the abyss

deploying two HC-30 Hercules airplanes, a

sure him that he was safe and that everything

of night felt as warm as the sun. But their or-

MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter, a forty-seven-foot

was going to be okay. Just down stream from

deal was hardly over. The wind had kicked up,

Motor Life Boat, and the 110-foot USCG cut-

him, the crew of the Ashima wished they could

gusting between thirty and forty knots, and the

ter Block Island. When the Zulu’s distress call

say the same thing to their families.

seas were building four- to eight-foot waves. The Coast Guard and the Zulu crew agreed

was relayed to them, it was already shaping up Bruce Grieshaber and Becky Meinking had

that it was too risky to execute any rescue ma-

sold all their worldly possessions to purchase

neuvers in these conditions and they needed to

Back aboard the Zulu, Sager and Oberg jury-

the Ashima. Whatever remained of their lives

wait till morning.

rigged a sea anchor out of a five-gallon bucket

was now packed in the berth of this floating

in hopes of bringing some rhyme and reason to

home set for the Caribbean and a tropical re-

their worsening sea state. Dark had set in long

tirement. But now as the Coast Guard Jayhawk

ago, and the crew used the satellite phone to

helicopter hovered overhead like a giant halo,

contact family members and the boat’s owner,

the idea of abandoning ship and

who had since relayed their coordinates to the

everything in it wasn’t

to be a pretty busy night for the Coasties.

Coast Guard. Perhaps the toughest call, however, came when Sager contacted his father. It had been a trying year for their family. That spring, Sager’s sister Jacqui was running in the Boston

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55


To make matters worse aboard Zulu, Scott Zaminer had suddenly become stricken with excruciating stomach pain that rendered him nearly delirious. On a one-to-ten pain scale, Zaminer put up nine fingers. He had taken a fall earlier in the day and thought that might have been the cause. Zaminer also complained of nausea, fever and extreme exhaustion. Sager and Oberg treated him with water and Pedialyte as the Coast Guard doctor instructed them over the radio. What they didn’t know was that Zaminer’s appendix was about to burst. The night was long and sleepless. Just after 1 a.m., Zulu’s staysail ripped in the gusting wind, forcing Sager and Oberg to don harnesses and foul weather gear to retrieve it. By this time, Zaminer’s appendix had burst, and although lethal toxins were now spilling into his guts, he was feeling significantly better, and was able to climb into the cockpit and keep a watchful eye on the men as they pulled down the sail from the bow. With the sail stowed, Sager and Oberg agreed to alternate two-hour shifts keeping watch on deck. Staring out to sea, Sager listened as the wind gradually shifted from southwest to the north. Things were about to get rough. The sun rose with the wind, which was now gusting up to forty knots from the

N magazine

north, running up against the flow of the

56

Gulf Stream. The ocean was enraged, hurling devastating waves at the boat that Sager gauged at sixteen to twenty feet. Without the staysail, Zulu’s sea anchor had broken free during the night,

and now the fifty-four-foot yawl was

Sager and Oberg looked down at their

drifting abreast to the swell, rising and

hands to find deep wounds, but neither

falling treacherously. If there was a move

was bleeding. The line instantly cauter-

to make to save Zulu, now was the time.

ized their gashes. Had the towline been

Otherwise the crew might end up like

wrapped around their feet or hands, they

Bruce and Becky of the Ashima: swim-

would be in a much worse boat than

ming for their lives.

one without a rudder. They were lucky. On its second attempt, the Block Island

After a brief powwow over the radio,

swooped in within fifteen feet of Zulu

Sager and Oberg prepared to receive a

and heaved a throwing line. Sager and

towline from the Block Island. The bow

Oberg caught it, hauled it onboard and

bucked violently as the two men climbed

quickly tied it off to cleats on the bow.

to the front and watched the Block Island

They then cleared the bow as the Block

position itself fifty feet upwind from

Island paid out four hundred feet of tow-

them. A crewmember aboard the Block

line. It was 9:00 a.m. and the Zulu was

Island fired a bright red line through

well over one hundred miles from the

the air and into Zulu’s rigging. Sager

closest port. So began their tow to safety.

and Oberg grabbed it with a line hook and began manually hauling it onboard.

The next thirty-six hours were torturous.

The skinny line was attached to a much

Imagine the worst hangover you’ve ever

thicker towrope, and Sager thought it

had, tack on three sleepless nights, and

felt like pulling in a hundred-pound tuna

then climb aboard a cross between a roll-

by hand. They had managed to haul in

ercoaster and the teacups ride at Disney

about fifty feet when suddenly a voice

World. The Block Island crept at three

screamed over the radio, “Cut the line!

knots, pulling the Zulu through wave

Cut the line!” Before either man could

after towering wave. Over and over, the

react, the line tore through their hands

towline buried itself in the belly of a giant

and whizzed overboard. Fifty feet of line

wave, dragging the boat directly through

vanished in a matter of seconds.

wall of water. Sager was amazed the line


hadn’t

snapped,

and more importantly, that their vessel hadn’t crumbled. They couldn’t read, couldn’t sleep, couldn’t even urinate standing up. All they could do was grimace, and endure, and dream about their first meal on dry land. In the days and weeks after Zulu reached port under USCG tow, much was written about the ill-fated November crossing. The Salty Dawg Rally came under criticism by the international sailing community for encouraging inexperienced sailors to make the journey in unpredictable weather. Salty Dawg officials responded by claiming that each skipper had to make his or her own decision to go or stay, and the rally was not responsible for inspecting the vessels before departure. Whoever was to blame, the incident was a stark reminder that no matter how many boats are in your fleet, once sailors leave the dock, they’re on their own. Thanks to the Coast Guard, everyone who left port on the first week of November was accounted for. Shortly after arriving in Norfolk, Virginia, Scott Zaminer was quickly taken into surgery, where his burst appendix was removed. He spent a week in the hospital but made a full recovery. Nate Oberg quickly found another boat to skipper, getting right back on the horse that bucked him. As for Brian Sager, when another family friend from the BVIs this April, he booked his ticket and packed his bags without batting an eye—because when the sea is in your blood, the sea is in your blood.

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asked him if he wanted to help sail a boat back

57


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Surviving

YOLANDA WRITTEN bY RobeRt CoCuzzo PHOTOGRAPHY bY teRRy PoMMett

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An Islander’s Story of Love, Loss & Devastation

80


Ndepth

it WAs thE strongEst storm to mAkE lAndfAll in rEcordEd history. Winds scrEAmEd up to 235 milEs pEr hour, ripping cEntury-old trEEs from thEir roots And turning EntirE city Blocks into pilEs of ruBBlE. It packed the fury of an F4 tornado and category-five hurricane. The storm surge climbed thirteen feet, wielding tsunami-sized waves that crashed through second story windows. The human toll was no less staggering. At least six thousand were dead, hundreds of thousands of others were missing or displaced. One of the witnesses to TyNovember was Nantucket resident, Terry Pommett. This is his story.

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phoon Yolanda’s devastation to the Philippines this past

81


erry Pommett started going

On November 2nd, a tropical depres-

east of Tacloban. Pommett advised her to

to the Philippines four years

sion in the West Pacific began kicking

stay in the city. He thought the storm was

ago. The longtime Nantucket-

up thirty-mile-per-hour winds. Forming

sure to wallop the coast, and the city of

based photographer had spent

over the open ocean, the weather system

Tacloban would provide her more pro-

his life traveling the world. He

sucked energy from the warm Pacific and

tection than on the coast where her fam-

was an army brat growing up,

strengthened with no landmass in its way

ily lived. After some debate, Gemma

and the rhythm of pin balling from place

to slow it down. Passing west of the Mar-

appeased Pommett and agreed to stay in

to place never left him. Yet much like

shall Islands, where the US Army once

Tacloban as he advised. The two said their

when he discovered Nantucket over forty

tested nuclear arms, the tropical depres-

goodbyes and Pommett flew to Manila.

years ago, Pommett found himself return-

sion graduated to a tropical storm. When

The day before the typhoon hit Tacloban,

ing again and again to the Philippines. For

the winds exceeded seventy-five miles-

Gemma sent a text message to Pommett,

a photographer, the Philip-

joking: “Will you rescue me if

pines were mesmerizing.

I’m in danger?” Neither could

All the colors and character

imagine what was to come.

of nearly 100 million people spread over seven thou-

When Yolanda made land-

sand islands could keep his

fall three days later it was the

camera clicking for a life-

strongest typhoon in recorded

time. He loved the nature,

history. Winds screamed at a

the culture and the tropi-

sustained 195 miles per hour.

cal lifestyle, but there was

Gusts plucked palm trees from

another reason why Terry

the ground like dandelions.

Pommett returned to the

Waves slammed through two-

Philippines this past fall.

story windows, and those huddling in their homes thought

Gemma Albon was work-

they were being consumed by

ing as a floor manager

a tsunami. Yolanda first struck

at a department store in

Guiuan, Samar, and then the

Tacloban City on the island

super typhoon descended upon

of Leyte when an Ameri-

Tacloban with all its fury.

can walked in. They started

Gemma was in Tacloban — or

chatting and then he asked

so Pommett thought.

her out to dinner. Before long, Pommett and Albon Yolanda over the Philippine Sea on November 7th

the Philippines together.

mett holed up in his high-rise apartment in Manila in a state

They went island hopping, snorkeling

per-hour, the Japanese Meteorological

of extreme anxiety. The news trickling in

with whale sharks in Southern Leyte, cav-

Agency labeled it a typhoon. Interna-

said that much of Tacloban had been de-

ing in Sagada, hiking the Banaue Rice

tionally the category-five hurricane was

stroyed and the number of dead was in the

Terraces and exploring the Ifugao tribal

known as Haiyan, but among the Filipino

thousands. Ninety percent of the build-

regions of Luzon.

people it would be called Yolanda.

ings, both homes and businesses, lay in heaps of rubble. Along the coast, gigantic

After spending the summer on Nantucket,

On November 5th, Yolanda was bearing

ships were tossed onshore by the storm

Pommett had now returned this Novem-

down on Tacloban City. Pommett decided

surge. The only sign of the airport was the

ber to the Philippines to travel with Gem-

to leave the city and fly to the safety of

runway. There was no electricity, no cell

ma again. She planned to take off from

Manila to avoid the storm, while Gemma

phone service, and no clean water supply.

work and they would set out on another

planned on staying behind to weather

If Gemma wasn’t in a shelter Pommett

adventure. Mother Nature, however, had

it with her family on the small island of

feared she was dead.

other plans.

Balud, some eight and a half hours north-

Photo: Planetary Visions Ltd/NASA/Science Photo Library

were traveling throughout

For days after the storm, Pom-


sage there. Four days later, while attending a Christmas vigil, just before heading off to volunteer, Pommett’s phone buzzed again. Gemma was alive, but she needed help. Just before the storm hit, Gemma had decided against staying in Tacloban and traveled to her family’s house in Balud. The decision probably saved her life. When Yolanda hit Balud, Gemma and her family hid beneath two tables lashed together in the kitchen. The roaring wind ripped off the roof and the walls crumbled around them. For seven hours, the Albon family of nine huddled under the wooden tables as the apocalypse raged overhead.

When he couldn’t handle his anxiety any longer, Pommett decided he’d leave Manila and volunteer in Cebu, the island south of Leyte. He was preparing to leave when his cell phone buzzed with a text message. It was from Gemma: “Can you help me?” Pommett had no way of knowing when Gemma had sent the text message. She might have sent it before the storm struck and he was only receiving the message now. Where was she? What could he do to help? Pommett texted and called, but the phone lines went dead again. He decided to stick to his plan and volunteer at Cebu. If Gemma were alive, he’d wait for her next text mes-

For seven hours, the Albon family of nine huddled under the wooden tables as the apocalypse raged overhead.


hen the eye of the storm passed over Balud, Gemma and her family ran to a nearby church that had been turned into a shelter. They remained there for six hours until the storm finally passed. When Gemma emerged from the church, the island was unrecognizable. Nearly every home had collapsed and the beautiful palm trees that once brought shade to Balud had all been snapped in half. The hundred-year-old bread tree that stood over Gemma’s front yard had slammed down just feet from where she and her family were hiding. The sun glared down and the heat was blinding. There was no food or clean drinking water. Gemma and her family banded together with their neighbors to hunt for crabs and clams to try to survive until help could reach them. That was when Gemma sent her text message to Pommett. Now in Cebu, Pommett volunteered by creating relief packets of rice, crackers and sardines. Vacationers and tourists from all over the world joined him in the effort. Meanwhile chaos spread throughout the Philippines. The Philippine government’s response to the storm was terribly slow, and disorder seized much of the impacted areas. In Tacloban, prisoners escaped and looting was rampant. Police told the prisoners that if they didn’t return to their cells, they would be shot on sight. Like many other Filipinos, Gemma made the daylong walk to Tacloban in hopes of recovering her belongings. The bodies of people and animals were strewn in the fields. She waded through knee-deep water where body parts floated amongst the debris. The stench was nauseating. In the city, when darkness came, so did lawlessness. Groups of hungry men trolled the streets for food. Gemma did not linger. After finding most of her possessions destroyed or looted in the city, she trudged back through the rubble, through the bodies, through the night to her family back in Balud.


Help came to the Philippines by way of an old friend, the United States. The USS George Washington steamed into the Gulf of Leyte along with 13,000 servicemen. Fifty other US military ships and aircraft followed in its wake. They immediately cleared and reopened the airport where thirty-four specially designed helicopters known as vertical lift aircraft flew aid and medical supplies to remote islands. One thousand American troops were deployed directly to disaster areas to distribute aid, clear roads and evacuate survivors. While twenty other nations would also come to the aid of the Philippines, they would all be dwarfed by the American effort. (China initially pledged a measly $100,000.) For the first time in a long time, Pommett felt deep pride for his country. Eleven days after the storm, Pommett took up his own rescue mission. He learned that Gemma was in Balud, and that she and her family were in desperate need of food. Pommett filled two duffel bags with rice and other non-perishables and boarded a commercial boat headed west to Leyte. Nearing the shoreline, he was aghast at what he saw. The destruction was baffling. This once gorgeous island was now a horrifying mess of twisted metal and distraught humanity. There was, however, one beautiful sight waiting for him

at the dock: Gemma had traveled overnight to meet him. After reuniting, Pommett and Gemma hired motorcycle taxis to take them to her family. The journey took six hours and cut through the heart of the hardest hit areas. The scene was so devastating that the prolific photographer had trouble even raising his camera. When Pommett and Gemma finally reached her family, he found them stripped of all their possessions. They had no food, no money and no home. Pommett did everything he could to help, shuttling food and supplies back and forth and even trying his hand at catching crabs and clamming. In the weeks that followed, he purchased timber and metal for the Albons to rebuild their home. Like millions of others, the journey back to life had just begun for Gemma. Even months after Yolanda hit, much of the impacted areas were still without power and left in the darkness. But there was hope shining out from the abyss. Terry Pommett was inspired by the show of solidarity shared amongst the Filipino people. They’d survived one of the worst natural disasters in human history, dug family and friends out from the rubble, scraped together whatever they had left, and began to rebuild. They were proof that even in the darkest days, the glow of the human spirit might flicker, but it can never be extinguished.


86

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Tasting with PHOTOGRAPHY bY JuaN PatiNo

NY Times Wine Critic, Eric Asimov, shares advice on soaking up the Nantucket Wine Festival Of all the oenophiles tasting at this year’s Nantucket Wine Festival, one man in particular might just be the most revered. Eric Asimov has served as the Chief Wine Critic at the New York Times for ten years and is the author of How to Love Wine. This spring, Asimov launched “Wine School,” an interactive column on the New York Times website that allows readers to learn about wine from the comfort of their homes. In preparation for this year’s Grand Tasting, we asked the master himself how to get the most out of the Wine Festival experience.


Nquiry

“...wine is a food, a grocery, and all the ridiculousness we’ve attributed to wine is an artificial construct of wine culture. It’s just a drink that can offer great pleasure.” — Eric Asimov

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N MaGaZiNe: You have one of the most revered palates in the country—what’s your ideal meal from soup to nuts? eric asiMoV: I appreciate very simple dishes, and on Nantucket it’s got to be seafood, particularly clams, bay scallops and chowder. Fruit for dessert. Good bread. And of course wonderful wines. N MaGaZiNe: You come from a distinguished literary tradition: Your father was the editorial vice president of Newsweek and your uncle was the prolific science fiction writer, Isaac Asimov. Did you grow up always knowing you were going to become a writer? eric asiMoV: No! Too much to live up to, and yet that’s what I ended up doing, though in a very different way than my uncle. N MaGaZiNe: Was there a particular experience that set you on your course to write about food and wine? eric asiMoV: As a sullen fourteen-yearold in Paris, I was taken to lunch by my father and some of his friends. That meal, which was so vibrant, the flavors so much N MaGaZiNe: What advice would you give first-timers attending the Nan-

fuller and richer and more alive than what

tucket Wine Festival to help them really soak up the experience, while also

I was used to in the land of TV dinners and

not getting overwhelmed?

instant coffee, inspired me to want to re-

eric asiMoV: The amount of wine available can seem overwhelming, so

peat that experience again and again.

don’t feel you have to drink everything, particularly at the Grand Tasting. Pick out the producers and regions you are most interested in, and focus on

N MaGaZiNe: Wine writers come up with

them. Relax, and drink plenty of water.

many imaginative ways to describe wine. Are there any descriptors you’re particu-

N MaGaZiNe: How do you keep your palate on point after tasting hundreds

larly proud of that come to mind?

of wines? I’ve read of at least one wine expert who had his nose insured by

eric asiMoV: Well, texture is important to

Lloyd’s of London for eight million dollars. How do you protect your palate?

me. The better a wine feels in the mouth

eric asiMoV: Ha. Insured? Maybe next time I need a publicity stunt. Tasting

the more you want to get to the next sip.

dozens of wines at one time is never the best way to understand particu-

But I think the extravagant language we as-

lar wines, though sometimes it’s a professional necessity. I prefer drinking

sociate with wine tasting notes is counter-

rather than tasting, and would much rather drink a few bottles with dinner

productive and largely useless. It’s primari-

than taste a hundred wines.

ly useful as a mnemonic device, reminding individuals of their own tasting experiences. It isn’t useful in communicating the experience of that wine to others.


N MaGaZiNe: One of your most famous

N MaGaZiNe: How does one overcome this fear associated with wine?

columns is “$25 and Under.” What ad-

eric asiMoV: By realizing that wine is a food, a grocery, and all the ridicu-

vice would you give someone on a budg-

lousness we’ve attributed to wine is an artificial construct of wine culture.

et who still wants to enjoy a high-end

It’s just a drink that can offer great pleasure. It can do much more than that,

culinary experience?

and can really attain profound heights. But it takes a certain level of commit-

eric asiMoV: I would say, forget about

ment to appreciate that, while the pleasure of wine can be enjoyed without

the high-end experience. So many won-

that sort of commitment. It all depends how far you want to go. Either way,

derful low-end meals beckon, particu-

not to worry.

larly if you are willing to be adventurous, to explore unfamiliar cuisines and

N MaGaZiNe: I know many fine dining chefs who will finish a night of service

are not overly concerned with creature

with a box of pizza and cheap beer. What’s your guilty pleasure?

comforts.

eric asiMoV: I don’t believe in guilty pleasures. Why should I feel guilty? What’s wrong with pizza and beer? Honestly, I’m too old to feel ashamed of

N MaGaZiNe: What do you think is the

anything I enjoy. When you are younger, your body can tolerate all sorts of

most common mistake wine drinkers

over-indulgence so perhaps your conscience has to play a greater role. Now,

make in selecting a wine?

my body tells me what I should and should not eat and drink, and I try to

eric asiMoV: I think the most common

hear the message.

mistake is fearing that you’re making a mistake. Wine is far more forgiving than we think. Most wines can go with many foods, so there’s really no need, unless you are a professional, to be obsessive about wine-and-food pairings. It’s not a mistake, but the biggest problem is the anxiety many people feel about wine, which leads to fearfulness and worry.

“I think the most common mistake is fearing that you’re making a mistake. Wine is far more forgiving than we think.”


Nantucket Restaurant week

Spring Join us

June 2nd Through

June 8th

Enjoy Your Favorite Restaurants

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5


NANTUCKET HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION

k

Become a member today! NANTUCKET HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION WHALING MUSEUM AND HISTORIC SITES N magazine

508 228 1894

nha.org

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THENEWNANTUCKET 96

AN EXHIBITION CELEBRATING MODERN DESIG N ON THE ISL A ND CURATED BY ANDREW KOTCHEN & MATTHEW BERMAN OF WORKSHOP/APD HOSTED BY AUDREY STERK DESIGN & GRAFICAS GALLERY, 18 BROAD STREET MEDIA SPONSOR N MAGAZINE


Nha

The

mAn &sEA The

As A prEviEW to his prEsEntAtion At thE WhAling musEum on mAy 19th, Author philip hoArE shArEs his thoughts on thE ocEAn, thE islAnd And his QuEst to folloW WhAlEs Around thE World.

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When Philip Hoare was just a boy growing up in Southampton, England, his father took him and his sisters to Windsor Safari Park where he watched dolphins jump through hoops and balance balls on their noses. After the performance, the pool was cleared out and in swam Ramu, “a killer whale—the orca, the apex predator of the ocean.” What happened next demoralized the young boy. “This proud animal went through the same routine—jumping through a hoop, balancing a ball on its beak, catching its reward of fish,” Hoare remembers. “It was, even to an ignorant young boy, a shameful spectacle.” Many years later, in 2001, Hoare witnessed his first whale in the wild off the coast of Cape Cod, and he was mesmerized. The experience set him on adventure following these massive mammals around the world. “It was these experiences which inspired my new

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book, The Sea Inside, which attempts to explain the extraordinary shared relationship between

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human history and natural history,” the author says. Philip Hoare will be speaking at the Whaling Museum on May 19th. Here he gives us a preview of some of the topics he will be presenting.


on sWimming With WhAlEs… Sharing the water with the biggest predator that ever lived is very scary. The first time I did it, in the Azores, my heart was pounding like crazy. This huge sperm whale actually began to swim directly at me. I now realize she was the matriarch of the pod, coming to check me out — whales are intensely curious creatures, but also very wary. I just thought she was coming for me! I knew that the sperm whale was the only cetacean that could, and indeed has, swallowed a human being. It’s not a nice way to go. A whale sucks in its prey, whole, and digests it with juices so acidic that human beings who have been cut out of the animal’s stomach have been bleached entirely white by the process. All this is going through my mind like a drowned man witnessing his life flash before him. But then I felt—I didn’t hear—her echolocation moving through my body like an MRI scanner. It was the most extraordinary sensation — click-click-click — reverberating in my bones. Then she turned and looked me in the eye. We were close enough to touch— but I knew that wasn’t part of the deal. Her eye was completely sentient, comprehending. All I could think of was to say, “Sorry.”

on trAvEling thE gloBE… I’ve been lucky enough to follow whales around the world, from Cape Cod, where I work with the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies, and where ‘Stormy’ Mayo took me out last year to witness eighty-five endangered North Atlantic right whales feeding in Cape Cod Bay; to the Azores (one of my favorite spots, with twenty-six different species of cetacean around the deep waters of the volcanic archipelago); to Sri Lanka, with its amazing population of blue whales (one day our tiny nineteen-foot fishing boat was surrounded by fifty blue whales, believe it or not); to Tasmania, where I’m writing from, whose coasts are witness to twice-annual migrations of humpbacks and southern right whales; and to New Zealand, where gigantic male sperm whales hang out, off the mountainous coast of Kaikoura. I’ll never forget seeing a sperm whale in New Zealand named Tiaki, or ‘guardian’ by the indigenous Maori, zapping the water with its sonar to stun yard-long kingfish, then rising, headfirst, from the waves with a huge fish clenched triumphantly in its toothed jaw. It seemed to me to be an emperor of its environment, of this vast and wild place that, in our arrogance, we assume we have conquered and tamed and resolutely have not.

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brought under our dominion, but which, as any sailor will tell you, we

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ON RETURNING TO NANTUCKET… I’ve been to Nantucket a number of times. I love the place; it just reeks of history, a tangible connection with the past. Isn’t the Whaling Museum just one of the best in the world? I find its evocation of the island’s heritage very moving. I like the way the cobbles and bricks force you to slow down, to move at a different place from our 21st century frantic rush. I’ve also been lucky enough to become friends with Nathaniel Philbrick, whose work has been such an inspiration to me. When I curated an online reading of Moby-Dick in 2012, I persuaded Nat to read Melville’s chapter on Nantucket, from Nantucket! And I love the fact that Melville wrote an entire chapter about Nantucket without ever having visited the place!

ON THE POWER OF THE OCEAN… We owe our lives to it. It provides 50% of the air we breathe. We evolved from it, and human culture owes its global spread to the oceans. We still rely on it for our food and our commerce. And yet we turn our backs on it. We barely give it a glance from the airplane window as we cross the oceans. We pollute it because its depths are

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invisible to us; we fill it with plastic and noise, and we do so at our peril, as we are coming to realize.

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But it is also a source of great wonder and metaphysical beauty. Whose heart does not soar when they see or smell or hear the sea? I always think of the opening chapter of Moby-Dick, when Ishmael talks of ‘water-gazers’ to be found at Battery Park in Manhattan, gazing out to the open ocean beyond, as if it might save their souls.


IT’S NOT A TOURIST ATTRACTION. IT’S A HUMAN ATTRACTION.

LARRY SUMMERS BETH COMSTOCK PETER THIEL ANDREW ROSS SORKIN

EVE ENSLER DAVID STOCKMAN ERIC SCHMIDT TIM ARMSTRONG

GREG LEMOND TED LEONSIS

JULIE TAYMOR TIM DRAPER

BOB DIAMOND JOHN MCCAIN STEVE CASE ANNE FINUCANE CHRIS MATTHEWS KRISTA TIPPETT

CRAIG VENTER EDDIE LAMPERT JOHN KERRY MEREDITH WHITNEY

BOB WRIGHT PETER DIAMANDIS

MELLODY HOBSON STEPHEN WOLFRAM MICHAEL POLLAN DAVID RUBENSTEIN Past TNP Presenters

Every year, The Nantucket Project hosts some of the world’s preeminent thinkers, leaders and innovators who bridge the gap between the world of ideas and the world of action. 2014 TNP presenter announcements will begin soon. FINANCE FORUM SEPTEMBER 25

MAIN EVENT SEPTEMBER 26–28 N magazine

For more information or reservations: Kate@NantucketProject.com | 508.228.8000 | NantucketProject.com

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Nuptials Featured wedding

B&G: Sarah aNd Carl liNdvall Dress: david’S Bridal Flowers: BudS N BlooMS Desserts: KeNt leBoutillier FooD: hope towN harBour lodge location: aBaCo, BahaMaS

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PhotoGraPhy: Zofia & Co. photography

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N magazine

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the nantucket blAckbook presents...

Top Five for

wine

fest

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WRITTEN bY holly FiNigaN PHOTOS bY ChaRlotte CaRey PhotogRaPhy

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bubbleS, burGunDy AnD borDeAux, oh My! it’s the most wonderful time of the year! expand your palate, meet fascinating characters and sip, swirl and schmooze

4

tAStinGS ‘rounD toWn. i love a good sip + shop! it’s a highlight of strolling ‘round nantucket dur-

5

celebrAte A SunDAy funDAy at Galley beach with the cisco brewers and veuve clicquot

your way through a four-day tour de force

ing nWf. there are dozens of opportuni-

sponsored unofficial closing party. Grab

of fantastic reds and whites of Wine fest.

ties to meet winemakers and chat one on

your best friends and get to 54 Jeffer-

here’s five ways to make the most of your

one. My favorites? beth english’s mixture

son Avenue for a Sunday afternoon in the

time during the 18th annual nantucket

of clothes and wines at currentvintage.

sand! toast to another amazing nWf with

Wine festival.

(Drew barrymore is a fan!) And it’s always

bubbles, beer, and add in the Galley bar

fun to go to the packed schedule of wine

menu while you’re at it! A fabulous way

the hArbor GAlA. Aside from the

tastings at epernay on north beach Street.

to cap off the weekend at an unparalleled

fantastic people watching, this

owners Jenny and kirk make the experi-

location.

thursday night Gala comes with a

ence memorable and you’ll walk out of the

ticket into tasting some of the most inno-

store with new wines and new knowledge!

1

vative foods and delicious wines out there. My personal favorite? Arriving fashionably late. i let the craziness begin and get the inside scoop from friends i see upon arrival, who tell me what’s worth the extra mile and where to spend and skimp my time.

2

Get DreSS-eD. Some of my favorite fashion sightings are from the highly anticipated harbor

Gala. So i get shopping around the town to get ready for the big night! head over to Milly & Grace on 2 Washington Street and check out loveShackfancy, a new line that exudes effortless beach chic that we island ladies love. Stroll down to the lovely on 11 Washington Street and get your fill of stunning maxi gowns that will have you turning heads while remaining comfy in luxe jersey fabrics. coming from work? their print silk dresses from lola and natalie Martin are perfect for that afternoon to evening outfit!

3

intiMAte DinnerS in GooD coMPAny. Make a point to check out the Wine Dinners that down-

town restaurants put on. A stellar choice for great ambiance, service and cuisine is the cru dinner featuring Maison Joseph Drouhin. this special opportunity lets you taste through highlights of Drouhin’s award winning portfolio accompanied by five wines over four courses and get ready to savor those burgundies! With limited seating available, make sure to book in advance.

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chef erin Zircher’s delightful dishes. Savor

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NOT SO FAST...

Meet the Mayor N MagaziNe: Tell us a little about being

ing visitors the island in an eco-friendly

Nantucket’s Honorary Mayor.

manner. Also, worsening water quality is

Mayor Bridges: The Honorary Mayor position

something we islanders should be aware.

is just that, an honor. How lucky am I to wear the grey top hat and be Nantucket’s

N MagaziNe: What should visitors to Nantuck-

#1 fan? I happily promote the Chamber

et know about our local businesses?

of Commerce’s events and Nantucket

Mayor Bridges: Nantucket is a special

as a whole at events such as Daffodil Fes-

place as an entrepreneurial spirit

tival, the annual Tree Lighting and Christ-

still thrives here today. From the

mas Stroll.

salty ship captains to two Toms selling fresh squeezed juice in our harbor,

N MagaziNe: What are some of your objectives

Nantucket cultivates the creativity needed

as mayor? Any changes you’d like to see?

to thrive thirty miles out to sea.

Mayor Bridges: Along with promoting the Chamber’s events and services, I would

N MagaziNe: What originally brought you to

like to highlight some of the island’s need-

Nantucket?

ed volunteer opportunities within Elder

Mayor Bridges: I intended to wash ashore for

Services, the Clean Team, and the many

only one summer of work after I graduated

active recreational events around Nan-

college, but I just couldn’t seem to get

tucket.

the sand out of my shoes.

N MagaziNe: When you’re not wearing the top hat as mayor, how do you spend your time on Nantucket?

Mayor Bridges: During the summer season, I operate Nantucket Bike Tours and also oversee the digital public outreach for the Town of Nantucket. In the off-season, my time is spent teaching classes on social media and volunteering for my favorite organizations.

N MagaziNe: What things concern you most about the future of the island?

Mayor Bridges:

I believe that housing has

become a growing problem for the island. The Town of Nantucket has difficulty staffing their departments, and the business community struggles as their staff can’t find housing. The environment has always been a concern to me. This is one of the reasons I concentrate on show-

Illustration by Peter Sheppard


ttra, David Magone, dini, Claire Hartley, Yoga Slackers

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Photo by Jeffrey Allen Photography

Photo by Zofia & Co.

Photo by Claudia Kronenberg

Susan Warner Catering Nantucket Clambake Co. 508.228.9283 www.susanwarnercatering.com www.nantucketclambake.com

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N magazine

N Magazine Advertising directory

108

76 main/Lark Hotels 29 ACK eye 34 Angel Frazier - J Pepper Frazier re 86 Anne becker Designs 22 Arrowhead 23 Atlantic Landscaping 58 berkshire bank 77 Cape Air 78 Cold Noses 96 Corcoran Group 25 Cru 22 Current Vintage 43 Daily & shuster management 38 Darcy Creech - Jordan raveis re 73 Donelan Wines 7 Dujardin Design 8 emeritus Development 41 epernay 70 First republic bank 3 Galley beach 58 Garden Design Co. 86 Geronimo’s 96 Great Point Properties 4 Grey Lady marine 43 Heidi Weddendorf 96 Islander 108 J. Pepper Frazier Co. 6 Jessica Hicks Jewelry 70 Jordan William raveis re 9 Kathleen Hay Designs 5 Land rover Cape Cod 17 Lee real estate 19 Lola 41 79 Lolo burger 79 marine Home Center 10 maury People - Craig Hawkins 109 maury People - Gary Winn 2,12,27 Nantucket Airlines 78 Nantucket boating Club 78 Nantucket book Festival 89 Nantucket Cottage Hospital 59 Nantucket Dreamland 108 Nantucket Historical Assoc 95 Nantucket Hotel 13 Nantucket Insurance 50 Nantucket media systems 34 Nantucket music Festival 71 Nantucket Pool & spa 51 Nantucket Project 103 Nantucket restaurant Week 94 Nantucket Tents 51 Nantucket Wine & spirits 96 Nantucket Wine Festival 21 Nantucket Yoga Festival 102 Nobby shop 15 North river Outfitter 86 Pazzo 79 Peter beaton 38 Planesense 11 sails 79 sconset real estate 4 susan Lister Locke Jewelry 43 susan Warner Catering 102 sutherburg builders 77 TCe Contractors 86 Tradewind Aviation 87 Vineyard Vines 110 Viola Associates 14 Water Jewels 14 Workshop APD 96 Zero main 15

Islander May 2014 Ad_Layout 1 3/11/14 1:29 PM Page 1

15 Old South Road

508-228-5855 Free Delivery with Minimum Purchase


Gary Winn, Broker gary@maurypeople.com 508.330.3069

Craig Hawkins Broker 508-228-1881, ext. 119 craig@maurypeople.com

SOL D

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.

Broker 508-228-1881, ext. 203 bernadette@maurypeople.com

37 Main Street, Nantucket Island, MA 02554 SOL D

SOL D

SOL D

SOL D

TOWN 5 BR and 5.5 bath classic 19th Century Federal style home on Fair Street. Garden apartment with its own kitchen, living room, patio and entrance. Front yard and parking for two cars. Approx. 4050 sq ft. Partially furnished. 4 wood-burning fireplaces. $3,565,000 SOL D

BRANT POINT Well executed restoration of a classic, bungalow style beach house – open, full length covered porch. New guest cottage. Walk to Children’s Beach, Town, The White Elephant, Brant Point and Jetties Beach. $2,975,000

SHAWKEMO The quality and finish work throughout this property is exceptional and absolutely must be seen to be appreciated. This incredible main dwelling offers several living areas and views out over butting conservation land. This is an extraordinary execution of a brilliant design. $10,800,000

TOWN Situated on one of the most charming, quiet streets in the heart of the historic district and just steps to Main Street, this 4 bedroom jewel has tons of potential. Lovely gardens and outdoor space, and pretty architectural details. $1,262,500

CLIFF Beautifully restored 1747 antique home on desirable Cliff Road, a five minute walk into town. Many original features including four fireplaces, wide pine flooring, moldings and raised paneling. Magnificent, private yard and gardens, and covered dining patio. Wonderful views of Sound from roof walk. $4,875,000

MID ISLAND 4 BR all en-suite, excellent floor plan. Located in a sub-division bordering Nan. Land Bank and Conser. Fndtn. land. Access to bike paths, Town and ‘Sconset Village. Great outdoor living and entertaining areas. Detached barn/1 car garage/storage $1,799,000

TOWN The George C. Gardner House - one of the premier properties in the town of Nantucket. Over a half acre of magnificent gardens and landscaping. Restored in 2004-05 maintaining its historical integrity and original moldings, finishes, ornamental trim, replacing plumbing, electrical and new systems. $7,900,000

MONOMOY Stunning Monomoy compound with views of Nantucket Sound, Brant Point Light and Coatue. House, garage with studio, pool and spa, and pool house. Beautiful reclaimed oak floors and bead board coffer accents are only the beginning of the wonderful detail contained within this home. $5,795,000

TOWN Renovated antique with large back yard and beautiful landscaping. Three finished floors plus basement. Wonderful floor plan for families and large groups. Bright kitchen with French doors leading to patio and yard. Two off-street parking spaces. $3,875,000

CLIFF Appealing home on a quiet stone lane off of Cliff Road. Open floor plan w/ half walls & columns defining common rooms - bright, open feel. First floor BR, full bath, wrap around covered porch and a beautiful landscaped yard. Original owner. $2,845,000

SCONSET An incredibly unique offering of over a half acre with a 4 BR fully furnished main house along with a two car garage - guest apartment above for family and friends. 1/4 mile to the ‘Sconset Casino in the heart of the village. Expansion capabilities. $3,350,000

SHAWKEMO Sweeping, 180 degree views spanning from Nantucket Town to the Harbor, Coatue, Pocomo and Great Point. Well built 4 BR home with a wrap around deck, full basement and attached garage. Lot is approved for a second dwelling. $4,975,000

TOWN Orange Street restoration, 1/4 mile to Main Street. 4 finished floors of approx. 5,000 sq/ft of living space. Original wide pine floors, beams, fireplace mantles and doors; large, private yard; roof walk with harbor views; full finished basement; finished third floor. $4,295,000

BRANT POINT Spectacular renovation on oversized lot in desirable Brant Point! 5 BR, 4.5 baths, custom kitchen, tiled baths, garage, wraparound decks, and private tennis courts. Walk to Town, Brant Point Lighthouse, or Jetties or Children’s Beaches. $3,995,000

TOWN Large, totally restored barn. 5 bedrooms, 5 ½ baths, three finished floors, custom kitchen with Sub Zero, granite counters, etc. Large rooms throughout. Two patios, yard, garage and off street parking. $2,250,000

SURFSIDE Large custom home in Surfside with a private path out to the beach and views out to the South Shore. Built on 2.78 very private acres. The perfect beach house for a large family or entertaining. Extremely private location. Original owner, never rented. $2,995,000

TOWN Beautifully restored in-town antique on an oversized, corner lot. Everything has been replaced; foundation, plumbing, electrical, roof, shingles, fireplaces, etc. All original moldings, flooring, mantels saved, stripped and refinished. A beautifully restored home with all of the amenities in a most convenient location. $3,875,000

POLPIS Beautifully sited, attractive Gwynne Thorsen designed home, overlooking and abutting acres of conservation land and the Creeks. Approx. 490 sq. ft. of ground cover remaining for expansion of the existing house or the addition of another structure. $1,795,000

TOWN Two beautiful houses, one restored antique, the other new construction, on a large in-town lot. There are a total of 9 bedrooms, and 8+ baths. Each house has a private, outdoor patio area and off-street parking. Walk to Main Street, bike to the beach. $1,995,000

TOWN Comfortable 4 BR home with nice yard and offstreet parking. Owned by the great grandson of original owner/builder and has always been in the same family. Generous size rooms, high ceilings and original details. Excellent rental history. $1,525,000

TOWN 4 bedroom/3.5 bath home in the Old Historic District. Large deck and gardens compliment the interior living spaces. Top end kitchen appliances, marble counter tops, surround sound system, A/C, central vac., two fireplaces and custom built-ins and molding throughout the home. Move-in condition. $2,975,000

TOWN Renovated five bedroom, five and 1/2 bath home on Fair Street with original historic details throughout the house. Pine floors, chair rails and original doors are still intact. There is parking for one car with entryway off of parking area. $2,395,000

TOWN Tucked in at the end of a private shell lane, this storybook 3 BR, 2 B home is hidden in the heart of town just off Main Street. This historic property is totally renovated including central A/C, storage shed, and off-street parking. $1,195,000

Maury People Sotheby’s International Realty | 37 Main St, Nantucket, MA 02554 | maurypeople.com

Bernadette Maglione

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.

WAUWINET Beautiful custom home with detached cottage/ studio in Wauwinet, abutting over 400 acres of conservation land. Cherry floors, magnificently landscaped, room for pool, many custom features. Bike to Polpis Harbor, Pocomo, and Squam beaches. $1,975,000

TOWN Two beautiful houses on a large, in-town lot. Total of 9 bedrooms, 10-1/2 baths. Each house has outdoor area and off-street parking. Walk to Main Street, bike to the beach. Acquire a large family compound adjacent to the Historic District. $2,295,000

SOL D


uE t ss cke l i ntu vA Na ti Es Ef in W

May 2014

N

Adrift At sEA A Sailor’s Journey

The Local Magazine Read Worldwide

Surviving

typhoon yolAndA Eric Asimov New York Times Wine Critic Spring

fAshion

skylEr Wright Nantucket’s Next Movie Star

Murray’s Toggery Shop

2 Harbor Square · 508.325.9600

62 Main Street · 508.228.0437

| 1.800.892.4982

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