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Dear Fresher, This year, Catz Freshers are receiving an additional Catz JCR Publication – a Subject Guide. We commissioned our year group to create a guide designed to assist in adjustment to life and work at Catz, specific to each subject. Our contemporaries reacted with typical Catz spirit and we are so proud of the results. In each guide should be a brief intro to what your first year will be like, with contact details, relevant links, helpful tips and useful information. By no means will all of it be relevant (or even make sense) before you arrive, but hopefully having a gist of how the year will turn out will prove helpful, and we suggest you read it in the summer. We also recommend that you keep it in mind throughout the year, some of the points may only become relevant later in the year. We ask that you don’t distribute these guides outside the Catz community – it’s by Catz, for Catz. We have tried to verify all the information, but some will inevitably change, such as who will supervise you. Please accept our apologies if that is the case. For this Music guide we would like to credit and thank Jonny and Frances. Please remember there is a multitude of people for you to come to with questions – us, the Subject Reps, your college parents, and others in the main Freshers’ Guide. We all want to help. Looking forward to meeting you – enjoy the rest of the summer! Catz Love Beth and Mikey

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Music Guide Introduction Hi incoming Catz musos! Well done for choosing the best college and subject (did you ever doubt it?) But I’m guessing you’re wondering who we actually are? In 2nd year there’s me (Jonny) and Frances and then in 3rd year Gregor Forbes and Hannah Bell (who also happen to be our college parents). If you have any questions at all feel free to contact Jonny (email: jpv33@cam.ac.uk mob: 07510520239) or Frances (email: fl314@cam.ac.uk mob: 07549523001). Below is some general information that we hope you will find helpful. The Faculty will provide a more detailed outline of your course during your first week. Modules Music and musicology today (2 parts) • 90 minute written paper, 8 lectures, 4 supervisions • Only module with an option: extended essay, recital (15mins) or free Composition • Extended essay - 3000 words on a subject of your choice (but requires approval). If you choose to do this then you’ll have to organise supervisions with a supervisor, ideally someone who’s an expert on the subject • Deadline at the beginning of the Easter (summer) term • Recital - 15 minutes, including getting on and off stage and between movements, on one instrument, must find your own accompanist but there are plenty around, takes place at the end of the Lent term. • Free composition – at least 6 mins long using 3 or more players. Must submit both the score (in conventional notation) and a recording. Lots of people were racing against time this year trying to arrange a recording (booking players and equipment) so make sure you finish in good time. • As it was a new course, there were a number of problems for our year but they will have made adjustments to make it better for your year. It is basically an introduction to the different types of musicology; how you might study music, musical concepts and theories History 1 (2 parts) • Part 1) Gregorian chant up to the Notre Dame School of polyphony, 6 lectures, 4 supervisions • Part 2) Dufay, Byrd and Palestrina, 6 lectures, 4 supervisions • 3 hour written paper • You'll study specific composers and pieces with reference to the cultural & political circumstances and the performance practices of the period History 2 • 3 hour written paper, 12 lectures, 6 supervisions • 1750-1914 - large period of time focussing on Beethoven and his influence. • Main genres examined are opera, the symphony, the string quartet and Song cycles. Again studying some specific works and composers. !!


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There is a lot to cover in this paper so some preliminary reading would probably be helpful (see below) Analysis (2 parts) • 3 hour written exam, 12 Lectures, 12 Supervisions • Aural analysis of a movement of a Bach Cantata. You'll get lots of practice in supervisions but it is definitely worth working on your aural skills. Familiarise yourself with a couple of cantatas with the score (you can find them all on imslp.org). Obviously you can’t get to know all of the cantatas but understanding the genre will certainly help • Score-based analysis of a movement, usually a string quartet or piano sonata. It will be useful to understand some of the most common forms like Sonata Form, Rondo form, Sonata-Rondo etc. (Caplin’s Classical Forms and Rosen’s Sonata Forms are both very useful) • You will get plenty of practice of both types in supervisions but it is definitely worth doing some score-reading while listening to it - it will help with both! Tonal Skills I & 2 These are divided up into small parts • 3 hour exam (without piano): completing a piece of 4 part 16th century polyphony (2 or 3 parts given already) and writing a piano accompaniment to a vocal line in the style of Schubert • 28 hour takeaway paper: Fugal exposition and either a String Quartet in rounded binary movement, set of piano variations or variations on a ground bass o This one sounds really scary but seriously don’t worry about it; if you work hard during the year the you will be more than ready for it when the time comes • Keyboard skills - figured bass, transposition, harmonisation and scorereading (there are some new jazz alternatives to the harmonisation and figured bass and it is possible to do parts of it on another instrument) • Aural skills – you’ll have lessons every week For modules 1-4 there are lecture series, usually 8-12 per module. There are also lectures in harmony and in counterpoint to help with the tonal skills. •

Supervisions Edward Wickham, our Director of Studies (DoS), chooses a lot of your supervisors while some are chosen by the faculty. For musicology you'll have 4 supervisions in total (although it might change for your year) - the supervisor will be chosen by the faculty. For the 2 history papers you'll have 4 supervisions per term; the second half of History 1 will definitely be supervised by Edward and the first half probably by Susan Rankin (who also lectures the first half and is awesome). History 2 might vary but we had Annette Armitage. For analysis and harmony/counterpoint you'll have 6 per term (I think). These will both most likely be supervised by Freddie Brown, an old Catz organ scholar. You'll also have keyboard skills supervisions but the way they are run depends on your supervisor. We had a guy called Jonathan Hellyer-Jones who taught !!


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us for an hour but in a group of 3 and spread over all 3 terms but some will do it on an individual basis in half hour slots. Aural classes take place either once or twice a week depending on which group you're in - you will get sorted by standard at the beginning of the year (not something to worry about at all!) Reading Both the Catz library and the faculty library are very well stocked so buying books isn't that necessary (unless you want your own copies) and you can always ask Catz to buy any essential books they don't have. Having said that I have found some books useful to own (although they can be quite expensive). Contact us if you want further advice Polyphonic composition by Owen Swindale - very useful for counterpoint Figured harmony at the keyboard part 1 by R.O Morris - my keyboard supervisor required me to get it and it is very useful Rosen - The Classical Style and The Romantic Generation Nicholas Cook - A Guide to Musical Analysis A book of Mozart or Haydn string quartets Though not particularly useful in First Year Alex Ross’ The Rest is Noise is a great introduction to 20th century music. You can always wait and see what you find useful once you're here. Preliminary Reading The most useful thing you could do before getting here is probably working on some aural skills/your inner ear. Get some miniature scores and read them whilst listening to the piece and it will develop quite quickly (I wish I had done more beforehand!) Reading wise, the History 2 and Musicology modules probably require the most background reading. If you can find a copy of Taruskin’s Oxford History of Western Music it is extremely useful (particularly the volumes on 17th-18th and 19th Century) but they are enormous and expensive so don’t worry if you can’t (Catz Library has a copy so you can just use it when you get here). The 2 Rosen books and the Cook mentioned above are extremely useful and worth having a look at. Listening If you don’t already, start listening to Radio 3. In the car, in the shower, doing the washing up just switch it on and try and guess what’s playing. If you’re really keen the website has some fantastic programme series, Composer of the Week and Discovering Music are probably most useful though The Essay has some good cultural stuff if you’re interested. Listening to lots of music beforehand will be particularly useful for History 1 and 2. History 1: Perotin, Leonin, Dufay, Palestrina, Byrd (extra: Dunstable, Ockeghem, Obrecht the Missa Caput, Josquin) History 2: The well-known works of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Berlioz, Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Liszt, Weber (Der !!


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Freischutz), Wagner (Parsifal, famous scenes from The Ring and Tristan), Bruckner, Brahms, Dvorak, Tchaikovsky, Elgar (violin concerto), Verdi (La traviata), Strauss (Salome), Mahler (Symphony 1), Sibelius (Symphony 4). Try to watch an opera by Mozart, Rossini, Verdi and Wagner if possible. Tons of great productions on youtube. Links www.bbc.co.uk/radio3 – composer of the week is great, listen to as many of the canonic composers as possible and it will give you a good grounding www.talkclassical.com – classical music forum www.camtools.cam.ac.uk – lecture notes and other useful info will be posted up here once you’ve started www.webmail.hermes.cam.ac.uk – this will be your email account www.grooveshark.com – use this if spotify/youtube isn’t working search.lib.cam.ac.uk – the Cambridge library website www.imslp.com – free scores www.scorser.com – more illegal free scores Locations All lectures take place in the Faculty (most probably in Lecture Room 2 or the Recital Room. The Faculty is on the Sidgwick Site, on West Road, right opposite Chad’s (Catz 2nd year accommodation where both of us will be living). Supervisions take place in a variety of places, most often at the College of your supervisor. Edward’s room, where you will have DoS meetings and any supervisions with him, is A2 which is on the 1st floor of the first staircase as you enter main court. Music Faculty: http://map.cam.ac.uk/?inst=fom#52.202417,0.109010,18 Tips Try and get into the habit of practicing your instrument in the morning if you’re not already. If you’re super organised you can book out rooms in advance in the faculty which are much nicer than the college ones (which come complete with the Top 40 being blasted out of the gym two doors away and authentic 50s nuclear bunker decor) Be discriminating. There’s tons of performance opportunities and its easy to just say yes to everything. If possible make sure you know what you’re letting yourself in for – when you’ve got an essay in the next day you’re not going to want to be stuck in rehearsal with a substandard choir/orchestra Find out quickly how to be the most productive. Personally I realised halfway through the first term that I needed to work in the library in order to concentrate. Getting a bike is really useful. Don’t forget about lights – these are a legal requirement – and a bell helps keep the tourists away. Food wise both Frances and I have only really bothered with buying dinner in hall and then had cereal for breakfast and sandwiches for !!


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lunch. Try and suss out what works for you early on and then make sure you keep stocked up from Sainsbury’s. Hall doesn’t have fantastic food (£2-£3 per meal) but particularly in first term it’s a good place to get to know people and saves you the hassle of cooking in the tiny Island Site gyp rooms. Also if you’re in the choir then you’ll get free normal hall on Thursday and free formal on Sunday (Hogwart’s-style 4 course meal) as well as free brunch (English breakfast) if you do Eucharist on Sunday morning. Even if it seems otherwise, Edward probably doesn’t hate you (it’s a common misconception!). If you think you’ll use it get a Spotify subscription for £5 a month – it’s definitely worth it. Fresher’s fairs at the start of term can be a bit claustrophobic. Try and think about interested you want to pursue before you get here (there’s a society for pretty much everything) if you want to save yourself trouble and time. Conclusion Basically ENJOY THE REST OF YOUR SUMMER. CAMBRIDGE IS REALLY FUN (and a lot of work, but more fun) AND WE CAN’T WAIT TO MEET YOU!

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