Issuu on Google+

marta minujin:Marta MInujin

3/4/10

12:35 PM

Page 20

Artists / Artistas

Short Circuit | Cortocircuito

Marta Minujín 1966-1968 M

By / por Daniel R. Quiles (Chicago)

INUCODEs, the Americas Society’s current exhibition of archival materials and a multimedia environment related to participatory works by Marta Minujín in the late 1960s, provides an opportunity to reconsider the Argentine artist’s projects between 1966 and 1968 that were either produced abroad or make reference to international exchange. During this period she was primarily based in New York, producing art that incorporated viewers into shared social experiences, in a manner strikingly similar to some widely discussed examples of contemporary “relational aesthetics”.1 Beyond facilitating this accessible dimension of her work, however, Minujín’s uses of media and choices of participants and venues also served to expose the circuits of cultural and political exchange in which these institutions and individuals—including the artist herself—were ensconced. In October 1966 at the Instituto Torcuato di Tella in Buenos Aires, Minujín staged Simultaneidad en simultaneidad [Simultaneity in Simultaneity], the Argentine installment of the Three Country Happening, a collaboration with Allan Kaprow in New York and Wolf Vostell in Berlin in which all three artists executed simultaneous happenings.2 In the final phase of her project, Minujín recorded members of the Argentine media via film and audiorecording, subjecting those normally in control of mass communication to its mediatic capabilities. It should also be noted that, in anticipation of her coming move abroad, the Three Country Happening instantiated an international artistic network between Minujín and the Di Tella and artists and institutions in other cities.3 Toward the end of that year, the artist arrived in New York on a Guggenheim Fellowship. In April 1967 she created Circuit, a media environment for three groups for the Pavillon de la Jeunesse at the Montreal World’s Fair. One of the groups watched films and other televised media in a central auditorium while the other two were appraised of the first group’s activity via radio and audio broadcast.4 Minujín selected viewers based on questionnaires placed in Montreal newspapers that surveyed personal details such as name, sex, height, hair color, and fashion preference; a computer organized the three groups based on shared characteristics. The project literalized the mass media’s division of receivers of information into different demographics with different levels of access to technology and content. Minucode was organized and executed in May and June 1968 at the Center for Inter-American Relations (renamed the Americas Society in 1984). Questionnaires were again used to divvy participants into one of four professions: politics, art, fashion, or the mass media. Four cocktail parties were held for each of the groups. At each event, eight 20

INUCODEs, la muestra que incluye material de archivo y una ambientación medial relacionados con las obras de Marta Minujín de fines de los años sesenta que involucraban la participación del público y que presenta actualmente la Americas Society, ofrece la oportunidad de reconsiderar los proyectos de esta artista argentina referidos al intercambio internacional o realizados en el exterior entre 1966 y 1968. Durante ese período en el que residió principalmente en Nueva York, su producción artística hacía partícipe al espectador de experiencias sociales compartidas de un modo llamativamente similar al de algunos ejemplos de “estética relacional”1 ampliamente analizados. Sin embargo, más allá de facilitar esta dimensión accesible de su obra, la utilización de medios y tecnologías que hace Minujín y sus elecciones de participantes y escenarios también sirvieron para poner al descubierto los circuitos de intercambio cultural y político en los que estas instituciones e individuos − entre los que se incluía la propia artista − se encontraban cómodamente instalados. En octubre de 1966, en el Instituto Torcuato di Tella de Buenos Aires, Minujín montó Simultaneidad en simultaneidad [Simultaneity in Simultaneity], la contribución argentina a Three Country Happening, un proyecto realizado en colaboración con Allan Kaprow en Nueva York y Wolf Vostell en Berlín, en el cual los tres artistas presentaban happenings en forma simultánea.2 En la fase final de su proyecto, Minujín realizó grabaciones fílmicas y sonoras de figuras representativas de los medios de comunicación de Argentina, sometiendo a aquéllos que normalmente se encontraban en control de la comunicación masiva a la demostración de sus habilidades mediáticas. También es de destacar que, anticipándose a su próxima mudanza al exterior, la obra Three Country Happening inauguró una red artística internacional entre Minujín y los artistas del Di Tella e instituciones de diversas ciudades.3

M

Hacia finales de ese año, la artista se traslada a Nueva York como ganadora de una beca Guggenheim. En abril de 1967, crea para el Pabellón de la Juventud de la Feria Mundial de Montreal la obra Circuit, una ambientación integrada por tres grupos. Los integrantes de uno de los grupos miraron filmes y otros tipos de material televisado en un auditorio central, mientras que los dos grupos restantes pudieron evaluar las actividades del primer grupo a través de transmisiones radiales y por altoparlantes.4 Minujín seleccionó a los espectadores sobre la base de cuestionarios publicados en periódicos de Montreal que incluían datos personales tales como nombre, sexo, altura, color de cabello y preferencias en cuanto a moda; una computadora organizó los tres grupos en base


marta minujin:Marta MInujin

3/4/10

12:35 PM

Page 21

Minucode at Americas Society

Simultaneidad

guests joined artist Tony Martin in the creation of new “media environments” that were collectively displayed in a later exhibition that was open to the public, in which film footage of the parties was also projected onto viewer’s bodies. Noting Minujín’s interest in Marshall McLuhan’s aim to promote increased awareness of the effects of communications media, Alexander Alberro has contended that in Minucode “the particular type of information was irrelevant; what mattered was its interplay with other information…”5 The most “analog” medium that the artist employed, however—the cocktail party—has a highly symbolic value in relation to the work’s context. Funded by the powerful Rockefeller family, the Center for InterAmerican Relations was designed to promote democracy over communism and further North American economic interests in Latin America in the midst of the Cold War. Minujín separated viewers into political, cultural and informational fields corresponding to the

a características comunes. El proyecto literalizaba la división de receptores de información en diferentes grupos demográficos con diferentes niveles de acceso a la tecnología y el contenido que realizan los medios masivos de comunicación. La muestra Minucode fue organizada y llevada a cabo en mayo y junio de 1968 en el Center for Inter-American Relations (Centro para las Relaciones Interamericanas), que pasó a llamarse Americas Society en 1984. Una vez más se utilizaron cuestionarios para encuadrar a los participantes conforme a una de cuatro actividades profesionales: las relacionadas con la política, el arte, la moda o los medios de comunicación. Se realizaron cuatro cócteles para cada grupo. En cada uno de estos eventos, ocho invitados se unieron al artista Tony Martin para crear nuevas “ambientaciones mediales” que se exhibieron colectivamente en una muestra posterior que estuvo abierta al público, en la que también se proyectaron filmes de las fiestas sobre el cuerpo

21


marta minujin:Marta MInujin

3/4/10

12:35 PM

Page 22

Artists / Artistas institution’s interdisciplinary outreach initiatives, and restaged the seemingly benign social events common to all of them for publicity and fundraising.The multilayered projections of the parties turned the institution’s operations back upon themselves, exposing the larger networks that were conditioning both ongoing historical events as much as the artist’s reception and success in the United States. Circuits of ideas and commodities are also present in Importaciónexportación (Importation-Exportation), which Minujín organized later that year back at the Di Tella in Buenos Aires.6 In this case there were multimedia environments with footage from the artist’s sojourn in New York relating to the hippie movement. She also staged a “hippie fair” with psychedelic merchandise brought back from the States. As in Minucode, an international network uniting art with other fields of production was signaled via festive events, infusing serious content into participatory spectacle. Curated by Gabriela Rangel and José Luis Blondet, MINUCODEs presents archival information related to Simultaneidad en simultaneidad, Circuit, and Minucode, and reinstalls the final media environment from Minucode in the institution where it first appeared. Like the Americas Society’s 2006 exhibition A Principality of its Own: 40 Years of Visual Arts at the Americas Society before it, MINUCODEs implicitly argues that the task of the post-Cold War cultural institution is self-historicization. Blondet and Rangel wisely do not attempt to restage Minucode’s cocktail parties; the participatory aspect of the project remains historical. We are afforded an overarching view of all the components and events comprising the work that few, save the artist, were privy to at the time. Minujín’s North-South institution critique, once cloaked as art-leisure, is no longer avoidable.

Interppening (A la derecha/ right, Juan Downey)

1 Nicolas Bourriaud introduced this term, connoting artworks that incorporate viewers

into shared social situations, in his book L’esthétique relationnel in 1998 to discuss trends in 1990s art. Major institutions are increasingly embracing this convention, as is emblematized by the Guggenheim’s current Tino Sehgal exhibition. The museum has been left bare, and a series of participants of increasing ages approach visitors and engage them in conversation as they ascend the museum’s circular ramp. Sehgal has (unsuccessfully) forbidden photographic documentation of the exhibition in favor of direct experience. See Nicolas Bourriaud, Relational Aesthetics (Paris: Les presses du réel, 2002). 2 Adriana Lauría, “El happening: Una estrategia inclusiva y revulsiva de la

cotidianeidad en el arte. Aproximación hermenéutica a ‘Simultaneidad en simultaneidad’ de Marta Minujín,” in El arte entre lo publico y lo privado: VI Jornadas de teoría e historia de las artes (Buenos Aires: Centro Argentino de Investigadores de Artes, 1995), pp. 255-260. 3 Minujín corresponded with Kaprow extensively for the project, sending him drawings

for a short film that she sought to broadcast on participants’ home televisions in the first phase of Simultaneidad en simultaneidad. See Marta Minujín File, Box 69 Folder 4, Correspondence with Artists section, Allan Kaprow Papers, Getty Research Institute Special Collections, Los Angeles. 4 Part of the media in the auditorium was a film, Superheterodino, broadcast on forty

Projection selection for exhibition. Selección de filmes para la muestra.

22

televisions placed between the seats and on eight televisions on a mobile stage where eight participants were seated; there was also media content from popular movies and television shows as well as media content being produced by the other two groups outside. See Jorge Glusberg, “Vivir en arte: nuestra antología de Marta Minujín,” in Marta Minujín, exh. cat. (Buenos Aires: Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, 1999), pp. 2628. According to Sabine Breitweiser, “numerous famous people and their look-alikes” were included in Circuit, although she does not specify in what capacity. See Breitweiser, Vivências, exh. cat. (Vienna: Generali Foundation, 2000), p. 24. 5 Alexander Alberro, “Media, Sculpture, Myth,” in A Principality of its Own: 40 Years

of Visual Arts at the Americas Society, eds. José Luis Falconi and Gabriela Rangel (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006), p. 165. 6 Glusberg, “Vivir en arte,” p. 31.


marta minujin:Marta MInujin

3/4/10

12:35 PM

Page 23

de los espectadores. Observando el interés de Minujín en el objetivo de Marshall McLuhan de promover una toma de conciencia creciente con respecto a los efectos que provocan los medios de comunicación, Alexander Alberro ha sostenido que en Minucode “el tipo particular de información era irrelevante; lo importante era la interacción con otra información…”5 El medio más “análogo” empleado por la artista − el cóctel − tiene, sin embargo, un alto valor simbólico en relación con el contexto de la obra. Financiado por la poderosa familia Rockefeller, el Centro para las Relaciones Interamericanas fue diseñado para promover la democracia defendiéndola contra el comunismo y para favorecer los intereses económicos estadounidenses en Latinoamérica en medio de la Guerra Fría. Minujín separó a los espectadores, ubicándolos dentro de la esfera de la política, la cultura o la información de forma que se correspondía con las iniciativas interdisciplinarias de extensión de la institución y volvió a crear los acontecimientos sociales aparentemente benignos a los que todos recurren para la publicidad y la recaudación de fondos. La proyección de las fiestas en múltiples niveles reenfocó la atención sobre las operaciones de la institución, dejando al descubierto las redes más amplias que condicionaban tanto los acontecimientos históricos en curso como la recepción y el éxito de la artista en Estados Unidos. Los circuitos de ideas y de bienes también se encuentran presentes en Importación-exportación, que Minujín organizó más tarde ese mismo año en el Di Tella, en Buenos Aires.6 En ese caso se presentaban ambientaciones multimedia con material fílmico de la estadía de la artista en Nueva York, relacionado con el movimiento hippie. También montó una “feria hippie” con mercadería psicodélica traída de Estados Unidos. Tal como ocurría en Minucode, a través de eventos festivos se señalaba la existencia de una red internacional que une al arte con otros campos de producción, infundiendo un contenido serio en el espectáculo participativo. Curada por Gabriela Rangel y José Luis Blondet, MINUCODEs presenta información de archivo relacionada con Simultaneidad en simultaneidad, Circuit y Minucode, y reinstala la última ambientación medial de Minucode en la institución donde fue vista por primera vez. Tal como lo hiciera con anterioridad la muestra presentada en 2006 por la Americas Society, A Principality of its Own: 40 Years of Visual Arts at the Americas Society, el argumento implícito en MINUCODEs es que la tarea de la institución cultural post-Guerra Fría es la historización de su propia trayectoria. Sabiamente, Blondet y Rangel no intentan volver a montar los cócteles de Minucode; el aspecto participativo del proyecto continúa siendo histórico. Se nos ofrece una visión panorámica de todos los componentes y eventos que conforman la obra de la que pocos, salvo la artista, tenían conocimiento en ese momento. Ya no es posible eludir la crítica institucional norte-sur que presenta Minujín, y que alguna vez estuviera disimulada como arte-recreación. 1 Nicolas Bourriaud introdujo este término con referencia a obras de arte que integraban a los espectadores en situaciones sociales, en su libro L’esthétique relationnel de 1998, para analizar tendencias en el arte de la década de 1990. Esta convención está siendo adoptada con creciente frecuencia por importantes instituciones, como es el caso emblemático de la muestra de Tino Sehgal que presenta actualmente el Guggenheim. El museo permanece vacío y una serie de participantes cuyas edades van en orden creciente se acercan a los visitantes y entablan conversación con ellos mientras ascienden por la rampa circular del museo. Sehgal ha prohibido (sin éxito) que la muestra sea documentada fotográficamente para favorecer la experiencia directa. Ver Nicolas Bourriaud, Relational Aesthetics (Paris: Les presses du réel, 2002).

Interppening MoMA New York 1972

2 Adriana Lauría, “El happening: Una estrategia inclusiva y revulsiva de la cotidianeidad en el arte. Aproximación hermenéutica a ‘Simultaneidad en simultaneidad’ de Marta Minujín”, en El arte entre lo público y lo privado: VI Jornadas de teoría e historia de las artes (Buenos Aires: Centro Argentino de Investigadores de Artes, 1995), pp. 255-260. 3 Minujín intercambió una cuantiosa correspondencia con Kaprow para el proyecto, enviándole dibujos para un filme corto que planeaba proyectar en los televisores de los hogares de los participantes durante la primera fase de Simultaneidad en simultaneidad. Ver el Archivo Marta Minujín, Caja 69. Carpeta 4, Sección Correspondencia con artistas, Documentos Allan Kaprow, Colecciones Especiales del Instituto de Investigaciones Getty, Los Ángeles. 4 Las proyecciones en el auditorio incluyeron un film, Superheterodino, difundido en cuarenta televisores ubicados entre los asientos y en ocho televisores ubicados en una plataforma móvil que albergaba a ocho participantes sentados; también se proyectó contenido medial de películas y espectáculos televisivos populares, así como contenido medial por los otros dos grupos en exteriores. Ver Jorge Glusberg, “Vivir en arte: nuestra antología de Marta Minujín,” en Marta Minujín, cát. exp. (Buenos Aires: Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, 1999), pp. 26-28. Según Sabine Breitweiser, “numerosos personajes famosos y sus sosias” fueron incluidos en Circuit, aunque no especifica en calidad de qué. Ver Breitweiser, Vivências, cát. exp (Viena: Generali Foundation, 2000), p. 24. 5 Alexander Alberro, “Media, Sculpture, Myth,” en A Principality of its Own: 40 Years of Visual Arts at the Americas Society, eds. José Luis Falconi y Gabriela Rangel (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006), p. 165. 6 Glusberg, “Vivir en arte,” p. 31.

23


marta minujin:Marta MInujin

3/4/10

12:35 PM

Interview / Entrevista

By / por Philip Larratt-Smith, Curator/Curador.* (New York) * Conducted by phone in December 2009 / Entrevista telef贸nica de diciembre de 2009

24

Page 24

Marta Minuj铆n in New York


marta minujin:Marta MInujin

3/4/10

12:35 PM

Page 25

PLS: When did you first meet Andy Warhol? MM: In 1966. PLS: How did you meet him? MM: I lived in Paris for three years, then I went back to Buenos Aires and did these crazy happenings that appeared in the New York Times. Andy knew about me from the crazy things I was doing with the Fluxus people in 1964, 1965. So when I showed up in New York, I brought a big piece of mine called El Batacazo to Leo Castelli, and Castelli got me an exhibition at the Bianchini gallery on 57th [Street]. They invited Andy to my opening in February 1966 and that’s how I met him. PLS: Did you hit it off right away? MM: He thought I was a freak, and he was collecting crazy people. So he immediately became my friend. PLS: And you started going to the silver Factory. MM: We became very close. We had dinner every night at Max’s Kansas City. Every time an Argentinian came to New York, I took them to the Factory. I took Jorge Romero Brest there, he was like the Pope of art in Buenos Aires, and nobody at the Factory even talked to him! Anyone who went to the Factory could walk around and do anything that he wanted. The doors were open and you could go back and forth. But Andy wasn’t famous. PLS: You mean he had a reputation but he wasn’t famous yet? MM: Right, he was recognized by a group of people. We were very much alike, we were looking for the same thing: the concept of fame. I was interested in television, how people had gone on television and then immediately became famous. He was also exploring that. We were very much alike but in different ways. PLS: What was your first impression of him as a person? Did you find him very shy and quiet, or did he talk to you? MM: He just said, “Hello, Marta, how are you? What are these things that you make?” We always spoke a lot, but sometimes when he was with people he didn’t know he acted shy. When we used to go to Max’s Kansas City at night, he talked to everyone. He was always surrounded by a group of underground people. When he went to openings he always had four, five people around him. PLS: Who were these people? MM: Nico, the Velvets, and Gerard Malanga. Also Jonas Mekas and Stan Brakhage, all those filmmakers, because he still wanted to make films. When I first arrived, he was already doing Chelsea Girls, and I saw the room in the Chelsea Hotel where they were filming it. PLS: That must’ve been a trip. MM: Filming people shooting heroin through their pants. That big fat woman didn’t even take off her pants. PLS: You mean Brigid Berlin. MM: When Andy and I did the piece with the corn, she was there in the Factory on 32nd Street. PLS: She stayed on at the Factory until Andy died. MM: I also became a close friend of Taylor Mead. PLS: Did you like the Factory scene? MM: I saw a lot of action there. I met all the Pop artists. I visited Roy Lichtenstein when he was living in a church. Also Robert Rauschenberg, who was living on the East Side. He was helping other artists because he was already much more famous. But the Factory was different, there was always much more activity there than at any other studio. If you went to Lichtenstein’s there were

PLS: ¿Cuándo conoció a Andy Warhol? MM: En 1966. PLS: ¿Cómo lo conoció? MM: Viví en París durante tres años, luego regresé a Buenos Aires y me puse a hacer esos locos happenings que aparecieron en The New York Times. Andy me conocía a través de las cosas extravagantes que hacía con la gente de Fluxus en 1964, 1965. Así que cuando hice mi aparición en Nueva York, le llevé una pieza mía de grandes dimensiones titulada El Batacazo a Leo Castelli y Castelli me consiguió una muestra en la Galería Bianchini, en la [calle] 57. Invitaron a Andy a la inauguración de mi muestra en febrero de 1966 y así fue como lo conocí. PLS: ¿Congeniaron de inmediato? MM: Él pensó que yo era un fenómeno, y en ese entonces él coleccionaba gente extraña. Así que inmediatamente se convirtió en mi amigo. PLS: Así que comenzó a frecuentar la Silver Factory (La fábrica plateada). MM: En el 66 nos hicimos íntimos, cenábamos juntos todas las noches en Max’s Kansas City. Cada vez que llegaba un argentino a Nueva York, yo lo llevaba a La Fábrica. Llevé allí a Jorge Romero Brest, que era como el pope del arte en Buenos Aires ¡y nadie en La Fábrica le dirigió siquiera la palabra! Cualquiera que visitara La Fábrica podía recorrerla, hacer lo que le viniera en gana. Las puertas estaban abiertas y uno podía ir de un lado a otro. Pero Andy no era famoso. PLS: ¿Quiere decir que para ese entonces tenía una reputación pero todavía no era famoso? MM: Correcto, era reconocido por un grupo de gente, pero más tarde fue inmensamente famoso. Éramos muy parecidos, buscábamos lo mismo: el concepto de ‘fama’. A mí me interesaba la televisión; me interesaba el hecho de que había gente que había ido a la televisión y se había vuelto famosa de inmediato. Él también estaba explorando eso. Ya en ese tiempo yo aparecía en televisión, utilizaba la televisión en mi trabajo. Éramos muy parecidos pero de formas diferentes, realmente diferentes. PLS: ¿Cuál fue su primera impresión de él como persona? ¿Le pareció demasiado tímido y tranquilo, o comenzó a hablar con usted? MM: Simplemente dijo “Hola, Marta, ¿cómo estás? ¿Qué son esas cosas que haces?” Siempre hablamos mucho, pero a veces, cuando estaba con gente, no se daba cuenta de que actuaba con timidez. Cuando solíamos ir a Max’s Kansas City en las noches, hablaba con todo el mundo. Siempre estaba rodeado por un grupo de gente underground. Cuando asistía a alguna inauguración, siempre tenía cuatro, cinco personas alrededor suyo. PLS: ¿Quiénes eran estas personas? MM: Nico, los Velvets y Gerard Malanga. También Jonas Mekas y Stan Brakhage, todos aquellos cineastas, porque todavía quería hacer películas. Cuando recién llegué, él ya se encontraba haciendo Chelsea Girls y vi la habitación del Hotel Chelsea donde la estaban filmando. PLS: Ese debe haber sido un viaje. MM: Filmando gente que se inyectaba heroína a través del pantalón. Ni siquiera se sacó los pantalones, esa mujer gorda y corpulenta. PLS: Se refiere a Brigid Berlin. MM: Cuando Andy y yo hicimos esa obra con los choclos, ella 25


marta minujin:Marta MInujin

3/4/10

12:35 PM

Page 26

Interview / Entrevista already a lot of helpers, two or three maybe, but you didn’t find people walking around. At Andy’s it was like walking in the streets, people would come and go, back and forth, and always much younger people, very underground, people without any money, but also some very rich people like Edie Sedgwick, and others who had more power. Sometimes Andy seemed dominated by those people, and became very, very shy. Later on, as he became more famous, he started acting shy, with an attitude towards people. He wouldn’t talk. Others spoke for him. PLS: In the 1970s a lot of people saw a big change in Andy. He had a new Factory and it was much more of a business and less of a scene. His assistants now came from the middle-class, and socially he chose to hang around with the rich and famous. MM: He never loved them the way he loved the underground. PLS: Did you know Candy Darling and Jackie Curtis? MM: Yeah, sure. In 1966-67, Salvador Dali used to hold five o’clock tea in the St-Regis Hotel, and he always invited Andy and I, Candy Darling, René Ricard, and Ultra Violet. Everything happened very fast. When I arrived Andy wasn’t famous but within one year he was very famous. But he always loved the underground people, even after Valerie Solanas shot him and almost killed him. It was wonderful when he first started making “Interview”, his way of relating to society people through a newspaper. PLS: Andy always liked to talk to people on the phone, or have a camera or some other technological barrier. MM: To protect him PLS: The crazy people who were so interesting could also be scary. Your look is very similar to Andy’s in a lot of ways. He had a collection of wigs. Some were platinum-blond, and some were more of a natural blond, and some were really very white. In the 60s he also wore dark glasses a lot, like you. MM: I always wear my dark glasses as a kind of protection. PLS: Warhol used his look as a brand. It was cool, neutral, withholding, somewhat bloodless, artful and artless at the same time. It confirmed what many of his contemporaries thought of him: that he was a fraud and a master manipulator who preyed on the talents and weaknesses of others. MM: Andy was one of the most generous people that I ever met. He was great to everyone. When we went out to eat at Max’s Kansas City he used to pay for the whole crowd. No one knows that. PLS: Yet there are lots of stories about him using other people. MM: No, no, no, he would use them but at the same time they got a lot out of him. Also, the people he was using were usually taking a lot of drugs and didn’t see what he was doing for them. It wasn’t true at all because he was always feeding those people. PLS: He became very successful, which is a great way to lose old friends. When you met Andy, did you make a decision to change your look and try to look like him? MM: No, I was always like this. PLS: It was more of a coincidence. MM: He always was my mate in New York. He didn’t help me in my career in New York and I didn’t want him to, and yet we still became really good friends. PLS: Before you went to Paris in ‘63, were you living in Buenos Aires? MM: Yes. PLS: Had you ever heard of Andy Warhol? MM: No, no. 26

estaba allí, en La Fábrica, en la calle 32. PLS: Siguió trabajando en La Fábrica hasta la muerte de Andy. MM: También me hice muy amiga de Taylor Mead. PLS: ¿Le gustaba el ambiente de La Fábrica? M: Vi mucha acción allí. Conocí a todos los artistas Pop. Fui a ver a Roy Lichtenstein cuando vivía en una iglesia, así como a George Segal, que vivía en el campo con su mujer. También a Robert Rauschenberg, que vivía en el East Side. Ayudaba a otros artistas porque él ya era mucho más famoso. Pero La Fábrica era diferente; siempre había mucha más actividad allí que en el estudio de cualquier otro artista. Si uno iba al atelier de Lichtenstein, ya había muchos ayudantes allí, dos o tres, tal vez,pero no se veía gente dando vueltas por allí. En lo de Andy era como caminar por la calle; la gente iba y venía, de aquí para allá, y eran siempre gente mucho más joven, muy underground, gente sin nada de dinero pero también algunas personas muy ricas, como Edie Sedgwick y otra gente que tenía más poder. A veces Andy parecía estar dominado por esa gente y se volvía muy, muy tímido. Más adelante, cuando se volvió más famoso, comenzó a hacerse el tímido, con una mala disposición hacia la gente. No hablaba con la gente. Otros hablaban por él. PLS: En los años setenta mucha gente vio un gran cambio en Andy. Tenía una nueva Fábrica que era mucho más una empresa que un escenario underground. Sus asistentes provenían ahora de la clase media y socialmente prefería rodearse de ricos y famosos. MM: Nunca los quiso como quería al grupo de gente underground. PLS: ¿Conoció a Candy Darling y Jackie Curtis? MM: Sí, seguro. En 1966-67, Salvador Dalí solía tomar el té a las cinco en el Hotel St-Regis y siempre nos invitaba a Andy y a mí, y a Candy Darling, René Ricard y Ultra Violet. Todo sucedía muy rápido. A mi llegada Andy no era famoso, pero en el transcurso de un año se volvió muy famoso. Pero siempre amó al grupo underground, aun después de que Valerie Solanas le disparara y casi lo matara. Fue maravilloso cuando recién comenzó a hacer la revista “Interview”, una forma muy interesante de relacionarse con la gente de sociedad a través de un periódico. PLS: A Andy siempre le gustó hablar con la gente por teléfono, o tener una cámara o alguna otra barrera tecnológica. MM: Sí, eso era una forma de protección. PLS: Las personas extravagantes que le resultaban tan interesantes también podían atemorizarlo. Su “look” es muy similar al de Andy en muchos aspectos. Él tenía una colección de pelucas. Algunas eran de un rubio platinado, algunas de un rubio más natural, y otras eran realmente de cabello muy blanco. En los años sesenta utilizaba mucho los lentes oscuros, como usted. MM: Siempre utilizo mis anteojos negros como una especie de protección. PLS: Warhol utilizaba su look como una marca registrada. Era “cool”, neutral, reservado, algo desapasionado, malicioso e ingenuo al mismo tiempo. Confirmaba lo que muchos de sus contemporáneos pensaban de él: que era un fraude y un maestro manipulador que se aprovechaba del talento y las debilidades de los demás. MM: Andy era una de las personas más generosas que haya conocido. Era fantástico con todo el mundo. Cuando íbamos a comer a Max’s Kansas City solía pagar la cuenta de todo el mundo. Nadie lo sabe. PLS: Sin embargo, hay muchísimas historias que lo describen utilizando a la gente. MM: No, no, no, tal vez los utilizara, pero al mismo tiempo, ellos


marta minujin:Marta MInujin

3/4/10

12:35 PM

Page 27

PLS: So you found out about him in Paris. MM: Not really. In Paris Ileana Sonnabend had her gallery and was showing him, but she also was showing Jim Dine, Jasper Johns, and Robert Rauschenberg, and I was more interested in them. The thing about Andy was his personality, he was much more fun than the others. The others were boring and conservative. PLS: Did he have a good sense of humour? MM: Fantastic! I don’t know if you know that he once sent somebody that looked like him to give a lecture. He did so many things: interviews, films, everything. Everything that he touched turned to gold. Joe Dallesandro became a star, Ultra Violet, those people all became artists from hanging around with him. Nico was the one I knew best. She lived around the corner from me and we used to go to the laundry to wash our clothes at the same place. PLS: Did you like her? MM: Yeah, she was very beautiful, very special. Everyone who was around Andy at that time was wonderful. I went to the opening of the Pillows [Silver Clouds] at Leo Castelli uptown on 77th Street and it was fantastic. PLS: That was in 1966. MM: I was there. We went to see Salvador Dali many times. PLS: Do you think there’s a strong connection between Dali and Warhol? MM: No, because Andy was Andy and Dali was Dali. Dali liked Andy because he was famous. And Andy liked Dali because he was a snob. Andy liked snobbish people. PLS: Why? MM: Because they believed they were better than common people. PLS: But Andy was a common person, he came from nothing. MM: Yeah, but he was completely different. For me he came from another planet. PLS: But why did he like the company of snobs? MM: I think it was because he was very nervous inside and frivolous people calmed him down. PLS: I think that’s exactly right. People who were too intellectual or too serious made him nervous, or silent. MM: Yet he was very brilliant. Everything he wrote, the way he spoke, brilliant. PLS: Were you friendly with other members of the Fluxus group, like George Maciunas and Yoko Ono? MM: I was familiar with Dick Higgins, Alison Knowles, Emmett Williams, Ray Johnson, Nam June Paik, Charlotte Moorman, and Al Hansen, but not so much George Maciunas. Mostly the ones in Paris, Robert Filliou, Wolf Vostell, Allan Kaprow. PLS: Did Warhol’s work influence your work in any way? MM: No, no influence at all, just friends. PLS: So it was just a personal connection. MM: Right. When I made the Electronic Telephone Booth in ’67 they gave a party for me on the roof of a building at 57th Street and 3rd Avenue. And Andy came with one hundred people or two hundred people, so by the end we were all chased off the roof. It was a scandal, people were going to the bathroom up there. It was a scandal and Andy loved that. PLS: You left New York in ‘67? MM: No, I left in ’69. PLS: Back to Buenos Aires? MM: At first, but later I went to work and live in D.C. for personal reasons. I kept coming to New York and I always saw Andy.

obtenían mucho de él. Por otra parte, las personas que él utilizaba generalmente consumían mucha droga y eran incapaces de ver lo que él hacía por ellas. No era para nada cierto, porque él siempre estaba alimentando a esa gente. PLS: Se volvió muy exitoso, que es una gran forma de perder viejos amigos. Cuando conoció a Andy, ¿decidió cambiar su “look” y tratar de verse como él? MM: No, siempre fui así. PLS: Fue más bien una coincidencia. MM: Siempre fue mi compañero en Nueva York. No me ayudó con mi carrera en Nueva York − ni yo quería que lo hiciera y aun así éramos realmente buenos amigos. PLS: Antes de irse a París en el 63, ¿vivía en Buenos Aires? MM: Sí. PLS: ¿Alguna vez había oído hablar de Andy Warhol? MM: No, no. PLS: Así que descubrió su existencia en París. MM: En realidad, no. En París, Ileana Sonnabend tenía su galería y estaba exhibiendo obra de Andy, pero también presentaba exposiciones de Jim Dine, Jasper Johns y Robert Rauschenberg, y a mí me interesaban más estos últimos. Lo que sucedía con Andy era que realmente me atraía su personalidad, era tanto más divertido que los otros. Los otros eran aburridos y conservadores. PLS: ¿Tenía un buen sentido del humor? MM: ¡Fantástico! No sé si sabe que una vez envió a alguien que se le parecía a dar una conferencia. Hizo tantas cosas: entrevistas, películas, de todo. Todo lo que tocaba se convertía en oro. Joe Dallesandro se convirtió en una estrella, Ultra Violet, todas esas personas se convirtieron en artistas como resultado de frecuentarlo. A la que conocí mejor fue a Nico. Vivía a la vuelta de mi casa y solíamos ir al mismo lavadero a lavar la ropa. PLS: ¿Le caía bien? MM: Sí, era muy hermosa, muy especial. Todos los que rodeaban a Andy en aquella época eran maravillosos. Asistí a la inauguración de The Pillows [Silver Clouds] en la galería de Leo Castelli en la calle 77 y fue fantástica. PLS: Esa exposición tuvo lugar en 1966. MM: Yo estuve allí. Fuimos a ver a Salvador Dalí muchas veces. PLS: ¿Cree que existe una conexión fuerte entre Salvador Dalí y Warhol? MM: No, porque Andy era Andy y Salvador Dalí era Salvador Dalí. A Dalí le gustaba Andy porque era famoso. Y a Andy le gustaba Dalí porque era un snob. A Andy le gustaba la gente snob. PLS: ¿Por qué? MM: Porque se creían mejores que el común de la gente. PLS: Pero Andy era una persona común, venía de la nada. MM: Sí, pero era completamente diferente. Para mí, venía de otro planeta. PLS: ¿Pero por qué le gustaba a Andy la compañía de gente snob? MM: Creo que se debe a que era muy nervioso en su interior, y la gente frívola lo calmaba. PLS: Creo que es exactamente así. Las personas demasiado intelectuales o demasiado serias lo ponían nervioso, o lo enmudecían. MM: Aun así era muy brillante. Todo lo que escribía, la forma en que hablaba, era brillante. PLS: ¿Mantenía una amistad con otros miembros del grupo Fluxus, como George Maciunas y Yoko Ono? MM: Conocía a Dick Higgins, Alison Knowles, Emmett Williams, 27


marta minujin:Marta MInujin

3/4/10

12:35 PM

Page 28

Interview / Entrevista PLS: You kept up your connection? MM: Yes. The last time I saw him was in 1985 when we made the piece. In the meantime I had become very famous in Argentina. Well, I was famous before, but now I was really famous. Everybody was so crazy about the Argentinian external debt. The dollar went higher every moment. So I decided that since he was the king in New York and I was the queen in Argentina I would go and pay off the Argentinian international debt in corn. PLS: Why corn? MM: Because during the first and second wars, when nobody in Europe had food, Argentina fed the world. Corn comes from Latin America, but think of corn flakes, Americans eat a lot of corn. That’s the true Latin American gold. I went to meet him at the Odeon and asked him if he wanted to do the piece and he said yes. So I went to the Puerto Rican market uptown and bought one thousand pieces of corn, and I painted them all orange to look like gold and took them to the Factory on 32nd Street. We made a mountain of corn, and then I took twelve pictures in which we started off by looking straight at the camera and then kept turning towards each other by degrees. Next I took a piece and I gave him one, two, three pieces at a time, and he accepted, and the debt was paid. PLS: Warhol never went to Buenos Aires. MM: No. He didn’t even know where it was! PLS: But he painted a portrait of an Argentinian woman in the 1970s. MM: That was Amalita Fortabat. She is the richest woman in Argentina. That was a commission, and she paid $400,000. Andy got many millionaires to come to the Factory. PLS: How do you think his work is understood in Argentina? Has it changed over the years? MM: Well, people travel so much, and there’s the internet, so they knew Warhol before. PLS: Now, the piece you made with Warhol has political overtones, yet Warhol was not a very political person. MM: Yes, but he liked the idea of being king. I believe he knew what was happening in Argentina in 1985, after the military dictatorship and everything. So he loved the idea, we talked on and on and he said yes, and we did it, and that was it. PLS: In your mind, was the performance the work of art? Or is it the photograph? MM: The photograph. The performance was executed in order to produce the photograph, which is a symbol of what was going on between the two countries. PLS: Did Warhol ever see the finished piece? MM: No. We went together to a place where they could make the blow-up of the picture, and then he left on a trip, I don’t know where. I brought the piece back to Argentina, where it stayed for twenty-five years here in my studio. After Andy and I finished, we walked to the Empire State Building, and we took the corn with us and gave it to people. Then we threw everything on the street and ran away. PLS: Warhol’s death marked a change in New York. The old underground was gone by then. MM: Not so many parties. PLS: He represented a certain moment of New York. MM: When he died, his work wasn’t considered so fine and good, and many people didn’t believe he was a good artist. But later, yes, they understood him later. PLS: Part of it is his influence on the younger generation of 28

Ray Johnson, Nam June Paik, Charlotte Moorman y Al Hansen, pero no tanto a George Maciunas. Conocía principalmente a los que estaban en París, Robert Filliou, Wolf Vostell, Allan Kaprow. PLS: ¿La obra de Warhol ejerció alguna influencia sobre su trabajo? MM: No, absolutamente ninguna influencia; sólo éramos amigos. PLS: Así que se trataba más que nada de una relación personal. MM: Correcto. Cuando hice la Cabina Telefónica Electrónica en el ’67 organizaron una fiesta para mí en la terraza de un edificio en la calle 57 y la 3a Avenida. Y Andy vino con cien o doscientas personas, así que hacia el final de la noche nos corrieron a todos del techo. Fue un escándalo; la gente hacía sus necesidades allá arriba. Fue un escándalo y a Andy eso le encantaba. PLS: ¿Usted se fue de Nueva York en el 67? MM: No, me fui en el 69. PLS: ¿Regresó a Buenos Aires? MM: En principio, pero más tarde me fui a trabajar y a vivir a Washington, por razones personales. Seguía yendo a Nueva York y siempre veía a Andy. PLS: ¿Mantuvo su relación? MM: Sí. La última vez que lo vi fue en 1985, cuando hicimos la obra de los choclos. En el ínterin me había vuelto muy famosa en Argentina. Bueno, ya era famosa antes, pero ahora era realmente famosa. Todo el mundo estaba tan enloquecido con la deuda externa argentina. El dólar no dejaba de subir. Así que decidí que ya que él era el rey en Nueva York y yo era la reina en Argentina, yo iría y pagaría la deuda internacional de Argentina con maíz. PLS: ¿Por qué con maíz? MM: Porque durante la Primera y la Segunda Guerra Mundial, cuando nadie tenía comida en Europa, Argentina dio de comer al mundo. El maíz proviene de América Latina, pero piense en los copos de maíz, los norteamericanos consumen mucho maíz. Ese es el verdadero oro de Latinoamérica. Fui a encontrarme con él en el Odeón y le pregunté si quería hacer la pieza conmigo y dijo que sí. Así que fui al mercado puertorriqueño en las afueras de la ciudad y compré mil choclos y los pinté de naranja para que parecieran de oro y los llevé a La Fábrica en la calle 32. Hicimos una montaña de choclos y luego tomé doce fotografías en las que comenzamos por mirar directamente a la cámara y luego nos volvíamos el uno hacia el otro progresivamente. Luego yo tomaba un choclo y le daba uno, dos, tres choclos por vez, él los aceptaba y así se pagaba la deuda. PLS: Warhol nunca visitó Buenos Aires. MM: No. ¡Ni siquiera sabía dónde quedaba! PLS: Pero pintó un retrato de una mujer argentina en los años setenta. MM: Fue el de Amalita Fortabat. Es la mujer más rica de Argentina. Fue una comisión y ella pagó $400.000. Andy logró que muchos millonarios visitaran La Fábrica. PLS: ¿Cómo cree que se entiende su obra en Argentina? ¿Esto ha cambiado con el transcurso de los años? MM: Bueno, la gente viaja tanto, y también está Internet, así que ya conocían a Andy. PLS: Ahora bien, la pieza que hizo con Warhol tiene resonancias políticas; sin embargo, Warhol no era una persona muy política. MM: Así es, pero le gustaba la idea de ser rey. Creo que sabía lo que estaba pasando en Argentina en 1985, luego de la dictadura militar y todo eso. Así que le encantó la idea, hablamos y hablamos al respecto y dijo que sí y lo hicimos y eso fue todo. PLS: A su juicio, ¿la obra de arte fue la performance? ¿O fue la fotografía?


marta minujin:Marta MInujin

3/4/10

12:35 PM

Page 29

American artists that really appreciated him. MM: Yes, well, the other pop artists were very jealous. No one would have recognized them if they passed them on the street, but Andy was on television and Andy was everywhere, and everybody in the United States could recognize him. He was like a pop star. PLS: Did you always like Andy better than the other pop artists? MM: As a person, yes. PLS: But do you think his work is better than that of the other pop artists? MM: No, no, it’s very similar, very similar. I don’t think it’s better. What’s better is his attitude, which was very avant garde, very advanced. He was more creative than the others. James Rosenquist, Tom Wesselman, they were always doing the same thing. Lichtenstein, too. Probably the one that I liked the most as a person was Rauschenberg, he was also very generous, talking all the time, and always doing new things. But the rest were boring. I met all of them but Andy was the coolest one. PLS: Andy always wanted the party to go on forever. I find his work more interesting because it’s more pathological. MM: It’s more contemporary. PLS: Look at all the art world now. It’s as if Warhol designed it. The rule of the market, the parties, the relationship to contemporary pop culture, TV, playing footsie with porno – it all looks very Warholian. MM: His books are extraordinary. The Philosophy of Andy Warhol is one of the most fantastic books ever written. PLS: His observations of human nature are spot on. MM: Yeah, he understood society really well. PLS: Did you find Warhol changed when you made the piece with him in 1985? MM: No, he was exactly the same, he never changed, that was a good thing about him. Even when he was established, once he knew you and liked you, it was forever. I always said to him, I don’t want you to put me in Interview because Interview is part of your work. What I want is to put you in my work, so that’s what I did. He was the king of New York, that’s why New York is so boring for me since he died. I don’t have anyone to talk to and take me to all the parties.

MM: La fotografía. La performance se realizó para producir la fotografía, que es un símbolo de lo que sucedía entre los dos países. PLS: ¿Vio Warhol alguna vez la obra terminada? MM: No. Fuimos juntos a un lugar donde podían ampliar la fotografía y luego se fue de viaje, no sé a dónde. Yo traje la obra de regreso a Argentina, donde permaneció veinticinco años aquí en mi estudio. Una vez que Andy y yo terminamos, caminamos hasta el edificio Empire State; llevamos los choclos con nosotros y se los repartimos a la gente. Luego arrojamos todo en la calle y salimos corriendo. PLS: La muerte de Warhol marcó un cambio en Nueva York. El viejo grupo underground había desaparecido. MM: No había tantas fiestas. PLS: Andy representó un cierto momento de Nueva York. MM: Cuando murió, su obra no era considerada tan buena ni tan fantástica, y mucha gente no creía que fuera un buen artista. Pero más tarde, sí; lo comprendieron más tarde. PLS: En parte debido a su influencia sobre la generación más joven de artistas estadounidenses que realmente lo apreciaban. MM: Sí, bueno, los demás artistas pop estaban muy celosos. Nadie los habría reconocido si se cruzaban con ellos en la calle, pero Andy estaba en la televisión y Andy estaba en todas partes y todo el mundo en Estados Unidos lo reconocía. Era una especie de estrella pop. PLS: ¿Siempre le gustó más Andy que los otros artistas pop? MM: Como persona, sí. PLS: ¿Pero cree que su trabajo es mejor que el de otros artistas pop? MM: No, no, es muy similar, muy similar. No creo que sea mejor. Lo que es mejor es su actitud, que era muy de vanguardia, muy de avanzada. Era más creativo que los demás. James Rosenquist, Tom Wesselman, siempre hacían lo mismo. Lichtenstein también. El que más me gustaba como persona era, probablemente, Rauschenberg, que también era muy generoso, hablando todo el tiempo y siempre haciendo cosas nuevas. Pero el resto eran aburridos. Los conocí a todos, pero Andy era el más “cool”. PLS: Andy siempre quería que la fiesta siguiera indefinidamente. Encuentro su trabajo más interesante porque es más patológico. MM: Es más contemporáneo. PLS: Mire el mundo del arte de la actualidad. Es como si Warhol lo hubiese diseñado. El dominio del mercado, las fiestas, la relación con la cultura contemporánea pop, la TV, el flirtear con la pornografía – todo parece muy Warholiano. MM: Sus libros son extraordinarios. The Philosophy of Andy Warhol (La filosofía de Andy Warhol) es uno de los libros más fantásticos jamás escritos. PLS: Sus observaciones acerca de la naturaleza humana eran absolutamente acertadas. MM: Sí, entendía a la sociedad realmente bien. PLS: ¿Encontró a Warhol cambiado cuando hizo la obra con él en 1985? ¿Era diferente de cómo había sido en los sesenta? MM: No, era exactamente el mismo, nunca cambió, eso era algo bueno que tenía. Aun cuando ya se había consagrado, una vez que te conocía y le gustabas, era para siempre. Siempre le dije, “no quiero que me incluyas en Interview, porque Interview es parte de tu trabajo. Lo que quiero es incluirte en mi trabajo”; así que eso fue lo que hice. Era el rey de Nueva York, por eso Nueva York me resulta tan aburrido desde su muerte. Ya no tengo con quien hablar, ni nadie que me lleve a todas las fiestas.

29


20-29