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REASON OF DESIGN

BIJAN THORNYCROFT

FALL 11 --- SPRING 13


Bijan Thornycroft

1555 Niblick Avenue (650) 492 1450 Los Altos, CA, 94024 bijan.thornycroft@gmail.com

www.bijant.com

Education

Washington University in St. Louis Bachelor of Design; Architecture and Economics Expected graduation in May, 2015 Cumulative GPA: 3.72

Language Fluent Intermediate

English, French, Farsi Japanases (4 years)

Skills Graphic Tools

Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Dreamweaver, Flash, and After Effects CS5

Modeling Tools

Rhino 4, AutoCAD 2012, Revit 2012

Other Software

Microsoft Word, Excel, Powerpoint

Relvant Skills

Major in Economics provideds experience in business oriented thinking relating to the firm. Well-adjusted to Microsoft office tools for business operations and accounting purposes. Comfortable communicating with clients and working on architecture projects by teams. MGT 100 - Individual in a Managerial Environment QBA 120/121 - Managerial Statistics I/II

MGT 390 - The Economics of Human Resource Management MEC 290 + Econ 1021 - Microeconomics + Macroeconomics


Experience Design freelance Habitat for Humanity

Completed design work for various companies online that offered competition based commissions. Work ranged from tee shirt designs to logos and stationary. Volunteered in Palo Alto by helping with the construction of a house around its final stages of completion.

Design Chair

Part of founding class of Alpha Delta Phi chapter at Washington University in 2012 as Design Chair; responsible for all marketing visuals and apparel designs.

Architecture School Council

Seated as executive member on ASC; organize communication between ASC and students, as well as producing marketing posters, visual designs, and contributing to the organizaion of social events.

Blutape

VP of Design for the team that is launching Blutape, a company that aims to reinvent how news and content is organized then experienced online. Blutape will be a website that focuses on stimulating relavent discourse around events coming from on campus and world wide. As the leader of the design team, I am responsble for creating the visuals and layouts of the site, and for branding in our marketing campaign. In addition, I play a key role in determining the site’s function and preparing it for launch.


ARCHITECTURE STUDIO

FALL 2011 - SPRING 2013; WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN ST. LOUIS


POTTING SHED 3

IMMERSION POOL 5

MODULE AS APERTURE 9

MODULAR FIELD 12

SKY-CEILING RESTROOM 15

TESSELLATED PARK 17

CONTAINED ECOSYSTEM 21

REAPPROPRIATING THE WALL 25


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POTTING SHED

Designed around the concept of embedding layers of undulating triangles to form a sheltered space. The solid surfaces of the inner layer break into a skeleton of the form, allowing people to experience the surrounding exterior while remaining sheltered.

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IMMERSION POOL The first level of design was to manipulate the topography of the site, a large, sloped field bellow a seminary, according to a natural artifact found on the site. An immersion pool was then placed within this context, taking inspiration for its form from the biased topography and the program.

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7


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MODULE AS APERTURE

A single module was conceived to manipulate light and shadows. Its triangular surfaces fold inward and outward, creating an aperture that narrows to one end. Struts placed on the inside compose its structure and prevent it from collapsing on itself.

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MODULAR FIELD Accumulating the modules into a field, the angular apertures filter light through to the inside, where the inner structure of the modules is revealed. The modules themselves are morphed in scale and shape, creating a fluid directionality through the folds of the outside surfaces.

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SKY-CEILING RESTROOM Bathrooms that were designed to take space within individual tessellated modules. Frosted walls give the impression of them floating, while the wooden shelving and interior paneling house lighting directed down from a above facilities.

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TESSELLATED PARK

Tasked with redesigning a children’s park in De Mun, St. Louis, this model bases its function and form on the characteristics of the module. The modules themselves dictate the experience of each space, allowing children to climb into them, light to filter through them, and creating a variety of open and closed spaces. Programs range from office buildings to bathrooms.

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The park was design in three layers. The base undulates with crests and troughs that control the flow of traffic. The second layer is composed of gravel and grass in the form of the module unrolled to create a pathway through the park. The third layer consists of the modules themselves that loom over and are inhabited by visitors.


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CONTAINED ECOSYSTEM A terrarium was constructed to house the umbrella palm plant and the fairy moss azolla. The container uses its form to allow light to access the water surface moss while creating space for the umbrella plant to grow directly above.

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-system for hashed lines -make sure lines print out properly -each drawing on 11x17, foam core -consistency in representation of dirt -scale darkness

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Umbrella Palm Dwarf

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Fairy Moss Azolla 12

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0�

Container from Plan

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Elevation of container

Sun from 90 and 45 degrees

Elevation of container

Container from Plan


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ATHLETIC CENTER CHILDREN’S STREET

SOUP KITCHEN


REAPPROPRIATING THE WALL The site at Soulard is lined by a red brick wall which was built with the Interstate 55, the highway responsible for why Soulard has been so neglected since the interstate’s introduction. The goal of the greenhouse is to re-purpose this wall, which creates such a destructive divide, for the use of the site and its people.

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The building is a reconstruction of the wall, designed as a fragmented facade which extrudes the wall so that the people of Soulard could inhabit the thickness of it. The front facade is for the majority solid, with unfolding strips of windows intersecting it.

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CHILDREN’S GAME ROOM

KITCHEN AND DINNING

PRIVATE PUBLIC SHARED WINDOW

LOUNGE NUTRITION CLASSROOM

In response to the two demographics surrounding the site, families with children and a homeless community, the building focuses on the growth of tomatoes to feed the homeless and to teach the children about nutrition. The façade of the building is solid and largely vertical, but designed to be porous to allow people to see the inside of the broken up wall from outside.

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FLOOR 2

Game Room + 23’2”

Resting Space + 18’11”

FLOOR 1

Public Kitchen + 13’1”

GROUND FLOOR

Lobby and Open Space

Classroom + 10’3”


Circulation in the building separates public and private programs while still allowing for people to fluidly move through the length of the building. The two demographics are also united through the open points of intersection, the potting beds within and outside the building, and the sweeping window panes.

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2 PM

3 PM

1 PM

2 PM 4 PM

3 PM 4 PM 5 PM

Game Room + 23’2”

Public Kitchen + 13’1”

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12 PM 11 AM

1 PM

10 AM

2 PM

3 PM

9 AM

8 AM

4 PM

7 AM

5 PM

6 AM

6 PM

5 AM

7 PM EAST

SOLAR AZIMUTH

WEST

Unfolding window strips that spread diagonally from one end of the facade to the other respond directly to the angle of the sun to allow maximum light into the largely solid building.

Resting Space + 18’11”

Classroom + 10’3”

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LOUNGE

CLASSROOM KITCHEN AND DINING

SECOND FLOOR

GAME ROOM

THIRD FLOOR

Windows allow light from different seasons of the year into different rooms depending on when their programs are used. The homeless require more shelter in the winter, while children would frequent the greenhouse in the summer for classes after school and to relax. The brush strokes in the drawings represent summer light in public spaces and winter light in private spaces. Light patterns were simulated in Autodesk Ecotect.


BT undergraduate architecture portfolio  

Undergraduate architecture from first through fourth semester.

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