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Parks and Recreation Ontario


Table of Contents Message from the President and CEO: Making the C.A.S.E.............................................................. 1 Making the C.A.S.E. through Public Policy.......................................................................................... 2 Making the C.A.S.E. through Local Action............................................................................................ 4 Making the C.A.S.E. through Essential Knowledge............................................................................ 6 Making the C.A.S.E. through Quality Assurance................................................................................. 7 Financial Statements.............................................................................................................................. 10 Community Commitment........................................................................................................................ 14

About Parks and Recreation Ontario Vision Parks and Recreation Ontario (PRO) is recognized as the expert on the value and importance of leisure to people and communities in Ontario. Mission PRO is an all-inclusive, not-for-profit corporation dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for the people of Ontario. PRO fulfills this mandate by collaborating with stakeholders to influence decisions and policies that support the benefits of recreation through information, advocacy and research and the development of innovative and relevant products and services.

Strategic Goals 2008 – 2011 Public Policy Positively influence public policy and legislation through advocacy and research in order to enhance the position of parks, recreation and physical activity. Local Action Enhance the position of recreation and parks in local communities through the development of tools and resources. Essential Knowledge Increase the skills and knowledge of professionals and volunteers so they are better able to manage issues relevant to the recreation and parks sector. Quality Assurance Assess the need and establish quality assurance and standards for recreation and parks in order to equip the sector with the capacity to measure, to improve and to account for performance.

Pa r k s a n d R e c r e at i o n O n ta r i o 2 0 1 0 A n n u a l R e p o r t


A Message from the President and CEO Making the C.A.S.E. for Creative Active Sustainable Communities Reflecting on 2010, it is amazing to see how Parks and Recreation Ontario members and stakeholders have used the power of recreation and parks to build Creative Active Sustainable Environments. We know that recreation and parks are essential for overcoming some of today’s toughest economic and social challenges. Parks contribute to social cohesion and environmental sustainability. Recreation builds healthy bodies and healthy minds, reducing our reliance on an overburdened health care system. Simply said, recreation and parks are good for the fiscal, physical and social health of Ontario and its citizens. Through education, research, quality assurance standards and advocacy, PRO has worked diligently over the past year to support communities as they Make their C.A.S.E. PRO began the year by reviewing and updating its governance and by-laws in order to operate more efficiently and effectively, better serve members and align the resources of the association with the priorities of the recreation and parks industry. As well, PRO conducted a membership survey and is using the results to help improve services and increase our reach. We continue to collaborate with a wide range of allied organizations, from health to education to social services, who share our vision that everyone in Ontario should have access to recreation and parks in their community. PRO strengthened its commitment to offering the most comprehensive and relevant education and training program for recreation and parks and increased our reach through new web-based learning and online resources. Excellence and quality assurance are also high priorities for the sector, and PRO has responded by updating and revitalizing elements of the HIGH FIVE® quality assurance standard. We’re proud also to be able to offer HIGH FIVE® training in both official languages. Built on a foundation of excellence in education and quality, PRO has been able to provide a strong and unified voice for the sector. PRO has capitalized on opportunities to influence decision makers at the local and provincial level by leading cross-sectoral coalitions on issues such as the HST and by publishing position papers and government submissions. At PRO, we want to be sure that policy decisions are made which value the critical role that recreation and parks play in creating and maintaining healthy and economically stable communities. We all have a role to play in Making the C.A.S.E. Together we can create a lasting legacy for the future of a healthier Ontario.

Liz Weaver Larry Ketcheson President CEO

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Making the C.A.S.E. though Public Policy Everyday in recreation and parks, we work to provide people with opportunities to be active and engaged in our cities, towns and neighbourhoods. It’s at the heart of what recreation and parks provide: quality of life. At Parks and Recreation Ontario, we strive to be active and engaged on policy issues that have a direct impact on the recreation and parks sector in Ontario. Everyone benefits from a strong, unified voice for the sector. PRO seeks to work collaboratively with members, stakeholders and allied organizations to promote the importance and benefits of recreation and parks in Ontario.

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PRO’s Policy Action Plan - Track emerging issues - Conduct research - Engage and mobilize - Create tools and resources - Work collaboratively

2010 Policy Highlights Building on strong, collaborative partnerships and a solid relationship with government, PRO has been able to positively influence public policy in several areas. PRO’s policy agenda comprises a variety of important matters including infrastructure renewal, access to recreation, community use of schools, youth engagement, reconnecting children with nature and much more. 2010 was a busy year, and PRO was able to have an impact on a variety of issues. Aligning Provincial Health and Tax Policy PRO continued to lead a coalition of provincial sport and recreation organizations concerned with the impact of the harmonized tax (HST). The coalition advocated for measures that would mitigate the impact of the HST. While we were not able to gain a full exemption for sport and recreation program fees and facility rentals, the provincial government did introduce a refundable Children’s Activity Credit to help families with program registration fees. Full-Day Learning and Recreation The provincial government has taken bold steps to strengthen the early learning system for children in Ontario. Within the context of the changes to the Education Act and Full-Day Learning for 4 and 5 year olds, PRO provided advice to the Ministry of Education. PRO stressed that that community partnerships between education and recreation would benefit both families and children and that community recreation is a vital part of healthy child development. Infrastructure As the infrastructure stimulus dollars flowed into communities, PRO began to track the impact of those investments on communities. PRO will continue to be a lead advocate for dedicated funding for sport, recreation and green infrastructure. Since 2007, more than $900 million has been invested in sport and recreation infrastructure in Ontario by all levels of government. Pa r k s a n d R e c r e at i o n O n ta r i o 2 0 1 0 A n n u a l R e p o r t

Recreation and parks is a billion dollar industry in Ontario with the power to help transform lives and solve some of today’s toughest social challenges.


Reconnecting Children with Nature In association with the Royal Botanical Gardens and Ontario Nature, PRO began a project to develop tools and influence policy that will help reconnect children with nature. A Coordinated Approach to Health Promotion It is estimated that physical inactivity costs local and provincial government in Ontario between $2.2 and $2.5 billion a year in direct and indirect health care costs. The burden of a sedentary lifestyle has caught up with the population and, if trends continue in this direction, government will no longer be able to afford to provide health care for those who need it. PRO believes that recreation and parks are crucial to overcoming this challenge. In 2010, PRO worked with many ministries across government to align policies to support health promotion and active living. Don Drummond, TD Bank’s former chief economist, “Preventing illness and promoting healthy living would almost certainly form a cornerstone of a holistic strategy… Ultimately, the most effective way of lowering costs in the health care system will be to ensure that fewer people are in need of expensive care.” Charting a Path to Sustainable Health Care in Ontario

Ministry of Children and Youth Services, Poverty Reduction Strategy Affordable Access to Recreation Ministry of Education Community Use of Schools Full-Day Learning Ministry of Finance Pre-Budget Consultations Ministry of Health Promotion and Sport Affordable Access to Recreation Policy Development and Community Workshops After School Initiative HIGH FIVE® Training within Public Health HIGH FIVE® and Intentional Youth Development Training for the After School Initiative Infrastructure Renewal Strategy Municipal Performance Measurement Renewal of the Provincial Recreation Policy Statement Value and Benefits of Recreation Youth Engagement Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Municipal Performance Measurement Program Ministry of Revenue Harmonized Sales Tax Ministry of Transportation Active Transportation Ontario Seniors’ Secretariat Recreation for Older Adults

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Making the C.A.S.E. through Local Action By providing community leaders with resources that promote the value and benefits of recreation and parks, PRO continues to help make the C.A.S.E. for Creative Active Sustainable Communities. In 2010, PRO launched a new database and website that connects communities and makes it easier for all stakeholders to access the information and resources they need to make a difference in their community.

Engaging Ontarians

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Recreation and Parks Month Each June, hundreds of communities across Ontario celebrate Recreation and Parks Month. In 2010, PRO was joined by a number of provincial partners for this initiative. The Heart and Stroke Foundation, Ontario Parks Association, Ontario Public Health Association, Ontario Recreation Facilities Association, Ontario Society of Physical Activity Promoters in Public Health, Ontario Trails Council and the Sport Alliance were all united in their efforts to improve the quality of life by promoting the benefits that recreation and parks provide to communities and to Ontario’s citizens. Municipal Action For the first time, PRO published a Municipal Election Platform, an introduction for elected officials on how recreation and parks can help build vibrant communities and overcome the significant economic and social challenges facing communities today. The Platform was successfully launched at the 2010 Association of Municipalities Conference in Windsor, just before the fall election.

Youth Engagement

Play Works PRO is one of eight provincial organizations that make up Play Works, the Ontario Partnership for Active and Engaged Youth. The Play Works Youth Friendly Recognition Program creates a standard for sustained and meaningful youth engagement and involvement. There are now 37 formally-recognized Youth Friendly Communities in Ontario that are helping to empower youth and to build healthier and more socially responsible communities.

Provincial Partnerships Through partnerships and collaborative action, PRO is expanding its reach and having a positive impact in communities. PRO is an active member of several coalitions including: • Back to Nature Collaborative • Ontario After School Collaborative • Ontario Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance • Ontario Collaborative on Healthy Eating and Physical Activity • Ontario Task Group on Affordable Access to Recreation • Play, Live, Be Tobacco-Free • Play Works • Spark Together for Healthy Kids (Heart and Stroke Foundation)

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There are over 17,000 resources available free of charge in the National Recreation Database at lin.ca. $2M worth of resources are downloaded from the Database each year.

National Action PRO is pleased to be a member of the renewed Canadian Parks and Recreation Association, a national alliance of provincial and territorial partners. PRO works with these partners on important issues such as infrastructure, youth engagement, changes to the long-form census and the Canadian Sport Policy Renewal. In 2010, PRO contributed significantly to the National Recreation Database, hosted by the Lifestyle Information Network (lin.ca) through projects such as the development of legislative audit tools for recreation and parks. “85% of Ontario residents can easily walk from their home to a park, playground or other open space.� Use of Benefits of Local Government Recreation and Parks Service: An Ontario Perspective

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Making the C.A.S.E. through Essential Knowledge PRO is committed to increasing the skills and knowledge of professionals and volunteers so they are better able to manage issues relevant to the parks and recreation sector today. PRO offers a wide range of educational and training opportunities, from face-to-face annual conferences and half-day and daylong workshops to virtual webinars. Each year, PRO connects with more than 10,000 individuals who attend education and training events. Here are some of the highlights from 2010. Annual Events PRO’s annual training events provide leaders in recreation and parks, public health, education, elected officials, students and interested citizens with the finest educational opportunities.

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2010 National Exchange and Educational Forum and Trade Show • Held in Niagara Falls, over 650 delegates, exhibitors, speakers and guests participated in sixty sessions and events. • The National Exchange brought delegates from across Canada to discuss issues of country-wide significance. PRO Aquatics Conference • Held at The Rosseau Resort in Muskoka, the 37th annual aquatic training event drew over 200 participants who took part in over 35 sessions. MBA Symposium 10 for Managers and Staff of Youth Development Programs • This Symposium, the More and Better Approach, provided training and tools to help communities improve the breadth and quality of their services for youth. In 2010, more than 90 participants came from as far away as Iqaluit representing a wide range of sectors including employment, recreation and public and mental health. Workshops With the support of local hosts, PRO was able to present over 30 workshops in communities across the province. In addition to webinars, introduced in 2009, in 2010 new online training programs in Customer Service and Marketing were launched. Additional highlights included: • Webinars on Positively Positioning Parks and Recreation Services, Volunteer Screening and Special Events. • A Middle Management Workshop for those on the upward move. • Community Development and Access Policy workshops. • A series of Positive Youth Development workshops for staff who work with adolescent youth. HIGH FIVE® Ontario To date in Ontario, more than: • 45,000 leaders have been trained in the Principles of Healthy Child Development (PHCD); • 5,500 people have acquired skills to assess policies, procedures and programs through QUEST – the Quality Experience Scanning Tool; and • 550 HIGH FIVE® Trainers have been trained.

Pa r k s a n d R e c r e at i o n O n ta r i o 2 0 1 0 A n n u a l R e p o r t


Making the C.A.S.E. through Quality Assurance Quality assurance is a mark of excellence that provides recognition of an organization’s commitment to constant improvement. Parks and Recreation Ontario supports the development of standards that enhance quality service delivery and asset management and equips the sector with the tools and resources necessary to ensure quality and high performance. HIGH FIVE® Founded in 2001 by Parks and Recreation Ontario, HIGH FIVE® is Canada’s only quality standard for children’s sport and recreation programs. It represents a true commitment to quality recreation, sport and play and is based on research involving child development experts, recreation and sport professionals, families and leaders. Building on the core objective to create exceptional quality assurance systems in Ontario, PRO also supports the delivery of the HIGH FIVE® standard throughout Canada. Here are some of the achievements from 2010.

The HIGH FIVE® Principles of Health Child Development A Caring Adult Friends Participation Play Mastery

• More than 500,000 children in communities across Canada are benefiting from participating in programs guided by HIGH FIVE®. • 230 organizations are involved as Registered and Accredited Organizations including municipalities, Boys and Girls Clubs, YMCA/YWCA, academic institutions and sport organizations. • 15 Accredited Organizations have achieved the highest level of excellence for quality assurance. • 15 Colleges and Universities are delivering Principles of Healthy Child Development (PHCD) to recreation and leisure studies students. • The development of QUEST 1 online training. • The development of a new Guide to Policies and Procedures for enhanced risk management. • The completion of customized PHCD training for aquatic Leaders. • HIGH FIVE® was a recommended standard in the Federal/Provincial/Territorial After-School Physical Activity Workshop Report. • Quality Assurance Forums were held across the province to share best practices and to benchmark standards of care with regard to service delivery standards for children aged 6 to 12. After School Initiative PRO has continued to support the Ministry of Health Promotion and Sport in its After School Initiative by providing leaders and staff in participating organizations across Ontario with 100% subsidized access to training to enhance the quality of programs for children and youth. PRO offered in-person training in the HIGH FIVE® Principles of Healthy Child Development, Becoming a High Five® Trainer, and online training in Intentional Youth Development and QUEST 1. Access to Recreation PRO created and delivered a workshop across Ontario to help municipalities and non-profit organizations develop policy standards that will increase access to recreation for Ontarians. Youth Friendly Community Recognition Program The 16 criteria for Youth Friendly Communities have become a benchmark for excellence in youth engagement. Communities strive for Bronze, Silver, Gold or Platinum Community Builder designation, encouraging and challenging leaders and youth to work together for active and engaged communities.

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Treasurer’s Report The 2010 audited financial statement for Parks and Recreation Ontario indicates a sound financial state that is in line with originally set targets, including a small surplus. The statements reflect priority outputs and outcomes in the core areas of membership services, contract services, communication and public relations, education and training, and the HIGH FIVE® Standard. In 2010, the PRO Board of Directors and staff initiated the implementation of a financial risk management process that will help effectively allocate resources, reduce loss, identify potential risks, seize opportunities and improve deployment of capital. A new Risk Management Committee will establish and achieve annual and long-term financial performance goals. PRO has also commenced work on a Code of Conduct to ensure effective compliance controls are in place for all areas of labour relations requiring the protection, safety and health of staff and volunteers. Furthermore, a purchasing policy is currently in development that will place internal controls on financial procurement, reporting and fund raising. PRO’s new governance structure supports this work to minimize PRO’s exposure to potential risk and improve control procedures. In closing, our progress is due in large to the strong support and dedication of our staff, Board of Directors, partners and members. PRO will continue to respond to the support from our members and partners with valuable programs to enhance the quality of life for Ontarians. Derek Edwards, Treasurer Pa r k s a n d R e c r e at i o n O n ta r i o 2 0 1 0 A n n u a l R e p o r t


Financial Reports To the Members of Parks and Recreation Ontario We have audited the accompanying financial statements of Parks and Recreation Ontario, which comprise the statement of financial position as at December 31, 2010, and the statements of changes in net assets, operations and cash flows for the year then ended, and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information. Management’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with Canadian accounting standards, and for such internal control as management determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards. Those standards require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe, except as explained in the following paragraph, the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. In common with many notforprofit organizations, the Parks and Recreation Ontario derives revenues from membership fees, the completeness of which is not susceptible to satisfactory audit verification. Accordingly, our verification of these revenues was limited to the amounts recorded in the records of the Organization and we were not able to determine whether any adjustments might be necessary to revenues, contribution to reserve and net assets. Opinion In our opinion, except for the effects of adjustments, if any, which we might have determined to be necessary had we been able to satisfy ourselves as to the completeness of revenue, as described in the preceding paragraph, these financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Parks and Recreation Ontario as at December 31, 2010 and the results of its operations and cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with Canadian accounting standards.

Mississauga, Ontario Gilmore & Company LLP Chartered Accountants February 28, 2011 Licensed Public Accountants

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Statement of Financial Position As at December 31, 2010 2010

2009

ASSETS Current Cash and short-term investments

$

253,879

Accounts receivable

227,139

220,238

Prepaid expenses

85,206

87,650

835,380

561,767

17,075

22,498

Property and equipment (Note 4)

$ 523,035

$ 852,455

$

584,265

$ 117,292

$

194,849

Deferred contributions

526,997

217,638

644,289

412,487

Invested in property and equipment

17,075

22,498

Unrestricted

149,726

127,915

Internally restricted

41,365

21,365

208,166

171,778

LIABILITIES

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Current Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

NET ASSETS

$ 852,455

$

584,265

Statement of Changes in Net Assets For the year ended December 31, 2010

Balance, beginning of year Contribution to: Reserve Projects Research and development Balance, end of year

2010

Invested in property and Internally equipment Unrestricted restricted

2009

Total

Total

$ 22,498

$ 127,915

$ 21,365

$ 171,778

$ 162,753

(5,423) - -

21,811 - -

- - 20,000

16,388 - 20,000

14,025 (5,000) -

$ 17,075

$ 149,726

$ 41,365

$ 208,166

$ 171,778

Pa r k s a n d R e c r e at i o n O n ta r i o 2 0 1 0 A n n u a l R e p o r t


Statement of Operations For the year ended December 31, 2010

2010

2009

Core revenue Corporate services

$

156,709

$

152,542

Education and training

572,292

461,739

HIGH FIVE

722,656

540,106

Communications and public relations

43,516

94,369

Membership services

136,558

152,962

Contract services

441,083

246,904

2,072,814

1,648,622

Core expenses Corporate services

299,385

290,867

Amortization

5,423

7,186

Education and training

461,040

388,144

HIGH FIVE

637,436

493,759

Communications and public relations

141,068

119,262

Membership services

107,518

111,245

Contract services

404,556

224,134

2,056,426

1,634,597

Core revenue in excess of expenses

16,388

14,025

Project revenue

299,418

811,533

Project expenses

299,418

811,533

Project revenue in excess of expenses

-

-

Contribution to reserve

$

16,388

$

14,025

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Statement of Cash Flows For the year ended December 31, 2010 2010

2009

Cash provided by (used in): Operating activities Excess of revenues over expenses for the year

$

16,388

$

14,025

Accounts receivable

(6,901)

(31,825)

Prepaids and deposits

2,444

12,541

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

(77,557)

65,275

Deferred revenue

309,359

(216,983)

Depreciation

5,423

7,186

249,156

(149,781)

Purchase of property and equipment

-

(13,968)

Contribution to projects

-

(5,000)

Contribution to research and development

20,000

-

20,000

(18,968)

Net increase (decrease) in cash

269,156

(168,749)

Cash and shortterm investments, beginning of year

253,879

422,628

Cash and shortterm investments, end of year

523,035

253,879

Changes in noncash working capital items:

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Investing activity

$

$

Notes to Financial Statements December 31, 2010 1. Purpose of the organization Parks and Recreation Ontario was created to enhance the quality of life, health and well being of people, their communities and their environments. Parks and Recreation Ontario is incorporated under the Corporations Act of Ontario as a notforprofit organization. The Organization is exempt from income taxes as long as it complies with the applicable provisions of the Income Tax Act. 2. Significant accounting policies Property and equipment Property and equipment are recorded at cost. Amortization is provided using the declining balance method at the following annual rates: Computer equipment 30% Furniture and fixtures 20% Leasehold improvements are amortized on a straightline basis over five years.

Pa r k s a n d R e c r e at i o n O n ta r i o 2 0 1 0 A n n u a l R e p o r t


Revenue recognition Parks and Recreation Ontario follows the deferral method of accounting for contributions. Restricted contributions are recognized as revenue in the year in which the related expenses are incurred. Unrestricted contributions are recognized as revenue when received or when receivable if the amount to be received can be reasonably estimated and collection is reasonably assured. Contributed services Given the difficulty of determining their fair value, contributed services are not recognized in the financial statements. Deferred contributions Deferred contributions represent unspent resources received or receivable in the previous and current periods, externally restricted for operating funding of subsequent periods. Investments Investments are carried at the lower of cost and market value. Use of estimates The preparation of financial statements in accordance with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amount of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reported period. On an ongoing basis, management reviews its estimates, and, as adjustments become necessary, they are reported in earnings in the period in which they become known. 3. Financial instruments The carrying value of cash and shortterm investments, accounts receivable, and accounts payable and accrued liabilities approximate their fair value due to the immediate or shortterm maturity of these financial instruments. 4. Property and equipment

2010

2009

Net Net Accumulated

Carrying

Carrying

Cost Amortization Amount Amount

Computer equipment

$ 86,848

$ 80,726

$ 6,122

$ 8,746

Furniture and fixtures

16,803

6,565

10,238

12,798

1,192

477

715

954

$ 104,843

$ 87,768

$ 17,075

$ 22,498

Leasehold improvements 5. Commitments

The Organization is committed to minimum annual payments on its premise as follows: 2011 Thereafter

$ 14,591 -

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Community Commitment Volunteers Gail Akins, Linda Albright, Terry Alyman, Mary-Lou Ambrose-Little, Rob Armstrong, Shelly Arnold, John Atkinson, Amanda Baker, Harry Bell, Praful Bhindi, Jim Boduch, Gail Botten, Jim Bradley, Kim Bradley, Barry Braun, Linda Breen, Michelle Brownrigg, Eric Burton, Tammie Caldwell, Dan Chenier, Nicole Cichello, David Clark, Robert Coughlin, Jennifer Cowie Bonne, Jason Cranny, Dan Crowder, Agnes Croxford, Michelle Cundari, Howie Dayton, Nina de Vaal, Mark DeBruyn, Mireille Dessaint-Ash, Sharon Doherty, Anna Drummond, Valma Fairgreave, Marianne Fallis, Minnie Fisher, Chris Foster, Richard Fournier, John Frittenburg, Bill Galbraith, Amy Gangl, Dianne Gate, Ryan Gelencser, Chris Gillis, Carly Haydt, Lori Henderson, Colin Higgs, Janet Hilts, Marek Holke, Vianne Horne, Jamie Houston, Violetta Ilkiw, Steve Indig, Darlene Joslin, Krista Klager, Colleen Koza, Sheri Krauss, Lavinia Lamenza, Brenda Lance, Karyn Lau, Dr. Ellen Lipman, John Lohuis, Lynn Loubert, Colleen MacDonald, Janice Makepeace, Michelle Manarina-Cianfrone, Stoney McCart, Lisa McNee Baker, Debbie Miller, John Milton, Scott Mitchell, Adam

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Mobbs, Kathy Moldenhauer, Sandra Morris, Yvette Munro, Jodi Murray, Mike Myatt, Colleen Neil, Micole Ongman, Brent Page, RenĂŠe-Anne Paquette, Michelle Philp, Heather Pilling, Russ Pooley, Sharon Proulx, Jennifer Reynolds, Nancy Rooyakkers, Russell Scott, Cindy Scythes, Ruth Simpson, Gus Siountres, Bill Slute, Debbie Smith, Nora Spinks, Marianne Staempfli, Ray Stukas, Doug Sweet, Joy Thompson, Sally Thomson, Holly Trimnell, Claire TuckerReid, Connie Uetrecht, Judy Vanderveer, Janath Vesna, Marnie Warman, John Watkins, Brenda Whitehead, Diane Wiber, Andy Wickens, Jessica Wolfe, Matt Wood, Susan Wright, Samantha Yamada. Corporate Partners ABC Recreation Ltd., Aquam Aquatic Specialist Inc., At the Lake Distributing Inc., Atec Marketing Inc., Ball Hockey International, BigHand Sports North America Inc., CAAWS, Canadian Locker, Canadian Ramp Company, Canadian Red Cross, Canadian Tire Jumpstart, Can-Fit-Pro, Cannon Design Architecture Inc., CEI/MMC Architecture, Centaur Products Inc., CIMCO, City of Brampton, City of Niagara Falls, Crozier Agencies, Dairy Farmers of Canada, David A. Clark Consulting Inc., DB Perks & Associates, Doapark Canada Inc., Eat Right Ontario, Environics Analytics, Exploration Playgrounds, F.J. Galloway, FieldTurf, Flaghouse, G & A Corporate Events, Green Gym, Gym-Con Ltd., Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario, Henderson Recreation Equipment Ltd., Hinspergers Poly Industries, IBI Group, IC Improvements Inc., Innova Disc Golf, Jack Watson Sports Inc., Jambette Playground Equipement, The JF Group, KidSport Ontario, Kwik Goal - Gem Sport, Laurentian Gymnastics Industries Ltd., Lettuce Make Thyme Inc., Lifesaving Society, Lifestyle Information Network, M4ideas, Ministry of Health Promotion and Sport, MJMA Architects, Montieth Brown Planning Consultants, Mountain Equipment Co-op, Musco Sports Lighting Canada, New Line Skateparks, OES Scoreboards Inc., Ontario Soccer Association, Ontario Volleyball Association, Open Air Products, Ophea, Paris Equipment Manufacturing Ltd., Paul S. Leskew & Associates, PBK Architects Inc, PHE Canada, Playpower Lt Canada Inc., Practica Ltd., Recreation Playsystems, School Specialty Canada, Schoolhouse Products Inc., Shore Tilbe Perkins + Will, Simplistic Lines Inc., SP&S Commercial Swimming Pool & Spa Management, Spectrum Sk8park Creations Ltd., Splashables Inc., Sport Alliance of Ontario, Sport Court, Sport Systems Canada Inc., Steps Count, Team Aquatic Supplies, Teamwork & Teamplay, Tennis Canada, Urban Poling Inc., Volunteer2, Water Polo Canada, Watermaid Canada Inc.

Pa r k s a n d R e c r e at i o n O n ta r i o 2 0 1 0 A n n u a l R e p o r t


PRO’s Strategic Partners in 2010 4 –H Ontario Arts Network for Children and Youth Association of Municipalities of Ontario Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada – Central Region Canadian Mental Health Association - Ontario Canadian Parks and Recreation Association Canadian Red Cross – Ontario Region Canadian Tire Jumpstart Centre of Excellence for Youth Engagement First Work Gymnastics Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario Imagine Canada KidSport Ontario Laidlaw Foundation Lifestyle Information Network (LIN) Lifesaving Society Northeastern Ontario Recreation Association Ontario Chronic Disease Prevention Alliance Ontario Collaborative Group on Healthy Eating and Physical Activity Ontario Colleges and University Coordinators Ontario Lung Association Ontario Public Health Association Ontario Municipal Social Services Association Ontario Parks Association Ontario Recreation Facilities Association Ontario Society of Physical Activity Promoters in Public Health Ontario Trails Council Ophea Provincial/Territorial Recreation and Parks Associations across Canada Regional Recreation and Parks Networks/Associations Sport Alliance of Ontario YMCA Ontario ONTARIO GOVERNMENT PARTNERS Ministry of Children and Youth Services Ministry of Education Ministry of Finance Ministry of Health Ministry of Health Promotion and Sport Ministry of Revenue Ministry of Transportation Ontario Seniors’ Secretariat

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2010 PRO Award Recipients In 2010, Parks and Recreation Ontario renewed its awards program to better reflect the innovation and diversity of the recreation and parks sector. The recipients of the 2010 PRO Awards represent the truly outstanding work that goes on in communities and the dedication of the individuals who are committed to improving the quality of life for Ontario’s citizens. President’s Award of Distinction Waterfront Regeneration Trust

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Excellence in Design Awards Alias Grace Park, Town of Richmond Hill City of Thunder Bay’s Skateboard/BMX Plaza Grand Bend Beach Enhancement Niagara Falls Lions Park Pickering Recreation Complex Expansion Innovation Awards Zachary Andrus Anna Drummond, The Healthy Active Living Initiative The FitZone — Century Gardens Recreation Centre Prescription for Physical Activity, City of Toronto Recreation Excellence Program, City of Vaughan Emerging Leaders Awards Jason Tsien, Town of Markham Lesley Atkinson, County of Brant Trillium Award Marie James, City of Toronto High Five® Awards HIGH FIVE® Champion Award Janet Hilts HIGH FIVE® Innovation Award Town of Ajax Student and Academic Awards Bob Secord Student Leadership Award Jamal Brooks, Centennial College Gina Dineen, Brock University Hugh Clydesdale Bursary Award Portia Lee, Centennial College

Pa r k s a n d R e c r e at i o n O n ta r i o 2 0 1 0 A n n u a l R e p o r t


Parks and Recreation Ontario (PRO) was formed in 1995 as a result of the consolidation of former member organizations of the Parks and Recreation Federation of Ontario. PRO now represents 2,000 members including professionals, volunteers, educators, and students, interested citizens, elected official and commercial representatives. Through its membership and strategic partnerships, PRO reaches over 10,000 people with an interest in the value and benefits of recreation and parks in Canada. An Impressive History of Leadership Presidents – Parks and Recreation Ontario Don May 2009 – 2010 Aaron Burry 2008 – 2009 Frank Prospero 2007 – 2008 Nina de Vaal 2006 – 2007 Karen Makela 2005 – 2006 Howie Dayton 2004 – 2005 Sharon May 2003 – 2004 Terry Alyman 2002 – 2003 Perry Smith 2001 – 2002 Stuart Taylor 2000 – 2001 Janie Romoff 1998 – 2000 Marion Price 1997 – 1998 Darlene W. Joslin 1996 – 1997 Michael H. Hall 1995 – 1996

Chairs – Parks and Recreation Federation of Ontario Thomas A. Hodge 1994 – 1995 Marlene J. Mitchell 1993 – 1994 Patricia A. O’Connell 1992 – 1993 James E. Olmstead 1991 – 1992 M. Gail Andrews 1990 – 1991 John A. MacIntyre 1988 – 1990 Ross L. Fair 1987 – 1988 Marc J. Neeb 1986 – 1987 R. Douglas Ferguson 1984 – 1986 Donald M. Gordon 1983 – 1984 M. Dean McCubbin 1982 – 1983 Robert Arnot 1980 – 1982

2010 PRO Board of Directors Liz Weaver, President Don May, Past President Derek Edwards, Treasurer

PRO Staff Larry Ketcheston, Chief Executive Officer LJ Bartle, HIGH FIVE® National Manager Camelia Bostan, HIGH FIVE® National Administrator Diane English, Communications and Public Policy Stan Fleet, Program and Office Administrator Carol Harding, Financial Manager Susan Huang, Financial Bookkeeper Fotini Iriotakis, Coordinator, Membership and Education Simone McArthur, Marketing and Events, HIGH FIVE® Marion Price, Manager, Education and Strategic Initiatives Emina Secerbegovic, Program Assistant, HIGH FIVE® Jessica Tonkin, Administrative Assistant Tia Wintre, Coordinator, HIGH FIVE® Ontario

Directors Rob Armstrong Hallie Atter Michael Cleland Brian Connors Sheri Krauss Denyse Morrissey Jennifer Reynolds Marilyn Willis (Treasurer to September 2010) Jan Wilson

Pa r k s a n d R e c r e at i o n O n ta r i o 2 0 1 0 A n n u a l R e p o r t

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Advancing the importance and benefits of recreation and parks Research and Education

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Repositioning Parks and Recreation

Benefits of Parks and Recreation Services

Policy Development

Access Policy Framework

Community Engagement

Charter for Recreation and Parks

Parks and Recreation Ontario 1 Concorde Gate, Suite 302 Toronto, ON  M3C 3N6 Tel: 416-426-7142  Fax: 416-426-7371 www.prontario.org  pro@prontario.org

Quality Assurance


Parks and Recreation Ontario