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GIVE A GIFT OF HISTORIC PROPORTIONS GIVE A MYSTIC SEAPORT MEMBERSHIP

Your gift of a Mystic Seaport membership is a gift of discovery, adventure, and a life enriched by experience. It is sure to be cherished all year long. And if you give someone a membership gift now, MYSTIC SEAPORT WILL

EXTEND YOUR OWN MEMBERSHIP BY THREE FULL MONTHS AND GIVE YOU A GIFT CARD OF UP TO $20 TO OUR MUSEUM STORE as our gifts to you!* So introduce a friend to Mystic Seaport and enjoy three more months of Mystic Seaport memories along with a little holiday shopping. To purchase a gift membership or for more information regarding membership levels and gift card values, call 860.572.5339 or visit our website, www.mysticseaport.org/holiday *This is a limited time offer.

SEA HISTORY ALIVE


CONTENTS

26

TM

Mystic Seaport magazine is a publication of Mystic SeaporT

IN THIS ISSUE SEASCAPES . ..................................… 4

President STEPHEN C. WHITE

MORGAN’S 38TH VOYAGE BY THE NUMBERS ............................ 5

executive vice presidents SUSAN FUNK MARCY WITHINGTON

ADVANCEMENT NEWS ...................6-7

Editor Göran R BUCKHORN editor@mysticseaport.org

THE “DOC SHOP” TRIO . ............. 8-11

PRODUCTION Susan HEATH

FROM THE TOP OF THE HURRICANE HOUSE . ................. 12-13

Design Dayna Carignan, Mystic Seaport karen Ward, THE DAY PRINTING COMPANY

MORGAN’S 38TH VOYAGE........... 14-19

contributors

STOWAWAY ON THE CHARLES W. MORGAN................ 20-21

Willits D. Ansel Fred Calabretta Chris Freeman

Amanda Keenan Ryan LeightoN Dan McFadden

THE LONGEVITY OF THE CHARLES W. MORGAN................ 22-25

PHOTOGRAPHY Evelyn Ansel

Dennis Murphy

Ken Bracewell

Joel Plessala

Nancy d’Estang

Andy Price

Chris Freeman

Mary Anne Stets

Deb House

WHALING IN THE MOVIES........... 26-29

MYSTIC SEAPORT PHOTOGRAPHY ARCHIVES

Ryan Leighton Ken Mahler

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2014

DRAWINGS Robert C. Allyn Evelyn Ansel Willits D. Ansel

ON BOOKS ....................................... 30

Kathy Bray Roger Hambidge

FALL / WINTER ON THE COVER: THE CHARLES W. MORGAN ON HER WAY TO NEWPORT ON JUNE 15, 2014. PHOTOGRAPHY: DENNIS MURPHY/MYSTIC SEAPORT.

CONTACT US VISITOR INFORMATION: 860.572.5315 • 888.973.2767 ADMINISTRATION: 860.572.0711 MEMBERSHIP: 860.572.5339 PROGRAM RESERVATION: 860.572.5322 MUSEUM STORE: 860.572.5385 MARITIME GALLERY: 860.572.5388 VOLUNTEER SERVICES: 860.572.5378

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Please go to the Museum’s website for information on the Fall/Winter/Spring schedule

ADDRESS: 75 GREENMANVILLE AVE. P.O. BOX 6000 MYSTIC, CT 06355 -0990 WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG

& FALL / WINTER 2014

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SPECIAL EVENTS at MYSTIC SEAPORT

NOVEMBER

23-April 19, 2015 — 28-29 — 28-Dec. 7 — 29 —

Marine Artists in Winter Field Days Members’ Double Discount Days Lantern Light Tours begin

DECEMBER 13 — Santa Claus is Coming 21 — Community Carol Sing 26-Jan. 1, 2015 — Holiday Magic

MYSTIC SEAPORT PRESIDENT STEPHEN C. WHITE (ON THE LEFT) SHARES A JOKE AT THE MORGAN’S HOMECOMING CEREMONY WITH J. BARCLAY COLLINS, II, CHAIRMAN OF THE MYSTIC SEAPORT BOARD OF TRUSTEES.

S E A S C A P E S The 38th Voyage: An Epic Traveling Exhibition

T

his issue of the Mystic Seaport Magazine celebrates what has become known simply as “The 38th Voyage.” The phrase embodies a clear shift in how Mystic Seaport creates experiences for visitors that are both immersive and interactive, that promote shared authority, and that are grounded in a sense of place. It has been all that and more as we witnessed and experienced a great ship come to life after years of restoration and preparation. In the end, I believe that the Charles W. Morgan’s 38th Voyage has proven to be transformative for our staff, volunteers, visitors, and the Museum itself. In short, the voyage was historic; it was an epic traveling exhibition that engaged all elements of the Museum and served to unite the maritime community across New England. The articles and pictures in this issue capture the essence of the voyage from a number of perspectives, and of course we were treated to an abundance of images throughout the voyage, both still and moving. As an introduction to this important issue, I would like to share some of my comments made at the memorable Homecoming Opening Ceremony in New Bedford, where the Morgan was built in 1841 and which was her homeport for many years, on June 28, 2014: “I don’t need to tell you what the Morgan’s homecoming means to you, but it is important that you know what it means to Mystic Seaport. Seventy-three years ago, we made a commitment to care for this remarkable treasure. She is at once a maritime artifact, a relic, an iconic ship, an ambassador, a platform for learning, and the last of her kind. We have done what any good museum would do for an object in its collection, and we have certainly been good stewards. But with this voyage, we take that stewardship to an entirely new level. “First, she is not our ship; she is not your ship; she is America’s ship, and it is our obligation to share her with America in the best manner possible. …It became clear that… we could redefine our care for her by allowing the Morgan to live again by going back to sea, fully renewed. And then, once freed from dock lines, take her back home to New Bedford, as that would be the fullest and most noteworthy manner in which to celebrate her significance to you, to us, and to America.

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The Museum grounds will be closed to visitors between January 2 and February 13, 2015. Please check our website for hours of operation for the Collections Research Center, Museum Store, Maritime Art Gallery, and Latitude 41° Restaurant during that period. Museum Administration, Education, and other departments will continue to operate on standard business hours. www.mysticseaport.org JANUARY 2015 3 — Chantey Blast and Pub Sing FEBRUARY 2015 11 — Maritime Author Series begins 14 -16 — Winter’s Aweigh

APRIL 2015 14-15 — Pirate Days 18-19 — Educators’ Weekend

“We have undertaken this voyage to learn… more about how a whaleship sails, to gather more knowledge about her history, to come in contact with descendants of crew members and owners we’ve not known before. We undertake this voyage to teach… to help America understand its maritime heritage more fully and to make it possible for you to teach our younger generations that this ship and this voyage are important and that they should take notice and agree that they will become her stewards when all of us are gone. We sail the Morgan again to show that great museum work can take place far beyond its safe walls and boundaries…. Finally, we do this because we must—I firmly believe that this 38th Voyage is what Mystic Seaport was created to do in the fullest sense—and that is to inspire an enduring connection to the American maritime experience.” Thank you to our team, and see you on the Charles W. Morgan!

STEPHEN C. WHITE President


BY THE NUMBERS: BY THE NUMBERS

The Charles W. Morgan and the 38th VOYAGE Age of the Charles W. Morgan Number of owners/owner groups the Morgan has had Longest period of ownership by a single owner (hint: Mystic Seaport) Number of whaling voyages Number of homeports, including Col. Green’s estate in South Dartmouth, MA The Morgan’s longest whaling voyage (July 13, 1881-June 18, 1886) in days The Morgan’s most profitable whaling voyage (October 4, 1859-May 12, 1863)

: 173 years :7 : 73 years : 37 :5 : 1,801 : $165,405.74

Total profit during her 37 whaling voyages between 1841 and 1921

: $1.4M

Number of days between the start of the restoration of the Morgan (hauled out September 27, 2008) and the beginning of the 38th Voyage (down the Mystic River on May 17, 2014)

: 2,058

Captains of the Morgan (including the 38th Voyage’s Capt. Kip Files)

: 22

Professional crew aboard the Morgan on the 38th Voyage

: 18

Mystic Seaport sailing deckhands aboard the Morgan on her 38th Voyage

: 25

Mystic Seaport staff working in the different ports at the dockside exhibits and aboard the Morgan

: 140

Museum volunteers working in the different ports, at the dockside exhibits and aboard the Morgan

: 105

The Morgan open to the public at the six ports in hours

: 293.25

Visitors who came aboard the Morgan in port during the 38th Voyage

: 64,297

Views of the most watched Mystic Seaport 38th Voyage video on YouTube, “Atop the world on the Charles W. Morgan” (as of Oct. 15, 2014)

: 144,908

Plastic shark pool toys recovered during the 38th Voyage

:1

Length of 38th Voyage in days

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: 81

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A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

D O D S O N B O AT YA R D : O U R N E W E S T C O M M U N I T Y P A R T N E R Dodson Boatyard has been a part of the working waterfront in Stonington, CT, for more than 50 years. The hard work and dedication of their team over those years has established an unbeatable reputation for quality service and has set the benchmark for other full service boatyards to aspire toward. For decades, the deeply experienced professional team at Dodson Boatyard has worked side by side with owners of classic vessels to support the highest level of stewardship and care. They share the understanding, espoused by Mystic Seaport, that sometimes the best way to look after a vessel over the long term is restoration through use. Thus it was no surprise when they approached Mystic Seaport this spring to offer their assistance in caring for one of the significant vessels in the Boats in Use program at the Museum. The vessel delivered to Dodson Boatyard was the L. Francis Herreshoff auxiliary ketch Araminta. She received a beautiful coat of paint (including new gold leaf) and fresh varnish to all of her brightwork. Some of you may have seen her swinging proudly on a mooring right off the main dock of Dodson Boatyard this summer. If you happened to pass by the yard this fall, you might have seen another

Museum vessel: the Wianno Senior Fantasy (see photo above). Working in concert with shipwright David Snediker of Taylor & Snediker, Dodson Boatyard’s skilled artisans will give Fantasy a good deal of special attention. This important work represents a very tangible step in the continued stewardship of this remarkable vessel. This year is the centennial year of the Wianno Senior Class (see book review on page 30) and thanks to our

partners at Dodson Boatyard, hull #11 will be looking like new again. In addition to this valuable in-kind sponsorship, the team at Dodson Boatyard backed the restoration and 38th Voyage of the Charles W. Morgan by becoming a “plankholder.” Please join us in thanking Dodson Boatyard for their support and also welcoming them as our newest community partners. If you are planning to visit Stonington, CT, by boat or by car, be sure to stop by Dodson Boatyard to say hello and see the work underway. Chris Freeman is Director of Development.

MYSTIC SEAPORT VOLUNTEERS: A COMMUNITY OF ENTHUSIASTS The historic 38th Voyage of the Charles W. Morgan was a vast undertaking. With the vessel now safely back at Mystic Seaport, we can all take pride in what has been achieved. Hundreds of individuals committed their time and talents to the common goal of taking the Morgan back to sea. I would like to take the opportunity to write about a specific group that was vital to our success: the Mystic Seaport volunteers. During her six port visits this summer, the Morgan was open to the public for nearly 300 hours (roughly 30 ten-hour days). When she was open, we were required by our USCG Certificate of Inspection to have nine trained personnel aboard to direct visitors and to be prepared to safely evacuate the vessel in the event of an emergency. One hundred and five volunteers filled 325 shifts to make sure that

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the Morgan was accessible to visitors. The traveling dockside exhibit, which was comprised of displays and activities at each port, needed to be attended to by competent, knowledgeable, and friendly people who could engage with visitors. More than 64,000 visitors came through the dockside exhibits and were met by cheerful, informative, and friendly hosts. Much of this important work was also done by Museum volunteers. It is important to point out that not only did these volunteers contribute their time, but they also covered their own travel and lodging expenses to participate in the 38th Voyage. We even had some volunteers who followed the Morgan on their own boats. While the Morgan was voyaging, it was business as usual at the Museum. All of our public programs, educational activities,

camps, and event weekends still took place. Hundreds more volunteers helped the staff to ensure that all those who visited Mystic Seaport this summer had a quality experience. Each year, some 500 enrolled volunteers commit an average of 80,000 hours of their time to support the Museum and help us to pursue our mission. Mystic Seaport was founded by volunteers. The organization was managed and run by volunteers for fifteen years before the first paid staff member was hired. This long tradition of volunteerism, dedication, and commitment has been a wellspring of success for 85 years. Please join in as we express a heartfelt “thank you” to all of the volunteers who are committed to the success of Mystic Seaport and who helped us to take the Morgan back to sea. Chris Freeman is Director of Development.


A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

ELIZABETH COOK REED EMPLOYEE ENRICHMENT FUND ESTABLISHED In the late summer of 2013, Mystic Seaport lost an important member of our community, Elizabeth “Lisa” Cook Reed. Lisa’s career at Mystic Seaport spanned four decades. She began her first job at age 21 as a Museum teacher and later accepted a position as Supervisor of Education, where she managed programs for school, youth, and family audiences. After taking time off to raise a family and work with other non-profit institutions, Lisa returned to the Museum in 1993 to manage the Annual Fund (then part of the Membership Department), followed by a position four years later in the Development Department as Campaign Coordinator. Lisa then served as Director of Membership from 1999 to 2003 before returning to the Develop-

ment Department as Director of Development and Membership. Always humble and unassuming, she took on each new responsibility with grace and determination. Through her leadership of the Membership and Development Departments and the PILOT program, Lisa befriended many of the Museum’s longstanding members and supporters. She

was genuinely interested in the lives of the people she met and was beloved by all those who were fortunate to make her acquaintance. Her legacy is one of true caring and compassion for the many members, volunteers, and especially the staff of Mystic Seaport. Now through the generosity of her family, friends, and colleagues, Lisa’s legacy will continue in a very tangible way. An endowment fund has been established in her honor to provide grants to the Museum’s staff to pursue professional development and personal enrichment opportunities. In keeping with Lisa’s spirit of generosity and her deep love for her colleagues at Mystic Seaport, the Elizabeth Cook Reed Employee Enrichment Fund will provide staff

with the opportunity to follow their passion in meaningful and memorable ways that deepen their connection to the Museum and its mission. Lisa had the rare gift of making everyone feel welcome and appreciated. Her memory will live on in the friendships she forged, her contribution as a valued employee at the Museum, and the innumerable acts of kindness she extended to those she knew. This fund remains open for new contributions. A generous donor has offered to match up to $50,000 in new contributions. If you are interested in making a gift please contact the Advancement Department at 860.572.5365. Chris Freeman is Director of Development.

65 YEARS OF EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING AND SUMMER FUN This year was the 65th season of our signature summer program, the Joseph Conrad Overnight Sailing Camp. Commencing in 1949, the camp provided an opportunity for girls in the Mariner Scouts to come to Mystic Seaport to learn about maritime history and build their sailing skills. Over the decades the program has evolved into a co-educational opportunity for youths ages 10-15. Campers from the 1950s who return to Mystic Seaport today will find that many of the maritime activities they participated in are still being done. Although the Joseph Conrad does not venture from the dock, campers continue to study about life at sea by sleeping aboard the ship and using smaller craft to learn the basics of sailing. Currently, campers sail a fleet of fifty Dyer Dhows (most sponsored by yacht clubs and individual families), many of which have been plying the waters of the Mystic River for decades. Chores are a daily activity as campers clean the fo’c’s’le, midships, and Youth

Training Building. They can be thankful that polishing brass and swabbing the deck have been taken off the list! Nervous campers still bravely climb the rigging, listen to sea chanteys, play games on the Village Green, and receive a certificate at the end of their experience. When Rosemary Duval-Arnould recently visited the Museum, she had her 1961 certificate proudly displayed in her Mariner Scout scrapbook. In addition, she still has her ditty bag, complete with Youth Training Program at Mystic Seaport patches that she made during camp. There have, however, been a few small changes over the years. The campers no longer take a Navy launch to the beaches in Watch Hill, RI, but instead do a downriver cruise on the steamboat Sabino. The titles of the fearless staff members working aboard the Conrad have changed from the highly nautical—Captain, Mate, 2nd Mate, and Cook—to the more modern: Director, Alternate Director, First-Aid Director, and

the like. Campers of yesteryear enjoyed their meals along the rail on the deck of the Joseph Conrad, while today they venture to one of the Museum’s restaurants. Over the past six and a half decades, some 18,000 campers have passed through the program. Many Conrad camp “graduates” move on to participate in the Brilliant sail training program. Others return to the Conrad program as sailing assistants and junior counselors. A few return to the Museum as undergraduates through their participation in the Williams-Mystic Program. Some camp alums become staff members of Mystic Seaport and prominent Museum leaders, such as the current Conrad Camp Director Hallie Payne and Mystic Seaport Trustee Sharon Cohen. David Griswold, Coastal Gourmet vice president of Finance and Operations, recalls, “My year as a Conrad camper was my first experience in sailing, and living aboard the ship was the best time of my life.” Amanda Keenan is Advancement Associate – Annual Fund. FALL / WINTER 2014

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LEFT TO RIGHT: BOB ALLYN AT HIS WORK TABLE. APRIL 1993. 93-4-141, ROGER HAMBIDGE TAKING AIM WITH THE SURVEYOR’S TRANSIT, APRIL 1988. 88-5-67, KATHY BRAY IN THE DOC SHOP IN MAY 1985. 85-5-170.

THE “Doc

Shop” TRIO

W

hen thousands of well-wishers along the Mystic River shoreline waved the Charles W. Morgan off on May 17 as she embarked on her 38th Voyage, much appreciation was directed toward those who had made it possible: the Mystic Seaport management, trustees, and donors; the management and workers at the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard; other Museum staff, volunteers, and members; and the people of the Mystic community. Nancy d’Estang, supervisor of the Shipyard’s Documentation Shop from 1985 to 1998, heartily applauds the incredible labor done by all these groups today. She also would like to recognize a trio of people whose groundwork, in her mind, made it all possible. “Without the unprecedented documentation by Robert C. Allyn, Kathy Bray, and Roger Hambidge, the restoration of the Morgan could not have been accomplished to this high level,” d’Estang said, adding: “These are three giants in the Morgan world.” Who were, or are, these “three giants”? In 1969, naval architect Robert “Bob” C. Allyn retired from the Electric Boat shipyard in Groton, CT. Soon thereafter he was hired

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THE MORGAN: CONSTRUCTION DETAIL: AFT SCARF JOINT IN WATERWAY. KATHY BRAY. SP. 1986.40.60.19.

to work in what would become the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard, where Supervisor Maynard Bray was aware of Allyn’s knack with numbers and his artistic sense of shape. Plans were made to haul out the Morgan from the bed of sand and gravel where she had rested since her arrival at the Museum in 1941, but first the Shipyard needed to know the vessel’s stability. The question went to Bob Allyn: “Can you measure the Charles W. Morgan?” Allyn then began a nearly three-year, intriguing project to define the Morgan’s weight, working with a slide rule­—remember, these were the days before the computer did most of our work. Then he had to

take the lines of the hull to determine her displacement. “To calculate that you have to measure every darn stick of wood there is on that boat,” Allyn jokingly said in a 1993 interview for The Log of Mystic Seaport. Using a surveyor’s transit, the old method of line-taking, he took sighting after sighting at numerous places along the Morgan. The surveyor’s transit gave him measurements of the vessel above the sand, but not below. Allyn went inside the hull, determined a centerline, and then worked his way from the inside out, taking into account the thickness of the wood. Despite the challenging conditions, his drawings, some 230 sheets in all, came out surprisingly accurate. However, it was not easy to get the Morgan off from her sand bed and set her afloat in her rightful element. At the sixth attempt, in the cold, early morning of December 6, 1973, she was finally free and taken to the Shipyard’s new lift dock, where she was hauled out a month later to have her bottom inspected and worked on. Her rig was also partly restored and changed to that of a split-topsail (also called double-topsail) bark—the rig she had carried during her whaling days from the beginning of the 1880s.


A major restoration of the Morgan took place between 1977 and 1984. In 1980, when the whaleship was up on the lift dock again, the “Morgan project” was handed over to shipwright Roger Hambidge, who had begun working in the Shipyard in May 1973. His first job was nasty: cleaning the bilge of the L.A. Dunton. After that, he became an informal apprentice to Master Shipwright Basil Tuplin. “He took me under his wing,” Hambidge said. “Tuplin and I worked side by side for six and a half years on different Museum vessels, including the Morgan, and I learned a lot from him.” When Tuplin was assigned to another project, Hambidge was placed in charge of the Morgan project for a couple of years. “So extensive was this rebuild that virtually every part of the hull visible above the waterline (and many parts not visible) was replaced,” Hambidge wrote in a 1998 article. The vessel was re-launched in October 1983, but for the rest of the 1980s, she underwent several “touch-ups.” To mention a few: the captain’s day cabin was restored, and the mess table, first mate’s cabin, pantry, and second and third mate’s stateroom were rebuilt. Later on, a small deck cabin, which had been built in 1877 for the wife of Capt. John Tinkham and removed in 1922, was rebuilt and installed. In 1991, for a part of an exhibit celebrating the 150th anniversary of the launching of the Morgan, Hambidge, now a master shipwright, did in-depth research describing the vessel’s history back to 1941. He wrote a report on his findings, made a list of artifacts, collected pictures, and provided drawings of the Morgan, then took a new set of lines, adopting Bob Allyn’s use of the surveyor’s transit. Hambidge rebuilt the fo’c’s’le and made a cutaway drawing of the vessel, and he also hand-carved two beautiful new billet heads, one of which was installed on the Morgan. The third “player” in the Morgan trio, Kathy Bray, daughter of Maynard Bray, started working as a Museum interpreter when she was in her teens in the mid-1970s. Later, she went to art school and took evening classes at Rhode Island School of Design, where she gained skills in perspective drawing that would later be useful in her work at the Documentation Shop. It was while painting the aft cabin of the Morgan in the late 1970s that Bray noticed the original layers were grainpainted instead of painted with a solid coat. She decided to teach herself the technique of graining to be able to apply her skills in her work on the Morgan—and so began her serious research and documentation of the whaleship. It was at this time, at Bray’s suggestion, that the Documentation Shop (the “doc shop”) took form in a corner of the Shipyard’s paint shop. Bray and Hambidge went through the Museum’s collections and archives searching for everything that had to do with the construction of the Morgan. Two albums with high-quality historic photographs of the Morgan, which had been assembled by Henry Jarvis and Keith MacArthur and kept aboard the vessel, proved to be a real treasure trove. To this day, they are still called the “Family Albums.” Bray also contacted other maritime CHARLES W. MORGAN IN HER BERTH OF SAND AND GRAVEL, FALL 1952. 52-9-11. FALL / WINTER 2014

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THE DOC SHOP TRIO museums in the country to ask for Morganrelated material. By the time the “doc shop” moved to a building of its own—opposite the main building in the Shipyard, where it is today— it had become, according to d’Estang: “the hotbed for ideas, discussions, arguments, and decision-making by Hambidge, Bray, and Allyn.” The Shipyard restoration crew would regularly come to the “doc shop,” now the center for research and documentation on the Morgan, to get information from the collected material. The daily work was carefully written down in log books and images were taken by the Museum’s photographers. As d’Estang notes: “Bray’s log books are praised and prized for their clarity, comprehensiveness, and for their style: truly an artist’s sketch books. Her log books recorded the found fastening types, wood types, construction methods, materials, scantlings, finishes, use patterns, the craftsmen’s names, etc.” In the early 1980s, Bray also began to create perspective drawings of details from the Morgan. In d’Estang’s words, these drawings are noted for Bray’s “astute X-ray-like observations of the vessel’s construction, deck furniture, hardware, including her ability to indicate wood types with pencil.” In 1985, Allyn retired from Mystic Seaport, only to immediately sign up as a volunteer in the Shipyard. Bray also left the Mu-

TOP: IN 1991, ROGER HAMBIDGE CARVED A NEW BILLET HEAD FOR THE MORGAN. HE ALSO CARVED A SECOND BILLET HEAD FOR THE INSURANCE MANAGING FIRM CHUBB AND SON OF NEW YORK, AS FUNDS FROM THE HENDON CHUBB FAMILY WERE GIVEN TO THE MUSEUM TO BUILD CHUBB’S WHARF, WHERE THE WHALING VESSEL IS DOCKED. 91-6-4. ABOVE: ROGER HAMBIDGE ABOARD THE MORGAN, JUNE 2014.

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seum that year to pursue a career as an artist. Hambidge stayed at the Museum but took a leave of absence in 1985 to build a nearly four-foot-long scale model of Christopher Columbus’s vessel the Niña for the National Geographic Society, which was going to publish an extensive article about where Columbus actually landed when he reached the New World in 1492. (As a matter of fact, the article was pushed forward a year, as the magazine instead published a piece about the Titanic, which had just been discovered on the bottom of the Atlantic. The editor of National Geographic told Hambidge about the Titanic, but asked him to keep the news “under his hat.”) Hambidge’s model of the Niña is now in the Explorer’s Hall in the National Geographic Society’s headquarters in Washington, D.C. As a boy, Hambidge had built plastic ship models out of kits. “My first ‘serious’ model was the L.A. Dunton, which I built just to see if I could do it,” Hambidge said. It took him five years to complete. To his astonishment, someone bought the model and donated it to the ship model collection of Mystic Seaport. He has now built more than 200 half-hull models—sixteen half-hull models of the Morgan, the latest one in May of this year—and many full-framed models. All major maritime museums in the United States have models built by Hambidge. “The biggest model I ever built was Amis-


tad,” Hambidge said in jest. In 1998, the Shipyard began building an 80-foot replica of the Amistad with Hambidge as the lead shipwright. Freedom Schooner Amistad was launched in March 2000. “It was very fulfilling to see a vessel you built from the keel up go under sail,” Hambidge said. “In July 2002, after 29 years at the Shipyard, I was ready to test the waters outside the Museum,” Hambidge remarked. He was offered a short-term job in San Diego, where he and a team of other shipwrights restored the 1970 179-foot Rose, which was a replica of the 1757 frigate HMS Rose of the Royal Navy. The renovated vessel, under the name HMS Surprise, was used in the movie Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003), starring Russell Crowe as Jack Aubrey. “I then worked part-time at a yacht restoration shop in Mystic, while I was building models in my shop.” Bob Allyn died in 2007, at almost 99 years old. Kathy Bray, who lives in Maine, is now an artist renowned in the maritime world for her airbrushed drawings, notecards, prints, and illustrations of wooden boats, many of which have appeared in WoodenBoat Magazine. How about Roger Hambidge? He was excited to hear the news in 2008 that the Morgan was going to go through a major restoration. “Later, I was thrilled to learn that Mystic Seaport actually intended to

THE MORGAN; CONSTRUCTION DETAIL: KEELSON, KEEL, CEILING PLANKING DETAIL. KATHY BRAY. SP. 1986.40.60.5.

sail her. Working on her all these years, I had fantasized how it would be to stand on her deck under sail, but everyone ‘knew’ it would never happen,” Hambidge said. “Now look at her this summer, out sailing on her 38th Voyage.” In January 2010, he was signed on as an outside contractor on her working crew. For the launch of the Morgan in July 2013, Hambidge was happy to watch shipwright Matt Barnes reinstall the billet head—now refurbished—that he had carved in 1991. Finally, a dream came true for Hambidge when he was able to sail on the old whaleship in mid-June on one of the Morgan’s sea trials. “It was amazing to be aboard the Morgan. The ship really felt alive,” Hambidge said. “At one point, I went below deck, all the way down to the bilge. It was completely dry. And you know all these Hollywood movies where the wooden vessels creak and moan below deck...sitting down there, on

the Morgan, it was so quiet.” Hambidge had a special gleam in his eyes when he continued: “Captain Files allowed me to do a little steering on the Morgan, which was fun. She responded and balanced very well, much better than I thought she would do for an old whaling vessel.” “Roger is the linchpin connecting the different restorations of the Morgan, done by the Museum’s Shipyard. The shipwrights who worked on her during the 1970s trained him, and he in turn led the major restoration in the 1980s. His return in 2010 helped guide the current shipwrights and craftsmen in the vessel’s latest restoration,” said Kane Borden, current head of the “doc shop.” He continued: “In many cases, Roger can look at a piece of wood and immediately know during which restoration it was installed and by whom, and tell an anecdote about that person. While I have no doubt my colleagues would have carried out the same level of expertise that shows in the vessel today, Roger’s presence helped make decisions easier. He is the living encyclopedia of the Morgan’s construction.” This article was compiled by Göran R. Buckhorn, editor of the Mystic Seaport Magazine. A special thanks to Nancy d’Estang, who collected material for the article and talked with Kathy Bray, while Buckhorn interviewed Roger Hambidge and talked with Kane Borden.

LEFT: ROGER HAMBIDGE’S CUTAWAY OF THE MORGAN. SERIAL NO. 222. RIGHT: BOB ALLYN MEASURES THE MORGAN WITH A SURVEYOR’S TRANSIT IN OCTOBER 1973. 73-10-97A.

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From the Top of the

Hurricane House

T

By DAN MCFADDEN

here is no one in the Mystic Seaport community who had a heavier burden on his shoulders this past summer than Captain Kip Files, the 22nd master of the Charles W. Morgan. His job was to take the ship back to sea, sail her to Boston and back, and make sure she, her crew, and passengers all returned safe and sound. That was no small undertaking. However, Files is no stranger to sailing historic vessels. An expert in the traditional sailing field, he has more than three decades of command experience. He is the captain and co-owner of the three-masted schooner Victory Chimes, a National Historic Landmark vessel that sails out of Rockland, ME, as part of the windjammer fleet. He has also served as the senior captain of the 1877 bark Elissa, operated by the Texas Seaport Museum in Galveston. Thus, the Morgan’s rig and the challenges of sailing a voyage without an engine were not new to Files. (Like the Morgan, Victory Chimes has no engine. She launches a small, powered yawlboat to help her maneuver when necessary.) The question was “How will the Morgan be different?” As Captain Files observed, “You can’t go out and ask her former crew members. There is no one alive who has the experience of sailing on one of these whaleships.” Recreating that experience and being able to document and share it with a new generation was a primary reason for Mystic Seaport to undertake the 38th Voyage. The

moment when that vision became reality was on the Morgan’s first sea trial on June 7. The ship was towed out from New London’s City Pier to spend the day sailing on Long Island Sound. For the first time since the ship’s final whaling voyage in 1921, the Morgan was under way by sail. It was an exciting event for all on board, and Captain Files marked the moment when the tow was cast off by shouting: “The Charles W. Morgan under way by sail alone for the first time in almost a century!” It was readily apparent that the Morgan was both faster and more easily maneuverable than everyone had anticipated. “We did have some sense that she might surprise us, as the hull shape below the waterline is quite fine, but she exceeded all of those expectations,” said Files. The Morgan proved to be no slouch in the speed department, clocking nearly 9 knots on the transit across Buzzards Bay to her New Bedford homecoming. Even under a reduced set of topsails, jibs, and staysails, she moved along at a quick pace. Just as significantly, she proved to be easy to maneuver. Tacking was no problem and she was responsive to helm and sail adjustments. “They sure knew what they were doing when they built her in 1841,” summed up Files. The lessons were continuous throughout the voyage as each leg and each day had different conditions and different program goals. This was an advantage for the crew as it offered them the opportunity to build their understanding of the Morgan’s han-

CAPTAIN KIP FILES ON TOP OF THE HURRICANE HOUSE. AT THE STEERING WHEEL, PROFESSIONAL DECKHAND GRANT “SKIP” WOOD AND IN FRONT OF THE WHEEL, SECOND MATE SEAN BERCAW.

dling properties. The rig in particular was a source of great learning. While the bark rig is well understood, there are many details to the Morgan’s setup that needed to be experienced to be properly understood in historical context. Over the course of the voyage, the crew came to understand the peculiarities of the Morgan and what it took to tune her rig properly. When underway, Captain Files could usually be found on the top of the hurricane house over the stern. This position allowed him to observe the sails, the crew’s sail handling, and the surrounding waters. The view from the helm is surprisingly obstructed due to the ship’s high bulwarks and deck structures. “The previous captains probably would not have spent as much time up there as I did,” said Files. “They wouldn’t need to as they were mostly alone in the middle of the ocean and would do nowhere near the amount of sail handling and maneuvering we did over the course of a day.” While he says each port was different and special in its own way, his favorite was Mystic. “The journeys down and back up the river were the most technical parts of the entire voyage—not to mention that there were thousands of people watching,” admitted Files. “I worried about those transits until I lit my cigar on shore at the very end. “That made Mystic so special: I could say, ‘We did it.’”

Dan McFadden is Director of Communications at Mystic Seaport.

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Two words sum up the Charles W. Morgan’s 38th Voyage:

D

uring a period of five years and seven and a half months, the 173-year-old Charles W. Morgan—the oldest American commercial vessel still afloat and the last remaining wooden whaleship in the world—underwent a multimillion-dollar restoration at the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard at Mystic Seaport. After an 80-year long career and 37 whaling voyages that spanned the globe, the Morgan was getting ready for her 38th Voyage, which was undertaken to raise awareness of America’s maritime heritage and to call attention to issues of ocean sustainability and conservation. On May 17, she embarked on her journey and was towed from the Museum downriver through the Mystic River Bascule Bridge

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GREAT SUCCESS

in downtown Mystic, the same bridge she had come through 73 years earlier, when she arrived in Mystic in November 1941. Her first destination this May was New London, CT, where she arrived after slightly more than four hours, being safely towed the whole way. Docked at the City Pier, the Morgan offered a remarkable sight not seen for almost a century in this old whaling city. In New London, the Morgan was outfitted and her crew took her on several sea trials on Fishers Island Sound. Ready for sea, the Morgan set sail for Newport, RI, where she arrived on June 15. Visits to other harbors along the New England coast followed. In every port, crowds met her with applause and cheers. The Morgan’s ports-of-call after New London

and Newport were: Vineyard Haven, MA; New Bedford, MA, the whaleship’s old homeport where she was originally built in 1841; Provincetown, which acted as port during her day-sails to Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary; and Boston, where she docked at the Charlestown Navy Yard, next to the 1797 USS Constitution— it was the first time these two American iconic vessels were docked in the same harbor. The Morgan then started for home, traveling to the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, Buzzards Bay, to take part in the centennial celebration of the opening of the Cape Cod Canal. After a couple of days at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, she set out in a homeward direction. During selected days in the ports, the


LEFT: IN BOSTON "OLD IRONSIDES" (CLOSEST TO THE CAMERA) FINALLY MET THE MORGAN.

LEFT: AT FENWAY PARK, CAPT. FILES EARNED HIMSELF A BALL.

JUST IN! New book and DVD on the Charles W. Morgan This December, Mystic Seaport, in collaboration with The Day of New London, will publish a new book about the Museum’s flagship, the Charles W. Morgan. The 144-page, coffee table book The Charles W. Morgan: A Picture History of an American Icon is a photographic account of the story of the American whale fishery, the Morgan’s career as an active whaleship, as an exhibit, and her recent restoration and historic 38th Voyage. The images are selected from the Museum’s collections and from work by the Museum’s photographers, who accompanied the whaleship during her latest voyage. The book retails for $39.95. To reserve your copy of The Charles W. Morgan: A Picture History of an American Icon, contact the Museum bookstore at 860.572.5386, or email msmbookstore@eventnetwork.com The book will be available online in early December through the Museum’s website at store.mysticseaport.org. The DVD of filmmaker Bailey Pryor’s The Charles W. Morgan: America’s Last Wooden Whaleship, broadcast on PBS earlier this year, is now available in the bookstore and online on the Museum’s website store.mysticseaport.org for $15.99.

Morgan was open for the public to board. More than 64,000 visitors took the opportunity to come aboard the whaleship to take a closer look at her. At these ports—except in Newport and Provincetown—the Museum also featured a dockside exhibition program that included historic interpretation, live demonstrations, music, and much more. More than 300 mariners, educators, historians, scholars, musicians, writers, artists, and special invited guests of Mystic Seaport were on board the Morgan for the various “legs” between ports. Included in this group were 85 38th Voyagers and one “official” stowaway—including the great-great-greatgreat-grandson of Charles Waln Morgan, one of the whaleship’s first owners, and the great-great-grandson of Herman Melville. The 38th Voyagers program and the dockside exhibits were made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Among the invited guests were JeanMichel Cousteau, son of the French oceanographer Jacques Cousteau, and marine biologist Sylvia Earle, who was the recipient of the Museum’s America and the Sea Award in 2010. For everyone involved, the 38th Voyage was truly a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

It may be impossible to pick one event which is more memorable than another. However, thanks to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Office of Marine Sanctuaries, an organization Mystic Seaport collaborated with during the 38th Voyage, one moment stands out: when the Morgan’s whaleboats rowed amongst the whales on Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. Captain Richard “Kip” Files, one of the most experienced sailors in the U.S. traditional sailing community, was thrilled to be the master of the old whaleship for her 38th Voyage. While few things were new to him during the journey, he became at least one experience richer at a shore event when the Morgan was docked in Boston. On “Mystic Seaport Night – A Whale of a Game!” at Fenway Park, when the Red Sox played against the Kansas City Royals, Capt. Files threw out the ceremonial first pitch to the delight of some of the Morgan’s crew members, who had gathered at the game (which ended with a 5-4 victory for the home team). On August 6, the Charles W. Morgan was back at Mystic Seaport again for a special homecoming celebration. Today, she is docked at the Museum’s Chubb’s Wharf, where she continues to tell stories about whaling and the country’s maritime heritage—now also including her own glorious adventures during the historic summer of 2014. For more details on the Morgan’s 38th Voyage go to: www.mysticseaport.org/38thvoyage ON JULY 12, FROM LEFT IN THE WHALEBOAT: SECOND MATE (OF THE MORGAN) SEAN BERCAW, SUSAN FUNK, RACHEL THOMAS-SHAPIRO, TIM REILLY, MATT PORTER, AND LAUREN BABER.

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T H E 3 8 T H V O YA G E

1

2

Morgan’s 38th Voyage 5

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3 4

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IN NEW LONDON: THE INFLATABLE 46-FOOT SPERM WHALE “SPOUTER” WITH MYSTIC SEAPORT CHANTEY MAN DON SINETI AND INTERPRETER KATY DAY.

2 3 4

THE MORGAN DOCKED AT TISBURY WHARF, VINEYARD HAVEN ON MARTHA'S VINEYARD. THE MORGAN ARRIVING AT HER OLD HOMEPORT, NEW BEDFORD, GOING THROUGH THE HURRICANE BARRIER. CHIEF MATE SAM SIKKEMA (LEFT) WITH PROFESSIONAL DECKHANDS DAN ROCHE AND JOEE PATTERSON HANDLING THE LINES.

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A UNIQUE IMAGE, ONE OF THE MORGAN’S WHALEBOATS ROWING AMONG THE WHALES ON STELLWAGEN BANK NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY.

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6

7

10

Morgan’s 38th Voyage 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 18

THE 38TH VOYAGE BEGINS: THE MORGAN TOWED DOWN THE MYSTIC RIVER, CHEERED ON BY THOUSANDS OF WELL-WISHERS. PROFESSIONAL DECKHAND GRANT “SKIP” WOOD STEERING THE

MORGAN PAST THE NEW LONDON LEDGE LIGHTHOUSE. HOME AT LAST: THE MORGAN GETTING READY TO DOCK AT CHUBB’S WHARF, MYSTIC SEAPORT. A YOUNG VISITOR IN NEW BEDFORD. THE MORGAN BEING TOWED THROUGH THE CAPE COD CANAL. THE MORGAN ON HER WAY IN TO NEWPORT. TWO AMERICAN ICONS: THE MORGAN DOCKED NEXT TO THE USS

CONSTITUTION AT THE CHARLESTOWN NAVY YARD, BOSTON.

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The Launch of the Charles W. Morgan on July 21, 2013

T H E 3 8 T H V O YA G E On her maiden voyage, the Morgan

rounded the Horn and gained the Pacific.

Gone three years and four months,

she made homeport,

8

9

her hold a cornucopia

of 2,400 barrels of oil,

10,000 pounds of whalebone.

The year was 1841.

This year, 2013,

she is launched again,

to sail for pleasure,

then lie anchored, as testament,

to the men who built her,

to the shipwrights who have restored her,

to the 80 years she sailed,

to the 1,000 men who sailed her,

to the 37 voyages,

to the boats launched from her,

to the oil, rendered,

from the blubber by her tryworks,

to her surviving the fire

from the wreckage of the Sankaty,

that struck her in New Bedford’s harbor;

all this, then, testament

to the very ship of her,

her planed planks bearing

the shipwrights’ handprints,

whose fingertips shaped her

to restoration with their work,

the touch of love in the work of their hands,

that pressed her, again,

into the embrace of oceans.

~ Philip Kuepper

Philip Kuepper, a former employee of the Mystic Seaport Bookstore, is a poet living in Mystic. Philip has had his work published in Poetry, The Washingtonian Monthly, RFD magazine, The New York Times, Promise Magazine, and The Mystic River Press.

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STOWAWAY ON THE CHARLES W. MORGAN

I stowed away on the

Charles W. Morgan

By RYAN LEIGHTON

ABOVE: THE FIRST TIME RYAN IS ALOFT, LOOKING RELAXED.

M

y journey as a stowaway started several months ago when a news bulletin popped up on my computer screen. Mystic Seaport was searching for a stowaway to adventure aboard the 1841 whaleship Charles W. Morgan. The word “adventure” seemed to jump out at me in a bold typeface. The Museum’s search for a stowaway reached far and wide. I think it was advertised in Boston, New York, and Buffalo. One hundred brave applicants sent videos with intentions to stow. I was the excitable guy who videotaped himself jumping off a pier. It was February in Maine. I was cold. But taking that icy plunge immersed me in the wonderful world of maritime history, because before I knew it I was shipping down to Connecticut to climb aboard the world’s last surviving whaling ship. I have a confession: on a traditional sailing voyage, I would make for a lousy stowaway. I am far too tall and I can’t hide very well, not to mention I had no clue how to sail a “tall ship.”

LEFT: A WHALEBOAT SEEN FROM THE HOOPS OF THE CHARLES W. MORGAN WHILE SAILING ON STELLWAGEN BANK.

But then again this was not a typical voyage. I was a 21st-century stowaway blogging from a 19th-century whaling ship. Equipped with a laptop, a camera, and an iPhone, I would tell my story of the Charles W. Morgan’s historic 38th Voyage. As a journalist, I was no stranger to inserting myself into unfamiliar places. I soon discover, however, that sleeping in the fo’c’s’le with a bunch of snoring sailors was like sleeping next to a backfiring air compressor; it takes some getting used to. Fitting in with the crew was the first task of my journey. The second task was trying to understand how a 19th-century squarerigger was rigged and sailed 90 years after sitting dormant alongside a wharf.

RYAN PULLING THE TOWLINE TOGETHER WITH PROFESSIONAL DECKHAND JOEE PATTERSON (LEFT) AND MYSTIC SEAPORT DECKHAND SARAH SPENCER ON THE MORGAN’S MARTHA’S VINEYARD-NEW BEDFORD LEG.

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When that fateful first day of sailing arrived, photographers, filmmakers, and news media descended on the docks. For the remainder of the voyage there was never a moment that the Morgan wasn’t in the public spotlight. The 38th Voyage was undoubtedly the most documented voyage in her 173-year history. As we sailed through summer, I discovered the ship’s truly magical ability to evoke a wide range of emotional responses. The magic happened when the towline was disconnected, the sails were set, and we all felt the world’s last wooden whaler come alive under our feet. The reaction onboard varied from wide-eyed adrenaline to warm welcome reverie. In the eyes of the Mystic Seaport volunteers, members, and donors, the 38th Voyage was this grand scale achievement. The ship was, and still is, a living example of American pride and our relationship with the sea.


ABOVE: A SUNSET BACKLIGHTS THE RIG IN BOSTON. RIGHT: THE CHARLES W. MORGAN SAILING IN CAPE COD BAY.

For the 38th Voyagers, the Morgan was not just a floating relic, but an open laboratory for exploration. She was a working vessel and our key to understanding the past. In the eyes of the core crew members and sailing deckhands, it seemed as if they wanted to take the Morgan out for a ride, to see not only what she was made of, but also how she was rigged and operated after all those dormant years. For me, it was the smells, sounds, and tactile sensations aboard the ship that authenticated the whole experience. The alluring smell of pine tar, the manilla fibers clasped between calloused hands, and the ocean swells swashing against her bow timbers made it more visceral than any camera equipment could capture. It has not been that long since the voyage concluded, and I miss the smell of pine tar on my hands. After living more than two months on the ship, I regarded the Morgan as my home. I will miss listening to her creaking timbers and sails filling in the salty breeze. I won't, however, miss the snoring in the fo’c’s’le. It was a grand vision for Mystic Seaport to take their prized artifact and restore her to her former glory. As the Morgan stowaway, I’m glad I was able to experience and share a marvelous chapter of maritime history with followers online. Together we explored the sand dunes of Cape Cod and traveled sacred paths with the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head. For me, the literal high point was standing atop the Morgan’s mast watching whales swim alongside this historic whaling vessel on Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. The story of the Charles W. Morgan does not end here. Museums are changing, and Mystic Seaport’s 38th Voyage demonstrated what happens when we think big and set our sights on the horizon. It’s my hope that in 75 years or so, families will continue to walk aboard the decks of the Charles W. Morgan, and grandparents will tell their grandchildren about the time the Morgan sailed again in the summer of 2014.

For me, it was the smells, sounds, and tactile sensations aboard the ship that authenticated the whole experience. The alluring smell of pine tar, the manilla fibers clasped between calloused hands, and the ocean swells swashing against her bow timbers made it more visceral than any

Ryan Leighton, a journalist from Boothbay, Maine, was the stowaway on the Charles W. Morgan during her 38th

camera equipment could capture.

Voyage. He also took most of the photos for this article.

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THE LONGEVITY OF THE MORGAN By WILLITS D. ANSEL

I

n the 1890s, when Clifford W. Ashley, who would later become an artist, collector of whale craft artifacts, and knot expert, was a boy in New Bedford, MA, he explored the unattended whaleships laid up at the wharfs. There were about 100 survivors of the large fleet that once sailed from New Bedford, moored three abreast. In 1857, the fleet had peaked at 329 vessels. (The total American whaling fleet that year was 593 vessels.) Their working life over, these remaining whaleships were stripped of the metal for salvage, settled, and sank. In one case a vessel was towed out and set afire on a Fourth of July celebration. At that time, the Charles W. Morgan was still sailing out of San Francisco, CA. At 50, she was a relative youngster. Whaleships had a reputation for a long working life. The Morgan’s example can explain why. Other whaleships also reached ages that deserve listing: the Rousseau survived 91 years, Maria 90, Triton 79, Ocean 75, and James Arnold 75. Many of those laid up in New Bedford were 50 years old.

LEFT: THE CHARLES W. MORGAN IN FISHERS ISLAND SOUND IN JUNE 2014. BELOW: A MAP SHOWING THE MORGAN’S MANY PORTS-OFCALL DURING HER 37 VOYAGES GIVES US A GOOD IDEA OF HER WHALING GROUNDS BETWEEN 1841 AND 1921. SHE HUNTED WHALES IN THE ARCTIC (BERING STRAIT AND SEA OF OKHOTSK), PACIFIC, ATLANTIC, AND INDIAN OCEANS, AND THE WATER SOUTH OF AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND. NEW BEDFORD WAS HER HOMEPORT BETWEEN 1841 AND 1886, SAN FRANCISCO FROM 1886 TO 1906, AND THEN NEW BEDFORD AGAIN BETWEEN 1906 AND 1921; FOR A SHORT STINT AROUND THE END OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR PROVINCETOWN WAS THE MORGAN’S HOMEPORT, THOUGH SHE SAILED OUT FROM BUZZARDS BAY.

PHOTOGRAPH © JOEL PLESSALA

The Longevity of the

Charles W. Morgan Shantar Island

Vladivostok, Russia

New Bedford

Hakodate, Japan

Azores

San Francisco Monterey Bermuda

Scammon’s Lagoon Ballenas Bay Honolulu Lahaina Oahu, Hawaii

Dominica

Cocos

Panama

Bonin Islands

Cape Verde Barbados

Guam

Paita, Tombez, Esmeralda, Peru

Galapagos Islands Marquesas

Marshall Islands

Caroline Islands

Malpelo Island Cabinda, Congo

Strong’s Island

Mahe

Ascension Island

Gilbert Islands Navigator islands

Callao

Tahiti

Madagascar

St. Helena

Fiji Islands

Mauritius Reunion Island

Rio De Janiero, Brazil

Friendly Islands

Durban

Valparaiso, Chile Juan Fernandez Island Talchuano, Chile

Tristan de Cunha

Cape Town

Norfolk Island St. Paul Island

Two Peoples Bay

Sunday Island

Bay of Islands Auckland, New Zealand Chatham Island,

Falkland Islands

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Kerguelen Island


SHIPWRIGHT BASIL TUPLIN WORKING ON SHEATHING ON THE MORGAN’S PORT SIDE IN 1974. 74-7-174.

Compare these ages to those of the whaleships with whaleboats, as in the case wooden sailing ships built by Percy & Small of the Morgan, were becoming economically in Bath, Maine, between 1895 and 1920, less competitive. Their numbers declined as a period later in time but still significant. the 19th century closed. The total number of The average working lifetime was American whaleships peaked thirteen years for the 38 ships built at 736 in 1846. there. More important than Several factors account for technological obsolescence the disparity in longevity of these of the ships was the decline ships: 1) the basic design of the in whale populations and the vessels; 2) the use for which they competition from petroleum were intended; 3) construction products, with kerosene used and materials; 4) the conditions for illumination and oil for where the ships sailed; 5) how lubrication. Gas from coal they were manned and sailed; was an earlier competitor. 6) maintenance, both at sea and CHARLES WALN MORGAN Whale oil was never an enbetween voyages; 7) the style and (1796-1861). 2004.48.1. ergy source as petroleum was attitude of the management and to become later. ownership; and 8) economic viability and The whaling fleet suffered greatly from competition. Confederate raiders in the Civil War. Seventy I will consider these factors in more ships were burned by the CSS Alabama detail, but will first review the situation and CSS Shenandoah. Thirty-nine more of whaleships in the second half of the were bought up by the Federal Govern19th century. ment and scuttled in a failed attempt to Traditional whaleships and whaling, block Charleston Harbor. A partial revival while making a few concessions to modof whaling followed the war. Then nature ern developments, were conservatively took its toll: 34 ships were caught in ice and designed and built. For many, the techcrushed off Cape Belcher, Alaska, in 1871, nology and equipment used remained basiand several more were damaged and lost cally unchanged, though steam whaleships in subsequent years. Still, some persisted. and harpoon guns were appearing. Sailing The naturalist John Muir sighted twelve off

Cape Barrow in 1881. In 1886, the Morgan was fitted out for the Arctic. John Muir’s observations on the industry were recorded on a voyage on the United States Revenue Service Cutter Corwin. Muir wrote: “Newly discovered whaling grounds, like gold mines, are soon over-crowded and worked out, the whales being either killed or driven away. But whales worth four or five thousand dollars apiece are so intensely attractive and interesting that the grand game has been hunted in the face of a thousand dangers, in all the seas of the oceans.” The Morgan’s career fit the pattern. San Francisco was her homeport for 20 years. In 1906, she returned to New Bedford. In 1916, the J. & W. R. Wing Company sold their shares after almost 53 years as principal owners. The first of the factors contributing to the longevity of whaleships is design and its appropriateness. The ships of the 1840s were short in length, full in the ends, rather beamy, high-sided, and ship-rigged. They were built to stay at sea for long periods— sea-keeping ability. Speed was not a factor as they jogged on the whaling grounds seeking whales and processing them into oil, which was their cargo. In this, they were a successful design. They were changed in few respects for most of the 19th century. Few were lost or went missing. When the Morgan

THIS PHOTO SHOWS A HACKMATAC HANGING KNEE UNDER A ’TWEEN DECK BEAM, LODGING KNEE, CLAMP, CEILING, AND AIR STRAKE. 1973.7.78.

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THE LONGEVITY OF THE MORGAN was being built, in traditional whaleship design, the clipper ship was being developed. It was radically different. Much longer, fine in entrance and run, lean, with a large rig, it was built for fast passages. It carried its cargo from one port to another; it did not get a cargo at sea. The Percy & Small ships were over twice the length of the whaleships; their lines derived from the early clippers. The next longevity factor was how the whaleships were sailed. Under reduced sails, they patrolled the grounds with good lookouts at the mast head, looking for whales but also sighting hazards. It was conservative, safe sailing compared to the races of the fast clippers, which profitable cargo forced them to contest, driving the ships and crews hard. A number of the clippers did not make port and simply went missing. Where a ship sailed in the course of its work influenced its survival. The trade routes of commercial carriers followed coasts and rounded capes, which often offered dangers from collisions and groundings. An examination of pilot charts of currents and winds in the different months shows conditions and the reasons for crowded ship traffic. On the other hand, the hunt for whales took whaleships to Arctic waters where ships were lost due to weather conditions. There was a sound cooperation between whaleships, particularly in the Arctic, when

ABOVE: THE MORGAN IS LESS THAN HALF THE LENGTH OF CLIPPER-INFLUENCED VESSELS OF THE LAST HALF OF THE 19TH CENTURY—ABOVE REPRESENTED BY THE 244-FOOT 1883 BENJAMIN F. PACKARD. MORGAN’S CREW WAS MORE THAN TWICE AS LARGE, AS THEY HAD TO MAN THE WHALEBOATS. HER FIVE WHALEBOATS REQUIRED SIX MEN EACH, OR A TOTAL OF 30. WITH ALL BOATS LOWERED, THE MORGAN WAS LEFT TO BE SAILED BY THE CAPTAIN, CARPENTER, COOPER, STEWARD, AND COOK. ILLUSTRATIONS BY ROGER HAMBIDGE.

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whalers met for a “gam,” a friendly meeting where competition was put aside and instead information on weather conditions and aid were exchanged. Whaleships were at sea for extended periods. The Morgan’s first journey lasted three years and four months. Her longest was four years and eleven months, from July 1881 to June 1886. Time at sea is not necessarily hard on vessels; some maintenance is possible and desirable. Ships fared better at sea than laid up in ports. Their rigging and spars, under the eye of mates and captains, received professional attention. When the Morgan returned to her homeport, New Bedford or later San Francisco, her owners were ready to spend money for overhaul and re-fitting. They did not stint in the original construction cost of $32,562.08 for the ship and $16,000 on the outfitting. Their investment was returned; the profit of the first voyage was more than $56,000 ($1,750,000 in today’s currency). It appears that the principal original owner, Charles Waln Morgan, a Quaker, took a personal interest in the building of the vessel. He visited the Jethro and Zachariah Hillman yard in New Bedford during her building from February to July 1841 and took pride in her appearance at launching. At the time, the ship had not been named, and when she was named Charles W. Morgan by the other owners, Morgan had misgivings. The quality of construction and

A BAREFOOT AUGER IS USED TO BORE HOLES FOR TREENAILS IN A SHIP’S HULL. ILLUSTRATION BY WILLITS D. ANSEL.

the materials were the best. This care and attention were important factors contributing to her longevity. The whaleships had a reputation for being well built of durable woods and metals. White oak, available then as now in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island, was used for structural members of the hull, which were the keel, the keelson, floor futtocks, frames or timbers, deadwood assemblies fore and aft, stem, apron, and knees. Yellow pine, long leaf or pitch, was shipped from the South. It was used for deck beams, carlings, ceiling, stringers, and hull planking in the waist. White oak or live oak was used for planking in the bow and stern where, being round and full, there is considerable curvature or shape. Deck planking was white pine. Metal fastenings in the hull were bronze alloys or wrought iron. Bronze spikes fastened butts in planking; deck spikes were forged wrought iron. Black locust treenails fastened the hull planking except at the butts. As a measure against rot, salting was employed in the bays between timbers on shelves between ceiling and planking. Air strakes below the clamps allowed circulation. Whale oil later saturated the decks, beams, and knees in the ’tween decks. When I was working on the Morgan in the 1970s, the wood still retained the feel and smell of oil.


SHIPWRIGHT JEFF GOLD DRIVES A LOCUST TREENAIL WITH A BEETLE, FASTENING EXTERIOR YELLOW PINE PLANKING TO OAK FRAMES. THE PLANKS ARE HELD IN PLACE BY TREENAILS (PRONOUNCED “TRUNNELS”). THE ENDS WILL BE SPLIT AND WEDGED TO HOLD THE TREENAILS TIGHTLY.

The salt was caked with it. The wood was pickled and saturated with oil, a combination apparently discouraging to any fungi. On the outside of the hull, below the waterline, protection against the ship worm and marine growth was provided by a system of sheathing. The yellow pine, white oak, and live oak, all naturally rot resistant planks, were covered with felt, followed by light cedar or pine boards, and copper sheets, all fastened with copper nails. The copper comes in five weights. The heavier sheets were at the waterline, stem, and bows and on the keel, stern posts, and rudder. The copper was replaced after each voyage, the pine and felt every ten years. Ships bound for the Arctic, such as the Morgan in 1886, were fitted with additional heavy oak sheathing in the bows at the waterline. Inside, additional breast hooks were fitted below the waterline to strengthen the bows. Above the waterline, repairs during the Morgan’s working life had been frequent. Re-topping and replacement of frame tops, deck beams, deck planking, and bulwarks was expensive work done between voyages. Fortunately for the Morgan, her owners were few and longterm and protected their investments. The original owners had her for eight years. The Wing brothers were the principal owners for 53 years. The Morgan

earned more money for the owners than any other whaleship. At this point, Mystic Seaport has been the longest owner with 73 years this November. Besides the scheduled maintenance such as sheathing, the owners took measures to add to her efficiency, while maintaining her traditional functioning and technology. She remained a sailing wooden whaleship with whaleboats in the years of operating from San Francisco and whaling in the Arctic. The Wings made alterations. In 1867, she was converted from a ship to a bark, which was a way for the owners to save money, as she then demanded fewer men. The Morgan as a ship-rigged vessel had a crew of 35 men; a five-masted schooner had ten men; and a bark of the 1880s had 14 men. One of the reasons that a whaling vessel still needed a large crew was to man the whaleboats. In 1882 and 1883, double topsails replaced the single topsails on main and

foremasts. This conversion made the sail handling easier. In 1882, the windlass was moved forward and, in 1886, a steam donkey engine was put aboard which was put to use in handling ground tackle, hoisting yards and sails, and cutting in. To a degree, the ship was modernized. When she returned to her place of building in 1906, her working life in the hunt for whales was not quite over. In 1920, she made her last voyage for oil. Since that time, the Morgan has served as an exhibit. A less direct and quantifiable accounting for the Charles W. Morgan’s long life is the romantic aspect of whaling, particularly when connected to the islands in the South Pacific. In the 1830s and 1840s, whaling was a nautical equivalent to going West. Hundreds of whaleships carried thousands of restless young men to sea. Herman Melville was one of them. He sailed from New Bedford on the Acushnet the same year the Morgan left for her first voyage. His novels with autobiographical elements inspired others. An undying appeal continued to draw men to the Pacific, longing for adventures such as those depicted in Melville’s Typee (1846). Richard Henry Dana was contemporaneously writing his own account of going to sea. Robert Louis Stevenson, Jack London, on his Snark, and John LaFarge, the artist, were later voyagers. The romance of whaling seems still to have been operating after the Morgan’s return to New Bedford. She was used in some early silent motion pictures (see article “Whaling in the Movies,” pp 26-29). Artists Harry Neyland and Clifford Ashley, and others with family connections or civic interest, sought to preserve the ship and the legend. She was placed in fill and opened for visitors at Col. Green’s estate at South Dartmouth, MA. There she lay until being towed to Mystic in November 1941.

Willits “Will” D. Ansel, an artist and a writer, worked as a shipwright at the Museum’s Shipyard in 1970-1982 and 1985-1989. Last May, a new edition of his book The Whaleboat: A Study of Design, Construction and Use from 1850 to 2014 was published by Mystic Seaport.

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WHALING IN THE MOVIES

Whaling in the Movies

A

By FRED CALABRETTA

s the new motion picture industry gained momentum in the early twentieth century, Hollywood moviemakers were drawn to whaling. Whaling movies offered audience appeal in the form of action, adventure, danger, and classic confrontations between man and nature. The American Film Institute’s Online Catalog lists 33 films in the category “whales and whaling.” While some Hollywood whaling movies relied almost exclusively on film industry standards of illusion and special effects, at least five actual whaling vessels, including the Charles W. Morgan, have been featured in movies. World Film Corporation released the silent film Miss Petticoats in 1916, probably the earliest non-documentary film with ties to whaling. While it lacked a whaling theme, it included scenes shot in New Bedford, some featuring the whaleship Charles W. Morgan as a ship called Harpoon. Most of the film was shot at a studio in Fort Lee, NJ. Another silent film, Down to the Sea in Ships, released in 1922, ranks as the most remarkable of the whaling-related movies. While many scenes are pure Hollywood fabrication, the film does provide a number of authentic glimpses of New Bedford’s historic whaling industry, including Merrill’s Wharf, a number of whaling-related

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buildings, the Morgan, and the bark Wanderer underway. For over 90 years this rare footage of a traditional American whaling bark under sail has been impossible to duplicate. The Charles W. Morgan’s 38th Voyage in 2014 provided just such an opportunity. Down to the Sea in Ships was not a typical Hollywood film. The movie’s creation, funding, and subsequent production represent the extensive support, input, and participation of the citizens of New Bedford, a number of whom formed the Whaling Film Corporation, a production company established specifically for the project. They envisioned the film as a memorial to the city’s whaling history. The Corporation hired director Elmer Clifton, who had trained with moviemaking pioneer D.W. Griffith. Down to the Sea in Ships combines romance and adventure. Actress Marguerite Courtot portrays Patience Morgan, the daughter of a whaleship owner. Her love interest is played by leading man Raymond McKee as Allen Dexter, who is shanghaied and finds himself on a whaling voyage. He prospers in his surroundings, becomes


LEFT: A DRAMATIC BUT FAKED PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPH SUPPOSEDLY SHOWING ACTOR RAYMOND MCKEE HARPOONING A WHALE IN DOWN TO THE SEA IN SHIPS. 1988.63.4. ABOVE: THIS PUBLICITY SHOT FOR DOWN TO THE SEA IN SHIPS DEPICTS THE BARK WANDERER AT THE END OF THE WHARF, THE CHARLES W. MORGAN IN THE LEFT BACKGROUND, AND A NUMBER OF NEW BEDFORD CITIZENS EMPLOYED AS EXTRAS DURING FILMING. 1988.63.8. RIGHT: ORIGINAL MOVIE POSTER FOR DOWN TO THE SEA IN SHIPS. 1996.108.1.

a boatsteerer, and harpoons a whale. Following considerable whaling activity, a mutiny, and other action, the ship—represented as the Charles W. Morgan—eventually returns home. The sweethearts are reunited and all is well. The film also introduced future star Clara Bow, who appears in several scenes filmed on the Morgan. Life imitated art when McKee and Courtot married not long after the film’s release. According to their son, Raymond McKee, Jr., they were both proud of their work in Down to the Sea in Ships. The film’s subject matter inspired McKee, Sr., who maintained a life-long interest in maritime matters. He collected nautical artifacts and learned the art of scrimshaw. Examples of his work, as well as several pieces of scrimshaw he acquired from New Bedford whalemen, are now included in the collections of Mystic Seaport. The Charles W. Morgan played a signifi-

cant role in the film, although she was not used for a whaling voyage as the script and film’s publicity suggest. Instead, the ship appears in wharf views and in other scenes as described in a special program issued for the film’s world premiere in September 1922: “This wonderful old ship is the ‘pièce de resistance’ of Mr. Clifton’s production […]. The cabin, deck, and forecastle scenes were all made below decks on this historic old vessel.” Captured less than a year after the Morgan returned from her final whaling voyage, these images—film and still photographs—provide a valuable visual record of the ship as she appeared at the very end of her whaling days.

To their credit, the filmmakers arranged an actual whaling voyage in order to obtain authentic footage. Ironically, the two surviving traditional whalers—Charles W. Morgan and Wanderer—played no part in this voyage. Instead, the three-masted schooner Gaspe was chartered from the Gorton Pew Company of Gloucester, MA. Fitted out with whaleboats, temporary davits, and other whaling gear, the Gaspe sailed for the West Indies. In addition to McKee and the rest of the film crew, on board were Captain James Tilton and several sailors with actual whaling experience. Before and after the film’s release, director Elmer Clifton, other crew members, and the actors contributed to myths and misinformation surrounding the realism of the film. For example, in portions of interviews with Clifton and McKee published in newspapers and magazines, both men implied that the Morgan was used for the whaling voyage, when in fact she never left Buzzards Bay. The official film publicity also stated that McKee had actually harpooned one of the three whales taken during the voyage and had been thrown into the water when the whale destroyed his boat. Hollywood actors are an extremely valuable “commodity” and producers and directors generally rely on professional stuntmen and women when a script calls for dangerous activity. A revealing note on the rear of a publicity photo indicates that one of the veteran whaleman hired for work on the film, Theophilo Freitas, killed the whale generally credited to McKee. Freitas also had a personal connection to the Morgan, having sailed on the ship’s 1918-1919 voyage. One of the most dramatic episodes of a whale hunt could be a “Nantucket sleigh ride,” which occurred when a harpooned whale swam through the water at a brisk speed, towing the whaleboat. Not surprisingly, this action was recreated for the film. Viewers are given the impression McKee and crew are pulled by a whale at a very fast pace thanks to accelerated film speed. This common movie technique exaggerated the speed of horses, cars, and trains in addition to whales. Also, some of the shots in this sequence are bow-on views of the whaleboat. This vantage point, from the position of a supposed whale, almost certainly was obtained while the whaleboat was being towed by a powerboat. FALL / WINTER 2014

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WHALING IN THE MOVIES

For over 90 years this rare footage of a traditional American whaling bark under sail has been impossible to duplicate. The Charles W. Morgan’s 38th Voyage in 2014 provided just such an opportunity. While Clifton and crew busily filmed their story in New Bedford, three thousand miles away a California-based production company battled their own whales and filming challenges. This Metro Pictures Corporation production focused on modern Pacific Coast whaling employing motorized boats and harpoon cannons. The film, All the Brothers Were Valiant, borrowed its title and story line from a popular book written several years earlier by Ben Ames Williams. This film, featuring actors Lon Chaney and Billie Dove, follows the seagoing adventures of two brothers. The film also employed two actual whaling vessels—the three-masted auxiliary schooner Carolyn Frances and a steam catcher boat, the Port Saunders. The film was remade twice, both MGM productions: Across to Singapore (1928), starring Ramon Navarro and Joan Crawford, and All the Brothers Were Valiant (1953), featuring Robert Taylor, Stewart Granger, and Ann Blyth. The first, which is now considered lost, apparently strayed from the Williams novel and lacked whaling content. The 1953 movie includes whaling sequences, which are pure Hollywood fakery. In 1922, almost immediately after the Morgan appeared in Down to the Sea in Ships, she traveled to Salem, MA, to appear in a film entitled Java Head (Paramount, 1923). In this sea tale, she represented a merchant ship, not a whaler. In 1926, Warner Brothers released the first in a succession of film versions of Moby-Dick. Entitled The Sea Beast, it featured John Barrymore as Ahab. A contemporary reviewer described the star as follows: “Mr. Barrymore's make-up is perfect. His hair is wet most of the time, long and unkempt. His eyes are bleary and vicious and he snarls at his men, having only one thought in mind—to find and

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THIS ARCADE CARD – A POPULAR COLLECTING FORMAT IN THE FIRST HALF OF THE 20TH CENTURY – DEPICTS ACTOR JOHN BARRYMORE AS HE APPEARED IN THE SEA BEAST. 2014.30.1.


kill Moby Dick.” The reviewer also praised the film’s storm scenes, but he noted the whale scenes were not realistic. The whaleboat scenes are actually “process shots” using bouncing, reproduction whaleboats in a studio or large movie lot tank, with projected ocean and whale footage in the background. This movie is distinctive for another reason. While the Charles W. Morgan, Wanderer, Carolyn Frances, and Port Saunders all “worked” in films, another whaler had even stronger Hollywood ties. The Narwhal had been launched as a steam whaler in 1883 and made a number of voyages for the Pacific Steam Whaling Corporation. After her whaling days and service as a freighter, the ship was eyed as John Barrymore’s Pequod. She was purchased by Warner Brothers for use in the film and owned by them for several years. She was eventually abandoned and rotted away in the tidal flats near San Diego. As with The Sea Beast, the sound version of Moby Dick, released by Warner Brothers in 1930, once again starred John Barrymore, plus Joan Bennett as Ahab’s fiancé. It also kept in step with its silent predecessor by taking many liberties with Melville’s classic work. In this case, for example, the Ishmael character is eliminated and a different ending is added. Movies changed dramatically with the introduction of sound in 1927 and color in 1939. A film incorporating both attributes—along with iconic director John Huston and actor Gregory Peck as Ahab—stands as the best-known whaling movie. Warner Brothers’ Moby Dick, released in 1956, tells this classic tale with flair. It is interesting that along with Hell Below Zero, a modern whaling story also released in 1954, this account of America whaling was filmed in England. Huston needed a real captain to sail his Pequod and he found one in Alan Villiers, an author, renowned sailor, sail training pioneer, and former owner of the Museum’s square-rigger Joseph Conrad. Villiers’ ship for this assignment was a converted coasting schooner, Ryelands, which had been launched on the northwest coast of England in 1887. Her lengthy career

even included prior movie experience. She had appeared as the pirate ship Hispaniola in Disney’s 1950 film version of Treasure Island. Making a coasting schooner appear to be a whaling bark required considerable Hollywood “magic,” not the least of which was fitting out the ship so Captain Villiers could manage her from below, out of sight of the cameras. Villiers summarized the experience as a “maritime melée, in the year of grace 1954, chasing a rubbery whale with a completely bogus and unseaworthy ship, in the Irish Sea. [… The whale] was a brute to tow and impossible to harpoon. The new skin stretched round him to replace some that had worn off was so thick and strong that no harpoon would go through it.” The parade of whaling and whale-related movies did not end with Huston’s Moby Dick in 1956. More recent films have featured bad whales (Orca, Dino de Laurentis, 1977) and good whales (Free Willy, Warner Brothers, 1993). Another recent movie, Big Miracle (Universal, 2012) effectively represents the changing perceptions of whales, depicting them as animals to be preserved rather than hunted. Popular actress Drew Barrymore starred in the movie, carrying on her family’s acting and whale movie traditions; her grandfather John Barrymore starred in The Sea Beast in 1926 and Moby Dick in 1930 and his brother Lionel Barrymore appeared in the 1949 version of Down to the Sea in Ships. Nearly 100 years have passed since the Charles W. Morgan appeared in the film Miss Petticoats. The Morgan still occasionally appears in Hollywood productions and whaling adventures continue to inspire filmmakers and the public. In 2013, director Ron Howard visited Mystic Seaport to view the Morgan, to discuss whaling history with several staff members, and to view whaling material in the collections. He has since begun production on a film based on the story of the sinking of the whaleship Essex by a sperm whale, ensuring that whaling will once again return to the big screen.

Fred Calabretta is the Museum’s Curator of Collections. Before joining the museum profession, Fred worked for several years as a stage technician in Hollywood. His assignments often took him to KTLA Studios, originally Warner Brothers Studios, where much of The Sea Beast had been filmed in 1926.

FRONT AND REAR VIEWS OF A SCRIMSHAW WHALE TOOTH CREATED BY AN UNIDENTIFIED WHALEMAN FOR DOWN TO THE SEA IN SHIPS STAR RAYMOND MCKEE. VIGNETTES INCLUDE DIRECTOR ELMER CLIFTON, THE CHARLES W. MORGAN, AND MCKEE HARPOONING A WHALE. 2001.128.2. FALL / WINTER 2014

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ON BOOKS

The Wianno Senior Story: A Century on Nantucket Sound By Stan Grayson Foreword by Llewellyn Howland, III (Tilbury House, 2013, 264 pages)

Reviewed by Dan McFadden

W

hat makes a successful one-design class? It goes without saying that every sailor has a favorite boat, and the discussion as to why my boat is better than yours will be debated as long as humans venture out onto the water. But few classes are as cherished and long-lived as the Wianno Senior, and after reading The Wianno Senior Story: A Century on Nantucket Sound by Stan Grayson, you will understand why. The Wianno Senior was commissioned by the Wianno Yacht Club, which was seeking a shoal-draft boat that could deal with the challenging conditions of Nantucket Sound. Designed by H. Manley, of the famous Crosby clan known for their iconic Cape Cod catboats, the first batch was produced at the Crosby yard in Osterville, MA, and delivered in 1914. Fantasy, one of the original boats in the class, is in the watercraft collection at Mystic Seaport. Twenty-five feet long, with a shallow keel and centerboard, a gaff-sloop rig, and room for four comfortably, the Wianno Senior is as perfectly suited for its local waters as it is beautiful, and that is definitely part of the reason for its longevity as a class. Grayson, a writer widely known for his books and articles on American yachting and marine engines, has indeed written a “comprehensive and generous history,” as Llewellyn Howland, III, states in his foreword. The book traces the boat’s origins in the town and club, the fleet’s growth and success over the years, its remarkable adaptation (and resistance) to technological change, a transition to fiberglass, and its journey into a second century as the class celebrates its centennial this year. However, this story is about more than just a boat—as fine an example of brilliant yacht design as it is. If one wants to know why an antiquated gaff main is still carried decades after it went out of style, or how a class association can somehow create competitive parity between wooden and fiberglass hulls, it is the people in the class that are the answer. President John F. Kennedy was one of them: he adored his Wianno Senior Victura from the day it was given to him when he was fifteen to the end of his life. Throughout the book, Grayson recounts season after season of races won, trophies awarded, and families handing down their boat from one generation to the next. “The boat is still the boat,” he writes after all these years, but you understand that it is the role of the boat in people’s lives that are its secret to success. Lavishly illustrated, this is a great book to curl up with on a cold winter’s day, especially if you want to transport yourself to a summer afternoon on Nantucket Sound, and be inspired for the next season of sailing. Dan McFadden is the Director of Communications at Mystic Seaport. In his spare time he can be found working on his 1903 Crosby catboat Storm King.

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A Bold and Hardy Race of Men: The Lives and Literature of American Whalemen By Jennifer Schell Jennifer Schell’s academic work has borrowed its title from Joseph C. Hart’s 1834 novel Miriam Coffin, or The Whale-Fishermen, where the author states that his characters were “a bold and hardy race of men.” Already in the 1780s there were portraits of hard-working whalers in American literature, Schnell writes in her well-penned book. Authors Lydia Howard Huntley Sigourney, Frederick Douglass, and Walt Whitman wrote narratives about the New England whale fishery, which grew into a major American industry in the 1800s, heroically depicting the whaling men as prime maritime workers. This is a book for everyone interested in literature and whaling.

Flat Water Tuesday By Ron Irwin In his wonderful debut novel, Ron Irwin presents the thrilling world of competitive rowing at the posh elite Fenton School, where Rob Carrey, a workingclass student on a scholarship, arrives to row in “God Four” to help the school to victory in the annual race against Fenton’s arch rival, Warwick. Flat Water Tuesday, on love and rowing, has two parallel stories, one of the young Rob’s rowing at Fenton and one taking place fifteen years later, when he is in his 30s and a successful documentary filmmaker. Forced to go back to Fenton for a class reunion, Rob has to face his demons, remembering a tragic event that took place after the crew’s race. Irwin’s language is beautiful, even poetic in certain parts. The British Raid on Essex: The Forgotten Battle of the War of 1812 By Jerry Roberts This is the untold story of a British raid on American privateers on the Connecticut River at Essex on April 8, 1814, an attack overlooked in the history books. Jerry Roberts’s account, The British Raid on Essex, built on new research on both sides of the Atlantic, reads like a fast-paced action chronicle, which sheds light on a significant but forgotten attack on Connecticut soil during the War of 1812.

TO ORDER THESE OR OTHER BOOKS, PLEASE CALL 860.572.5386, OR EMAIL MSMBOOKSTORE@EVENTNETWORK.COM DON’T FORGET YOUR 10% MEMBERS’ DISCOUNT! MEMBERS’ DOUBLE DISCOUNT DAYS NOV. 28-DEC. 7. REMEMBER WE SHIP ANYWHERE! WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG/BOOKSTORE


Glowing lanterns. Holiday spirit. Guaranteed fun. We’re pleased to present the 35th annual Lantern Light Tours at Mystic Seaport. Join us in celebrating the holiday season with this walking performance throughout the maritime village, November 29 – December 27. To learn more, visit mysticseaport.org #LanternLightTours

Member FDIC. Citizens Bank is a brand name of Citizens Bank, N.A. and Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania. 424658


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Profile for Mystic Seaport Museum

Mystic Seaport Magazine - Fall/Winter 2014  

Mystic Seaport Magazine is the official publication of the Museum, dedicated to all things “America and the Sea.” This issue commemorates th...

Mystic Seaport Magazine - Fall/Winter 2014  

Mystic Seaport Magazine is the official publication of the Museum, dedicated to all things “America and the Sea.” This issue commemorates th...

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