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SPRING 2010

The 38th Voyage

All ne w summer camps Mystic Se aport in the Movies | Tugs! E xhibit to Open Fiddlehe ads & Climbing Vines


a whole new latitude arrives. spring, 2010.

new things are always happening at mystic seaport. But none are more tasteful than our new restaurant, latitude, which updates our classic seamen’s inne. Come discover all that’s new, starting in spring 2010, from the people who’ve made mystic market and aspen restaurant in old saybrook into culinary landmarks.

www.CoastalGourmetCt.Com | For your event and CaterinG needs, Call 860.572.5305 or Go to www.mystiCseaport.orG/yourevents


CONTENTS

18

Mystic Seaport in the Movies

12

The 38th Voyage of the Charles W. Morgan

6

in every

issue

Tugboat Adventures

seascapes. .........................

4

by the numbers. ...............

26

museum briefs....................

9

calendar of events...........

27

in the galley....................

10

gardening by the sea.........

11

advancement news............

24

windrose (events, classes

and programs)..................

28

contents

spring2010

3


S E A sca p es INSPIRATION! Mystic Seaport believes that inspiration should be at the very

M Y ST I C SE A P O R T

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core of important museum work, and that applies to staff, scholars and visitors alike. These days nothing provides more pure inspiration than the Charles W. Morgan herself. Over the past several months, the Museum, as well as its members and guests, has been abuzz with excited conversation regarding the prospect of the Charles W. Morgan going to sea again post-restoration. As you are undoubtedly aware by now, the Museum’s Board of Trustees voted unanimously to authorize the Museum staff to continue with its planning to sail the Morgan on a ceremonial 38th voyage in 2013, having agreed that it is both feasible and responsible to undertake such a venture — without a doubt, a bold and decisive decision. Even to the casual museum visitor, the image of the Morgan floating down the Mystic River and eventually setting sail for New Bedford and beyond stirs up both romantic and historic emotions. The question remains: why would Mystic Seaport undertake such an enormous venture — why bother? While the feature article within answers that question more fully, I will offer here that we must because with President Steve White onboard the Morgan. this restoration and renewed strength, she becomes the vessel through which the Museum connects America — in a most authentic and compelling manner — to a significant aspect of its maritime and economic roots. It reminds us and allows us all to consider, through dialogue and action, some of the challenges that America faced over a century and a half ago in the midst of the Industrial Revolution. Great museums are expected to push the boundaries of interpretation and to engage the public in “conversations” about its past and the relevant human condition. We believe that restoring and sailing the Charles W. Morgan is potentially the fullest expression of the Museums’s dual responsibility of stewardship and education, giving us the unique chance to demonstrate what we have learned over time about what our ancestors faced as they sailed in search of solutions to our nation’s challenges and needs. To visit the Morgan today as she sits in the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard is an inspiration in itself. To witness the careful restoration by our skilled staff inspires one to want to help in some meaningful way. I, for one, cannot get enough of it and am truly inspired by the work and by the notion that in 2013 she, our Charles W. Morgan, will once again live as the ship she was built to be. I hope that you will also find inspiration in this voyage and find a way to help our effort. One final thought on inspiration: what other organization has the skill, talent and resolve to restore a 19th-century vessel AND to sail her again? You know the answer, as you are a proud member. Please spread the word, and thank you for your unfailing support! See you on the Morgan,

Mystic Seaport magazine is a publication of Mystic Seaport

The Museum of America and the Sea. President STEPHEN C. WHITE executive vice president SUSAN FUNK Editor Anna F. Sawin contributors ELYSA ENGELMAN JEAN KERR KARA lally ERIN RICHARD Design Karen WARD THE DAY PRINTING COMPANY Photography Dennis Murphy nicki pardo Andy Price SUSANNAH SNOWDEN / OMNIA PHOTOGRAPHICS AMANDA TEDESCHI

cover The whaleship Charles W. Morgan under sail in 1920.

CONTACT US VISITOR INFOR M ATION: 860.572.5315 | 888.973.2767 ADMINiSTRATION: 860.572.0711 MEMBERSHIP: 860.572.5339 CENTRAL RESERVATIONS: 860.572.5322 MUSEUM STORE: 860.572.5385 MARITIME GALLERY: 860.572.5388 VOLUNTEER SERVICES: 860.572.5378

Stephen C. White President

WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG


41º NORTH

5 4 1 º NO R T H

spring These delicate blooms of spring can’t be too far off, at least that’s what we New Englanders like to think!


UPCOMING EXHIBITS

Notes from an Exhibit Developer’s Tugboat Adventures Three times in the past four months, Mystic Seaport exhibit researcher Elysa Engelman has had the chance to ride on tugboats while we shoot footage for exhibit videos in the upcoming “Tugs!” exhibit. From a Manhattan tugboat race to ship-assist jobs in Maine and sea trials out of Quonset, RI, each trip was exhilarating and interesting in its own way.

U P CO M I N G E X H I B I TS

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Sunday, Sept. 4. 10 a.m. 79th Street Boat Basin off Manhattan’s Upper West Side The starting horn sounds and we’re off! A dozen tugboats churn up the water, horns blaring and crews hollering as the 17th annual Great North River Tugboat Race starts. I’m standing on one of the oldest and smallest tugs in the race, the 1901 New York State canal tug Urger. Cheerful in its blue-and-yellow paint scheme, this “teaching tug” is soon left behind by the more modern commercial tugs with their larger engines and twin propellers. The fastest tug takes just over six minutes to travel the one nautical mile. Running in the back of the pack improves the view for director of photography Dan Harvison and me, but also makes the ride more treacherous. There’s no room for anyone but the captain in the tiny wheelhouse, so we face the spray on the front deck. Dan is most vulnerable, focusing on filming the race with a handheld HD camera. Dan has already told me that if he goes overboard he will

throw the camera up toward me as he falls and I’m supposed to catch it before yelling “man overboard.” I can’t quite tell if he’s joking, but know the expensive (rented) camera will be ruined if it goes into the river. Another colleague, Brandon Morgan, is on the race committee boat somewhere ahead of us shooting another view of the racing tugs, while producer Lisa Simmons is stationed on the pier. After the race, all the tugs mill around in the river while bystanders take pictures. Tugs team up for nose-to-nose pushing bouts. We’re the last tug back at the pier, which means we raft up to two other tugs. As I grip the camera gear and walk gingerly across a rickety wooden ladder they’ve jury-rigged to serve as a horizontal gangway between the rafted tugs, I try not to look down at the fendered tug hulls grinding against each other.

Tuesday, Dec. 1. 7:30 a.m. Portland, Maine I awaken to my cell phone ringing insistently and know immediately who it will be. Pete, the deckhand on the tug Iona McAllister, delivers a message that is part invitation, part challenge: “If you can get down to the pier by eight, you can come out with us to escort an oil tanker.” In half an hour, cameraman Dan, producer Lisa Simmons, and exhibit designer Jeff Crewe and I have loaded our camera and sound equipment into the van. We drive through the security gate at the ferry pier on Commercial


Monday, Dec. 7. 8 a.m. Senesco Shipyard, Quonset Point, RI I’m standing high in the wheelhouse of a brand-new 116-foot tug, named Laurie Ann Reinauer, built by the Reinauer-owned Senesco. This oceangoing tug is designed to fit into the notch at an oil barge’s stern and push it, laden with up to 3.3 million gallons of oil, through fog, high seas, and other rough conditions up and down the New England coast. Right now, the water in Narragansett Bay is flat and calm and we barrel along at a top speed of 13 knots, passing a fishing trawler. The tug captain is pleased with its maneuverability, showing how the tall tug can do figure eights in the water and “walk” sideways to the pier, thanks to its NautiCAN nozzles, each with an integral triple-rudder system.

7 U P CO M I N G E X H I B I TS

Street, park the van and lug the gear around the narrow perimeter of a coffee barge, across one tug, and onto another, a state-of-the-art tractor tug. Dan and I each wonder when we will get to board a tug that is tied directly to the pier. It’s freezing cold but sunny. Last night’s tugboat ride on the Iona to dock a different oil tanker ended at 10 p.m., so my Bean boots and foul-weather coat are beginning to feel like a second skin. It was too dark that night to capture any good footage, but we recorded great interviews with Capt. Brian Fournier and his crew. Today we’re onboard the year-old Andrew McAllister hoping to get some clear footage of daily life and work aboard a Portland harbor tug. From the minute the deckhands cast off, we’re in constant motion. From the thrumming of the diesel engines to the delicate dance of turning, backing, and pushing the nimble tug works in concert with two others in bringing a massive oil tanker safely away from the pipeline pier and under a busy bridge to the mouth of the harbor. Onboard, our film crew is also in constant motion — climbing up the wheelhouse to record the captain getting directions from the harbor pilot choreographing the tug/ tanker dance, then clambering back down to the deck to get action shots of the deckhand adjusting lines. If the tug is a three-dimensional stage, it’s a pro-

gressive play with the scenes all playing at the same time. We’re getting better at anticipating where the action will be next. Dan shoots it all, the camera perpetually glued to his arm and his eye. Jeff takes still photos for inspiration in exhibit design and I’m trying to mentally record it all while staying out of their way, but also speaking up when I see the potential for a shot we can use in a “Tugs!” exhibit videos. I’m hoping we caught enough to give visitors a sense of what it’s like to work on a modern harbor tug. The McAllister captain and crews are friendly but focused. Underlying each action is a sense of purpose. Even before the tug leaves the dock, it is burning money in the form of diesel fuel and salaries. The unspoken philosophy: Stay out as long as the job takes, but don’t waste time. The oil company that owns the tanker will be charged around $4,000 for assistance of the tugs, a necessary operating cost in these days of strict regulations to prevent potential oil spills.


UP C O M I N G E XHIBI T S

Tugs! Get ready for “Tugs!” It’s a brandnew exhibit opening in May, 2010 and bringing the fascinating story of American tugboats to Mystic Seaport. Every day tugboats move millions of tons of cargo, escort cruise ships, save lives during maritime disasters, conduct environmental cleanups and salvage wrecks. Yet, many people still think of tugs as the cheery, coal-smoke-bellowing little ships from children’s storybooks. It will introduce the kinds of work that tugboats do and how they’ve changed

U P CO M I N G E X H I B I TS

8

over the past 150 years in their design, operation, and use. Visitors will also learn why today’s tugs are stronger, safer, and more efficient than ever, and how tugs might change in the future. The tug is on its public sea trial. Dan, Jeff, Brandon and I are here to film the ride, joining tug designer Bob Hill, two freelance photographers who are tug enthusiasts, and representatives from Senesco and its parent company, Reinauer. The tone is celebratory as the pride of the shipyard workers and managers shines through. This is only the third tug they’ve built and it’s clear that they are excited to see how well she performs. We’re all standing in a wheelhouse that towers five stories above the deck, giving the captain good visibility when pushing a light barge. As I look around at the dozen people standing comfortably inside and at all the high-tech navigation and communications equipment within the captain’s easy reach, I realize we’ve come a long way from the slippery deck and one-man wheelhouse of the historic Urger. And at last, on our final tug adventure, after we have learned to pack light on camera batteries, microphones and other heavy gear, we disembark easily across a stable metal gangway, directly from the tug to the pier. Elysa Engelman is the Museum’s exhibit researcher, and is an integral part of the team behind the “Tugs!” exhibit at Mystic Seaport.

This colorful, inviting exhibit is designed for family audiences and school groups, but with plenty of content to satisfy even the most knowledgeable maritime expert. It will include hands-on activities as well as material drawn from Mystic Seaport’s rich collections — historic photographs, paintings, models, and manuscripts about important tug-related people, places and events. Don’t miss Tug Blast, a weekend event celebrating all things tugs, May 22 - 23 —— and stay tuned for more tug events all summer long!


Museum Briefs capitol hill reception Mystic Seaport and the Connecticut Society hosted a Capitol Hill reception on September 15, 2009, for members and staff to the Connecticut congressional delegation and Washington, D.C., friends of the Museum. The event was graciously supported by General Dynamics Corporation.

Mystic Seaport President Steve White with Congressman Joe Courtney, representing Connecticut's 2nd Congressional District. Photo Credit: Neil McKiernan

[left to right] John Casey, President, Electric Boat; Bill Bonvillian, a new member of the Museum's International Council; President Steve White; and Ted Hack, Director, Government Relations Submarine Programs, General Dynamics.

Coastal Gourmet serves up new menus, new restaurant at Mystic Seaport

by Charles Spathakis, owns and operates Aspen, an Old Saybrook eatery named the best new restaurant in Connecticut in 2009 by Connecticut magazine. “We are committed to Menu ey Winter ll a G exceeding expectations ... APS ......... HES & WR ......... SANDWIC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .r .Ro. .ll of Museum visitors and ... . . ise . . . . Ka . . a . . ......... . . . . . . . . . Garlic Mayonnaise on d ......... ......... members,” said Spathakis, . . . . . . . . . Ciabatta . . . . . . . . ., Tomato, Red Onion an . . . . . . .. . . . . . . EY . . . . RK ce ......... . . . . . . . . ,.Balsamic Vinaigrette on ROAST TUy and Swiss with Lettu ......... ......... ......... . . . . . . . . . ppers, Lettuce,Tomato Roast Turke . himself a longtime Mystic . . NE . . LO . . . . . . VO . . . .. PRO Red Pe Ciabatta . . . . . . . . Ma ......... HAM andolone Cheese, Roasted yonnaise on ......... ......... ......... DAR . . . .ce. ,Tomato, Horseradish Ham, Prov . . Seaport member. “Our team ED . . . CH . . d . . . . . EF an Lettu ......... ......... ROAST BECheddar, Red Onions, ......... . . . . . . . . .at Bread . . . . . . . . .Wrap ICH . . . . . ato . he . W Roast Beef, W . . . ND on . has implemented an innova. SA . ch ... ... ce, Tom SALAD on a Spina ......... ......... CHICKENrket Chicken Salad, Lettu . . . . . . . . .Carrots, Lettuce, Tomato ......... ......... ......... Mystic Ma tive vision which has allowed ......... P . . . . . . . Cucumbers, Shredded . .. . . RA . . . . W . . . . . . US . . . . . HUMM rlic Hummus, Feta, ......... ......... ......... RAP . . . . . Roasted Ga ......... CHIPS the company to grow steadily SALAD W . ) TO NA TA NA ato TU PO TU m C EN OR ED WITH CLASSI d Onion and Ripe To RAPS SERV UP (CHICK Lettuce, Re H AND SO L SANDWICHES AND W since our inception. Partnering SANDWIC AL ..... LADS SA COMBO ½ D ......... N SOUPS A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . with Mystic Seaport is a logical . . . . ... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... CHOWDER ......... ......... progression for us.” AND CLAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,. Balsamic Vinaigrette . . GL . . EN . . . W . ....... NE ... ..... berries ......... T BISQUE Dried Cran ......... ......... BUTTERNU T SALAD . . . . . . . . .asted Spiced Walnuts, ......... “This is the start of what we . . . . To . , . KE . se . . . . . . . essing Goat Chee EAST MAR ......... rgonzola or D . . . . . . .rlic Croutons, Caesar Dr Greens, Go believe to be a very strong part. ESAR SALA rmesan, Ga GRILL ......... Pa ed CLASSIC CA av Sh ttuce, FROM THE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Romaine Le . . . . . nership — one that not only ben. . . . . .... ......... ......... ......... ......... . . . . . . . . .kles on Kaiser Roll ......... RGER . . . m efits each organization, but, more . . . . . . . . . iser Roll . es, Pic .... . . . . ato . . . . . . To . ANGUS BU . , . . s on Ka ...... ...... s, Lettuce 100% Angu ER . . . . . .Le. ttuce, Tomatoes, Pickle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EESE BURG ... dar, importantly, visitors, members and . CH ed . tta . .... S . Ch ba . . . . or . GU Cia . . la . . . AN s, Gorgonzo . . . . . . . . , Lemon Mayonnaise on ......... 100% Angu ......... ......... ......... ICKEN . . . ch, Pepper Jack Cheese . . CH . . clients,” said White. D . ... . . . LE . . . IL . . GR Spina ......... ......... d Onions, . . . . . . . . .ssian Dressing on Rye ......... Caramelize EN . . . . . Ch ......... . UB , Ru . . se RE . . ee D . .. To view the complete new Galley . . . LE . . . GRIL t, Swiss ....... ......... Sauerkrau ......... ......... Corn Beef, D CHEESEd ......... LE . . IL . . . GR . . C .. . ea . SI menu and get a preview of the new hite Br CLAS DOG . . . .. . . . . $ .50 ......... eese on W NG HOT ef ......... ili . . Cheddar Ch ......... EF FOOT $LO . . Or Be Ch BE . . L . . AL . .50 . D . Latitude menu when it is released ...... GRILLE n Queso . . . . . . . CHIPS ......... H POTATO Add Chili Co ERS . . . . . RVED WIT ....... ABOVE SE ICKEN FING ......... . . ALL ITEMS . this spring, be sure to check online . FRIED CHl White Meat Chicken . . . . ....... Breaded Al ......... . . . . ...... . . . . . . . . .... ..... at www.mysticseaport.org. . . . . . . . . . French Fries ......... d S........ ......... mu s e um bri e f s

The team that made Mystic Market and Aspen Restaurant of Old Saybrook local culinary landmarks now oversees all food service at Mystic Seaport. Coastal Gourmet is staffing and operating the Museum’s on-grounds dining venues — The Galley Restaurant and Schaefer’s Spouter Tavern and the newly renamed and renovated Seamen’s Inne, now known as Latitude and scheduled for a spring 2010 opening. Coastal Gourmet is responsible for booking and servicing wedding and catered events in venues like the Museum’s open-air boat shed, north lawn and even the steamboat Sabino. “Our goal is to provide our visitors and members with the ultimate experience – and that includes food service,” said Mystic Seaport President Steve White. “Establishing a relationship with Coastal Gourmet is a natural fit for us. We both seek to achieve the same goal – to provide quality product and service to our customers.” The Mystic-based company, which was established in 1993, operates Mystic Market East & West, Coastal Gourmet Catering & Event Planning, the 250-seat venue Stonington Meadows and the culinary operations at Stonington Harbor Yacht Club. Additionally, the group, which is owned

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an IP .. FISH & CHCole Slaw, Tartar Sauce ......... S........ White Fish, ILLA CHIP RT ili TO T Ch ef KE HOT MAR ili Con Queso or Be Served with

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JUICE


Fiddleheads

I N T H E G A LL E Y

IN THE GALLEY

10

I love fiddleheaDs not only for their earthy, asparagus-like flavor, but for the signal they send when they arrive in local produce markets, usually sometime in April. It means that it’s finally spring in New England. It may not be warm exactly, but we know that winter is over and we can look forward to more of the earth’s bounty as the days grow longer and warmer. I’ve never gathered fiddleheads myself. (Like foraging for mushrooms, I would want to be very sure indeed that I was gathering the right sort of fern.) But they are a wild-harvested crop and are generally found growing alongside streams and lakes from April to June. And if you are lucky enough to be able to forage for mushrooms, or have a source for them, chanterelles and morels do make a lovely accompaniment to fiddleheads, sharing an earthy richness and the aroma of woodlands in spring. Fiddleheads are the unfurled fronds of the ostrich fern, with their distinctive furled heads (like the carved head of a violin) and brown papery “skin” that should be peeled and/or rinsed off.

Fiddleheads are usually anywhere from half an inch to an inch in diameter and come with the distinctive grooved, smooth stalk. This tends to be quite short, as the fiddleheads are harvested when they are only a few inches above the ground. Due to their earthy environment and uncultivated nature, you should wash well and cook before sampling. Trim the cut ends of the stalk and wash thoroughly in a colander. Put them in a large bowl of fresh water and swirl them around, rubbing off the thin flakes of chaff on the ferns. Pat dry in a clean kitchen towel, rubbing off the remaining parchment-like covering. Most experts recommend cooking the fiddleheads for 10 minutes in boiling water, or steaming them for 20 minutes. After steaming or boiling, drizzle with a sprinkle of olive oil and a touch of lemon juice, they make a lovely side dish or addition to a salad. Or try making them part of a healthy, satisfying main course like the dish below.

Penne with Pancetta, Wild Mushrooms and Fiddleheads This would be particularly good over fresh or dried lemon-pepper pasta. 1 pound fiddlehead ferns, cleaned as above, and steamed for 20 minutes 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 cloves finely chopped garlic 1/4 cup pancetta or bacon, cut into 1/4-inch cubes 1/4 cup white vermouth 1 tablespoon butter, optional 1/2 pound of wild mushrooms (chanterelles, oyster, morels, shitake or a blend) wiped clean and sliced Kosher or sea salt and ground black pepper 1 pound of small penne regate or your favorite pasta 1/3 cup freshly grated Parmesano Reggiano

1. Heat oil in a large sauté pan or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the bacon or pancetta, and cook, stirring until lightly browned. Add mushrooms and cook for three to four minutes. Add garlic and vermouth and cook until the mushrooms begin to brown and liquid is evaporated. Add salt and pepper to taste and swirl in the butter if you wish. 2. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add pasta and cook according to manufacturer’s directions. Drain, reserving 1/2 cup of the pasta water. 3. Return drained pasta to the pot, and add mushroom, pancetta and fiddlehead mixture. Toss well with pasta liquid and add cheese. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve immediately.

Jean Kerr is the author of Mystic Seafood: Great Recipes, History, and Seafaring Lore from Mystic Seaport, as well as Union Oyster House Cookbook and the forthcoming Windjammer Cooking. She is the editor of Taste of the Seacoast magazine and co-owner of Smith Kerr Associates Publishing.


G A RD E N I N G BY T H E S E A

T

Vines

wisting, ClimbingHanging,

I

Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) is a native North American vine that is a deciduous perennial. A beautiful and hardy vine, Virginia creeper can grow in full sun or full shade, poor soil or rich, and it is salt-tolerant. Growing this vine is easy, as it does not need any support. Virginia creeper’s disk-like suckers secrete calcium carbonate, which acts as glue and allows it to attach to anything. A vigorous grower, this vine will grow as tall as the structure that it is climbing. It can also crawl on the ground, acting as an attractive ground cover, especially in the fall, with its brilliant red palmate leaves. Virginia creeper’s foliage can be mixed with other annual or perennial ground covers, such as lamb’s ear (Stachys byzantina) or foam flower (Tiarella cordifolia). One may become attached to vines, helping them climb, manually twisting their tendrils around the structure that they will become part of. Depending on the species, some vines are finicky and need extra attention when they are getting started. Use string to tie up young vines and carefully prune to ensure proper branching. When training vines, be sure that the structure and location are ideal for the mature size and weight of the vine; also be sure to have good air circulation between the vine and the structure. All in all, even the forgetful gardener can grow vines. Once started, vines are relatively simple to care for, easy to experiment with and come in all shapes and sizes.

Gardening by the Sea columnist Kara Lally is the Museum's horticulturalist and garden supervisor. She has a degree in horticulture and anthropology from the University of Connecticut.

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magine walking through a tunnel of foliage, brushing up against a wall of flowers or eating lunch in a nook of thorns and berries. Are these delightful moments only experienced within old gardens, with vines that are as ancient as the structures they grow on? Or can we enjoy them within our own garden, covering modern structures and vertical areas with natural, enchanting beauty? Using vines in the garden adds height, color and texture in places that would normally be bare or unsightly. A vine’s stretching foliage can adorn chainlink fences, stark staircases, stone walls, tree stumps and porches. At the Seaport, there are a number of climbing vines grown to hide our bare walls, to decorate iron fences and to cover other structures for privacy. Native to Mexico and tropical South America, cathedral bells (Cobaea scandens) is grown as an annual vine in New England. This towering vine grows as much as 25 feet in one season. With one-foot-long tendrils, cathedral bells wraps around almost anything; trellises, pillars, arbors, staircases and stucco walls. Cathedral bells’ compound purple-veined leaves and shrubby habit provide shade during hot summer days and can create privacy. Most important, this vine has unique flowers that bloom from midsummer though fall. The bell-shaped flowers have the slightest honey fragrance. They emerge pale green and turn through the season to a purple with white veins. Each flower hangs delicately upside-down mimicking bells.


T H E M O RG A N S A i L S A G A I N

The

38

th

Voyag e: Br e at hi ng Li fe i n to t he

Charles W.Morgan

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ThE M O R G A N S A I L S A G A I N

12


T H E M O RG A N S A i L S A G A I N

With this sail comes a renewed purpose for the historic ship, as she sails not only to inform modern audiences about her historic significance, but also to identify her contemporary relevance in a changing world.

k

by Erin Richards

W

13

following the bulk of her restoration work in spring 2012. Following an additional year of work in the water in order to reinstall her rig, the whaleship will set sail in the summer of 2013. Before truly beginning her voyage, the Morgan will be towed down the Mystic River to New London, Connecticut, for additional ballast, and from there she will sail to Newport, Rhode Island, carefully monitored by a support fleet. The next leg of her journey returns the Morgan to the port where she was originally built in 1841 in New Bedford, Massachusetts — the port that acted as her homeport for the majority of the 37 voyages that sailed to all corners of the world. After New Bedford, the Morgan will continue on through the Cape Cod Canal to Stellwagen Bank, a national marine sanctuary located off of Provincetown, Massachusetts. The symbolic visit will be the final stop on the Morgan’s voyage before she returns to Chubb’s Wharf to continue to welcome a new generation of visitors that will join the more than 20 million people who have walked her decks since her arrival at Mystic Seaport in 1941. As with most unconventional visions and epic journeys, the reception to the Morgan’s upcoming voyage has been both praised and questioned. Many have asked why. The Museum’s carefully laid — out comprehensive goals for the voyage seek to resolve all doubt: the Morgan’s voyage will illuminate the whaleship’s history for audiences that never before have been privy to her life; it will bring public history to life via a com-

ThE M O R G A N S A I L S A G A I N

hen we reflect upon the moments that define our lives, it’s rarely the simple tasks we remember. Monumental feats that called upon our utmost strength — events when against all challenging forces our character and integrity endured — these are the moments that tell the stories of our lives. And just as with people, vessels, too, earn a lifetime of such stories. Perhaps none more so than the Charles W. Morgan, who, as the nation’s sole surviving wooden whaleship and the oldest commercial ship afloat, is about to add another chapter to her already storied life. In September of 2009, the Board of Trustees at Mystic Seaport authorized Museum staff to restore the 168-year -old vessel to sailing condition and to plan a ceremonial 38th voyage upon completion of the current 6.5 million dollar restoration project. The unanimous vote came after Mystic Seaport conducted its own four-month feasibility study into sailing the registered National Historic Landmark vessel. “This decision has excited the Trustees more than any project I can remember in the past 25 years,” said Richard Vietor, the Museum’s chairman of the Board of Trustees. “We realize that this is a very ambitious and large goal, but our task it to make others believe rather than be daunted by the goal. The Board of Trustees certainly believes. Enough work has been done by Dana Hewson, Quentin Snediker and their crew in the shipyard proving that sailing the Charles W. Morgan is technically feasible, so we are positive this can be done. These are not idle goals.” The current project timeline calls for the vessel to be launched


T HR O UGH T H E GUID E ’ S E Y E S

ThE M O R G A N S A I L S A G A I N

14 pelling adventure; it will emphasize the innovative and influential nature of the maritime tradition; and it will stimulate relevant conversations about the changing world. But most importantly, the vessel will do what she was built to do — she will sail again. “The Morgan presented us with this remarkable opportunity,” said Mystic Seaport President Steve White. “She needed to be restored from the waterline to the keel, and for us to do this, to fulfill our obligation to care for her, we had to undertake the work now. The restoration will return her to a state of strength that will show America the unique nature of her character. At Chubb’s Wharf, the Morgan demonstrated much of that character, but only when a ship moves — only when a ship does what ships are meant to do — does it show the truest essence of character.” Quentin Snediker, the director of the Museum’s Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard, confirms the Morgan’s soonto-be renewed strength saying that the restoration work necessary for the vessel is such that, as a result of this work, the Morgan will indeed be seaworthy. “We’re addressing some of the last historic fabric — the most deteriorating wood in the hold — so she’ll be in as good of a shape when

we’re done as she was when she was an active whaling vessel,” said Snediker. “I think it’s important to make the distinction that we’re not restoring the vessel in order to make her seaworthy; because, that degree of restoration, depending on her condition, might go beyond the degree of work necessary to maintain historic integrity,” noted Snediker, stressing the essential balance between historic integrity and structural integrity that must be taken into consideration with every vessel worked on in the shipyard. “We can’t simply remove wood to make it better if it’s already good enough. But in the case of the Morgan, since the areas of the vessel we’re now addressing have never in her history, as far as we can detect, been addressed, there is an extensive amount of replacement that needs to take place. That will make the hull capable of being seaworthy,” assured Snediker. Approximately 15 percent of the vessel’s original fabric will remain after the current restoration is complete, and when the Morgan once again sails into New Bedford harbor, her hull will be carried by her original keel — the very first piece laid when she was built in 1841. Restoring the ship to seaworthy condition has made an impact on the seven full — time shipwrights who are working on

the Morgan, noted Snediker. “A sense of liveliness has been brought to the project; though many of the crew are more interested in their craft than they are in sailing, the idea that their skill will produce an object that will eventually move adds a whole new layer of life to the restoration,” said Snediker. Other elements of the vessel that will be replaced to make her seaworthy again include rigging, the bowsprit, portions of the spars and some of her 22 sails — primarily the staysail, spanker sail and topsails. Though many of the whaleship’s upper sails are in good shape and won’t need replacing, the Museum is currently undertaking an inventory and survey of all the sails, evaluating each one to see which need to be repaired and which need to be replaced. Modern safety equipment will also be temporarily added for the voyage including life jackets, life rafts, safety boats, all without altering the ship’s original structure. The Morgan will proudly display both her renewed structure and more than two centuries of stories when she sets sail. As our nation’s oldest commercial sailing vessel, she represents generations of those who earned their living from the sea. Their values, independence, self — reliance,


T H E M O RG A N S A i L S A G A I N the topics of exploration and discovery, technology and navigation, social and cultural evolution, the literature of the sea and the mathematics necessary to sail across it, and ship design and the influence of function on it. With this sail comes a renewed purpose for the historic ship, as she sails not only to inform modern audiences about her historic significance, but also to identify her contemporary relevance in a changing world. “We’re taking this historic object and exploring it in the context of today, not in the context of prior generations,” said White. “If we’re going to sail the Morgan to the mouth of the river, then let’s keep going. Our initial idea was to sail her to New Bedford and back, but we were encouraged to think more broadly and consider how the Morgan could tell her story in a contemporary context. Would it not be a great thing to return to the whales as a ship of peace, to return as a ship doing contemporary research, to return as a ship that will force conversation about what whaling was and why we don’t do it today? Why not go back to Stellwagen Bank? It’s the best way to engage in relevant conversation.” More than a century ago the Morgan was a vital part of an industry relevant to its time. Now, in the twenty-first century, she will no longer sail the oceans of the world searching for whales, but rather act as an ambassador, reminding us that innovation fades, resources are finite and fresh ideas are necessary to define new approaches to global environmental challenges. And perhaps, most importantly, with her visit to the national marine sanctuary, the Morgan will also have the chance to “make peace and complete her circle,” as noted by The New London Day’s editorial staff. To reach the final goal of Stellwagen Bank, the Morgan project needs significant support. The cost of restoration alone is $6.5 million — more than half of which has been raised. An additional $1.5 million is necessary to undertake the voyage. And while a fundraising goal this ambitious may seem daunting during uncertain economic times, one only need to look at the significant national maritime history that the Morgan represents in order to understand the absolute confidence Mystic

15 ThE M O R G A N S A I L S A G A I N

courage and perseverance in the face of adversity were critical elements in our nation’s founding, growth and success. Sailing the — will not only tell the story of her restoration, but will also illuminate the numerous stories of men and women from varied lands. Back in an era when American society had become increasingly divided on the subject of race, the Morgan often set sail with a remarkably diverse crew. Men of African, European, Japanese and South Pacific islander descent regularly worked side by side with New Englanders on journeys that could last upwards of five years. Women, too, were a part of the Morgan’s life, as five captains brought along their wives — two of whom were expert navigators. “We are, in many respects, validating and bringing attention to the tremendous sacrifices that Americans and other nationalities made in order to lubricate the Industrial Revolution,” said White. “We’re bringing validation to an important element of the past and to ethnic communities such as the Azoreans and the Cape Verdeans in New Bedford. And by bringing her back to New Bedford, we will be recognizing the port for the great community it was and is.” Sailing the Morgan will pay tribute to all those who lived and served aboard her, bringing their stories to life for local, regional and national audiences. From students and educators to maritime buffs, vacationers and little children ecstatic at the sight of seeing a “tall ship,” the Morgan’s 38th voyage will beckon audiences as diverse as the crews that sailed her. She will embody public history on a grand scale, engaging individuals and communities of diverse cultural backgrounds with the discovery that their own ancestors were directly involved with this American maritime epic. Those that witness the Morgan under sail will see the continuation of this epic, watching as the vessel exemplifies the innovation, exploration and inf luence that make up the core of the maritime tradition. As the sole survivor of more than 2,700 American whaleships, the Morgan alone authentically illuminates


ThE M O R G A N S A I L S A G A I N

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T H E M O RG A N S A i L S A G A I N

“As a maritime historian and a sailor I am intrigued and excited by Mystic Seaport’s decision to restore the Charles W. Morgan to sailing condition,” says Nathaniel Philbrick, National Book Award winning author of In the Heart of the Sea. “Sailing this historic artifact in the here and now presents an opportunity for a contemporary journalistic, as opposed to a research based, insight into the reality of the past. How thrilling and useful.” He adds, “If the Museum is looking for crew, I’m available.”

k

Erin Richard is the Museum’s publicist.

17 ThE M O R G A N S A I L S A G A I N

Seaport maintains in raising support for this project. “Donors, ranging from those who have made six — figure contributions to those who have put a $20 bill in one of the barrels here on the grounds, have told us they believe this effort is an essential element of our nation remembering the stories and lessons that were such an important part of this country becoming what it is today,” said Matthew Stackpole, the Museum’s major gifts officer for the Charles W. Morgan. “As one donor said: ‘our family is proud and pleased to help make this ship strong again so that the next generations will be able to walk her decks and feel and understand, as only the real thing can communicate it, American maritime history.’ ” The stories we build today are the history lessons we leave for tomorrow. Allowing the Morgan to add another story to her life will not only provide counsel and interpretation of the past, but will also bring perspective for the present and hope for the future. “The story of the American whaling industry, which the Charles W. Morgan so powerfully represents, is a rousing chapter in our nation’s history,” said Pulitzer Prize winning author and historian David McCullough. “I think to have no sense of the story of your country is like having no sense of the history of your life. It’s a form of amnesia and can be as detrimental to a society as it is to an individual. I enthusiastically support the important work Mystic Seaport is doing on the Morgan’s restoration, which will insure we remember this vivid chapter in our country’s history.” By bringing the Morgan to life once again, by calling upon her strength and by invigorating her with her original purpose of sailing, Mystic Seaport is ensuring that the historic whaleship will add many more untold chapters to her enduring story.


L I G H TS , C A M E R A , A CT I ON !

18

, s t h g , i a L mer

Ca ion! t Ac

s l e e R d o o at w y y r ll Histo o H t r How aritime o p a in M Se

c i t s y M


LIGH T S , C A M E R A , A C T I O N !

By Erin Richard

A

As respectful stewards of this National Historic Landmark vessel, Mystic Seaport shares the Morgan, her history and the Museum with film crews in hopes of sparking a new generation’s interest in America’s seafaring past.

19 facsimile of the past; the past is actually there. From scampering up the shrouds of a ship to demonstrating how to set a sail, the people who work at Mystic Seaport — the interns, docents, staff — they all help you to understand a bygone part of American history. There is a free masonry of living historians who make their home at Mystic Seaport, and I find it incredibly moving each time I walk onto the campus.” Burns admits he was driven to Mystic Seaport for “professional reasons,” feeling confident that the living history museum could indeed provide the ideal setting for Into the Deep, a whaling documentary scheduled to premiere in the spring of 2010 on PBS’s American Experience series. But as soon as filming began aboard the Charles W. Morgan in September of 2007, Burns found he had instantly become a “grateful patron.” Into the Deep details American whaling when it was at its

peak, an era when whale oil was used to fuel the Industrial Revolution. Unfortunately, this fact has basically been forgotten by the general public, said Burns. Filming aboard the nation’s last wooden whaleship helped the documentarian bring this history back to life. “There were once 3,000plus whaleships; they were the space shuttles of their day,” said the documentarian. “They weren’t around for their beauty or their speed, but for their durability. Now that only one remains — the Charles W. Morgan — that’s a startling fact. I feel so grateful to Mystic Seaport as an institution for caring for this treasure, and grateful to the men and women who keep her and the Museum alive.” As respectful stewards of this National Historic Landmark vessel, Mystic Seaport shares the Morgan, her history and the Museum with film crews in hopes of sparking a new generation’s interest in

L I G H TS , C A M E R A , A CT I ON !

momentary escape from reality. An entry into the past. A glimpse of a better future. Despite the rising cost of tickets in today’s uncertain economy, we faithfully flock to movie theaters. Films allow us to briefly walk in someone else’s shoes, providing a gateway into a moment that we would otherwise not be privy to. Well, films provide this… and so does Mystic Seaport. The moment visitors step onto Museum grounds, they are transported to a re-created 19th-century seafaring village alive with the clip-clopping of hooves, the pounding of iron in the shipsmith’s shop and the creaking of old ships. Each authentic detail found within Mystic Seaport helps bring a bygone era to life and create a picture of yesteryear — and it is this exact picture that draws many of Hollywood’s elite to the Museum. From Steven Spielberg to Ric Burns, directors across the nation have chosen Mystic Seaport as their cinematic backdrop for decades, dating as far back as 1956, when John Huston used Museum grounds to film scenes for his maritime epic Moby Dick. The productions have since run the gamut: from Spielberg’s largescale blockbuster Amistad to Burns’ upcoming documentary Into the Deep: America, Whaling and the World to smaller, yet just as noteworthy credits, which include commercials and segments on network and cable television stations. “No place in the country is as real as Mystic Seaport,” said Burns. “The Museum is not a theme park


LIGH T S , C A M E R A , A C T I O N !

L I G H TS , C A M E R A , A CT I ON !

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America’s seafaring past. Along with sharing this history comes a vital responsibility to maintain the institution’s historic integrity — a responsibility that for the past 10 years has belonged to Sarah Spencer, Mystic Seaport’s locations and productions manager. “It’s important for film companies to understand Mystic Seaport’s limitations, which is often a challenge for productions that have their own focus,” said Spencer. “Many of these film crews are used to dealing with a sound stage — not a museum that has parameters.” Along with carefully guarding the Museum’s vessels, buildings and collections, Spencer must also take into consideration Mystic Seaport’s dual role as an attraction, doing her best to remind film crews that their presence must not interfere with a visitor’s experience. “I try to steer production companies into filming at Mystic Seaport during the shoulder season — late September through early April when the grounds are quieter and more manageable,” said Spencer. This seasonal stipulation is a key factor in the Museum’s two-page “Guidelines for Film/Video/Photo and Commercial Productions” document that all prospective film companies must abide by. The document also states that “preference is given to feature, documentary and news productions that depict Mystic Seaport in an educational, historical or tourism context,” and that “commercial productions are evaluated based on the nature of the project, its subject, distribution method and the manner in which the Museum is represented.” “Though the Museum does give preferential consideration to documentaries and educational programs before commercial projects, the list of productions and photo shoots that have occurred on the grounds has varied tremendously,”

Famous directors such as Steven Spielberg (above) and Ric Burns praise Mystic Seaport for the authenticity of setting it lends to their work.

(Above) the Morgan as movie set in the Ric Burns documentary, Into the Deep. Actor Matthew McConaughey at Mystic Seaport in March of 1997 to film Steven Spielberg's Amistad.


21 L I G H TS , C A M E R A , A CT I ON !


said Spencer. Not all requests to use Mystic Seaport as a backdrop are permitted. “We always get the call from some student who wants to shoot a music video on the Morgan or someone who owns their own pirate production group who decides, ‘Hey, let’s go film at Mystic Seaport,’ ” said Spencer. “A lot of people think that we’re a public park and they don’t understand that the Museum is privately owned. Once this is explained to them, people realize the different limitations that we have and they’re okay with that.” Spencer acknowledges that the main component in the smoothness of film shoots at Mystic Seaport is due to the Museum’s employees. “Mystic Seaport’s staff is well indoctrinated on filming procedures,” noted Spencer. “Filming on grounds can require a lot of internal juggling — from the Facilities Department emptying the trash much earlier than normal in the morning to coordinating around the many educational programs that are held on the Conrad — staff members understand these issues can become a chal-

A D VA NCE M ENT NE W S

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Into the Deep: America, Whaling and the World, a co-production of Steeplechase Films & American Experience / WGBH Boston, filmed in part at Mystic Seaport, is expected to air on PBS on May 10. Check the Mystic Seaport website (www.mysticseaport.org) and your local listings for more information.

lenge and they are always flexible and accommodating. They are the best people I’ve ever worked with.” Whether it’s adjusting their daily schedule or stepping in at a moment’s notice, Museum employees help out when needed. “The shipyard staff has always been phenomenally helpful in shoots,” praised Spencer. “If there’s a certain sound issue because the shipyard is running a planer while a production company is filming, I’ll call Dean

Right, above: An actor in Ric Burns documentary Into the Deep: America, Whaling & the World, premiering in May, 2010. Below right: the Morgan, seen here at Chubb's Wharf, has been featured in numerous films.


LIGH T S , C A M E R A , A C T I O N ! Seder [shipyard supervisor] and ask if the machines can run at another time, and the noise will stop almost immediately.” And though Mystic Seaport’s village and waterfront are seemingly perfect, there are still those moments when a director’s vision requires just a little bit more, a task that calls upon the diverse talent and skills of the Museum’s staff. “When we need to populate the river, I give Doug Butler a call and he’ll sail the Breck Marshall back and forth for however long is necessary,” said Spencer. Other staff members step in to sail boats or climb rigging if required for a specific scene, a tricky feat that actors are not allowed to perform. On several occasions, female employees have doubled as male actors, demonstrating their ability to transform into 19th-century sailors at a moment’s notice.

lowed. The Academy Award–winning film director discovered the Museum while scouting locations for Amistad in New Haven, CT, and quickly decided that Mystic Seaport was the exact locale he needed for his film. “The difference in the appearance of Mystic Seaport was phenomenal,” said Spencer. “The Museum came alive.” Spielberg, his crew and the Museum staff worked together to create the director’s vision of an 1839 seafaring village, making it as authentic as possible — down to the last drop. “Spielberg brought in bourbon barrels to be used in some of the scenes,” recalled Spencer. “When his crew left, they left behind the barrels, which we discovered had actual bourbon in them. For the longest time, I had a peanut butter jar at home filled with bourbon.”

23 L I G H TS , C A M E R A , A CT I ON !

A number of Museum staff members, including the editor of this magazine, were hired as extras in Steven Spielberg's Academy Award nominated film, Amistad. Photographed at Mystic Seaport, March 1997.

Though the essence of Mystic Seaport is woven throughout all of the productions filmed on grounds, the cinematic regions, characters and themes highly vary. In December of 2005, the Museum’s waterfront was transformed for a Federal Express commercial, requiring four hundred pounds of lobsters and two days of filming during single-digit temperatures. The finished product? A 30-second telecast depicting Maine lobstermen unloading their morning catch on a bright, cold morning. Undoubtedly, the most well-known Mystic Seaport transformation to date occurred during the filming of Amistad, Spielberg’s depiction of the historic 1839 mutiny aboard the ill-fated Baltimore Clipper and the legal battle that soon fol-

When reinventing a faraway time and place, the entertainment industry spares no expense. It would undeniably be cheaper and easier for film crews to shoot on a sound stage in Southern California’s San Fernando Valley, but would it be authentic? Would a team of knowledgeable artisans be on hand to answer questions and step in when needed? Probably not. Hollywood recognizes that in order to paint the perfect picture, it must be genuine. And being genuine is what Mystic Seaport is all about. A native of southern California and no stranger to the film industry, Erin Richard is the Museum's publicist.


ADVANCEMENT NEWS

Gala

America and the Sea A D VA NCE M ENT NE W S

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L

ast fall the Museum celebrated noted sailor and collector, William I. Koch, founder, owner and president of the Oxbow Group at its annual America and the Sea Gala in New York City. More than 200 people gathered to recognize this remarkable maritime expert, a collector who consistently strives to create public access to his collection. As a strong supporter of art education and art engagement, Bill Koch is involved with art curricula and welcomes hundreds of schoolchildren to view his private collection each year.

It was a historic night for other reasons, as the crew America3 All-Women’s America’s Cup Team gathered together for the first time in years. They celebrated their leader in high style, fully embodying Koch’s “T3 approach: Teamwork, Technology and Talent.” The night also featured fantastic auction items that helped raise more than $200,000 for Mystic Seaport. Some of the marquee items included a private tour of Bill Koch's collection, as well as an exclusive opportunity to charter the 145-ft. luxury motor yacht, Rena.


ADVANCEMENT NEWS

WEDDING GIFT For The MUSEUM

Forty-eight Mystic Seaport members and friends sailed as crew members on classic 12-meter yachts last August in Newport, RI, for a truly exhilarating series of races on picturesque Narragansett Bay. The four yachts were Weatherly (the 1962 Cup defender), American Eagle (Ted Turner's famous champion and the 1964 Cup contender), Nefertiti (designed by Ted Hood) and Intrepid (legendary two-time Cup winner). Ninety-foot masts towered above while boat captains made assignments through a combination of volunteerism and fast appraisal of character and strength. And it worked! While some took turns sitting in the safety of the cockpit, most were on the deck, working the winches for the halyards and main, plus grinding furiously for each tack or jibe. As one crew member said, “The opportunity to sail on a 12-meter was a dream come true for me!” Don't miss the second Mystic Seaport America's Cup Regatta this summer, to be held on July 10. And for the record — the winner was Intrepid!

25 A D VA NCE M ENT NE W S

A Mystic Seaport America’s Cup Regatta

On August 23, 2009, International Council Member Sharon Cohen, of Boston and Noank, married Stephen Johnson in Noank. In lieu of gifts, the bride and groom asked their guests to join them in their support of the Museum's restoration of the Charles W. Morgan. They enclosed a card with their invitations noting that “The Morgan is the enduring embodiment of the Museum's dedication to our nation's maritime heritage and to our responsibility to share that heritage with future generations.” Sharon first experienced Mystic Seaport with the Conrad program in 1977, followed by several trips on Brilliant and two summers as a full-time instructor in the Conrad program. In addition to the International Council, Sharon serves on the Museum’s Investment Committee. Appropriately, she and Stephen met during a regatta in 2004; they like to say that their “shared love of the sea brought us to this special day.” We are grateful that they included Mystic Seaport in their celebration and appreciative of their thoughtful expression of support. As a result of their successful advocacy for the Morgan, the ongoing restoration of the Museum’s flagship has greater visibility and a new group of supporters. We wish Sharon and Stephen fair winds and a following sea on their new voyage together. For information as to how you can include the Museum in your festivities, please call 860.572.5365, write to EveAnne Stouch, Advancement Office, Mystic Seaport; PO Box 6000, Mystic CT. 06355 or email advancement@mysticseaport.org.


By ThE NUMBERS

By The Numbers: Mystic Seaport Gardens Number of volunteers who weed, plant, water and care for the Muse-

18

. Number of garden volunteers active for more than

um’s gardens:

2

10 years:

. On average, the number of plants grown from seed in the

17,280

. Number of lawns and

Museum’s greenhouse per year:

70,072

.

open spaces to mow and string trim in square feet:

The amount of string used for one year of string trimming, in

1,175

. Number of individual species and varieties grown in

feet:

the Museum greenhouse:

270 20

. Number of years the Mystic Seaport . Total number of gardens at Mystic

plant sale has been operating:

BY THE NUMBERS

26

Seaport:

9

. Number of 19th-century re-created historic gardens:

2

.

Number of window boxes, barrels and other planters and containers on the Museum grounds:

36

. Number of hours it takes to plant annu-

als each spring throughout the Museum grounds: trees to prune and rake up after:

. Number of

. Number of square feet in

1,800 56,628

the greenhouse: Seaport green:

120

112

. Number of square feet on the Mystic .

— Kara Lally, Supervisor of Grounds

Got a green thumb – or wish you did? Don’t miss these dates:

Spring Garden Series with Kara Lally Feb. 26, March 26 and April 23 Mystic Seaport Greenhouse plant sale May 13 and 14 (come early!) Mystic Seaport Garden Days June 19 and 20 www.mysticseaport.org


®

SPRING 2010

February February-April Blacksmithing. Call 860.572.5322 — classes to be created by request.

March 20 Rowing Hall of Fame Induction

April 17-18 Easy Introductory Celestial Navigation

March 20 Maritime Matinees

April 17-May 1 Stitch in Time: Sew a 19th-Century Doll Dress

March 21 Rowing History Forum

April 23 Spring Garden Series

March 24 Maritime Author Series

February 12 Maritime Surprises

March 26 Spring Garden Series

February 13, 14, 18-21 Liberty Days (February School Vacation Program)

March 27 Maritime Matinees

April 24 Private Patron Preview (Modern Marine Masters ) April 25 - June 12 Modern Marine Masters Exhibition, Maritime Gallery

February 18 Adventure Series

March 27 Dinner at the Buckinghams’: Open Hearth Cooking Class

February 21 Meet John Adams

March 27 Behind the Canvas

April 29 Visit a CT Boatbuilder and Sailmaker

February 24 Maritime Author Series

March 27 Varnishing Class

February 26 Spring Garden Series

March 27-28 Celestial Navigation: 19th-Century Methods

February 27 Behind the Canvas

March 30-31 Overnight Bus Trip to Maine Boatbuilders

May

February 27 Introduction to Half-Model Construction February 28 "Skills of the Sea" activity center moves to Stillman Building

March

April

May 8 Bus Trip to Essex, MA May 14-16 Marine Weather, Level II May 15 A Celebration of the Sea theater performance

April 9 Maritime Surprises April 10 Behind the Canvas

May 15 Brilliant one-day sail for adults

April 10 Spring Community Sailing starts

May 15 Behind the Canvas

April 10-11 Educator’s Weekend

March 1 Ship to Shore School overnight program

April 10 & 24, and May 8 Introduction to Coastal Navigation

March 2-31 Museum Purchase Award Collection, Maritime Gallery

April 13-14 Pirate Days

March 6 Maritime Matinees

May 8 “Tugs!” Exhibit opens, Schaefer Gallery

May 16 Brilliant one-day sail for adults May 22 Member Reception for “Tugs!” Exhibit Opening May 22-23 Brilliant two-day sail for adults

April 15 Adventure Series

May 22-23 Tug Blast: Exhibit Kick-Off Weekend

March 6-27 Music of the Sea

May 28-29 Brilliant two-day sail for adults

March 12 Maritime Surprises

May 29-31 Lobster Days

March 13 Maritime Matinees

May 30-31 Brilliant two-day sail for adults

March 18 Adventure Series March 19 Anchor Watch

www. m y st i csea p o r t. o r g

860.572.5322

27 Cal e n dar o f Ev e n t s

February 27 Dinner at the Buckinghams’: Open Hearth Cooking Class

April 28 Maritime Author Series


S PRI N G E V E N T S

Rowing Weekend

Liberty Days

February School Vacation Program Feb. 13 & 14 and Feb. 18-21 Kids, come spend a day (or two!) at Mystic Seaport for February vacation fun! Free for Museum members and with paid admission. Children five and under are always free at Mystic Seaport.

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Why do we call our February vacation program Liberty Days? Well, everyone needs a vacation, even sailors of long ago. When a ship arrived in port, the captain would allow the sailors to take turns having ”liberty” ashore. Come discover what a sailor would bring in his sea chest for a long voyage, make a sailor’s craft and explore the interesting world of sailors’ superstitions and tattoos. Great fun for kids of all ages. All Day: Make a craft in the Children’s Museum 10:30 Zoo in the Sky, A Planetarium program for all ages, particularly five and under. Free! 11 a.m. - 12 p.m. Hands-on story time in the Children’s Museum 11 a.m. - 12 p.m. Make a paper dory in the Voyages exhibit 1 p.m. - 12 p.m. Explore a sailor’s sea chest in the cabin of a real ship (Packard Building)

at Mystic Seaport Saturday-Sunday, March 20-21

National Rowing Foundation Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Saturday, March 20, 7 p.m. The National Rowing Hall of Fame is pleased to invite Mystic Seaport members to attend the National Rowing Foundation Dinner and Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony. Special recognition will be given to inductee Anita DeFrantz, an Olympic bronze medalist and a current member of the International Olympic Committee (IOC). To see the complete list of 18 distinguished honorees, go to www. mysticseaport.org/rowinghallfame. Individual tickets are $100 and table sponsorships are $1,000 (10 seats per table). With your ticket you will meet the hall of fame inductees, and enjoy a threecourse dinner and four complimentary bottles of wine per table of 10. To make your reservations, contact Hart or Gillian Perry at the National Rowing Foundation by calling 860.535.0634 or send an email to natrowing@comcast.net.

Mystic Seaport welcomes

Rowing History Forum Sunday, March 21, 9:30 a.m. Mystic Seaport, Friends of Rowing History and the National Rowing Foundation present the 5th Rowing History Forum focusing on the history of competitive rowing. Presentations by rowing historians Thomas Weil, Christopher Dodd (UK), Bill Miller and special guest speaker Olympic rower Kent Mitchell, will highlight the program. Afterward, enjoy a social hour and visit to the Mystic Seaport exhibition space dedicated to the National Rowing Hall of Fame and Rowing History. For details and to register go to www.rowinghistory.net.

President JohnAdams Sunday, Feb. 21

Greenmanville Church, 2-3 p.m.

Perfect for families! Come and celebrate Presidents’ Day with lively guest performer George Baker as he portrays John Adams, the second president of the United States and the father of American Independence. This energetic program appeals to all ages — no dry history lesson here! Laugh and learn as this historical figure, dressed in period clothing of 1797-1801, presents his views of our young nation, its history and period family life in an inspiring and humorous speech. Ask the questions you never dared ask in history class and enjoy two patriotic songs, including a moving sing-along. Members: $6 adult or child. Non-members: $8 adult or child. Register online or call 860.572.5322. w w w. m y s t i c s e a p o r t. o r g • 8 6 0 . 5 7 2 . 5 3 2 2


S PRI N G E V E N T S

Maritime Matinees Saturdays: March 6, 13, 20 and 27 Mystic Art Cinema, Olde Mistick Village 1-3:30 p.m.

March 6 The Marine Photography of Benjamin Mendlowitz

March 20 Braving the Northwest Passage

Benjamin Mendlowitz has traveled the globe for more than 25 years to photograph wooden boats. He is wellknown throughout the boating world for his contributions to nautical publications and for his award-winning annual Calendar of Wooden Boats. Seven books of his photography have been published to date.

Sprague will share stories from this incredible journey and a unique sneak preview of footage taken above and below the Arctic waterline.

The focus of Benjamin’s work is to capture the beauty, romance and fine craftsmanship of a classic wooden boat. His photography is dedicated to the continued preservation of these craft. A question-and-answer discussion session follows his visual presentation.

March 27 Maine Built Boats

March 13 American Fisheries Local filmmaker Bailey Pryor and producer Stephen Jones explore one of the greatest sea stories of all time in his film American Fisheries, the dramatic tale of the North Atlantic cod fishery. Today the fishery is in ruins, and fishing regulations are a quagmire of red tape while small-time fishermen are living on the edge of poverty. Drawing on the sometimes contradictory perspectives of fishermen, ecologists and fisheries managers, this stirring film reveals an epic story that stretches from the age of sail to today. After the film, Bailey and a team of fishing experts discuss the embattled fishing industry, one of the most significant environmental disasters in history. The film was chosen for the Boston International Film Festival in 2008.

Gary Jobson is a world-class sailor, ESPN television commentator and author based in Annapolis, MD. He has won championships in one-design classes, the America’s Cup in 1977, the infamous Fastnet Race and many of the world’s ocean races. He has led ambitious expeditions to the Arctic, Antarctica and Cape Horn and sailed on every continent. Hear Gary’s comments about his new film, Maine Built Boats, and why he’s excited about doing a documentary on Maine’s boatbuilding industry. ”There is a high level of talent there, and Maine boats stack up against any in the world,” says Gary. Jane Wellehan, president of Maine Built Boats, and other boatbuilders from Maine will join Gary for a postprogram discussion. Members: $35/series, $10/program Non-members:$40/series. $12/program Register online or call 860.572.5322.

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In November 2009, filmmaker Sprague Theobald and his crew pulled up to a dock in Seattle, turned off the engines, and announced their official return from the five-month Arctic expedition. They had successfully navigated the Northwest Passage and captured over 250 hours of HD video footage and audio diaries for a new documentary film, Braving the Northwest Passage, due out in 2010.


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31st Annual Modern Marine Masters Exhibition and Sale April 25 - June 12 | Private Patron preview cocktail party, April 24 This annual exhibition showcases the timeless beauty of ships and the sea. On view are works that inspire the artist’s spirit, including classic racing yachts, elegant modern vessels, everyday working boats and the men who make their living from the sea, along with scenes of busy harbors and serene beaches. www.mysticseaport.org/gallery. Call 860.572.5388 for more information.

Jack Coggins, ASMA, “Alaskan Salmon Fishers” OIL 22" x 25"

Victor Mays, F.E. ASMA, “Block Island Boat Beaching“ 19th Century WATERCOLOR 12" x 20"

Robert Moore, "America's Cup Racing" OIL 8'' x 12''

Douglas Purdon, “Tugboat Alley “ OIL 22 x 28

Museum Purchase Award Collection March 2-31, Maritime Gallery Each year at the Maritime Gallery’s Annual International Exhibition, a member of the Museum’s curatorial staff chooses a work to purchase for the Museum’s permanent collection. Come see these exquisite maritime selections chosen from 1983 through 2009, on exhibition in the Maritime Gallery.

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S PRI N G E V E N T S

Pirate Days

Tuesday and Wednesday, April 13 and 14 • 10 a.m.- 4 p.m.

Ahoy, matey! Join us for a family fun time during April school vacation week. Save your energy for the pirate treasure hunt — fun for the whole family. A special Planetarium program teaches how pirates navigated the high seas, and you make your own special Pirate Days souvenir. Members: $7 per person or $25 per family Non-members: $10 per person or $30 per family (plus Museum admission).

To participate, register online, or call 860.572.5322.

NEW!

10 a.m.- 4 p.m.

Follow the pirate’s treasure map for clues to discover secret hiding places where your seafaring skills will be the key to finding the final treasure chest.

Pirate Souvenir Craft Shop 10 a.m.- 4 p.m.

Baubles, bells and sailorman tales — come create your very own unique pirate souvenir and pirate story. For children ages 4-10.

High Seas Planetarium Show

11 a.m., 3 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Learn how pirates of old navigated the high seas at our special Pirate Days planetarium show.

A Celebration of the Sea A theater performance by the Revels Repertory Company Saturday, May 15 • Mystic Art Cinema, 7-8:30 p.m.

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elebrate the arrival of spring with this original musical theater production. The exuberant performance tells the story of the life and work of whalers and their families in the mid-19th century. The songs, singing games, ballads, chanteys, dances and stories describe the fitting out of a sailor‘s trunk, a farewell to family and friends, shipboard work and entertainment, a whale hunt, a storm at sea, the homeward voyage and a celebration of the seamen’s safe return. The program is appropriate for adults and children ages six and up and includes many opportunities for audience participation. The Director of Revels Rep. will highlight how the production ties into Mystic Seaport's current restoraton of the Charles W. Morgan. Members: $18 per adult; $10 per youth (ages 6-18) Non-members: $20 per adult; $12 per youth (ages 6-18) Buy tickets online or call 860.572.5322.

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31 SPRING events

Reservations strongly recommended. Children of all ages welcome with an adult.

Pirate Treasure Hunt


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Educator's Weekend

April 10-11

Pencil us in! A spring weekend at Mystic Seaport always gets an “A,” not to mention a couple of pluses. Educators Weekend gives you a special opportunity to explore our educational programs, finding the connections that link our classroom with yours. Admission is free for school staff and their families (up to four people). For details, call 860.572.5322 or visit www.mysticseaport.org.

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New! Overnight bus trip to Maine boatbuilders Tuesday and Wednesday, March 30-31 Boat lovers who long to get inside shipyards and see how sail-and motorboats are built, this trip is for you. Journey to Maine, where the boatbuilding heritage spans four centuries. On this two-day trip we visit four production facilities spanning old and new, small and large. Planned with cooperation and assistance from Maine Built Boats, Inc., in Portland, Maine.

Bay of Maine Boats, Kennebunkport Learn how Mike Severance developed a 14-foot rowboat into a beautiful pulling boat now found from Florida to Nova Scotia.

Sabre Yachts, Raymond Roger Hewson started Sabre in 1970 to build the finest possible 28-foot sailing yacht using production-line methods and fiberglass technology. The boat was an immediate success, and many models followed.

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Tug BlasT! May 22-23

We’re kicking off the opening of our new tugboat exhibit with a ton of tug activities. This weekend celebration will include: radio-control tug demonstrations, behind-the-scenes tours, visiting tugs along the waterfront, line-throwing competitions, movies, crafts and a cocktail reception with McAllister tugboat Captain Pat Kinnier from the Port of New York. Something for everyone, from toddlers to tug vets. Stay tuned for more details through our members’ email newsletter.

Lyman-Morse Boatbuilding, Thomaston For more than a century, graceful Alden Malabar schooners and sturdy Friendship sloops slid down the ways in Thomaston. In the late 1970s, the boatbuilding company expanded its focus to produce exceptional custom sailing yachts and custom motor yachts.

Rockport Marine, Rockport Since 1962 this family business has focused exclusively on wooden boats and mostly on yachts. Many boats, including our own Brilliant, have been restored at this famous yard, which is now finishing a major project on the yacht Bolero. The trip includes lunch, dinner and lodging in Portland on the first day, and breakfast, lunch and dinner on the second day. We depart from Mystic Seaport Bolero being replanked. at 7:30 a.m. and return around 9 p.m. the following day. Deadline for sign-up is March 1. Members: $350 per person, double occupancy Non-members: $400 per person, double occupancy Single supplement: $75. Register online or call 860.572.5322.


cru x xi ses x x x x&x xtxrxi p s

Bus trip to Essex, Massachusetts Saturday, May 8 7:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.

New! Visit a Connecticut boatbuilder and sailmaker Saturday, April 29

Members: $25 Non-members: $30 Register online or call 860.572.5322.

Lunch is on the waterfront at Periwinkles (www. periwinklesrestaurant.com). Indicate your luncheon choice: haddock, steak tips, chicken or fried clams. Then relax on a private 1 1/2-hour

river-narrated cruise on the sheltered, meandering waters of the Essex River with unspoiled natural beauty, scenic salt marshes, abundant wildlife, engaging history and shoreline estates. Traveling from Cape Cod, Rhode Island or southeastern MA? Call about an en-route intercept spot to join the trip. Members: $90 Non-members: $100 Register online or call 860.572.5322.

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Meet at Derecktor’s Yard in Bridgeport and tour the new 281' super yacht, Cakewalk— the largest yacht built in the U.S. since the 1930s. The sheer amount of space is unparalleled and opens a world of possibilities for extraordinary design and craftsmanship. The yacht is due to be launched in June; you can see her up close in the final stages of production. Visit www.derecktor.com for photos. Lunch is at Knapp’s Landing in Stratford. (Lunch is not included in the program cost.) A menu and driving directions will be sent with confirmation of your reservation. After lunch, we visit North Sails to tour the world leader in sailmaking. North Sails develops more cruising and racing sails than any other sailmaker in the world, from Beetle Cats to the America’s Cup yachts.

Who was the L. A. Dunton's first captain? Where was she framed up? How was she launched? Travel with us to the Essex, Massachusetts Historical Society and Shipbuilding Museum to learn about the birthplace of our own Gloucester fishing vessel, and you’ll be transported to the time and place where Essex shipbuilders constructed not only the Dunton, but more wooden schooners than any other town in the world. For more detailed information about the day’s program and activities, go online to www.mysticseaport.org.

Sail the Greek Isles October 6-14 This October sail the deep blue waters and visit golden beaches of the Greek Isles with Mystic Seaport. We start ashore in Athens, spending two days exploring the ancient city. Then we spend five nights aboard the Star Clipper. Cruise the Greek Isles, stopping at Mykonos, Santorini and Hydra, and the seaside resort town of Kusadasi, Turkey. Prices start at $3,699/person (double occupancy) and include round-trip airfare from New York; transfers; two nights in Athens at a five-star hotel; two half-day tours in Athens, including the Nautical Museum of Greece; five nights aboard the Star Clipper, including breakfast, lunch and dinner; all port charges, hotel taxes, air taxes and fuel surcharges. Other terms and conditions apply. Call 860.572.5339 for details.


Lect u r e se r i es

2010

2009-2010

AUTHOR SERIES

Adventure Series

MARITIME

G.W. Blunt White Building

Wednesday Evenings 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. Meet the authors firsthand, hear the inside story of how each book came to be written, and enjoy a wine and cheese reception. The lucky raffle winner takes home a free copy of the author’s book.

The Mystic Art Cinema. OldeMistick Village 1 : 3 0 a n d 7 : 3 0 p. m .

Our exciting series concludes in March and April with two vastly different sailing adventures. Learn about these firsthand experiences at the afternoon program beginning at 1:30 p.m. or the evening program beginning at 7:30 p.m. If You’re Ever in the AmazoN… Thursday, March 18

March 24 |

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Stephan J. W. Platzer has been sailing since childhood, and in 1982 he served as radio operator on the transatlantic voyage bringing a Gloucester fishing vessel from Cape Verde to America. Bringing E Home is the story of the 3,400-mile trip, entirely under sail, steering by the stars. The journey included weeks of becalmed seas, unexpected squalls and close encounters with freighters as the 14 sailors learned to survive and thrive on the 105-ft.vessel.

April 28 | Noted maritime author William H. White brings to life the engrossing story of H.M.S. Pandora, her skipper and crew, and their charge from the British Admiralty to find the Bounty mutineers and bring them to justice in England. When Fortune Frowns is the story of this 1790 voyage, the capture of some of the mutineers, and the perilous and disastrous return trip. Storms, tropical islands and shipboard life under a tyrannical commander and shipwreck all figure into this epic tale carefully researched from original documents.

Local blue-water sailors Bob and Ami Green returned to sea in 2005 after a three-year hiatus caused by the loss of their yacht, Scallywag. The Greens left Rhode Island on Scallywag II and traveled to Cape Verde, Senegal and the sensual land of Brazil. They ended their voyage with a thousand-mile cruise in the coffee-colored waters of the Amazon River — a glorious cacophony of sights, music, sounds and stories.

Racing around the World, Nonstop & Alone Thursday, April 15 Rich Wilson from Marblehead, Massachusetts, was the only U.S. entry in the 2008 Vendee Globe. The race departs every four years and covers 28,000 miles around the world. Nineteen of the 30 racers dropped out along the way, but Rich finished the grueling race in ninth place after four months at sea. His finish is a testament to his excellent seamanship skills, determination, careful planning and prudent execution.

ADVENTURE SERIES SINGLE TICKET PRICING Afternoon Programs at 1:30 p.m. $12 (members) / $14 • $5 students Evening Programs at 7:30 p.m. $13 (members) / $15 • $5 students

MARITIME SURPRISES FROM THE MUSEUM’S COLLECTIOns

MARITIME AUTHOR SERIES Members: $15/program Non-members: $20/program

Collections Research Center

This program is co-sponsored by the Library Fellows of the G.W. Blunt White Library at Mystic Seaport.

Friday, March 12 and Friday, April 9 5:30-7 p.m.

Buy tickets online!

Enjoy a close-up look at intriguing artifacts in the collections of Mystic Seaport, chosen by the Museum's collections staff. This is an insider opportunity for you to view and learn why they are in our collection, and understand their importance to maritime history. The evening presentation includes a cash bar and light snacks. Come relax and be prepared for a surprise.

Maritime surprises Members: $10/program, Non-members: $12/program

To purchase, go to www.mysticseaport.org/tickets or call 860.572.5322.


Lect u r e se r i es

NEW

Behind the Canvas

A s p e c i a l s e r i e s f or art l ov e r s Saturdays: Feb. 27, March 27, April 10, May 15 Maritime Art Gallery, 4 - 5:30 p.m.

Enjoy a four-program series with award-winning artists at the Maritime Art Gallery. Hear their personal stories through lectures, slide presentations and live demonstrations. Learn what inspires their creativity and discover what art collectors today look for in a painting, whether for personal enjoyment or investment. Light refreshments included.

Russ Kramer, F. ASMA. "The Wizard and the Queen" OIL 26'' x 44''

Robert Noreika, "Low Tide, Maine" ACRYLIC 16'' x 20''

FEBRUARY 27 Sailing the World with Howard Park

March 27 The Moment of Inspiration with Robert Noreika

April 10 A Trip Back in Time with Russ Kramer

Sharing his visual journal of watercolors and photographs, and the fascinating stories behind them, artist Howard Park reveals the beauty of distant ports and the adventures of life aboard his sailboat circumnavigating the globe with paintbrush and camera.

Watch as artist Robert Noreika demonstrates his fresh and vibrant painting technique. Learn how he creates works of art in the studio and on location. A unique opportunity to see how a painting is created by a master.

Renowned for his ability to capture the authentic people, places and vessels of America’s yachting days gone by, award-winning artist Russ Kramer will take you on an unforgettable visual journey showing how he creates his historic maritime paintings.

May 15 An Artist‘s Walk through the Modern Marine Masters Exhibition Join today’s leading marine artists on a personal tour and talk as they reveal how they create tranquil seascapes, historic naval scenes, racing yachts under sail or working boats and their fishermen. Come meet these maritime masters and enjoy their behind-the-canvas stories.

This series is free for 2010 Maritime Art Gallery Patrons Members: $80/series or $25/program Non-members: $100/series or $30/program Register online or call 860.572.5322.

2010Spring Garden Series Friday mornings in the Greenhouse February 26, March 26 and April 23 10 a.m. -12 noon

Under the guidance of Kara Lally, horticulturalist and the Museum’s supervisor of grounds, join the Spring Garden Series for a hands-on greenthumb experience. Inside the balmy Mystic Seaport greenhouse you’ll plant heirloom seeds in February, transplant your seedlings in March and prepare for planting in your own garden in April.

Buy tickets online!

Kara provides the heirloom seeds, instruction, growing medium, space in the Greenhouse and watering for your 12 tender seedlings as part of this great new spring series. Come learn from Kara’s expertise and spend time chatting over coffee, morning sweets (and potting soil!) with likeminded gardening friends. All three dates are encouraged. Space is limited to 10 participants.

Members: $50/series, $20/program Non-members: $60/series, $25/program

To purchase, go to www.mysticseaport.org/tickets or call 860.572.5322.

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Howard Park, "COMET, Leaving St. Johns, USVI" WATERCOLOR 9" X 13"


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CAMPS, Classes & SPRING Programs Music of the Sea: Chanteys, Ballads and Fo’c’sle Songs Saturdays, March 6-27, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Final performance Saturday, March 27

Blacksmithing

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Want to try your hand at the forge this spring and create your own hooks, tools and decorative objects? We're taking names to organize classes on your schedule. Call Central Reservations at 860.572.5322 with your name and phone number. You will be called with information about classes built based on individual and group needs.

Introduction to Half-Model Construction Saturday, February 27, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Learn the basics of half-hull construction by carving your own model of a classic sailboat. Following a demonstration of the basic techniques used to build a waterline-lift model, you'll begin working on your own model. Discussions of techniques, materials, tools and finishes continue throughout the day as you work to complete your project. This class will teach you the foundations of a new hobby. At the end of the day, you'll go home with a new family heirloom! (m)$250/$300

Dinner at the Buckinghams’: Open Hearth Cooking Class Saturday, February 27, 4-7 p.m. Saturday, March 27, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Knowledgeable interpreters will guide you as you roast, bake, stir and sizzle your way through the preparation of a traditional 19th-century meal. Enjoy the warmth of the 1876 hearth as you enjoy the fruits of your labor. All materials are provided — you bring your curiosity and appetite! Class registration includes a delicious hearth-cooked supper, plus a copy of The American Frugal Housewife by Lydia Child. (m)$80/$85

Learn about the history of music and the sea while practicing your musical skills. Led by the Museum’s experienced chanteymen, the class will include the chance to pump the windlass, heave on the capstan and learn the function of sea chanteys in the work of 19th-century sailors. The class will culminate in a performance at the Museum's Greenmanville Church. Class registration includes a set of “bones” and a “Songs of the Sailor” booklet and CD. For all skill levels. (m)$80/$85

Varnishing Techniques for Traditional Boats Saturday, March 27, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. So, now that you have your new or restored traditional boat, how do you protect it and keep it beautiful for years to come? Our full-day finishing class begins with discussions of appropriate materials, tools and surface preparation. Then, you'll begin hands-on practice on sample boards in various stages of completion. This varnishing class focuses on techniques for bleaching, staining and varnishing. All materials and your own badger-hair brush are included. (m)$220/$170

Stitch in Time: Sew a 19th-Century Doll Dress Saturdays, April 17-May 1, 10 a.m.- 12 p.m. Cut, sew and trim a period dress for your 18-inch doll while learning about fashions of the 1870s. Classes are held in the Museum’s costume shop, which produces all the costumes for the historic roleplaying program and Lantern Light Tours. We provide all materials and patterns; you bring your 18-inch doll and a friend or family member. Open to individuals or pairs. Prices are per dress, not per person. Up to two participants per dress. (m)$75/$80

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Easy Introductory Celestial Navigation by the Noon Sun Saturday-Sunday, April 17-18, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Planetarium All classes are held in the Susan Peterson Howell Memorial Classroom of the Treworgy Planetarium, unless otherwise noted. For complete class descriptions, including detailed schedules, go to www.mysticseaport.org/planetarium.

Celestial Navigation: 19th-century Methods Saturday-Sunday, March 27-28, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Introduction to Coastal Navigation Saturdays, April 10 and 24, and May 8, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. This three-day workshop will provide an introduction to latitude and longitude, nautical chart symbols, hands-on plotting, the magnetic compass, magnetic and true directions, determining the state of the tide and tidal current, sailing with tidal currents and some basics of electronic navigation. Charts will be provided. Navigation instruments will be available for use during the class, and charts will be provided. If you have your own instruments, by all means bring them. If you do not have any, do not purchase any until after the first class. (m)$108/$120

Marine Weather, Level II Friday, May 14, 6-9 p.m., and SaturdaySunday, May 15-16, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Lee Chesneau, instructor. Founder of Lee Chesneau's Marine Weather, www.marineweatherbylee.com Marine Weather, Level II is a two-plus-day program with an introduction and weather chart review exercise on Friday evening. Saturday morning will be a review of the pre-requisite program, Marine Weather, Level I: the atmosphere; global pressure and wind; forecast charts; wave formation, propagation, and decay; and Tropical Cyclone basics for hurricane avoidance. Other qualifying pre-requisites include weather classes from the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, or U.S. Power Squadron. Instruction, review questions and exercises occupy the Saturday afternoon and Sunday sessions. For complete class description, go online to www.mysticseaport.org/planetarium. (m)$315/$350

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This two-day weekend class is devoted to the history and practice of celestial navigation as it was done aboard the whaling vessel Charles W. Morgan. Students will learn details of the practical techniques, both the sight-taking methods and the mathematics of navigation using the sun and stars aboard 19th-century sailing vessels. This class is for adults as well as younger students with good basic math skills. If you can add and subtract, you can do celestial navigation. (m)$72/$80

A two-day weekend class (second day optional) on using a sextant and how to find latitude and longitude using simple observations. This is a modern technique based on classical celestial navigation. It’s ideal as a GPS backup. It is also fashioned for the sextant enthusiast interested in using the instrument to get a real position fix without the time and expense of a ten-week course. Students will learn how to use and adjust a sextant, and they will receive advice on buying sextants through online auctions and elsewhere and how to avoid counterfeit sextants. Students will learn how to get latitude and longitude using sights at, and around, local noon. You will also learn how to correct for vessel motion, a critical detail frequently omitted. Students will take away the knowledge and the skills to navigate using sextant observations of the sun at noon almost anywhere on Earth. (m) $72/$80


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Navigation Weekend Advanced Topics in Traditional Navigation Friday-Sunday, June 4-6, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

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The weekend gathering of navigators and navigation enthusiasts, Navigation Weekend is devoted to the practice, history and future of traditional navigation methods, focusing on advanced and unusual techniques in celestial navigation. Events will include multimedia presentations and lectures as well as practical sight-taking. In addition, the weekend will include some social events, including a Saturday dinner in Mystic with a special presentation (food and beverage is at the participant's expense). This will be our third gathering at Mystic Seaport. This program is sponsored by the NavList online community, as well as the Treworgy Planetarium at Mystic Seaport. Additional support is provided by Frank Reed, founder of the Frank Reed School of Navigation. (m)$10 or with paid admission/$35 without paid admission

Spring Community Sailing

Anchor Watch: An Overnight Program for Youth Groups

Adult Beginner sailing

Connect your youth group to the traditions of America and the sea during a fun-filled overnight adventure at Mystic Seaport. You’ll sleep aboard the 1882 squarerigged training ship Joseph Conrad after an evening of maritime activities. Rise and shine the next morning for a hearty breakfast, then join in a group activity led by Museum staff. Afterward, you’re free to spend the day exploring Mystic Seaport on your own. The program runs Fridays and Saturdays from mid-March through mid-May, and mid-September through mid-November. Call for available dates. Cost: $75 per person includes overnight accommodations aboard the training vessel Joseph Conrad, pizza snack, evening activities, craft materials, breakfast, a Mystic Seaport patch and two days of admission (the day of arrival and the following day). Group Size:The group size is a minimum of 20 participants, maximum of 45. One supervising adult is required for every 10 children. You may combine small groups from your area. Groups with fewer than 20 participants will be charged $1,500. Eligibility: Open to all youth groups, ages 6 –14. Call Central Reservations at 860.572.5322 to register. Dates available on a first-come, first, served basis.

Homeschool Beginner sailing Dates

Times

Cost

Friday, April 16 – Friday, May 21

9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

$130 (m)

Dates

Times

Cost

Sunday, April 11 – Sunday, May 16

9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

$220 (m) / $250

Adult Intermediate sailing Dates

Times

Cost

Sunday, April 11 – Sunday, May 16

1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

$220 (m) / $250

Adult Advanced sailing Dates

Times

Saturday, April 10 – Saturday, May 15

9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Cost $220 (m) / $250

Racing series Dates

Times

Cost

Saturday, April 10 – Saturday, May 15

2 p.m. – 5 p.m.

$150 (m)

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SUMMER SAILIng CLASSES Adult (Ages 15 and up) Beginner

Junior Sailing

In this two-day class, you’ll be introduced to the theory of sailing (why and how a boat sails), basic sailing and gear terminology, rigging and unrigging a Dyer Dhow, equipment stowage and care, personal safety, knots, safety on the dock and on the water, points of sail, small-boat handling, right-of-way rules, and capsize and running aground procedures.

Our junior programs are for beginner and intermediate sailors. Classes use Dyer Dhows or JY15s. All equipment, except foul-weather gear, is provided. If you have a PFD, please bring your own. Competent swimmers ages 15 and older may enroll in adult classes.

Adult Beginner weekend classes Dates

Times

Cost

Sat and Sun july 10-11

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$220 (m) / $250

Sat and Sun July 24-25

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Sat and Sun Aug 7-8

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$220 (m) / $250 $220 (m) / $250

Dates

Times

Cost

mon. - fri. july 5 -9

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$140 (m) / $160

mon. - fri. july 19-23

8:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

$140 (m) / $160

mon. - fri. july 26-30

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$140 (m) / $160

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Junior Sailing (Ages 12-14) Dates

Times

Cost

$220 (m) / $250

mon. - fri. june 28 - july 2

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

$140 (m) / $160

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$220 (m) / $250

mon. - fri. Aug 9-13

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$140 (m) / $160

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$220 (m) / $250

Dates

Times

Cost

Sat and Sun july 17- 18

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Sat and Sun July 31- Aug 1 Sat and Sun Aug 14-15

Intermediate If you are comfortable sailing a small boat alone and have mastered beginner skills, this two-day course is for you. You’ll begin with a review of terminology and points of sail, then move to learning about safety, sail trim and advanced terminology. Class includes practice leaving and landing at docks, picking up moorings, man overboard, inland rules of the road, gear failure, wind and current, headers and lifters.

Junior Intermediate (Ages 11-14) Dates

Times

Cost

mon. - fri. july 5 -9

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

$140 (m) / $160

mon. - fri. july 12-16

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$140 (m) / $160

mon. - fri. July 26-30

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

$140 (m) / $160

mon. - fri. Aug 2-6

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$140 (m) / $160

mon. - fri. Aug 9-13

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

$140 (m) / $160

Junior Racing Dates

Times

Cost

mon. - fri. Aug 16-20

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$140 (m) / $160

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Adult Intermediate weekend class

Junior Beginner (Ages 8 -11)


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Family Community Sailing Learn to sail as a family! Master water safety, boat controls and basic sailing maneuvers through shore and on-the-water activities. Pick from two classes, one class for beginner parents or an intermediate class where the parents feel comfortable in a boat.

Family sailing (Beginner)

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Dates

Times

Cost

mon. - fri. June 28 - July 2

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$250 (m) / $290

mon. - fri. july 12-16

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

$250 (m) / $290

mon. - fri. Aug 2 -6

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

$250 (m) / $290

Family sailing (Intermediate) Dates

Times

Cost

mon. - fri. July 19-23

12:30 p.m.- 3:30 p.m.

$250 (m) / $290

mon. - fri. Aug 16-20

12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

$250 (m) / $290

Above pricing includes one adult and one youth. $25 for each additional child (up to two more). Each five-day session meets Monday through Friday.

Summer Day Camp 2010 Mystic Seaport offers a number of summer day camp programs for boys and girls ages 4-14. Summer Day camp at Mystic Seaport is a wonderful and unique learning adventure. There is a program for every age and interest! Summer Day camp programs meet Monday through Friday. Each day, we explore a topic based on the subject of the camp week. Campers bring their own lunch and picnic together each day. Limited enrollment means your child gets individual attention. Our programs are licensed by the state of Connecticut and are staffed by experienced Museum educators.

New for 2010! Extended care is available from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., Monday - Friday. Extended care is $75/week. Also, sibling discounts of 5% will be applied to any other summer day camp registered for in the same year.

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C A M P S , C L A S S e S an d P r o g r ams

2010 Camp Dates & Prices Times

Dates

Ages

Cost

Junior Explorers

9 a.m.-12 p.m.

June 21-25

4&5

$150 (m) / $175

Junior Explorers

1 p.m.-4 p.m.

June 21-25

4&5

$150 (m) / $175

Junior Explorers

9 a.m.-12 p.m.

June 28-July 2

4&5

$150 (m) / $175

Junior Explorers

1 p.m.-4 p.m.

June 28-July 2

4&5

$150 (m) / $175

Secrets, Serpents & Superstitions

9 a.m.-3 p.m.

July 5-9

8 -10

$275 (M) / $310

Through the Lens: Photographing Mystic Seaport

9 a.m.-3 p.m.

July 5-9

11-14

$300 (M) / $340

Girls of Long Ago

9 a.m.-3 p.m.

July 12-16

8-10

$275 (M) / $310

Growing up in Greenmanville

9 a.m.-3 p.m.

July 19-23

11-14

$300 (M) / $340

Seaport Sampler

9 a.m.-3 p.m.

July 26-30

6-7

$275 (M) / $310

Seaport Sampler

9 a.m.-3 p.m.

Aug. 2-6

6-7

$275 (M) / $310

A Sailor’s Life

9 a.m.-3 p.m.

Aug. 9-13

8-10

$275 (M) / $310

Art Around the World

9 a.m. -3 p.m.

Aug. 16-20

5-7

$275 (M) / $310

Junior Explorers

New! Through the Lens: Photographing Mystic Seaport

Ages 4 & 5 Camp meets Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. (dropoff starts at 8:30 a.m.) Camp sessions are also offered in the afternoon 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. (dropoff starts at 12:30 p.m.) This high-energy, fast-paced program features hands-on activities in exhibits and ships, unique games and fantastic craft projects. Travel the universe on Star Day, explore the ocean deep and the Mystic River on Sea Critter Day, discover the secret lives of sailors aboard ships on Jack Tar day and many more surprises! Extended care is available.

Ages 11-14 Capture the beauty of Mystic Seaport in this five-day photography workshop. From tall ships to historic gardens, explore this recreated 19th-century village with your own digital camera. You'll create a unique photo journal to showcase your Mystic Seaport photographs. The workshop will also include a tour of the famed Rosenfeld classic photography collection. You bring your own digital camera (no disposables) and we will supply photo paper, book and instruction. Location: The Maritime Gallery at Mystic Seaport and on Museum grounds. Extended care provided 3-5 p.m. M-F, $75 per child.

Girls of Long Ago

Secrets, Serpents & Superstitions

Ages 8-10

Ages 8-10 Examine secrets, sea monsters and superstitions of the sea. Explore the facts and fiction of mermaids, ghosts and shipwrecks, based on survivors’ sightings and scientific research. Make fabulous art projects, have hands-on activities in exhibits and do a bit of investigating as well. Extended care provided 3-5 p.m. M-F, $75 per child.

Discover what kinds of daily life styles and opportunities girls in the 1800s had. Step back in time as you try your hand at 19th-century cooking and housekeeping in our exhibits. Learn to hand sew! Make old-fashioned accessories for the home and explore the medicinal nature of our gardens. Discover real stories of young women who lived aboard sailing ships. Extended care provided 3-5 p.m. M-F, $75 per child.

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Camp


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New! Growing Up in Greenmanville Ages 11-14 If you have always wanted to learn about the past by living it, then this is the camp for you! Campers in this program learn about first-person interpretation, or roleplaying, by adopting the personas of teenagers living in Mystic in 1876. It is an exciting year, full of nostalgia for America's colonial past as well as visions of the future. From exploring 19th-century documents in the Museum's collection to donning an outfit in your character's wardrobe, you'll see how much like them you they really were. (Go to “Meet the Roleplayers” on the Museum's website for a look at the characters who already inhabit 1876.) Extended care provided 3-5 p.m. M-F, $75 per child.

Seaport Sampler Ages 6-7 c amp s , c la s s e s & pr o gram s

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Boys and girls get a kids' eye-view of Mystic Seaport while sampling many different hands-on activities in exhibits, games, crafts and music. From riding on the steamboat Sabino, to a private Planetarium program to rolling a cask, children absorb maritime history through active learning and summer fun. Extended care provided 3-5 p.m. M-F, $75 per child.

A Sailor’s Life Ages 8-10 Discover the secret lives of sailors as we roleplay different types of sailors each day. Learn sailor’s crafts and lore, practice simple seamanship skills aboard our docked ships and cruise the Mystic River on the steamboat Sabino. Extended care provided 3-5 p.m. M-F, $75 per child.

NEW! Art Around the World Ages 5-7 A special hands-on program in the arts for children to learn about countries and their culture around the world. Discover how to make a Japanese fan, a French landscape, an African mask and more! Extended care provided 3-5 p.m. M-F, $75 per child.

Joseph Conrad Summer Camp An overnight summer sailing camp for boys and girls ages 10-15 Young people have come to Mystic Seaport each summer to sail on the beautiful Mystic River and sleep on a tall ship. Learning by doing — in a friendly and supportive atmosphere — is the cornerstone of the Joseph Conrad overnight summer sailing program. Built in Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1882, the Joseph Conrad is a square-rigger once used to train young Danish men for the merchant service. Today, permanently moored on our waterfront, she's outfitted with bunks for 50 campers, flush toilets, showers, heat and electricity. During the six-day program, young people ages 10-15 sail our fleet of Dyer Dhows and learn the skills of the sea. Each day starts early with morning deck chores. After breakfast, campers tackle the wind and current of the Mystic River, then break for lunch before setting off for an active afternoon with an activity or more sailing. Evenings are filled with activities, as well as plenty of time to spend with new friends, stargazing in our Planetarium, climbing the rigging of the Conrad, or enjoying a lively sea music sing-along. Choose the camp that best fits your child's age group. The camps, while age group specific, will focus on the skill level of the individual sailor. Many campers return year after year to perfect skills, reunite with camp friends and enjoy another summer at Mystic Seaport. Program enrollment is limited to 40 for each session, so every camper gets individual attention and feels like part of the crew. Camp sessions being Sundays at 4 p.m. and run through Fridays at 1 p.m. Dates

Level

JUNE 20- 25

Beginner (Ages 10 -12)

$635 (m) / $690

June 27- July 2

Beginner/Intermediate (Ages 13-15)

$735 (m) / $790

July 4 -9

Intermediate (Ages 13-14)

$635 (m) / $690

July 11-16

Beginner/Intermediate (Ages 13-15)

$735 (m) / $790

July 18 -23

Intermediate (Ages 13-14)

$735 (m) / $790

July 25 -30

Beginner (Ages 10 -12)

$735 (m) / $790

August 1- 6

Race week ( Ages 13-15)

$735 (m) / $790

August 8 -13

Intermediate (Ages 12-13)

$735 (m) / $790


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Schooner Brilliant Adult Sails

One-day Sail Dates

Sail Fee

May 15

$150

May 16

$150

Two-day Sail Dates

Sail Fee

May 22 - May 23

$360 (m) / $410

May 28 - May 29

$360 (m) / $410

May 30 - May 31

$360 (m) / $410

June 4 - June 5

$360 (m) / $410

June 6 - June 7

$360 (m) / $410

september 10 - September 11

$360 (m) / $410

september 12 - September 13

$360 (m) / $410

September 17 - September 18

$360 (m) / $410

September 19 - September 20

$360 (m) / $410

September 24 - September 25

SOLD OUT

$360 (m) / $410

September 26 - September 27

SOLD OUT

$360 (m) / $410

October 2 - October 3

$360 (m) / $410

Three-day Sail Dates

Sail Fee

October 9 - October 11

$570 (m) / $650

One-day Sails A unique opportunity to get onboard Brilliant! Join us from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. for a sail around Fishers Island Sound. What better way is there to spend a day on the water?

Two-day Sails Experience an exhilarating day sail to Block Island, RI, and Shelter Island, NY and then enjoy an evening of shore leave. Each two-day sail begins at 9 a.m., returns at 4 p.m. the following day and includes an overnight aboard.

Three-day Sail Take advantage of Columbus Day weekend and add a day onto our regular two-day sail!

Charters Invite your friends and family to join you in the Brilliant experience. Charters are available for any of our adult trips. Four-day charters may be created by combining adjacent two-day sails. A four-day sail will likely add Newport, RI, to the itinerary. If you charter Brilliant, please note that we must have at least six able hands, fit and agile, to run the boat safely. Charters for two-day sails or longer are limited to eight adults.

Charter fee, two-day sail: $2,900 Charter fee, four-day sail: $6,000

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Join seven other adults and the professional crew aboard Brilliant for a hands-on, full participation sailing experience aboard a classic yacht. Learn to sail a 61-foot schooner while cruising local waters and visiting scenic anchorages and towns. Participants become part of the crew as they raise the sails, haul on lines, steer, help in the galley and learn traditional seamanship. Ports of call may include Block Island, RI, and Shelter Island, NY. When space and weather permit, Brilliant will be docked, permitting shore leave for the crew. While Brilliant has been updated with modern safety and navigation equipment, her accommodations are true to her original construction, providing open sleeping quarters and traditional marine heads. Participants must be physically fit and agile as well as competent swimmers to take part in the sailing program. Once you reserve a berth aboard Brilliant, you will be sent a health form and a handbook outlining what to bring, arrival information, as well as many other details. No previous sailing experience is necessary.


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Five-day Sails

Brilliant for Teens

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Experience the adventure and challenge of sailing while visiting New England harbors and towns aboard schooner Brilliant. Nine teenage participants, on either five- or 10-day voyages, work together under the guidance of the professional crew to safely sail hundreds of miles and learn traditional seamanship skills. The Brilliant program focuses on educating participants about sail handling and theory, teamwork, being a good shipmate, stewardship, navigation and proper seamanship. All teens are expected to fully participate in all aspects of daily vessel operations from hauling on lines and steering to helping in the galley.

Dates

Sail Fee

June 14-18

$920 (m) / $970

Mystic - Mystic

June 21-25

$920 (m) / $970

Mystic - Mystic

July 12-16

$920 (m) / $970

Portland- Portland

August 2-6

$920 (m) / $970

Mystic - Mystic

August 9-13

$920 (m) / $970

Mystic - Mystic

August 16- 20

$920 (m) / $970

Mystic - Mystic

August 23-27

$920 (m) / $970

Mystic - Mystic

Ten-day Sails Dates

Sail Fee

June 28-JULY 7

$1870 (m) / $1920

Mystic - Portland

July 19-July 28

$1870 (m) / $1920

Portland - Mystic

Participants must be physically fit and agile as well as competent swimmers to take part in the sailing program. Once you reserve a berth aboard Brilliant, you will be sent a health form, letter of agreement, a booklet of information outlining what to bring and many other details. No previous sailing experience is necessary. All voyages begin at 9 a.m. and end at 4 p.m. Need-based financial aid is available.

New! Brilliant returns to Maine this summer! Experience the beauty of Maine's coastline, harbors and towns. Brilliant's return to Maine for a few weeks this summer will allow returning participants to visit new ports while making Brilliant more accessible to participants from northern New England. Three trips this summer will offer teens the opportunity of sailing in Maine waters. The two 10-day voyages will be transits between Mystic and Portland, Maine. In addition, a fiveday voyage will begin and end in Portland, Maine. Please note that the transits to and from Maine are one-way trips and parents are responsible for their participants' transportation to and from the vessel.

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R E G i st r at i on

How To Register Nearly all classes, programs and ticketed events have online registration. In addition, registration forms can be found on the web at www.mysticseaport.org/registration and can be faxed, emailed or mailed.

PHONE

860.572.5322

Fax

860.572.5398

Mail

Reservations Mystic Seaport P.O. Box 6000 75 Greenmanville Avenue Mystic, CT 06355

EMail reservations.desk@mysticseaport.org Courses are filled on a first-come, first-served basis.

Important Information In the event of extreme weather, Mystic Seaport may cancel a class or program. A full refund will be issued only if the participant cannot be rescheduled. Occasionally, Mystic Seaport photographs or videotapes visitors while on the grounds for use in a variety of publicity and promotional materials and to advance our educational mission. We thank you for your cooperation and support.

Cancellation Policies Unless otherwise noted, all registrations for classes and programs are nonrefundable and nontransferable.

Planetarium, Community Sailing, Shoreside Trades and John Gardner Boat Shop Courses Cancellations made up to 30 days prior to the start of a course will receive a refund less an administrative fee of 25% of the course cost. Cancellations made 15 to 29 days prior to a class will receive a refund less an administrative fee of 50% of the course cost. No refund will be given if cancelled within 14 days of the course.

Payment is due in full at the time of registration.

Schooner Brilliant Adult AND TEEN Sails, Joseph Conrad Program and SumMer day camps

Mystic Seaport program prices are subject to change without prior notice.

Williams-Mystic, the Maritime Studies Program of Williams College and Mystic Seaport, offers undergraduates a hands-on, interdisciplinary semester focused on the world’s oceans. Classes requiring original research and writing are conducted at Mystic Seaport in maritime history, marine sciences, environmental policy and literature of the sea. Taking hands-on learning even farther, Williams-Mystic students explore America in a way unlike any other — from a sailing voyage on a tall ship and traveling both the Pacific and Gulf coasts on three extended field seminars.

Williams-Mystic The Maritime Studies Program of Williams College and Mystic Seaport

Sophomores, juniors and seniors from any accredited four-year institution may apply for a fall or spring semester. Admission is competitive. Students earn a full semester of credit and transcript from Williams College. Need-based financial aid is available. For an application, please visit us at www.williams.edu/williamsmystic or call 860.572.5359, ext. 2.

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Cancellations made up to 30 days prior to the start of courses will receive a refund less an administrative fee of 25% of the course cost. The administrative fee will be 50% for Brilliant charters. No refund will be given for cancellations made within 30 days of any Brilliant or camp courses.


MEMBER GEAR Charles W. Morgan Umbrella

baseball cap

Double-sided, navy/white 42" auto-open umbrella with white piping and image of Charles W. Morgan. Windproof frame folds to 18.5".

Canvas cap with member burgee logo. Leather strap. Mesh lining to promote cooling. Breton red, khaki or yellow. Specify color choice.

$18 • ITEM CODE #0011

$23 • ITEM CODE #0016

flashlight

brilliant sport pack

Ocean blue, aluminum flashlight with member burgee logo features 17 white LED lights, a pushbutton on/off switch and hand rope. Batteries incld.

Black microfiber. 15"x12". Unique double-draw top/shoulder strap combination. Zippered gusset expands to 5" on the bottom.

$15 • ITEM CODE #0077

$15 • ITEM CODE #0023

TWO-BOTTLE COOLER TOTE

burgee

Lightweight yet sturdy, two-bottle cooler tote, perfect for wine. Comes with a high-quality combination wood-detailed corkscrew/bottle opener. The front pocket and detachable padded bottle divider make this a perfect picnic or boat accessory.

Durable 400-denier nylon. UV inhibitor to reduce fading. Anti-microbial coating to prevent mildew. No-fray bond. Two brass grommets. $32 • ITEM CODE #0012 • SMALL 12"X18" $42 • ITEM CODE #0013 • LARGE 16"X24"

$35 • ITEM CODE #0069

Proceeds from the sale of these items contribute to the education and preservation efforts of Mystic Seaport. All prices include shipping and handling. Tax, where applicable, not included. Available exclusively at our Membership Office (860.572.5339).

Program, Class and Member Gear Order Form MEMBER GEAR

46 give the gift of membership and receive a Mystic Seaport Member's hat.

Name

Address

Phone

State

City

Email

Payment Information

Offer valid through 05/31/10. Visit us online at www.mysticseaport.org to order.

Membership ID#

Member Gear (members only)

Payment by check: make check payable to Mystic Seaport Payment by Credit Card Visa Mastercard

Zip

Amex

CODE

DESCRIPTION

specify (color) if applicable

QTY

UNIT PRICE

SUBTOTAL

Discover

Expiration Date Contact Membership Office for international rates prior to placing order.

Account Number Signature

Mail Orders: Mystic Seaport Reservations 75 Greenmanville Ave. Mystic, CT 06355-9990

Programs & Classes PG #

DESCRIPTION

DATE

MEMBER

CT deliveries and 6% sales tax baseball cap tax exempt

$

MERCHANDISE TOTAL

$

NON-MEMBER

QTY

UNIT PRICE

specify (date) (youth* or adult) (luncheon choice) if applicable

Call-in Orders: Reservations Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 860.572.5322

*If youth, please provide birthdate.

PROGRAMS TOTAL

$

GRAND TOTAL r e gi s t e r f o r pr o gram s A N D C L A SSES o n li n e at www. my s t i c s e ap o r t. o rg .

$

SUBTOTAL


Today! Mystic Seaport is a national treasure. For more than 80 years its mission has been to preserve, protect and present a priceless collection of ships, boats, photographs and maritime artifacts. Your gift to the Annual Fund benefits thousands of visitors each year and enables the Museum to pursue excellence in education, preservation and research. Please make your gift by April 14 to be credited to the 2009-2010 goal. Your donation to the Annual Fund is tax-deductible. Leadership gifts of $1,000 or more qualify for membership in the America and the Sea Society. To make a gift to the Annual Fund please call 860.572.5365, or visit www.mysticseaport.org.

Thank you for investing in the Museum's future.


S SP PR RI N I NG G 2 20 01 10 0

75 75 Greenmanville Greenmanville Avenue Avenue PO Box 6000 Mystic, CT 06355-0990 Mystic, CT 06355-0990 Dated Material Dated Do notMaterial hold Do not hold

Nonprofit organization US postage PAID Permit #119 Deep River, CT

There’s more Than one kind of kid.

so mysTic seaporT has more Than one kind of camp.

Mystic Seaport has more summer camp choices than ever this year. You’ll find camps for every age and interest (even a new photography workshop!). Extended care is offered for kids six and up Monday through Friday. Climb aboard for an adventure, either a day camp or a residential camp, like our popular overnight Conrad summer sailing camp, or our sensational sailing program on the 61-ft schooner Brilliant. Games, crafts, music, art and living history–it’s all part of Mystic Seaport summer camp fun. So whether your child is ready for the high seas or an avowed landlubber, there’s a Mystic Seaport summer camp made to order.

To learn abouT all of our camps, visiT mysTicseaporT.org/summercamps or call 860.572.5322.

Profile for Mystic Seaport Museum

Mystic Seaport Magazine Spring 2010  

Mystic Seaport is the official magazine of Mystic Seaport, dedicated to all things "America and the Sea." Mystic Seaport presents a lively...

Mystic Seaport Magazine Spring 2010  

Mystic Seaport is the official magazine of Mystic Seaport, dedicated to all things "America and the Sea." Mystic Seaport presents a lively...

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