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SUMMER 2010

Creating an exhibit Behi nd t he sc enes of “ t ugs ! ”

"Tugs!"opens | America and the Se a Photo Contest Getting Out on the Water


Why spend “60 Minutes” in front of the TV when you can spend 180 minutes at Mystic Seaport? Summer Sunday evenings are for relaxing. For sitting back and enjoying the view. For sipping a cold drink and taking it all in. Now you can do some of your best relaxing on summer Sunday evenings at Mystic Seaport. Come enjoy the beauty of our scenic waterfront after hours. Sample live music, a frosty beverage and tasty appetizers at Schaefer’s Spouter Tavern and leave that couch behind.

Summer Sundays

at

Mystic Seaport

The best way to end your weekend. 5-8 p.m. | Free access | www.mysticseaport.org


C O N T EN T S

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summer 2010

America and the Sea Photo Contest

12

in every

issue

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“TUGS!�

seascapes. .........................

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by the numbers. ...............

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museum briefs.................6-7

calendar of events...........

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in the galley....................

10

windrose (events, classes

gardening by the sea.........

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advancement news....... 24-25

and programs)..................

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3 contents

ON THE WATER


SE A s ca p e s

Mystic Seaport magazine is a publication of Mystic Seaport

The Museum of America and the Sea.

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M Y ST I C SE A P O R T

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ystic Seaport represents many things to its 17,000 members and 275,000 visitors, but I suspect that there are two predominant elements that define us most: boats and water…and we have an abundance of both! With summer on the horizon, it’s time, thankfully, to return our thoughts to getting out on the water. This issue of the magazine serves as your summer planner for how the Museum can add value to your weekday and weekend experience for you, your family and your guests. For many, Mystic Seaport is a gateway, especially for families, to the water. Whether it’s sitting on a pier or bulkhead, taking a trip on the Sabino or perhaps renting a Whitehall for a row, we help meet that natural urge to return to the sea. Even though the horizon is short at Mystic Seaport with the Groton side just 200 yards away, our interaction with vessels takes us to far-reaching destinations. Let your imagination run at the Museum and there’s no telling where you’ll end up! This month we closed our most popular winter exhibit: “Skills of the Sailor.” What a sight it was to see children (and their parents!) making believe they were in some far-off land or on a great ship as they furled sails and practiced their knots. I think most sailors would agree that skills learned at sea become skills for life, and even today our visitors can enjoy adding a new skill to their sea chest. And the reason we emptied the Schaefer Building this spring was to Mystic Seaport President Steve White. make way for the much-anticipated “Tugs!” exhibit. What fun it will be to showcase tugboats and towboats, those unsung heroes of port life worldwide and to tell the many stories and share the diverse talents of the essential vessels that symbolize the everyman of boats. The exhibit is interactive and engaging, and it will include a pool outside where future tug captains can experiment with the concepts of pushing and pulling. Local tug favorites will pay us visits from time to time as their schedules permit to call even greater attention to their specialized role in our maritime heritage. And please keep a look out for our own tug, Kingston II, that may well play an “active” role in bringing more attention to the world of tugs. We will do our best, too, to acknowledge the key role that crews of tugs play in assisting ships navigate the often congested and complicated ports and by helping them find the security of their transient berths. So come join us again this summer, either on the water or at “Tugs!”—or both! Regardless of what you choose, it will no doubt be another busy and exciting summer at Mystic Seaport. See you at “Tugs!”

President STEPHEN C. WHITE executive vice president SUSAN FUNK Editor Anna F. Sawin contributors ELYSA ENGELMAN JEAN KERR KARA lally ERIN RICHARD Molly Stach Design Karen WARD THE DAY PRINTING COMPANY Photography Dennis Murphy nicki pardo Andy Price SUSANNAH SNOWDEN / OMNIA PHOTOGRAPHICS AMANDA TEDESCHI

cover Members of the exhibit crew take a break in the installation of the “Tugs!” exhibit. Photo by Susannah Snowden.

CONTACT US VISITOR INFOR M ATION: 860.572.5315 | 888.973.2767 ADMINiSTRATION: 860.572.0711 MEMBERSHIP: 860.572.5339 CENTRAL RESERVATIONS: 860.572.5322 MUSEUM STORE: 860.572.5385 MARITIME GALLERY: 860.572.5388 VOLUNTEER SERVICES: 860.572.5378

Stephen C. White President

WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG


41º NORTH

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State of the Art

Art becomes a family affair at the Museum’s en plein air Art Spot. Try your hand at painting or illustrating, inspired by the maritime landscape all around.


Museum Briefs

Latitude 41˚ opens at Mystic Seaport M u s e u m B ri e f s

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After a winter of renovations, Mystic Seaport has opened its newest eatery, Latitude 41˚. Formerly known as the Seamen’s Inne, the new restaurant, operated by Coastal Gourmet, features a completely renovated space, a new menu and a new chef. As you walk into the space, natural hues surround a unique combination of historical and contemporary elements including extraordinary black-and-white yachting photographs from the Museum’s historic Rosenfeld Collection. Visitors can choose to dine in one of the main dining rooms, gather for casual fare in the tavern or enjoy cool river breezes while dining on the tented terrace. The new menu, masterminded by new chef James Klewin, a native of Griswold, CT, is built on the foundation of new American cuisine, with consistency, creativity, innovation and inspiration. Chef Klewin began his culinary career at the age of 15 in a small family-operated restaurant. By the age of 19, he was selected by Foxwoods Cedars Steak House as their youngest but most talented lead line chef. As Chef Klewin's reputation grew, acclaimed chef and restaurateur Todd English hired him to head the culinary team at Tuscany, located at Mohegan Sun. Chef Klewin’s talents have afforded him the distinction of being selected by Chef English to represent him as the evening’s celebrity chef for the prestigious James Beard Foundation dinner. He has also been featured on numerous culinary television shows including reccurring segments of NBC’s “Meet the Chef.” For menus, hours and information about dining at Mystic Seaport, go to www.mysticseaport.org/latitude41.

Williams-Mystic supports local marine education and clean water initiatives Two Mystic-area organizations are taking a closer look at the waters of Mystic and Stonington, with assistance from WilliamsMystic. The college-level interdisciplinary maritime studies program located at Mystic Seaport has loaned marine science teaching laboratory equipment to the Stonington Harbor Yacht Club’s Sailing Foundation (SHYC) in support of their marine biology summer program for children and teens. “We used the microscopes and plankton nets—one of the student research projects was based around the different types of zooplankton that we found. And the 7-10 year-olds were so excited, since most have never gotten to look at plankton before,” reported Mistral Dodson and Mike Smith, program directors for the SHYC’s marine biology program. “We’re pleased to support maritime education for all ages, and especially glad when it is focused on our local Stonington waters,” said Jim Carlton, director of the Williams-Mystic program and professor of marine sciences at Williams College. In addition, Williams-Mystic has loaned sampling equipment to Clean Up Stonington Harbor (CUSH) for their work assessing and monitoring local bodies of water. CUSH samples water in the Mystic and Stonington area, with one of their sampling stations at Mystic Seaport on the Mystic River. Williams-Mystic, the Maritime Studies Program of Williams College and Mystic Seaport, is a one-semester interdisciplinary program for college students, located at Mystic Seaport, based on the study of the sea. Applications are still being accepted for fall 2010 and spring 2011. Inquire for more information at www.williams.edu/williams-mystic.


“The American Maritime People” Munson Institute of American Maritime Studies An NEH Summer Institute for College and University Professors • June 21- July 30

7 M u s e u m B ri e f s

The purpose of “The American Maritime People” NEH Institute at Mystic Seaport is “to provide college teachers... with the opportunity to enhance course offerings by studying the influence of maritime activities on U.S. history and culture.” This, the third such NEH Institute, will build on the latest research in studies of the sea, which has recently been the focus of increasing scholarly interest. In a series of seminars, “The American Maritime People” will employ interdisciplinary perspectives on American maritime studies, with an emphasis on the most recent social, cultural and ecological approaches. To apply and for more information, go to www.mysticseaport.org/NEH.


SEEING

THE�

SEA

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A m e ri c a a n d t h e S e a P h o t o C o n t e s t

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The annual America and the Sea photo contest is an opportunity for readers of Mystic Seaport magazine to show us their view of America and the sea—from their own particular vantage point. An open invitation to capture America and the sea brought us a beautiful variety of images this year—from Alaska to Maine and representation of the land in between. The grand prize winner this year was David Bliss of Attleboro, MA, with his stunning landscape, “Herring River, “ taken in Harwich, MA. “I took a landscape photography class at Rhode Island School of Design last year, and was doing some shooting while on vacation with my wife,” David says. “We had seen this red dinghy for several days in a row—it wasn’t a very nice day, but the sun peeked through the clouds just before sunset and I was able to capture multiple exposures of this image.” David’s business, Bliss Dairy in Attleboro, MA, affords

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him the opportunity to try another challenging kind of photography—ice cream still lifes. Thank you to all our inspired photographers who submitted images this year; we so appreciate your participation and your unique views on our maritime world. And now that summer is here, charge up those camera batteries and show us your own view of America and the sea! We’ve added two new categories for 2010—most humorous and most original—so start clicking that shutter. For complete submission information, go to www. mysticseaport.org/photocontest.

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1. Grand Prize, David Bliss, Attleboro, MA, “Herring River,” Harwich, MA. 2. Landscapes First place, Ingrid Mathews, Wyoming, RI, “Red, White & Blue,” Narragansett Bay, RI. 3. Landscapes Second place, David Quincy, So. Orleans, MA,“Foggy Day,” Namequoit River, S. Orleans, MA.

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4. Landscapes Third Place, Nate Gardner, Newton, MA, “Clouds and Sunset,” Groton, CT. * Landscapes Honorable Mention, Jorge Viso, Tampa, FL, “Rockland Dinghies,”Rockland, ME. 5. Life First place, Steve Shurtleff, West Warwick, RI, “Flying,” Narragansett, RI. 6. Life Second place, Jason Paddock, Milltown, NJ, “Lilypad Loafer,” Mystic, CT. 7. Life Third place, Stephen Wood, Wakefield, RI, “Wordon Pond,” Wakefield, RI. * Honorable Mention, Betty Meade, Andover, KS, “Under the Sea,” Ketchikan, AK. * Youth Award, Cathleen Warren, Racine, WI, “Fog over the Harbor,” Racine, WI. *Viewable online at www.mysticseaport.org

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A m e ri c a a n d t h e S e a P h o t o C o n t e s t

America and the Sea 2009 Photo Contest Winners


IN T HE G A L L EY

The Season of the

I

IN THE GALLEY

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trawberry S

was once in California at the height of their strawberry season in the spring. Like so many things

in California, the berries seemed larger than life. Even though purchased at a convenience store, they were unmistakably local—not picked in order to ripen on the way to their ultimate destination, no white core supporting their sexy scarlet exterior. Just glistening, scarlet, fully ripe (and by New England standards) huge berries. They were gorgeous. There is a certain perfection to a sunwarmed, freshly picked, ripe strawberry. In fact, it’s amazing that when we pick them in the height of the season that any ever make it back to the kitchen. And while strawberries seemed like the perfect topic for my summer column and there are tons of great recipes out there, ripe strawberries need little embellishment. So I offer recipes for those of us who feel compelled to share the bounty—and create dishes that let their natural flavor, texture, and aroma shine through. Some of the earliest settlers to the New England colonies found acres of strawberry fields when they landed. As with many things in New England, the season may be short, but all things come to those who wait. A typical late June or Fourth of July festival might well feature strawberries as the main attraction. Strawberry ice cream, strawberry shortcake, strawberry pies, strawberries dipped in sour cream and brown sugar—all in the delicious lineup. Here is a slightly adapted recipe from one of my favorite home chefs, Martha Greenlaw, mother of famous swordboat captain Linda Greenlaw. It comes from their wonderful cookbook, Recipes from a Very Small Island.

Strawberry Shortcake Trifle 1 pint of fresh, ripe strawberries 2 tablespoons sugar 2 cups homemade or packaged instant vanilla pudding 1 3-ounce package package of cream cheese, softened 2 1/2 cups of homemade or store-bought pound cake, cubed 1/3 cup framboise or sweet sherry (optional) Lightly sweetened whipped cream, for garnish Reserve 3-4 of the best-looking berries for garnish. Hull and slice enough of the remaining berries to measure two cups. Set aside. Transfer the remaining berries to the bowl of a food processor fitted with a metal blade, add the sugar and process to a purée. With an electric mixer, preferably fitted with a paddle blade, beat together the pudding and cream cheese until well-blended. Arrange the sliced strawberries around the sides of a clear straight-sided 1 and 1/2-quart glass bowl or trifle dish. Spread half of the cake cubes over the bottom of the dish. Add sherry or framboise if desired. Pour half the puréed berries over the cake and top with half of the pudding mixture. Repeat to layer the cake, berries, and pudding mixture. Cover and refrigerate for up to 24 hours. Before serving, top with whipped cream and reserved berries for garnish.

Jean Kerr is the author of Mystic Seafood: Great Recipes, History, and Seafaring Lore from Mystic Seaport, as well as Union Oyster House Cookbook and the forthcoming Windjammer Cooking. She is the editor of Taste of the Seacoast magazine and co-owner of Smith Kerr Associates Publishing. w w w. m y s t i c s e a p o r t. o r g • 8 6 0 . 5 7 2 . 5 3 2 2


G A RDENIN G BY T HE SE A

Filling the landscape with fragrance, beauty and color

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or every perfect summer’s day there should be a perfect tree to sit under, to watch and listen to the day go by. Such a tree would be fragrant, have beautiful foliage and bark, and its shape would blanket you with shade. Sourwood (Oxydendrum arboreum), native to the southeastern United States, is the tree that we dream of. Though quite common in the South, a New England gardener may see sourwood as a treasure and an irreplaceable specimen in the garden. Alice Lounsberry, American botanist and author, wrote, “Every good gift, it seems, has been showered upon this lovely tree.” Sourwood has a winsome, soft, pyramidal habit with dainty, bowing branches. The native beauty grows 25 to 30 feet tall and has a potential 20-foot spread. The foliage of

Summer with

Gardening by the Sea columnist Kara Lally is the Museum's horticulturalist and garden supervisor. She has a degree in horticulture and anthropology from the University of Connecticut.

— Kara Lally

Gardening by the Sea columnist Kara Lally is the Museum's horticulturalist and garden supervisor. She has a degree in horticulture and anthropology from the University of Connecticut.

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11 G A R DEN I N G B Y T H E SE A

Sourwood

this tree is much like a chameleon. In spring, the leaves are chartreuse maturing into a lustrous, dark green; by fall, the leaves turn into an intense red to rich purple. The gray-brown, blocky bark of sourwood is of special interest in winter, along with the olive-green and bright red stems. When the spring-blooming trees have faded, sourwood begins its wonderful, fragrant show. For four weeks, from June to early July, the tree is nearly smothered with drooping panicles of fragrant, white flowers. Another name for sourwood is the lily-of-the-valley tree, noting the similar appearance of the flowers. These blooms fill the surrounding air with sweet, spiced fragrance. After blooming, the flowers are replaced with yellowish-tan capsules that are attractive against the bright red fall foliage. The gorgeous blooms of sourwood produce the most delectable surprise, honey! With its medium light color, heavy body and floral, one-of-a-kind flavor, sourwood honey is a rare, cherished commodity. Along with sourwood’s sweet treasures and multi-season interest, this tree is easy to grow and care for. Sourwood is susceptible to hardly any diseases, grows in full sun to partial shade and can tolerate dry soils. At the Museum, we have sourwood planted on the north side of the Clark Greenman Building. This specimen is surrounded by ferns, creating a naturalistic setting. Other species that pair well with sourwood are Oakleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia) with its deep burgundy fall foliage or Arrowwood (Viburnum dentatum), which attracts wildlife. There is no yard or garden that should be without this native beauty. As Alice Lounsberry said about sourwood, “The only difficulty is that one is tempted to sit down beside it and never go away!”


x xTxHE x x xW xx xx ON AT ER

Michael rows that boat ashore.

x x xoxnx xtxhxex xwxat x xexr x

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Writer Molly Stach, and her husband Michael, spent the day getting out on the water at Mystic Seaport.

On the Water I

One couple’s water adventure at Myst ic Seaport By Molly Stach

t was a hot and beautiful August day in Mystic, CT, when my husband Michael and I decided to embark on a challenge: How many ways could we get out on the water at Mystic Seaport? I’m no stranger to the Museum. Having once worked in the Museum’s Communications Office, I often spent my lunch hour walking the historic grounds or hopping on a quick boat ride. Yet in all that time, I never experienced all the Museum or the scenic Mystic River had to offer. All that was about to change as we stepped into the Visitor Reception Center. We grabbed a map of the grounds and an On the Water brochure and began our journey. What we found was clear; Mystic Seaport


O NE T HE W AT ER

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bring next time!). Upon reaching the drawbridge, we turned back, delighted to see the steamboat Sabino, which had passed us earlier, heading back to shore as well. We followed her back to Mystic Seaport, shouting “hello” and waving to passengers on board, all the while looking forward to our own ride aboard Sabino later that afternoon. Michael rowed us back to the docks and we turned in our oars and life jackets to the friendly staff waiting to greet us. Our first hour on the water was a success, and we were excited for more. Except, we were hungry! Longing for some ice cream, we thought a trip to downtown Mystic was in order, but we didn’t feel like leaving the Museum grounds and driving. Instead, we hopped on Liberty, the Museum’s water taxi to downtown Mystic. The quick ride was relaxing, and so convenient. We left right from the riverbank near the Visitor Center, and were deposited at the base of the drawbridge right downtown. After our snack and some window shopping, we met Liberty again for our ride back to Mystic Seaport. It was so easy, and sure beat finding a parking space! Full and happy, we were ready to play the role of tourists. We made our way over to the dock for Sabino and passed a little time reading up on her

Above left: Museum visitors Michael and Molly Stach came to Mystic Seaport with a singular goal—how many different ways could they get out on the water? Michael and Molly chose a bright and breezy summer day for their maritime adventure at Mystic Seaport.

ON T H E W ATE R

offers the best of the best when it comes to water adventure. Whether you’re looking for fun, luxury or good old tourism, there’s a water excursion that’s right for you. We began our day looking for fun. Our first stop was the Boathouse, where we rented our own personal rowboat for some leisurely boating. (A large selection of sailboats were also available to rent.) We climbed inside the rustic black and gray vessel, and as Michael took the oars, I remarked how lovely and old timey it felt to be rowed down the river by a handsome man. All that was missing was my parasol! The sun sparkled off the water as Michael rowed us toward the Mystic River drawbridge. The shore was dotted with kayaks and other small vessels, boat sails flapped in the gentle breeze, and fellow boaters passed us and smiled. I snapped pictures as we glided by the Charles W. Morgan — the last remaining wooden whaleship in the world, currently undergoing renovations in the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard. We felt dwarfed by her size as we rowed by. The ride was picturesque—birds flew overhead, the blue of the sky reflected off the water and the sun warmed our shoulders. All that was missing was a cold lemonade (which I will remember to


O N T HE W AT ER

ON T H E W ATE R

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Above, scenes from the Mystic river, including the whaleship Charles. W. Morgan undergoing restoration at the Museum's Shipyard.

history. Built in 1908 in Maine for passenger service on the Damariscotta River, this coal-fired steamboat and National Historic Landmark now makes daily 30- and 90-minute cruises along the Mystic River from May through October. I could have continued to read about Sabino, but it was time for our ride to begin. We climbed aboard and made our way to the upper deck, finding a bench seat in the shade with a great view. The seats filled quickly with visitors of all ages —from infants to grandparents. Children held hands as they peered over the railing, looking down into the heart

of the boat as fresh coal was shoveled into the furnace to make our journey. Suddenly, the steamboat’s horn blared, surprising us all and causing the children to squeal with delight and laughter. We slowly backed away from the dock and headed down river. A cool breeze blew across the water as our guide began to speak, filling our heads with facts about both the steamboat and the Mystic River. He spoke knowledgably for a few minutes, then retired to the lower deck, leaving us to enjoy the ride. I rested my head on Michael’s shoulder


O N T HE W AT ER

15 ON T H E W ATE R

and took in the view. Though we had traveled twice already down this very river, it was a brand-new experience. Sitting high above the water, I noticed more of the landscape, the tall ships and the bird’s-eye view of the Museum. The half-hour passed by leisurely, punctuated a few more times by our guide and his tales of historic Mystic. On our return trip, we took our turn greeting and waving to those rowing by us in rowboats and kayaks, glad to share our smiles like other Sabino passengers had with us earlier in the day. With some time before our next scheduled boat ride, I decided to show Michael some of my favorite Mystic Seaport exhibits (the Figurehead exhibit is always a must-see for me!). Since our Sabino ride had left us relaxed and we didn’t feel like walking, we decided to take Necessity, the Museum’s free water shuttle to the other end of the grounds. It seemed as though a lot of fellow

Sabino riders had the same idea, but we managed to grab two open seats along Necessity’s long glossy benches. The quick ride brought us to the north end of the Museum grounds, and we slowly made our way back south, stopping along the way at various exhibits. We arrived back just in time to see Resolute pass by us. The classic power launch held a visiting family, smiling and taking in the sights. From the shore, I could see their captain talking animatedly and pointing out sites along the riverbanks. Our time didn’t allow for a ride on Resolute during this visit, but we made a note to take one of the 30- or 90-minute captained cruises on her the next time we visited. My disappointment over missing a ride faded quickly, though, as it was time to close out our day in the lap of luxury. We were off to sail on Breck Marshall, a historic 20-foot reproduction Crosby catboat built in 1987 at Mystic Seaport.

"Sit t ing high above t he water, I not iced more of t he landscape, t he tall-ships and t he bird’s-eye view of t he Museum.” ABOVE LEFT: Molly at the Museum's Boathouse, where vistors can rent classic wooden rowing and sailing vessels or charter a larger sailboat. ABOVE RIGHT: Sabino touring the river basin on a glorious summer's day.


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ON T H E W ATE R

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W e laughed in amusement as we made a turn, t he boom swinging over our heads, t hen sat back for our return to shore and relaxed as t he sun began to lower in t he sky.

Our skipper was Al Burnett— a seasoned sailor with a lively attitude. He greeted us as we climbed aboard, joining two others waiting for their first sail. We were introduced to Samantha, age seven (“and a half!”), and her mother, visiting Mystic Seaport from Massachusetts. Samantha’s blonde curls bounced in the breeze and she checked her life jacket a few times “just to be safe.” This was to be her first sailboat ride. The five of us made a perfect group, but there was plenty of room for more in the spacious cockpit. Burnett pushed us away from the dock, and the sails caught the wind, snapping briskly. We glided easily across the glassy water as Burnett pointed out the sights. We passed Lighthouse Point jutting out from the Museum grounds, then made our way south down the river. As we glided by the Joseph Conrad—lodgings for the summer residential sailing camp and some Museum educational programs—sounds of sea chanteys being sung on her decks

caught the wind and drifted towards our ears. Samantha leaned forward to hear the songs, then sniffed the air, remarking her favorite part of the ride was the smell of the water, and the breeze in her hair. I had to agree with her. We laughed in amusement as we made a turn, the boom swinging over our heads, then sat back for our return to shore and relaxed as the sun began to lower in the sky. As our day on the water came to an end, I reflected on our visit and how diverse each trip down the historic Mystic River was. A day on the water at Mystic Seaport is not just special because of its rich maritime history, but also because of the diverse views of the Museum time on the water can offer. In one day, we experienced so many different adventures, each one better than the next. We stepped onto shore for the last time, with slightly more freckles than when we arrived and windswept hair, happy, content and already making plans for our next visit.


O N T HE W AT ER

— Molly Stach is a soon-to-be firsttime mother, and is looking forward to sharing her love of Mystic Seaport with her son.

To find out how you can get out on the water at Mystic Seaport, visit www.mysticseaport.org/boatrides, or pick up an On the Water brochure at the Museum’s Visitor Reception Center. Water activities are seasonal, and some may have an additional charge.

Opposite page, left: Young Samantha and her mom, visitors from Massachusetts enjoying a summer sail. Opposite page, right: Winding down the day on the water with a sail aboard the Museum's Crosby catboat, Breck Marshall.

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behind the scenes

B E H I ND T H E SCENES

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behind the

“Tugs!”

exhibit

A dedicated and passionate team spurs the entire Museum to pull together By Elizabeth Yerkes

ABOVE, Exhibits designer Jeff Crewe and developer Elysa Engelman chat with Jeff Huffenberger during installation of his custom-built tug environment

From the sneakers on your feet, to the coal for an energy plant, to the tuna salad on your plate, tugboats help to move almost everything we use. Small but mighty, the tugboat plays a greater role in America today than it did in the 1800s when it steamed to the fore of our harbors and waterways. In 2000, with assistance from tugs, one billion tons of domestic waterborne freight moved on American waterways. America's fleet of nearly 4,000 modern tugboats and towboats and more than 28,000 barges moves more than 800 million tons of raw materials and finished goods each year. The Museum’s newest exhibit, “Tugs!” at the R. J. Schaefer Exhibit Hall, puts the tug and towboat’s history, future and relentless working present on display through mid-2011. Behind the scenes of “Tugs!” for years has been a diligent, inspired team of Mystic Seaport professionals hard at work on their subject: the vessels that move cargo, salvage wrecks, escort cruise ships and save lives during maritime disasters. “A successful exhibit requires the whole Museum’s input and reactions. As much as any department, we need input from the Mystic Seaport community. I can’t think of another department that requires as much input from as many


behind the scenes

Visitors will be able to crawl through the tugboat’s hull to the engine room. Once inside, they can see a large back-lit image of a real engine on a local tugboat. When visitors climb up to the captain’s chair, they can try their hand at a five-minute mission driving a tug in heavy weather up the East River off Manhattan. “We want to give a sense of all the factors a tugboat captain has to consider—weather, current, traffic and the momentum of his tow,” said Engelman. Heads nod around the table. Some suggest realistic enhancements for the game developers to include. Crewe said, “The danger is that it might be accurate but not exciting.” More ideas pop up, some are batted around, a few are seized upon, and the meeting moves to Plan B, should the game not satisfy the exhibition team. There’s plenty of testing, said Shay, once an element is installed into the display. Now in discussion is a tug demonstration pool that will stand outside the G.W. Blunt White Building. Three custombuilt working model tugs, five feet long and powered by car batteries, will show visitors how real tugs push and pull model barges and ships. Staff will give demonstrations throughout the warm months. At this point, the pool, remote-control tugs, barges and land formations around which

19 B E H I ND T H E SCENES

people in what it does,” said Jonathan Shay, director of exhibitions and interpretation. In 2006 and 2007, while Museum visitors were enjoying “Black Hands, Blue Seas” and “From Model to Masterpiece: The Work of Thomas Hoyne and Erik Ronnberg,” the exhibitions staff had begun planning what visitors would view in 2010. “While we’re planning for an exhibit to open tomorrow, we’re working on the plans for an exhibit to open in five years. It’s a bit like trying to change a tire while the car is going 60 mph,” said Shay. During planning sessions around the exhibit department conference table, the Museum visitor reigns supreme in the mind of designers. “We want to give them the best visitor experience,” said Elysa Engelman. Engelman is the Museum’s exhibit researcher. She and Shay, as well as their exhibit colleagues Jeff Crewe and Arleen Andersen, have met weekly for almost a year on “Tugs!” Independently, though, since 2006 they’ve researched, designed and tested ideas for this display. At a recent planning meeting, talk centers on how best to design a tug simulator game. Collaborating with the Dutch maker of ShipSimPro, and using ship controls provided by Newport Maritime Simulations Institute, the exhibition team plans to mount the game screen in the wheelhouse of a climb-on tugboat, now being custom made by a builder in upstate New York.

TOP, Team meetings often take place around the department's big work table. Department director Jonathan Shay meets with designers Jeff Crewe and Arleen Andersen about plans for signage outside the Schaefer gallery.

ABOVE, Volunteer Jane Akins preps drums that will become part of the signage system used inside the exhibit.

LEFT, Engelman and Crewe compare the schematic plan with the actual installation.


behind the scenes

B E H I ND T H E SCENES

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ABOVE: The interior of the R.J. Schaefer Gallery is painted and re-configured for each exhibit. OPPOSITE PAGE: Huffenberger's company J. Harold LLC built the tug environment in its New York workshop, then cut it apart for transportation to Mystic. It will feature a crawl-through engine room for kids and agile adults.

they will navigate are in various stages of construction. Expert model builder Ron Burchett of Vancouver, Canada, created the model tugboats that will weigh 75 pounds and need a recharging shed. So the team is brainstorming ways to launch and haul out the boats every night. Crewe made a prototype model and is eager to test the final versions well before the first scheduled demo. “We don’t want any surprises with the outdoor part of the exhibit,” he said. As a rule, said Shay, the team tries to keep a mix in any exhibit. “We always think about who the audience is for any given show. The level of interest varies for every


behind the scenes

visitor, but without working to the lowest common denominator we try to make it accessible for everyone,” said Shay. Books and artifacts from the Museum’s collection comprised the surface layer of research for the “Tugs!” exhibit. While most of its collection is stored, Mystic Seaport provides access to researchers and displays select pieces. While developing “Tugs!” Krystal Kornegay, the Museum’s registrar and collections management technician, presented to the team a PowerPoint tour of representative artifacts in the vast collection that will tell the “Tugs!” story clearly and effectively. In its research the team used human

sources, too. Museum volunteers Hugh Smith, Peter Littlefield and Rob Groves operated offshore and harbor tugboats, and offered their know-how in labeling photographs and constructing the mockup of New Haven harbor for “Tugs!” To reach deeper, though, staff took to the water. Last autumn, Engelman, Crewe and a Museum film team joined a one-mile tugboat race off Manhattan, and continued filming for “Tugs!” on other tugs in Maine and Rhode Island. Engelman said, “I’m hoping we caught enough to give visitors a sense of what it’s like to work on a modern harbor tug.”

21 B E H I ND T H E SCENES

Back at the planning meeting, the team talks over tug-themed campus-wide events. A Tugs! Blast weekend will include special tours of the exhibit and engine collection, lectures by tugboat experts, and an evening members’ reception during which a New York City tugboat captain will relate his experiences. Another highlight promises to be a 65-foot U.S. Coast Guard tugboat motoring up the Mystic River and docking at the Museum for the weekend. “I think the historic New York tug Pegasus and character tug Theodore will be here over Columbus Day weekend,” reports Engelman. Keeping abreast of all the elements and contributors in this exhibit could be a job in itself. The agenda for this planning meeting, three months from opening day, is long and complex. “It’s like looking at sheets of music scored for oboe, violin, cello and timpani...but we know they will all work together in an orchestra,” said Crewe. The team is also scheduling working tugs to visit the Museum's waterfront throughout the season. Visitors will learn how tugs maneuver, see these maritime marvels in action and hear stories of reallife tugboat captains. Quentin Snediker, head of the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard, will give one of the Tug Talks about Kingston II. It’s a Museum artifact that for 40 years aided submarines as they launched from and returned to the Electric Boat plant in nearby Groton. When Kingston II was


behind the scenes

B E H I ND T H E SCENES

22

retired from the military and arrived at the Museum in 1980, the valuable workboat helped move the Museum’s historic vessels and even assisted with the new lift dock. It was Engelman’s charge to develop content or the script of “Tugs!” the narrative springboard from which the exhibit jumps. One reason “Tugs!” was chosen was that it’s a story most people aren’t aware of but one that needed to be told. An invisible industry, the tug world supports commerce and transport around the globe. Some communities, such as those in Alaska, are supplied almost exclusively with goods provided by water transport, and tugs make that happen. Another reason the Museum chose the subject was that tugs and towboats have an immediate and universal attraction, particularly to children. “Tugs are seen as friendly, helper boats. They are small but very strong, with a broad public appeal,” said Shay. They’ve been anthropomorphized in books, such as Little Toot and cartoons such as “Theodore Tugboat.” The latter was transformed into a life-sized replica in the 1990s in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and the team hopes that a grant will bring Theodore to Mystic in October. Adults, too, know that tugs do real jobs. Many see towboats pushing chains of barges, military tugs ferrying supplies, or TowBoatsUS rescuing distressed boaters. One of the most important tug jobs is not seen, however, and that job is preventing accidents. What happened in 1989 in Prince William Sound, Alaska, is still considered one of the largest oil spills in American waterways. The tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground and loosed 11 million gallons of crude oil along more than 1,100 miles of Alaska’s coastline. Investigators found that sufficient pilot and escort service for the tanker were lacking. The disaster prompted changes in local shipping regulations—requiring two escort vessels for each tanker while passing through Prince William Sound—and

Chris White of the Museum's Collections Research Center, seen here with just a few of the exhibit's tug-related materials.


behind the scenes

have to make meaningful relationships with a real sharing of core values.” Added Arata, “We’ve been so successful because our fundraising and exhibition crews are constantly talking to each other.” But two months from opening day, the exhibits department also talks to extra carpenters and artists who specialize in scenery and faux painting. “It often takes more time than we think to prepare the set,” Shay said. Much of an exhibit’s design is to convey knowledge, but behavioral science and theater arts play major roles, too. Unlike the design of a building, for example, the effectiveness of a museum’s show can be measured. Said Crewe, “I’ll never forget one comment from the Comer exhibit, ‘thank you for treating the Inuit people equally in this display.’” To promote the exhibit, graphics specialist Arleen Andersen and an outside agency created several iterations of the “Tugs!” logo and the graphics to brand the exhibit. Because tugs convey particular messages to disparate populations, their challenge was to capture the tug’s helperboat persona without trivializing the heavy and often dangerous work that tugs and their operators perform. The beefy yet business-like tug on the front of the Museum’s marketing brochure shows just that. Once inside the Schaefer Building, Andersen’s graphics also address visitors’ many learning styles. Large-print labels, like headlines, are designed to grab the “streakers,” those who whiz through exhibits. Visitors who linger at the cased models or bollard-pull tank will linger to read smaller type and in different type styles. Still others won’t read labels at all, but will be cued by the color of graphics, preferring to take away the audio-visual or tactile experience of “Tugs!” Even as fine-tuning continues before opening day of “Tugs!” several departments are already thinking about the next large exhibit. “The wolf is already at the door for exhibits we plan to open in 2013,” said Arata.

TUGS! Small but strong, these work vessels and auxiliaries to the American shipping industry and the military have a place of their own at Mystic Seaport. Whether you’re more familiar with Little Toot, shallow-draft river pushboats, ocean-going tugs or the Museum’s own Kingston II, this display of the history and future of these hard-working water vessels is sure to delight, inform and fascinate. The new exhibit opened in ear-

23

ly May in the R.J. Schaefer Exhibit

B E H I ND T H E SCENES

tightened regulations on oil deliveries in all U.S. ports. Perhaps one positive outcome of the disaster was that it focused attention on the important role of tugs, the littlerecognized aid to the world of shipping. As the exhibits team began its research, pressure was already on the advancement department to fund such a different display. In 2006, the Museum used business consultants to retool its fundraising approach for corporate America. “This effort made us think hard about how to approach businesses and refine the way that all of our departments work together,” said Chris Freeman, one of the Museum’s major gift officers. Improved communication also allowed the advancement department to keep potential donors apprised of how the exhibit was taking shape. And in 2007, Freeman organized a tug enthusiast symposium that helped crystallize the “Tugs!” vision. The “Tugs!” exhibit started out with a price tag of $2 million, said Vice President for Advancement Nat Arata. “But as the ideas developed, we determined an effective use of funds rather than pie-inthe-sky ideas,” he said. He said the creative process pervades the Museum, even in advancement. “Ideas should drive the funding and resources, not the other way around,” Arata said. An example of this creative thinking is the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services grant that Mystic Seaport grant writer Claire Calabretta secured. Additionally, two private family foundations made grants for the “Tugs!” exhibit that will help build and power up the model tugboat demonstration. The timing of fundraising efforts for “Tugs!” was crucial, not only because the Museum approached corporate America for the first time, but also because the emerging recession seemed serious and long term. Better communication within the Museum and to outside supporters became essential. Freeman has worked on the “Tugs!” campaign since 2006. He said, “It’s been a unique venture because the tugboat industry is a business-to-business concern. With the economy in the shape it’s in, we

Hall and includes outside features too —live demonstrations of beefy remote-control vessels in their own pool. This exhibit explains how tugs and towboats have been part of America’s maritime history since the 1800s and how barge shipping with tugs continues to move goods farther than any other land transportation on a single gallon of fuel. Find out, too, how tugs will work in the future…in space! Enter “Tugs!” through a tugboat wheelhouse, try your hand at a tug driver computer simulation. How are tug designs tested? A test-tank video will show the action before your eyes. Climb through the hull of a scaled tugboat replica to pretend you’re the engineer tending the systems. Pull, push, salvage and rescue, tugs do it all—come see “Tugs!”


ADVANCEMENT NEWS

A Note from Membership Dear Members, Early one spring morning, the creaking of a door opening across the village announced the shipsmith, carrying a black bucket. It was clear from his leaning that the bucket was laden with coals. While he was a solitary figure on the street, he reminded me of all the work that goes on behind the scenes, and all that was accomplished this past winter. The Joseph Conrad is back at her dock following repairs to her bottom, the streets have been re-graded and the gardens raked for spring. Later that day, two grinning children looked up from sipping their hot chocolate in the Membership Lounge, their legs swinging in happy unison from their seats. As their mom renewed their membership, one child, with a sparkle in her eyes, loudly whispered to me, “We’re going to play on the boats!” This really is what we are all about: inspiring,

A D VA NCE M ENT NEWS

24

one-by-one, a special connection to the sea. While the Museum staff and volunteers work hard behind the scenes all year long, this connection couldn’t happen without members like you. Even with the difficult economy this past year, you joined, renewed and in many cases, increased your level of membership, making this one of the best fiscal years for Membership this century. And so, I want to say to you, with a big smile, “thank you.” Hope to see you at Summer Solstice River Jazz, on June 19 — it is our special tribute to members! Cheryl Mattson Director of Membership P.S. Watch for our emails and publications for some new exciting member events this fall and winter, including a Jack-O-Lantern River Walk.

Valentine’s Day in Florida Mystic Seaport was well represented at a festive Valentine’s Day event in Palm Beach this winter, generously hosted by Museum Trustee Emeritus and International Council Member, James D. Bishop, along with Museum Chair, Richard Vietor, and Museum President, Steve White. More than 40 couples enjoyed a cocktail party which, appropriately, featured the exquisite “Sailor’s Valentines” by award-winning artist Sandy Moran. Sandy brought a number of her beautiful original works of art based on the special tokens sailors often brought home to loved ones in the 1800s. These valentines, made of thousands of small natural shells placed in colorful, decorative patterns around a unique central image, were elegantly displayed at the party and provided a wonderful ambience for the evening. Guests were also treated to romantic sea chanteys by renowned folk singer, musician and Mystic Seaport chanteyman Geoff Kaufman, who entertained the group with songs meant to evoke the love felt between sailors and those they leave ashore. The evening also included informative updates about recent strategic initiatives and exciting plans for the 38th voyage of the Charles W. Morgan. It was a delightful evening and a nice opportunity to get together with Museum members and friends at a distance. To learn more about Sandy Moran’s sailor’s valentines, visit www.sailorsvalentinestudio.com. To learn more about Geoff Kaufman’s music, visit geoffkaufman.com.

Top, Geoff Kaufman shares stories and songs. Below, a display of Sailor's Valentines by artist Sandy Moran.


ADVANCEMENT NEWS

Sprigs & Twigs and Mystic Seaport – A Growing Partnership

25 A D VA NCE M ENT NEWS

Mystic Seaport recently entered into a unique partnership that will enhance the beauty of its 19-acre campus. The Museum has named Sprigs & Twigs, Inc., of Gales Ferry, CT, as the official landscape company of Mystic Seaport. This partnership, which began in 2009, is a great opportunity for both organizations. “We believe this partnership is a match of our abilities and the needs of the Museum,” said Bill Lillie, who co-owns Sprigs & Twigs with his wife, Linda. “In addition to an intellectual and philosophical match, we augment the Museum staff and bring extra capabilities to the relationship. This is unique for us. ” Bill Parent, the Museum’s vice president of facilities, echoed Lillie’s statement. “The Sprigs & Twigs team has become part of the Museum team, working well with our staff, which is led by Kara Lally and Steve Sisk,” he said. “We work well together to plan and implement projects. Bill and Linda are professional, thorough, honest and hard-working. They helped us immensely last year, and we are thrilled that the partnership has grown into a second year.” This year, the work of Sprigs & Twigs will be focused on the Village Green, as well as the entrances to the Museum’s new restaurant, Latitude 41˚. Last year, the company, which was established in 1997, was involved with the Museum in a variety of ways. In addition to being the lead sponsor of both Lantern Light Tours and the new Garden Days event (a role it will continue again this year), Sprigs & Twigs completed a new garden installation at the entrance of the P. R. Mallory Wing and sodded Anchor Circle—immediately improving two key areas of the Museum’s north end. Sprigs & Twigs is known for its stewardship of the environment and its ability to offer the highest quality products and services. Four members of its team, Bill and Linda Lillie included, were recently named Accredited Organic Land

Bill and Linda Lillie, owners of Sprigs & Twigs,the official landscape company of Mystic Seaport. Bill and Linda were photographed on the Museum’s Anchor Circle, resodded last year by Sprigs & Twigs.

Care Professionals by the Northeast Organic Farming Association. In 2007, Total Landscape Care magazine named Sprigs & Twigs as a National Finalist for 2008 Landscaper of the Year. The company was selected as one of 12 finalists from across the country representing the industry’s best. A unique aspect Sprigs & Twigs brings to the relationship is its willingness to share knowledge and educate Museum visitors and members. Linda Lillie was a featured presenter during

Garden Days and the company shared information with visitors throughout the Mallory garden installation. “We view ourselves as teachers of the type of work that we do, and we work hard to maintain a visible profile in our community,” said Bill Lillie. “The opportunity to do similar things for Mystic Seaport visitors and members is perfectly consistent with what we do, and we’re excited for the chance to do more.”


B y T h E NU M BERS

B Y T H E NU M B E R S

26

BY T H E N U M BE R S:

The U.S. Tugboat and Towing Industry 5,424 $8.5 billion 10.5 million $3,145 3,464 97 $4,070 465 $12,135 87 11 60 Number of tugboats/towboats in 2008:

The value of that exported grain to the U.S. economy:

Combined horsepower of those 5,424 tugs:

Weekday minimum rate to hire a tug in Portsmouth, RI, for assist work docking or undocking a ship:

Number operating in the Mississippi River and Gulf Intracoastal Waterway in 2008: New tugboats/towboats built in 2008:

Companies operating tugboats/towboats:

Percentage of major U.S. cities directly served by towboat-delivered barges:

Percentage of U.S. grain exports moved by towboat and barges along inland waterways:

Rate to hire a tug for ship assist work in San Francisco for three hours: Rate to hire a tug as a tanker escort from Richmond, CA, to Benicia:

On-the-job fatalities in the tugboat and towing industry in 2004: — Elysa Engelman


®

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May

Summer 2010

June 20-25 Joseph Conrad Sailing Camp

July 9-10 New! Strawberry Delights

July 23-25 Vintage Model Yachting Days

August 2-6 Family Community Sailing (Beginner)

June 21-25 Brilliant teen cruise: Mystic to Mystic

July 10 Mystic Seaport/ America’s Cup Regatta, Newport

July 24 Trip to Lowell’s Boatshop, Amesbury, MA

August 2-6 Junior Community Sailing (Intermediate)

July 10-11 Adult Community Sailing (Beginner)

July 24 Rum Runners Rendezvous

August 7 Sail the Connecticut River and Discover the Turtle

July 10-11 Military Appreciation Weekend

July 24-25 Adult Community Sailing (Beginner)

August 7-8 Adult Community Sailing (Beginner)

July 14 Celebration of Volunteers

July 24-25 Antique & Classic Boat Rendezvous

August 14-15 Model Yacht Regatta

July 11-16 Joseph Conrad Sailing Camp

July 25-30 Joseph Conrad Sailing Camp

July 12-16 Summer Day Camp: Girls of Long Ago

July 26-30 Summer Day Camp: Seaport Sampler

July 12-16 Brilliant teen cruise: Portland, ME to Portland, ME

July 26-30 Junior Community Sailing (Beginner)

May 22-23 Tug Blast!

June 21 Munson Institute begins

May 22 Member reception for opening of “Tugs!”

June 25-27 The WoodenBoat Show

May 22-23 Brilliant adult cruise May 28-29 Brilliant adult cruise May 29-31 Lobster Days May 30-31 Brilliant adult cruise May 31 Decoration Day

June, July & August Junior Sleuth Days June 4-5 Brilliant adult cruise June 4-6 Navigation Weekend June 5-6 Small Craft Workshop June 6-7 Brilliant adult cruise June 8 World Ocean Day June 10-13 Sea Music Festival June 14 Thimble Islands Cruise June 14-18 Brilliant teen cruise: Mystic to Mystic

June 25-September 6 Tale of a Whaler June 27-July 2 Joseph Conrad Sailing Camp June 28-July 2 Junior Community Sailing (Beginner) June 28-July 2 Junior Explorers Summer Camp June 28-July 2 Family Community Sailing (Beginner) June 28-July 7 Brilliant teen cruise: Mystic to Portland, Maine

July

July 12-16 Family Community Sailing (Beginner) July 16 The Maine Connection, Winslow Homer

July & August Summer Sundays 5-8 PM July 2-3 New! Strawberry Delights July 4 Independence Day July 4-9 Joseph Conrad Sailing Camp

June 15-June 19 Plein Air Painters of the Maritime Gallery

July 5-9 Summer Day Camp: Secrets, Serpents & Superstitions

June 18 New! Strawberry Delights

July 5-9 Summer Day Camp: Photojournalism

June 19-20 Garden Days

July 5-9 Junior Community Sailing (Beginner)

June 19 Summer Solstice River Jazz June 19 Junior Volunteer Orientation & Training

July 12-16 Junior Community Sailing (Intermediate)

July 5-9 Junior Community Sailing (Intermediate)

July 17 The Maine Connection, Eagle Island July 17-18 Adult Community Sailing (Intermediate) July 18-23 Joseph Conrad Sailing Camp July 19-23 Summer Day Camp: Girls of Long Ago July 19-23 Summer Day Camp: Growing Up in Greenmanville

July 26-30 Junior Community Sailing (Intermediate) July 30-September 1 Celebrating the Tugboat, The Maritime Gallery July 31 Lighthouse Cruise out of Newport, RI July 31 Book signing: Olympic sailor Carol Newman Cronin, Museum Store

August July 31-August 1 Adult Community Sailing (Intermediate) July 31-August 1 Moby-Dick Marathon

July 19-23 Junior Community Sailing (Beginner)

August 1-6 Joseph Conrad Summer Camp (Race Week)

July 19-23 Family Community Sailing (Intermediate)

August 2-6 Brilliant teen cruise: Mystic to Mystic

July 19-28 Brilliant teen cruise: Portland, ME to Mystic

August 2-6 Summer Day Camp: Seaport Sampler

w w w. m y s t i c s e a p o r t. o r g • 8 6 0 . 5 7 2 . 5 3 2 2

August 8-13 Joseph Conrad Summer Camp August 9-13 Brilliant teen cruise: Mystic to Mystic August 9-13 Summer Day Camp: A Sailor’s Life August 9-13 Junior Community Sailing (Beginner) August 9-13 Junior Community Sailing (Intermediate) August 14 Sabino Dixieland Cruise August 14-15 Adult Community Sailing (Intermediate) August 16-20 Brilliant teen cruise: Mystic to Mystic August 16-20 Summer Day Camp: Arts From Around the World August 16-20 Family Community Sailing (Intermediate) August 16-20 Junior Community Sailing (Racing) August 21-22 Antique Marine Engine Expo August 23-27 Brilliant teen cruise: Mystic to Mystic August 28-29 Dog Days

27 W I ND R OSE

June

,


S u mm e r EVEN T S

S u mm e r E V NTS

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Tug BlasT!

New!Sunday Summer Evenings by the River

Saturday and Sunday, May 22-23 Help celebrate the opening of our new tugboat exhibit with a ton of tug activities. There’s something for everyone, from toddlers to tug vets. Events will include radio-control tug demonstrations; behind-the-scenes tours; and a chance to board one or more visiting tugs on the Museum’s waterfront. Kids will enjoy the special “Build a Tug” project at the Toy Boat Shop and climbing on the tug playboat outside the Planetarium. Adults will like the behind-the-scenes tours and beautifully illustrated talks about tugs, past and present. Saturday evening is a special members’ cocktail reception with a featured speaker. Stay tuned for more details at www.mysticseaport.org/tugblast.

Member reception to celebrate the new “Tugs!” exhibit Saturday, May 22, 5:30-7 p.m. Members are invited to a special evening reception at the Museum’s Greenmanville Church for a lively presentation as tug captain Pat Kinnier talks about his tugboat experiences in the busy Port of New York including the towing of the aircraft carrier Intrepid across the harbor. A wine and cheese reception precedes the talk. Members: No charge Non-members: $10 per person Register online at www.mysticseaport.org or call 860.572.5322.

w w w. m y s t i c s e a p o r t. o r g • 8 6 0 . 5 7 2 . 5 3 2 2

Sunday evenings, beginning July 4 5 - 8 p.m. Enjoy live music, free access, horse and carriage rides and the peaceful beauty of Mystic Seaport and its riverside grounds on Sunday evenings from 5 to 8 p.m. all summer long. The Museum’s historic Schaefer’s Spouter Tavern will have a cash bar and hors d’oeuvres.


S u mm e r EVEN T S

Junior Sleuth Days June, July & August June 25-27

Plan to join us at Mystic Seaport for the 19th Annual WoodenBoat Show. WoodenBoat magazine calls it “The most dynamic wooden boat show in the country.” Step aboard classic and contemporary boats of every class — power, sail, oar and paddle. Learn tips and skills at workshops and much more. This memorable celebration of wooden boats will include dozens of vendors and many annual show favorites, including the

P 3rd Annual “I Built it Myself” display

P 2010 Concours d’Elegance

P Expert Skills Demonstrations

P Skua races on the Mystic River

For more information, go to www.thewoodenboatshow.com. And as always, admission to the show is free for Mystic Seaport members!

Slip into Mystic Seaport by boat this summer! Want to spend a summer evening on 17 acres of prime waterfront real estate, with all the comforts of home? Come with your boat and dock in a slip at Mystic Seaport! Put the nation’s premier maritime museum on your list of ports of call, and enjoy first-class docking facilities. Unlike any other marina or docking area, this offers you the quiet and calm beauty of our riverside grounds in the evening-—yours to stroll as an after-hours special guest of the Museum when the grounds are closed to other visitors. For docking rates and to reserve your slip, call 860.572.5391 or email docks@mysticseaport.org. w w w. m y s t i c s e a p o r t. o r g • 8 6 0 . 5 7 2 . 5 3 2 2

29 S u mm e r E V ENTS

Junior Sleuth Days for member children 4-10 are back again this summer. Your quest begins at the Membership Building, where you pick up your free Junior Sleuth Clue Card. It’s loaded with drawings of boats, buildings, animals and nautical items. Your assignment? Find them on the Museum grounds! Record your discoveries on your Clue Card, return it to the Membership Building and receive a prize—and have fun learning about special spots on the Museum grounds.


S u mm e r e v e n t s

Navigation Weekend Advanced Topics in Traditional Navigation Friday-Sunday, June 4-6, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $10/member or with paid admission $35 without paid admission

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Lobster Days

Crack your first lobster claw of the season at Mystic Seaport’s Lobster Days. Lobster platters are served picnic-style by the river under our open-air Boat Shed by the Rotary Club of Mystic. Enjoy the first weekend of the summer season as you watch boats cruising on the Mystic River and enjoy music of the sea. Proceeds from Memorial Day Weekend support the Rotary Club of Mystic’s community organizations and projects. Coastal Gourmet will be providing New England clam chowder, clam fritters and a cash bar. To learn more, go to www.mysticseaport.org/lobsterdays.

A weekend gathering of navigators and navigation enthusiasts, Navigation Weekend is devoted to the practice, history and future of traditional navigation methods. Events will include multimedia presentations and lectures as well as practical sighttaking. In addition, the weekend will include social events, including a Saturday dinner in Mystic with a special presentation (food and beverage is at the participant’s expense). This program is sponsored by the NavList online community, as well as by the Treworgy Planetarium at Mystic Seaport. Additional support is provided by the Frank Reed School of Navigation.

Decoration Day Monday, May 31 Join in a beautiful re-enactment of Decoration Day (known today as Memorial Day). Roleplayers representing residents of Mystic and Greenmanville in 1876 come together to solemnly remember those lost in the Civil War. After the ceremony in Greenmanville Church, costumed participants walk to the waterfront and pass a wreath to a widow in a rowboat. While “Taps” are playing, the wreath is placed upon the water as a poignant reminder of the true meaning of Memorial Day. For more information, go to www.mysticseaport.org/ decorationday.

w w w. m y s t i c s e a p o r t. o r g • 8 6 0 . 5 7 2 . 5 3 2 2


S u mm e r EVEN T S

Small Craft Workshop Saturday and Sunday, June 5-6 Get out on the water in all kinds of small craft: peapods, whitehalls, sharpie skiffs, wood and canvas canoes, kayaks, dories, dinghies and other boats as participants share their boats with other registered enthusiasts. Also, enjoy a row down the Mystic River early Sunday morning. To learn more and register, go to www.mysticseaport.org/smallcraftworkshop.

Sea Music Fe s t i va l

Thursday-Sunday, June 10-13

For presentations by some of the country’s leading maritime scholars, join us for the Sea Music Symposium at the University of Connecticut at Avery Point on Friday and Mystic Seaport on Saturday. And families, don't miss the children’s stage, featuring daytime music workshops. For complete schedule of workshops, concerts and symposia, and to purchase your ticket, go to www.mysticseaport.org/seamusicfestival.

w w w. m y s t i c s e a p o r t. o r g • 8 6 0 . 5 7 2 . 5 3 2 2

Plein Air Painters of the Maritime Gallery Tuesday-Saturday, June 15-19 Following the tradition of the plein air painters of the 19th and early 20th centuries, featured artists of the Maritime Gallery will be found at their easels on the grounds of Mystic Seaport capturing the shifting light along the Mystic River. Come and watch your favorite artists paint en plein air beginning Tuesday, June 15, and continuing through Saturday, June 19. Regular admission rates to Mystic Seaport apply. In additon to the paintings they will create of various sizes, each of the artists will paint a 5" x 7" panel on Saturday, June 19. At the gallery reception (open to the public), held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, June 19, paintings may be purchased fresh off the easel, and many of the artists will be in attendance. The exhibition of plein air works will continue until September 1, 2010. To learn more, go to www.mysticseaport.org/pleinair.

31 S u mm e r e v e n t s

Enjoy the nation’s leading maritime music festival with daytime performer-led workshops and performances, and toe-tapping outdoor evening concerts by the river at Mystic Seaport. This year’s theme is the Charles W. Morgan, focusing on her original ports of call around the globe. It’s an international roster, including the Barrouallie Whalers of St. Vincent, Nordet of France, the Hawaiian stylings of Three Finger Poi, the Aquinnah Wampanoag music and dance of the Black Brook Singers and a homeport tribute from New Bedford’s The Beans. The festival also features American sea music powerhouses Debra Cowen, Bob Webb, The Johnson Girls, Mustard’s Retreat, David Coffin, Peter Kasin and Richard Adrianowicz, and local Connecticut star Cliff Haslam.

David Bareford, F. ASMA, "Breaking Sky over the Mystic River," Oil 9" x 12"


S u mm e r EVEN T S

New!

Strawberry Delights June 18, July 2 & 3, July 9 & 10 Buckingham-Hall House 5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

S u mm e r E V ENTS

32

Enjoy the bounty of summer in this seasonal cooking class. Learn to prepare homemade ice cream, lemonade, shortcake, wafers done with a wafer iron over the coals, whipped cream and succulent berries. After class, sit out in the Buckingham Parlor garden with a view of the river, and enjoy the fruits of your labor.

River Jazz Summer Solstice

Featuring

Wycliffe Gordon

and his quintet

Saturday, June 19 (rain date June 20) 7–10 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.) Hot jazz and cool river breezes amidst a profusion of fresh flowers!

$25 member; $30 non-member. Pre-register or pay at the Visitors’ Center on the day of the class.

SEE PAGE

Children must be 14 years or above and cost for youth is the same as for adults. Register by calling 860.572.5322.

47 FOR DETAILS

Garden Days Saturday-Sunday, June 19-20

Join us for Garden Days, an educational event focused on gardening, landscaping, the environment and sustainability. Stroll through the village green to view displays and demonstrations, participate in hands-on activities and take a tour of the Museum’s historic gardens. Speak with local businesses and organizations about gardening, meet fellow garden enthusiasts, and shop for gardening goodies from our vendors. For the kids, partake in fun gardening activities and visit the Children’s Museum Zoo Garden. Celebrate a weekend in bloom at Mystic Seaport. For more information go to www.mysticseaport.org/gardendays. Sponsorship for Garden Days is provided by Sprigs & Twigs, the official landscape company of Mystic Seaport.

w w w. m y s t i c s e a p o r t. o r g • 8 6 0 . 5 7 2 . 5 3 2 2


S u mm e r EVEN T S

Independence Day Sunday, July 4 All-day activities. Parade, patriotic ceremony & concert 1 p.m.

The 27th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry will perform military exercises on the Green. In the afternoon, join in a game of croquet, make some ice cream and enjoy a scoop and get involved in friendly competition with some Old English sports. And you won’t want to miss those 1876 “Antiques & Horribles” in the parade. You might see Father Time, Uncle Sam, the Grim Reaper, a mermaid and who knows what else? To see past photos, www. mysticseaport.org/july4.

Friday-Sunday, July 23-25 Mystic Seaport will host the Vintage Model Yacht National Championship for four days of races on the waterfront. This event will represent 60 vintage sailing designs from the late 1800s through the 1960s, including Nat Herreshoff’s 1891 Gloriana break-through racing yacht and Starling Burgess’ famous 1908 Elizabeth Silsbee fishing schooner. An on-the-water parade of models will be highlighted by the superb 87-inch sailing replica of the Museum’s Charles W. Morgan. There will be model judging and a tent exhibit providing visitors with insights on the different vintage designs. To learn more, go to www.mysticseaport.org/modelyachtregatta.

Military Appreciation Weekend Saturday and Sunday, July 10-11 In appreciation of our military, Mystic Seaport will offer a reduced rate for active duty and retired military (with proper ID) and their families. The reduced rate is $19 for adults and $10.50 for youth ages 6-17. Children five and under are admitted free. During this weekend, the U.S. Naval Academy (USNA) Offshore Sail Training Squadron (OSTS) will visit Mystic Seaport after a 300-nautical-mile sail from Annapolis, Maryland, on four NA-44 foot sailboats. Weekend visitors to Mystic Seaport are welcome to tour a USNA offshore sailing vessel from 12 to 4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, and to meet the Navy midshipmen who crew them.

Frederick T. Kubitz, ASMA, "Tugboat Jupiter, Mystic River, Boston," OIL 18" x 24"

Celebrating the Tugboat July 30-September 1, The Maritime Gallery View original paintings and ship models celebrating the mighty tugboat. Works will be for sale. For more information, go to www.mysticseaport.org/ gallery or call 860.572.5388.

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33 SU M M E R E V ENTS

Visitors of all ages may participate in the fun and festivities when they witness the grand 1876 centennial celebration of America at 100! Children participate in a traditional 19th-century spelling bee and make a special hat to wear in the Children’s Parade. Costumed members of the 1876 Greenmanville community will participate in the parade and present an Independence Day Patriotic Ceremony at the Gazebo on the green. Along with a recitation of the Declaration of Independence, you will hear patriotic hymns sung followed by a concert featuring the Mystic Silver Coronet Band.

Vintage Model Yacht Regatta Championship


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Antique & Classic Boat Rendezvous Saturday and Sunday, July 24-25 Join us for the Antique & Classic Boat Rendezvous, a dazzling display of high-quality antique vessels, including cruisers, sailboats and runabouts. An award competition recognizes excellence in restoration, authenticity and workmanship.

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This year we feature members of the Classic Yacht Association. Dressed and in pristine condition, approximately 50 classic vessels create a colorful gathering along the Museum’s waterfront all day Saturday and Sunday morning. Sunday afternoon watch as the vessels make their way down the Mystic River in a jubilant, three-mile parade. For more information, go to www. mysticseaport.org/acbr.

s a v e t h e d a t e for

Rum Runners Rendezvous during

Antique & Classic Weekend!

S at u r day , J u ly 24, 8:00 p. m . Period dress encouraged! Please call 860.572.5365 for more information.

Moby-Dick

Marathon

Saturday-Sunday, July 31-August 1 It's the 25th Moby-Dick Marathon, a Mystic Seaport tradition celebrating the Charles W. Morgan and commemorating the birthday of Herman Melville. We start at noon on July 31 with Chapter 1 of Moby-Dick, read by a costumed roleplayer portraying Mr. Melville himself. The marathon reading continues over the next 24 hours, and will take place entirely on the deck of the Charles W. Morgan. Participants may listen or take their turn reading a chapter aloud. Participation during regular Museum hours is included with Museum admission (free for members). There is an extra fee for overnight participation. The overnight price includes a small coffee and pastry at the Bake Shop. Register online at www.mysticseaport.org or call 860.572.5322.

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J-Class and 12-Meter Model Yacht Racing Thursday-Sunday, August 12-15 This summer, the Mystic River Radio Sailors and the American Model Yachting Association will again take to the waters off Mystic Seaport for four exciting days of J-Class and 12-Meter model yacht racing. Spectators and participants welcome. For more information, contact Chuck Luscomb at chuckluscomb@dpmyc.com.

Dog Days Saturday-Sunday, August 28-29

Antique Marine Engine Expo Saturday-Sunday, August 21-22

The transition from sail to engine power was a momentous event for the maritime industry and the world. Experience it firsthand as collectors from around the country show off 19th- and early-20th-century marine engines. Inboards, outboards and steam engines will be on display in the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard. Learn more at www.mysticseaport.org/antiqueengines.

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It’s the end of summer vacation and you can count on Mystic Seaport to go to the dogs! Dog Days returns this August with brand-new demonstrations and activities, as well as the welcome return of many of last year’s favorites. Come witness lifesaving water demonstrations, meet adoptable dogs and take part in a pack of other special activities for families—and your furry ones. For the complete schedule of events, go to www.mysticseaport.org/ dogdays.


C RUISES & T RIPS

The Thimble Islands and Shore Line Trolley Museum

New! The Maine Connection:

Monday, June 14 • 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Bring a picnic lunch and enjoy a two-hour narrated cruise of Connecticut’s Thimble Islands off Stony Creek, often described as “a piece of the Maine coast that drifted into Long Island Sound.” After the cruise, visit the Shore Line Trolley Museum in East Haven. Board an antique trolley from the early 1900s and travel over a scenic salt marsh while the conductor explains the trolley's electrical mechanisms. Join us in Stony Creek. Members: $40, Non-members: $50

Winslow Homer (United States, 1836-1910) “Weatherbeaten” 1894. oil on canvas, 28 1/2" x 48 3/8" Portland Museum of Art, Maine.

Winslow Homer Friday, July 16 • 12 noon-5 p.m. Meet at the legendary Black Point Inn in Prouts Neck (just south of Portland) for an exquisite lunch in this small town where Winslow Homer painted. Hike “Cliff Walk” along the craggy coast where the famous artist was inspired. Then, meet at the Portland Museum of Art for a private, guided tour of the new exhibit, Winslow “Homer and the Poetics of Place,” a showcase of Homer’s watercolors and oils. Cost includes lunch, walk and guided tour of the Homer exhibit.

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Members: $60, Non-members: $75

Eagle Island Saturday, July 17• 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Mystic Seaport America's Cup Regatta Newport, RI Saturday, July 10 • 12:30 p.m.-6 p.m. Join Mystic Seaport members and friends this summer aboard a classic America’s Cup 12-meter yacht as crew for an exhilarating regatta in Newport, Rhode Island. You've seen these legendary 68’ yachts compete for sailing's most coveted prize, the America’s Cup, now feel the thrill of competing on board one of these powerful and graceful sailboats in picturesque Newport Harbor. For our second annual Mystic Seaport regatta, we’ve rounded up a team of six classic and modern 12-meter yachts:

• Weatherly, the 1962 America's Cup defender • American Eagle, Ted Turner’s famous champion and the 1964 Cup Contender • Nefertiti, designed by Ted Hood • Intrepid, two-time defender of the America's Cup • Columbia, winner of the 1958 America’s Cup • Heritage, 1970 America’s Cup Contender Experienced sailors may not want to pass up this opportunity of a lifetime, but novice sailors shouldn’t be shy! Professional sailing crews will instruct you as you practice trimming, jibing and coming about prior to racing. Participants’ skills are matched with a sailing position, the starting line and course are defined, and the racing begins! Includes a complimentary drink at the Newport Harbor Hotel at our post-race celebration. Sign up online now to get the boat of your choice (and make sure to let your friends know which boat you’ll be on!). Sailing positions: Members $325, Non-members $350

Meet at the Harraseeket Inn in Freeport (chosen as one of the top 500 hotels in the world in 2010) for a special presentation, No Place for a Woman, by Patricia Erikson, PhD, from the University of Southern Maine. This illustrated lecture focuses on Robert E. Peary’s wife, Josephine, and her participation on several expeditions to the North Pole (1891-1909) and on ties to their home on Eagle Island. After lunch on your own, tour the Peary family home and island trails. We return to the dock at 4:30 p.m. Cost includes presentation, cruise to Eagle Island and guided tour of the Peary island home. If you are interested in a room at the Inn, please contact them directly at 207.865.9377 and mention that you are with the Mystic Seaport group. Early reservations are strongly recommended. Members: $60, Non-members: $75

Register online for these programs at www.mysticseaport.org/memberprograms or call 860.572.5322.


C RUISES & T RIPS

New! Lowell’s Boat Shop

Amesbury, MA Saturday, July 24, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Meet at Lowell’s Boat Shop in charming Amesbury, MA, a National Landmark museum on the banks of the Merrimack River. Tour a working museum where they still build wooden dories and skiffs. Hear the stories about the simple, economical and attractive dories that are a symbol of New England ingenuity and integrity. The visit includes a picnic lunch and a time to row one of their dories on the river. Make it a fun get-away weekend, starting with the boat shop dedicated to preserving and perpetuating the art and craft of wooden boat building. If non-members decide to join either museum, there is a $10 credit toward their membership. Members: $30, Non-members: $40.

Lighthouse Cruise out of Newport Saturday, July 31 (also Saturday, September 11) • 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m.

Members: $75, Non-members: $90

Saturday, August 7 • 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sail out of Essex on the Connecticut River aboard the Mary E, an authentic 75' clipper ship built in Maine in 1906. Join the crew in hoisting the sails and steering or just relax and enjoy the river views. Hear author Roy Manston talk about his new book on the American Turtle, the extraordinary American Revolution submarine. The Connecticut River Museum owns the only working, fullscale model of David Bushnell’s 1776 invention, the first submarine ever to be used in combat. Meet at the CT River Museum at 10 a.m. The cost includes the sail, talk, exhibit tour and picnic lunch. Members: $60, Non-members: $75

Sabino cruises with a Dixieland beat Saturday, August 14 and Saturday, September 18 • 6:30-8:30 p.m. What better way to spend a summer evening than with a downriver cruise aboard the steamboat Sabino with foot-tapping Dixieland music? Dance to the tunes of the Mystic River Mud Band, enjoy delicious appetizers and a cash bar, and enjoy the camaraderie of an evening on the water. The cruise passes by boats docked along the riverfront and follows the channel out to the lighthouse at the entrance to the Mystic River. Sabino leaves from her dock near the main entrance to Mystic Seaport. Please call the Sabino office after June 1 at 860.572.5381 to purchase tickets. For more information, go to www.mysticseaport.org/dixielandcruise. Members: $45, Non-members: $55

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Drive to charming Newport, and enjoy a private Mystic Seaport three-hour cruise on Rum Runner II to get up close to local lighthouses in Narragansett Bay. The 58' wooden boat was built by Elco and transported hooch for New Jersey mobsters to the Newport mansions during Prohibition. Go ashore and tour Rose Island Lighthouse in the center of the harbor. Be at Bannister’s Wharf in downtown Newport by 9:30 a.m. for our 10 a.m. departure. As an added benefit for Mystic Seaport members, you receive a sticker to cover free all-day parking (8 a.m. until midnight) in the Gateway Visitors’ Center lot, just a ten-minute walk to Rum Runner II. Group size limited to 45.

New! Sail the Connecticut River and Discover the Turtle


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CAMPS, Classes & Summer Programs Secrets, Serpents and Superstitions (Ages 8-10) Examine secrets, sea monsters and superstitions of the sea. Explore the facts and fiction of mermaids, ghosts and shipwrecks, based on survivors’ sightings and scientific research. Make fabulous art projects, have hands-on activities in exhibits and do a bit of investigating as well. Extended care provided 3-5 p.m. M-F, $75 per child.

Summer Day Camps

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Summer Day camp at Mystic Seaport is a fun and interesting learning adventure for boys and girls 4-14. There is a program for every age and interest. Summer Day camp programs meet Monday through Friday. Each day, we explore a topic based on the subject of the camp week. Campers bring their own lunch and picnic together each day. Limited enrollment means your child gets individual attention. Our programs are licensed by the state of Connecticut and are staffed by experienced Museum educators. New for 2010 – aftercare available from 3 p.m.5 p.m., Monday-Friday. A sibling discount of five percent will be applied to any other summer camp program registered for in the same year. The Bartram Building is the new home for our summer camp programs. It is a great new space for our campers and has easy access from Route 27 (almost directly across from Hinckley Street) which will make drop-off even easier!

Junior Explorers (Ages 4 & 5) Camp meets Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. (Drop-off starts at 8:30 a.m.) Camp sessions are also offered in the afternoon 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. (Drop-off starts at 12:30 p.m.) This popular program features hands-on activities in exhibits and aboard tall ships. Campers will play unique games and create one-of-a-kind crafts. Discover stars under our planetarium dome, explore the Mystic River and more!

New! Through the Lens: Photographing Mystic Seaport (Ages 11-14) Capture the beauty of Mystic Seaport in this five-day photography workshop. From tall ships to historic gardens, explore this re-created 19th-century village with your own digital camera. You’ll create a unique photo journal to showcase your Mystic Seaport photographs. The workshop will also include a tour of the famed Rosenfeld classic photography collection. You bring your own digital camera (no disposables) and we will supply photo paper, book and instruction. Location: The Maritime Gallery at Mystic Seaport and on Museum grounds. Extended care provided 3-5 p.m. M-F, $75 per child.

Girls of Long Ago (Ages 8-10) Discover what kinds of daily life styles and opportunities girls in the 1800s had. Step back in time as you try your hand at 19th-century cooking and housekeeping in our exhibits. Learn to hand sew! Make oldfashioned accessories for the home and explore the medicinal nature of our gardens. Discover real stories of young women who lived aboard sailing ships. Extended care provided 3-5 p.m. M-F, $75 per child.

New! Growing Up in Greenmanville (Ages 11-14)

T U O D SOL

If you have always wanted to learn about the past by living it, then this is the camp for you! Campers in this program learn about first-person interpretation, or roleplaying, by adopting the personas of teenagers living in Mystic in 1876. It is an exciting year, full of nostalgia for America’s colonial past as well as visions of the future. From exploring 19th-century documents in the Museum’s collection to donning an outfit in your character’s wardrobe, you’ll see how much like you they really were. (Go to “Meet the Roleplayers” on the Museum’s website for a look at

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the characters who already inhabit 1876.) Extended care provided 3-5 p.m. M-F, $75 per child.

Seaport Sampler (Ages 6-7) Boys and girls get a kids-eye-view of Mystic Seaport while sampling many different hands-on activities in exhibits, games, crafts and music. From riding on the steamboat Sabino, to a private planetarium program to rolling a cask, children absorb maritime history through active learning and summer fun. Extended care provided 3-5 p.m. M-F, $75 per child.

A Sailor’s Life (Ages 8-10) Discover the secret lives of sailors as we roleplay different types of sailors each day. Learn sailor’s crafts and lore, practice simple seamanship skills aboard our docked ships and cruise the Mystic River on the steamboat Sabino. Extended care provided 3-5 p.m. M-F, $75 per child.

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T U O D SOL

A special hands-on program in the arts for children to learn about countries and their culture from around the world. Discover how to make a Japanese fan, paint a French landscape, an African mask and more! Extended care provided 3-5 p.m. M-F, $75 per child.

2010 Camp Dates & Prices Camp

Times

Dates

Ages

Cost

Junior Explorers

9 a.m.-12 p.m.

June 21-25

4&5

$150 (m) / $175

Junior Explorers

1 p.m.-4 p.m.

June 21-25

4&5

$150 (m) / $175

Junior Explorers

9 a.m.-12 p.m.

June 28-July 2

4&5

$150 (m) / $175

Junior Explorers

1 p.m.-4 p.m.

June 28-July 2

4&5

$150 (m) / $175

Secrets, Serpents & Superstitions

9 a.m.-3 p.m.

July 5-9

8-10

$275 (M) / $310

Through the Lens: Photographing Mystic Seaport

9 a.m.-3 p.m.

July 5-9

11-14

$300 (M) / $340

Girls of Long Ago

9 a.m.-3 p.m.

July 12-16

8-10

$275 (M) / $310

Growing up in Greenmanville

9 a.m.-3 p.m.

July 19-23

11-14

$300 (M) / $340

Seaport Sampler

9 a.m.-3 p.m.

July 26-30

6-7

$275 (M) / $310

Seaport Sampler

9 a.m.-3 p.m.

Aug. 2-6

6-7

$275 (M) / $310

A Sailor’s Life

9 a.m.-3 p.m.

Aug. 9-13

8-10

$275 (M) / $310

Art Around the World

9 a.m. -3 p.m.

Aug. 16-20

5-7

$275 (M) / $310

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NEW! Art Around the World (Ages 5-7)


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Joseph Conrad Summer Camp Young people have come to Mystic Seaport each summer to sail on the beautiful Mystic River and sleep on a tall ship for more than 60 years. Learning by doing — in a friendly and supportive atmosphere — is the cornerstone of the Joseph Conrad overnight summer sailing program. Built in Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1882, the Joseph Conrad is a square-rigger once used to train young Danish men for the merchant service. Today, permanently moored on our waterfront, she’s outfitted with bunks for 50 campers, flush toilets, showers, heat and electricity.

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During the six-day program, young people ages 10-15 sail the fleet of Dyer Dhows and learn the skills of the sea. Each day starts early with morning deck chores. After breakfast, campers tackle the wind and current of the Mystic River, then break for lunch before setting off for an active afternoon with an activity or more sailing. Evenings are filled with activities, as well as plenty of time to spend with new friends, stargazing in our planetarium, climbing the rigging of the Conrad, or enjoying a lively sea music sing-a-long. Choose the camp that best fits your child’s age group. The camps, while age-group-specific, will focus on the skill level of the individual sailor. Many campers return year after year to perfect skills, reunite with camp friends and enjoy another summer at Mystic Seaport. Program enrollment is limited to 40 for each session, so every camper gets individual attention and feels like part of the crew. Camp sessions begin Sundays at 4 p.m. and run through Fridays at 1 p.m. More information at www.mysticseaport.org/conradcamp.

Joseph Conrad Camp Levels Beginner (Ages 10–12) The perfect “first” sailing class. Beginner is designed for students with little or no sailing experience, giving them the proper instruction to begin a lifetime of sailing. Sails with a partner.

Beginner/Intermediate (Ages 13-15) This class is for youngsters who have had little to no sailing experience and are still in need of basic fundamental review before moving forward. Solo sailing is encouraged.

Intermediate (Ages 13–14) This class takes students to the next level of learning. Instruction is given to provide students with the opportunity to sail solo.

Race Week (Ages 13–15) This “final” class in the series provides students with experience sailing solo, as well as participating in a racing regatta.

Dates

Level

Cost

June 20-25

Beginner (Ages 10-12)

$635 (m) / $690

Sailing Assistant Program for Teens

June 27-July 2

Beginner/Intermediate (Ages 13-15)

$735 (m) / $790

July 4-9

Intermediate (Ages 13-14)

$635 (m) / $690

July 11-16

Beginner/Intermediate (Ages 13-15)

$735 (m) / $790

July 18-23

Intermediate (Ages 13-14)

$735 (m) / $790

July 25-30

Beginner (Ages 10-12)

$735 (m) / $790

Sailing assistants are often former Conrad campers who return as volunteer junior counselors to work alongside the full-time staff, assisting in the daily operation of the camp. The Sailing Assistant program develops leadership skills and can be a unique supporting element in college and job applications.

August 1-6

Race Week (Ages 13-15)

$735 (m) / $790

August 8-13

Intermediate (Ages 13-14)

$735 (m) / $790

You must be 16 years old to apply for a Sailing Assistant position. Priority will be given to multi-week commitments, single and multi-week assistantships are available. More information and applications available online at www.mysticseaport.org/sailingassistant.

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SUMMER SAILIng CLASSES Brilliant Teen Trips

Five-Day Programs Teens (Ages 15-18)

June, July and August Experience the adventure and challenge of sailing while visiting New England harbors and towns aboard schooner Brilliant. Nine teenage participants, on either five- to ten-day voyages, work together under the guidance of the professional crew to safely sail hundreds of miles and learn traditional seamanship skills. The Brilliant program focuses on educating participants about sail handling and theory, teamwork, being a good shipmate, stewardship, navigation, and proper seamanship. All teens are expected to fully participate in all aspects of daily vessel operations from hauling on lines and steering to helping in the galley.

Experience the beauty of Maine's coastline, harbors and towns. Brilliant's return to Maine for a few weeks this summer will allow returning participants to visit new ports while making Brilliant more accessible to participants from northern New England. Three trips this summer will offer teens the opportunity of sailing in Maine waters. The two ten-day voyages will be transits between Mystic and Portland, Maine. In addition, a five-day voyage will begin and end in Portland, Maine. Please note that the transits to and from Maine are one-way trips and parents are responsible for their participants' transportation to and from the vessel. Participants must be physically fit and agile as well as competent swimmers to take part in the sailing program. Once you reserve a berth aboard Brilliant, you will be sent a health form, letter of agreement, and a booklet of information outlining what to bring, arrival information, as well as many other details. No previous sailing experience is necessary. All voyages begin at 9 a.m. and end at 4 p.m. To learn more, go to www.mysticseaport.org/brilliant.

Dates

Sail

June 14-18

Mystic to Mystic

June 21-25

Mystic to Mystic

July 12-16

Portland, Maine to Portland, Maine

SOLD OUT

Mystic to Mystic

August 9-13 SOLD OUT

Mystic to Mystic

August 16-20

Mystic to Mystic

August 23-27

Mystic to Mystic

August 2-6

Ten-Day Programs Teens (Ages 15-18) All voyages begin at 9 a.m. and end at 4 p.m. Program Costs: $1,870/member, $1,920/non-member Dates

Sail

June 28-July 7

Mystic to Portland, Maine

July 19-28

Portland, Maine to Mystic

Brilliant Adult Trips Join seven other adults and the professional crew aboard Brilliant for a hands-on, full participation sailing experience aboard a classic yacht. Learn to sail a 61-foot schooner while cruising local waters and visiting scenic anchorages and towns. Participants become part of the crew as they raise the sails, haul on lines, steer, help in the galley and learn traditional seamanship. Common ports of call may include Block Island, RI, and Shelter Island, NY. The nightly anchorages are weather dependent and at the captain's discretion. When space and weather permit, Brilliant will lay to a dock permitting shore leave for the crew. While Brilliant has been updated with modern safety and navigation equipment, her accommodations are true to her original construction, providing open sleeping quarters and traditional heads. Participants must be physically fit and agile as well

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New! Brilliant returns to Maine this summer

All voyages begin at 9 a.m. and end at 4 p.m. Program Costs: $920/member, $970/non-member


cam p s , cla s s e s & P r og r am s as competent swimmers to take part in the sailing program. Once you reserve a berth aboard Brilliant, you will be sent a health form and a handbook outlining what to bring, arrival information, as well as many other details. No previous sailing experience is necessary. For more information, go to www.mysticseaport.org/brilliantadult.

One-Day Sails - Adult (Ages 19+) Programs begin at 9 a.m. and conclude at 4 p.m the same day. Dates

Sail Fee

May 15

$150

Mystic to Mystic

May 16

$150

Mystic to Mystic

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Dates

Sail Fee

May 22-23

$360 (m) / $410

Mystic to Mystic

May 28-29

$360 (m) / $410

Mystic to Mystic

May 30-31

$360 (m) / $410

Mystic to Mystic

June 4-5

$360 (m) / $410

Mystic to Mystic

June 6-7

$360 (m) / $410

Mystic to Mystic

September 10-11

$360 (m) / $410

Mystic to Mystic

September 12-13

$360 (m) / $410

Mystic to Mystic

September 17-18

$360 (m) / $410

Mystic to Mystic

September 19-20

$360 (m) / $410

Mystic to Mystic

September 24-25 SOLD OUT $360 (m) / $410

Mystic to Mystic

September 26-27 SOLD OUT $360 (m) / $410

Mystic to Mystic

October 2-3 SOLD OUT

Mystic to Mystic

$360 (m) / $410

Three-Day Sails - Adult (Ages 19+) Programs begin at 9 a.m. and conclude at 4 p.m. on the third day. Dates

Sail Fee

October 9-11

$570 (m) / $650

Mystic to Mystic

Anchor Watch: An Overnight Program for Youth Groups Connect your youth group to the traditions of America and the sea during a fun-filled overnight adventure at Mystic Seaport. You’ll sleep aboard the 1882 square-rigged training ship Joseph Conrad after an evening of maritime activities. Rise and shine the next morning for a hearty breakfast, then join in a group activity led by Museum staff. Afterward, you’re free to spend the day exploring Mystic Seaport on your own. The program runs Fridays and Saturdays from mid-March through mid-May, and mid-September through mid-November. Call for available dates. Cost: $75 per person includes overnight accommodations aboard the training vessel Joseph Conrad, pizza snack, evening activities, craft materials, breakfast, a Mystic Seaport patch and two days of admission (the day of arrival and the following day). Group Size: The group size is a minimum of 20 participants, maximum of 45. One supervising adult is required for every 10 children. You may combine small groups from your area. Groups with fewer than 20 participants will be charged $1,500. Eligibility: Open to all youth groups, ages 6–14. Call Central Reservations at 860.572.5322 to register. Learn more at www.mysticseaport.org/anchorwatch. Dates available on a first-come, first-served basis.

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Summer Community Sailing Adult (Ages 15 and up) Beginner

Junior Sailing

In this two-day class, you’ll be introduced to the theory of sailing (why and how a boat sails), basic sailing and gear terminology, rigging and unrigging a Dyer Dhow, equipment stowage and care, personal safety, knots, safety on the dock and on the water, points of sail, small-boat handling, right-of-way rules, and capsize and running aground procedures.

Our junior programs are for beginner and intermediate sailors. Classes use Dyer Dhows or JY15s. All equipment, except foul-weather gear, is provided. If you have a PFD, please bring your own. Competent swimmers ages 15 and older may enroll in adult classes.

Adult Beginner weekend classes Dates

Times

Cost

Sat. and Sun. July 10 - 11

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$220 (m) / $250

Sat. and Sun. July 24 - 25

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Sat and Sun Aug. 7 - 8

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$220 (m) / $250 $220 (m) / $250

Junior Beginner (Ages 8-11) Dates

Times

Cost

Mon. - Fri. July 5-9

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$140 (m) / $160

Mon. - Fri. July 19-23

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

$140 (m) / $160

Mon. - Fri. July 26-30

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$140 (m) / $160

Junior Sailing (Ages 12-14) Dates

Times

Cost

Dates

Times

Cost

Mon. - Fri. June 28 -July 2

12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

$140 (m) / $160

Sat. and Sun. July 17-18

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$220 (m) / $250

Mon. - Fri. Aug. 9-13

11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

$140 (m) / $160

Sat. and Sun. July 31-Aug. 1

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$220 (m) / $250

Sat. and Sun. Aug. 14-15

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$220 (m) / $250

Junior Intermediate (Ages 11-14) Dates

Times

Cost

Intermediate

Mon. - Fri. July 5-9

12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

$140 (m) / $160

If you are comfortable sailing a small boat alone and have mastered beginner skills, this two-day course is for you. You’ll begin with a review of terminology and points of sail, then move to learning about safety, sail trim and advanced terminology.

Mon. - Fri. July 12-16

8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

$140 (m) / $160

Mon. - Fri. July 26-30

12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

$140 (m) / $160

Mon. - Fri. Aug. 2- Aug. 6

8:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

$140 (m) / $160

Mon. - Fri. Aug. 9-Aug. 13

12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

$140 (m) / $160

Class includes practice leaving and landing at docks, picking up moorings, man overboard, inland rules of the road, gear failure, wind and current, headers and lifters.

Junior Racing Dates

Times

Cost

Mon. Aug. 16Fri. Aug. 20

8:30- a.m.-11:30 a.m.

$140 (m) / $160

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c amp s , c la s s e s & pr o gram s

Adult Intermediate weekend class

43


cam p s , cla s s e s & P r og r am s

Family Community Sailing Learn to sail as a family! Master water safety, boat controls and basic sailing maneuvers through shore and on-the-water activities. Pick from two classes, one class for beginner parents or an intermediate class where the parents feel comfortable in a boat.

Family sailing (Beginner) Dates

Times

Cost

Mon. - Fri. June 28-July 2

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$250 (m) / $290

Mon. - Fri. july 12-16

12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

$250 (m) / $290

Mon. - Fri. Aug. 2-6

12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

$250 (m) / $290

c amp s , c la s s e s & pr o gram s

Fall Sailing Classes Adult Beginner sailing

Family sailing (Intermediate) 44

Fall Community Sailing

Dates

Times

Cost

Sun. Sept. 12Sun. Nov. 7

9 a.m.-12 p.m.

$220 (m) / $250

Dates

Times

Cost

Mon. - Fri. July 19-23

12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

$250 (m) / $290

No class on September 19.

Mon. - Fri. Aug. 16-20

12:30 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

$250 (m) / $290

Adult Intermediate sailing

Above pricing includes one adult and one youth. $25 for each additional child (up to two more). Each five-day session meets Monday through Friday.

Dates

Times

Cost

Sun. Sept. 12Sun. Nov. 7

1 p.m.-4 p.m.

$220 (m) / $250

No class on September 19.

Adult Advanced sailing Dates

Times

Cost

Sat. Sept. 11 Sat. Nov. 6

1 p.m.-4 p.m.

$220 (m) / $250

No class on October 2.

Racing series Dates

Times

Cost

Sat. Sept. 11 Sat. Nov. 6

2 p.m.-5 p.m.

$150 (m)

No class on October 2.

Homeschool Beginner sailing Dates

Times

Cost

Fri. - Fri. Sept. 10 - Oct. 29

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$130 (m)

www.mysticseaport.org/communitysailing

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RE G i s t r at i o n

How To Register

Important Information

Nearly all classes, programs and ticketed events have online registration. In addition, registration forms can be found on the web at www.mysticseaport.org/registration and can be faxed, emailed or mailed.

In the event of extreme weather, Mystic Seaport may cancel a class or program. A full refund will be issued only if the participant cannot be rescheduled.

PHONE

860.572.5322

Fax

860.572.5398

Mail

Reservations Mystic Seaport P.O. Box 6000 75 Greenmanville Avenue Mystic, CT 06355

EMail reservation.desk@mysticseaport.org Courses are filled on a first-come, first-served basis.

Occasionally, Mystic Seaport photographs or videotapes visitors while on the grounds for use in a variety of publicity and promotional materials and to advance our educational mission. We thank you for your cooperation and support.

Cancellation Policies Unless otherwise noted, all registrations for classes and programs are nonrefundable and nontransferable.

Planetarium, Community Sailing, Shoreside Trades and John Gardner Boat Shop Courses Cancellations made up to 30 days prior to the start of a course will receive a refund less an administrative fee of 25% of the course cost. Cancellations made 15 to 29 days prior to a class will receive a refund less an administrative fee of 50% of the course cost. No refund will be given if cancelled within 14 days of the course.

Payment is due in full at the time of registration.

Schooner Brilliant Adult AND TEEN Sails, Joseph Conrad Program and SumMer day camps

Mystic Seaport program prices are subject to change without prior notice.

Williams-Mystic, the Maritime Studies Program of Williams College and Mystic Seaport, offers undergraduates a hands-on, interdisciplinary semester focused on the world’s oceans. Classes requiring original research and writing are conducted at Mystic Seaport in maritime history, marine sciences, environmental policy and literature of the sea. Taking hands-on learning even farther, Williams-Mystic students explore America in a way unlike any other — from a sailing voyage on a tall ship and traveling both the Pacific and Gulf coasts on three extended field seminars.

Williams-Mystic The Maritime Studies Program of Williams College and Mystic Seaport

Sophomores, juniors and seniors from any accredited four-year institution may apply for a fall or spring semester. Admission is competitive. Students earn a full semester of credit and transcript from Williams College. Need-based financial aid is available. For an application, please visit us at www.williams.edu/williamsmystic or call 860.572.5359, ext. 2.

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45 R E G I ST R AT I ON

Cancellations made up to 30 days prior to the start of courses will receive a refund less an administrative fee of 25% of the course cost. The administrative fee will be 50% for Brilliant charters. No refund will be given for cancellations made within 30 days of any Brilliant or camp courses.


M E M BER G E A R Charles W. Morgan Umbrella

baseball cap

Double-sided, navy/white 42" auto-open umbrella with white piping and image of Charles W. Morgan. Windproof frame folds to 18.5".

Canvas cap with member burgee logo. Leather strap. Mesh lining to promote cooling. Breton red, khaki or yellow. Specify color choice.

$18 • ITEM CODE #0011

$23 • ITEM CODE #0016

flashlight

brilliant sport pack

Ocean blue, aluminum flashlight with member burgee logo features 17 white LED lights, a pushbutton on/off switch and hand rope. Batteries incld.

Black microfiber. 15"x12". Unique double-draw top/shoulder strap combination. Zippered gusset expands to 5" on the bottom.

$15 • ITEM CODE #0077

$15 • ITEM CODE #0023

TWO-BOTTLE COOLER TOTE

burgee

Lightweight yet sturdy, two-bottle cooler tote, perfect for wine. Comes with a high-quality combination wood-detailed corkscrew/bottle opener. The front pocket and detachable padded bottle divider make this a perfect picnic or boat accessory.

Durable 400-denier nylon. UV inhibitor to reduce fading. Anti-microbial coating to prevent mildew. No-fray bond. Two brass grommets. $32 • ITEM CODE #0012 • SMALL 12"X18" $42 • ITEM CODE #0013 • LARGE 16"X24"

$35 • ITEM CODE #0069

Proceeds from the sale of these items contribute to the education and preservation efforts of Mystic Seaport. All prices include shipping and handling. Tax, where applicable, not included. Available exclusively at our Membership Office (860.572.5339).

Program, Class and Member Gear Order Form MEMBER GEAR

46 give the gift of membership and receive a Mystic Seaport Member's hat.

Name

City

Address

Phone

State

Email

Payment Information

Offer valid through 09/30/10. Visit us online at www.mysticseaport.org to order.

Membership ID#

Member Gear (members only)

Payment by check: make check payable to Mystic Seaport Payment by Credit Card Visa Mastercard

Zip

Amex

CODE

DESCRIPTION

specify (color) if applicable

QTY

UNIT PRICE

SUBTOTAL

Discover

Expiration Date Contact Membership Office for international rates prior to placing order.

Account Number Signature

Mail Orders: Mystic Seaport Reservations 75 Greenmanville Ave. Mystic, CT 06355-9990

Programs & Classes PG #

DESCRIPTION

DATE

MEMBER

CT deliveries and 6% sales tax baseball cap tax exempt

$

MERCHANDISE TOTAL

$

NON-MEMBER

QTY

UNIT PRICE

specify (date) (youth* or adult) (luncheon choice) if applicable

Call-in Orders: Reservations Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 860.572.5322

*If youth, please provide birthdate.

PROGRAMS TOTAL

$

GRAND TOTAL r e gi s t e r f o r pr o gram s A ND C L A SSES o n li n e at w w w. my s t i c s e ap o r t. o rg .

$

SUBTOTAL


River Jazz

Summer Solstice

Featuring

Wycliffe Gordon

Event Tickets:

and his quintet

Members: free! Non-members: $17/adult, $7/youth (6–17)

Saturday, June 19 (rain date June 20) 7–10 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.)

VIP Seating on Chubb’s Wharf:

Hot jazz and cool river breezes amidst a profusion of fresh flowers.

Summer's Eve Picnic Baskets

Wycliffe Gordon returns for our annual member appreciation night with a special jazz concert by the river. The 2001 and 2002 Jazz Journalists Association Critics’ Choice Winner for Best Trombone, Wycliffe has traveled the globe with Wynton Marsalis, was a member of the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra and was featured on Ken Burns’ extraordinary “Jazz” documentary. Universally hailed by jazz critics as “mixing powerful, intricate runs with sweet notes extended over clean melodies,” he is an extraordinary performer, conductor, composer, arranger and educator. Sunset is a magical time to be at Mystic Seaport when rich colors play off the water and ships. Experiencing the music of Wycliffe Gordon amidst the tall ships is truly a memorable event. This year, plan to arrive earlier in the afternoon and enjoy our Garden Days event. Then grab a picnic basket (reservation required) and find a seat near the river to enjoy the sunset over Chubb’s Wharf—punctuated by jazz. And as in years past, we're sure to have a few surprises.

Members Only: $20 (Limited—reservations required by June 10)

Choose one of the following sandwiches: Smoked Connecticut turkey, Black Forest ham and brie, grilled marinated vegetables, or premium roast beef and herb cream cheese. Basket also includes a fresh fruit salad, pasta salad, freshly baked jumbo cookie and Mystic chips. $15 per person

Summer's Dream Picnic Baskets For Two Enjoy international cheeses with gourmet crackers, seasonal vegetables and curry mango dip and a bottle of Stonington Vineyards Seaport White wine. $38 per couple Pick up your picnic dinner basket at the Galley between 6:30-7:30 p.m. and enjoy a drink at the cash bar. Picnic basket reservations required by June 10. Non-members must also purchase an event ticket.

Register online at www.mysticseaport.org/summersolstice or call 860.572.5322.


SUMMER 2010

75 Greenmanville Avenue PO Box 6000 Mystic, CT 06355-0990 Dated Material Do not hold

So your kid likes photography? Sailing? Art? Living history? There’s a camp for that at Mystic Seaport. Mystic Seaport has more camp choices than ever this year. You’ll find camps for every interest, starting at age four. Extended care is available M-F. Climb aboard for an adventure, either a day camp or residential camp, like our popular overnight Conrad summer sailing camp, or our sensational sailing program on the 61-foot schooner Brilliant. Games, crafts, music, art and living history—it’s all part of Mystic Seaport summer camp fun. So whether your kid is ready for the high seas or an avowed landlubber, there’s a Mystic Seaport camp for that.

There’s a camp for that. To learn about all of our camps, visit www.mysticseaport.org/summercamps or call 860.572.5322.

Profile for Mystic Seaport Museum

Mystic Seaport Magazine Summer 2010  

Mystic Seaport is the official magazine of Mystic Seaport, dedicated to all things "America and the Sea." Mystic Seaport presents a lively...

Mystic Seaport Magazine Summer 2010  

Mystic Seaport is the official magazine of Mystic Seaport, dedicated to all things "America and the Sea." Mystic Seaport presents a lively...

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