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SUMMER 2009

SUMMER

ON THE RIVER

America and the Sea Photo Contest | Sea Music Festival | Mapping the Pacific Coast


WHAT’S NEW AT

MYSTIC SEAPORT? JUST ABOUT EVERYTHING. Now there’s more than ever to enjoy at Mystic Seaport this summer. From the incredible restoration of the Charles W.

Morgan to exciting new events like Maritime Mystery and Dog Days weekend. Plus Sabino music cruises, painting classes and dining on the river! There’s something for everyone. So drop by and make a day (or two) of it.

www.mysticseaport.org/calendar

New Exhibits

New Events

Mapping the Pacific Coast: Coronado to Lewis & Clark

Family Fun Weekend

Restoring an Icon: The Charles W. Morgan Map Spot: Exploring the World Of Maps

New Programs & Classes

Mystic Seaport Dinner Theater

Painting the Maritime Landscape

Maritime Mysteries

Safe Powerboating

Sea Story Weekend

The Art of Orienteering

Get Out On The Water Days

Music On The River

Garden Days Dog Days Weekend


CONTENTS

16

summer

2009

8 10

6 8

in every

issue

President Steve White takes the helm

“Mapping the Pacific�: A new exhibit opens at Mystic Seaport

10 16

An American Album: America & The Sea Photo Contest

Sea Music Festival celebrates 30 years

seascapes. .........................

4

armchair sailor................

15

museum briefs....................

5

greenhands corner. .........

20

gardening by the sea.........

13

calendar of events...........

23.

in the galley....................

14

windrose (events, classes.

and programs)............. 23-43


SEAscapes A

s you can see, the message from the President has changed to Seascapes from Sightings. Those of you who have gone to sea and those who have stood at the shoreline dreaming of a destination beyond the horizon know well the reflective places to which the seascape transports us. Painters and poets have long captured that mood and the seascape itself so that others, too, may enjoy and interpret what is so unique to the sea and its environs. This page in our magazine gives me a chance to reflect upon what I see here at Mystic Seaport and well beyond our own shores. As we enjoy these glorious summer months when the Museum is at its zenith of activity and vitality, the village, the ships and the duPont Shipyard are alive and telling their compelling stories as only they can. Pay attention to the faces on children during these times and one can’t help but be inspired by the “magic of Mystic.” Yet we all know that museums, like Mystic Seaport, are facing an economic storm that challenges our ability to tell these stories well and to protect our treasures, both large and small. Museums in particular find it difficult to navigate through such storms, as we are so rich in physical assets yet so limited in cash to cover even our most essential and basic expenses. In such times, it’s you, our members, volunteers and friends, on whom we must depend, even more then ever. Our dedicated staff, whose numbers have sadly been depleted, can only withstand so much work and pressure, and our amazing corps of volunteers have done their best to fill the gaps and to add value to the experience of each visitor. In order for the Museum to fulfill its mission and flourish in doing so, it’s critical that we grow the Annual Fund by at least 50% in this fiscal year, meaning that we will look to members and friends to make the Museum their philanthropic priority this year and for the next two. By realizing this goal, we can then begin to reinstate some of those things that have been eliminated in recent months, as well as create new programs that can reinvigorate our community. In addition, we are renewing our efforts to find more corporate support, and we are building broader partnerships with other leading organizations that share our values and our responsibility to America. Along this focused journey, we will look for fresh, new ideas that will help Mystic Seaport stand taller in the region and in the genre. We are exploring new ways to expand our outreach and how we share the spirit of the Museum with those who can’t make the trip to Mystic or with those who aren’t aware, yet, of this jewel on the Connecticut coast. Finally, come climb aboard and crawl around the Charles W. Morgan, hauled ashore in our shipyard. Here you will see, smell, hear and feel all that Mystic Seaport is and acutely observe how authentic and critical our work truly is.

Mystic Seaport magazine is a publication of Mystic Seaport

The Museum of America and the Sea. President STEPHEN C. WHITE executive vice president SUSAN FUNK Editor Anna F. Sawin contributors DAN BRAYTON ELYSA ENGELMAN JEAN KERR LEIGH KNUTTEL ERIN RICHARD Design Caspari McCormick Photography Judy Beisler CHELLE FARRAND Dennis Murphy nicki pardo photography Andy Price SUSANNAH SNOWDEN / OMNIA PHOTOGRAPHICS

cover Summertime on the river: small craft workshop at mystic seaport. photo © mystic seaport.

CONTACT US VISITOR INFORMATION 860.572.5315 | 888.973.2767 ADMINiSTRATION: 860.572.0711 MEMBERSHIP: 860.572.5339 CENTRAL RESERVATIONS: 860.572.5323 MUSEUM STORE: 860.572.5385 MARITIME GALLERY: 860.572.5388 VOLUNTEER SERVICES: 860.572.5378 WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG

Stephen C. White President


CONTENTS

BRIEFS

Restoring an Icon: New exhibit opening June 26

Last fall saw the hauling of the mighty Charles W.

5 m u se u m b r i e f s

Morgan, now ashore for a planned three-year restoration. The Morgan is open for visitors, as is a brand new exhibit in the Museum’s duPont Shipyard detailing the painstaking, skillful restoration of this National Historic Landmark. “Restoring an Icon: The Charles W. Morgan” explores the preservation of the world’s last wooden whaleship. Learn all about the tools and timbers and the skills and stories that are part of the unprecedented restoration of this American icon. This interactive exhibit offers visitors audio-guided tours of the Morgan, detailing parts of the vessel that have been untouched since her construction in 1841.

Mystic Seaport joins Team Acadia When Stonington skipper Clay Burkhalter leaves Newport in early June for the first leg of the Bermuda One/Two race, there will be one very noticeable difference to the hull of his sailboat Acadia – the Mystic Seaport logo. That’s because Acadia, the 21-foot solo, transatlantic racer, commonly known as a Mini, is the latest addition to the Museum’s collection of more than 500 watercraft. Donated by Burkhalter and his partner who helped fund construction of the vessel, Acadia joins Brilliant as the Museum’s only active sailing vessels. Burkhalter raced the vessel in the 2007 Mini Transat race from the start in France to the finish in Brazil. One of just two American vessels in the fleet of more than 80 racers, Acadia completed the course in 25 days, 10 hours – good enough for 12th place. Racing under the Mystic Seaport banner, Burkhalter hopes to compete in the next Mini Transat race in 2010. Burkhalter spent the winter working on the boat at the Museum, answering questions from visitors about the boat, his accomplishments and future plans. When the vessel isn’t racing, plans call for it to remain at the Museum – giving visitors the chance to learn about its brief – but busy – history.

In February, former President and Director J. Revell Carr spoke at the Musem’s Maritime Authors Series about his book, Seeds

of Discontent. From left to right, former President J. Revell Carr, President Steve White and former President Doug Teeson.


HOMEPORT

President

W h ite ta k e s

t h e

h e l m

A

fter Steve White accepted the appointment to the office of president of Mystic Seaport last fall, one of the first things he did was reread the maritime classic Moby-Dick. Since then, the lifelong educator has made it a practice to read a maritime work each week in his spare time, ranging from universal classics like Melville to Mystic Seaport titles like America and the Sea: Treasures from the Collections of Mystic Seaport, Waldo Howland’s A Life in Boats, John Leavitt’s Wake of the Coasters and Marion Dickerman’s The Three Founders.

“Every

place I go at this Museum, I am moved by what I see, from the bilge of the Morgan to the backrooms of the CRC,” White says. “This is a mighty impressive place.” The past few months have given him a chance to learn as much as possible about the Museum and its people as he gathers knowledge about past practices to shape the strategy of his administration. “I have learned that Mystic Seaport is staffed by wonderfully dedicated individuals who daily strive to fulfill our stated objectives, even with reduced human and financial resources,” says White. “I’ve learned that our predecessors, such as Cutler, Bradley, Stillman, Mallory, Schaefer, Ridgway, Carr and Howland, have left us a legacy of stewardship for our country’s maritime heritage that must be furthered and protected by our actions today and in years to come.” White took over the helm at Mystic Seaport from Retired Coast Guard Rear Admiral Doug Teeson on January 15. “It was important to find a successor capable of building on Doug’s many achievements,” said Richard Vietor, chairman of the Museum’s board of trustees. “We’ve found that person in Steve White – an experienced educator, successful fundraiser and someone with a deep passion for sailing and for Mystic Seaport.”

White was headmaster of the Fay School in Southborough, MA for 18 years, and a teacher before that. A native of Camden, ME, White has long enjoyed a connection to the sea, sailing with his grandfather and father in wooden boats. He found his call to education through the sea as well, having spent summers as a director of junior sailing programs at Camden Yacht Club and Fort Worth Boat Club. Before beginning his teaching career, White made two transatlantic crossings on a sloop from Connecticut. He and his wife Maggie now live in Mystic. “What inspires me about Mystic Seaport is the pervasive sense of a clear mission —connecting Americans with the sea—and how palpable it is in everything the Museum does,” said White. “Mystic Seaport provides more than a career challenge for me. It gives me an opportunity to return to my roots. And, more importantly, to tell stories. As an educator, I cherish the opportunity to tell stories. And there is no better place to tell maritime stories than Mystic Seaport.” Looking ahead, White is unflinching about the challenges the Museum faces in turbulent economic times. “I’m from Maine—I’m a realist,” he says. “However, there is no doubt in my mind that Mystic Seaport will rise from these tentative and uncertain times and undergo a great renaissance. Now is the time to plot the course for that envisioned future. In every area, we can set the standard, be it restoration, education, caring for objects—we can be the definitive resource. “I am so proud of this institution and wish I had been here years ago. I am convinced it is ready to experience a rebirth, and it needs us to do our good work more than ever. Right now, instead of a full set of sails, we’re flying the storm trysail. But we are still sailing on.” ~ Anna sawin

7 HOMEPORT

But that isn’t the only way White is getting to know Mystic Seaport. On any given day you might find him brown-bag lunching with the staff in the CRC, speaking with the shipwrights on board the Morgan, examining the fearsome blades of the Museum’s massive sawmill with sawyer Scott Noseworthy or visiting the Information Technology team.


m a pp i n g the pa c i f i c co a st

8

Mapping the Pacific Coast AN e w E x h i b i t a t M y s t i c S e a p o r t we all use maps and map skills to navigate the world, from roadmaps t o n a u t i c a l c h a r t s , GPS u n i t s t o h a n d - s c r a w l e d d i r e c t i o n s . T h i s summer, plot a course to Mystic Seaport to enjoy a range of exhibits, programs and activities all related to maps and wayfinding.

“Mapping the Pacific Coast: Coronado to Lewis and Clark” is a special traveling exhibit of rare antique maps. Made between 1550 and 1802, these maps were highly prized and jealously guarded by European rulers intent on finding lucrative trade routes and claiming new territories. Individually, they are beautiful works of art featuring ornate cartouches and borders, imaginative drawings of sea serpents and ships, and detailed observations about coastlines and rivers – some accurate and some not. Together, they trace the evolution of European understanding about the geography and orientation of North America’s Pacific Coast. A free audio guide enables you to hear collector Henry Wendt discuss the story behind each map or illustration, prompting you to peer closely at the details and enter the world of the mapmaker and explorer. Also on


HOMEPORT

display in the gallery will be a small selection of navigational instruments and other artifacts from the Museum’s collection. These will include an Americanmade backstaff from 1762, a chronometer used aboard the Charles W. Morgan, and a scale model of Endeavour, one of the ships used by Captain Cook. A beautiful exhibit catalog featuring full-color plates of the Wendt maps is also available for purchase, to examine in detail at home. “Mapping the Pacific Coast” will be at Mystic Seaport until January 2010. Next door, the Art Spot has been hey are beautiful works transformed into the Map Spot—a of art featuring ornate fun, hands-on activity center where cartouches and borders, you can explore many different types of maps, learn how to read and create i m a g i n a t i v e d r a w i n g s o f your own maps and test your knowl- s e a s e r p e n t s a n d s h i p s . . . edge of geography and wayfinding. The activities will engage members of all ages and stages, from map enthusiasts to the geographically challenged, from family groups with school-age kids to single visitors. You’ll see historic and modern maps in a new light as you encounter a giant, wall-size map of the world or a 3D toppgraphic model of an island and surrounding waters. Make and take home a memory map of your favorite room or create a fantasy map of your dog’s perfect day and leave it for display in the gallery. Test your ability to follow confusing directions and find the right map to your destination. Put yourself in the shoes of maritime explorers approaching an island from the sea and trying to map its outline. Or race the clock through a series of visual map games that will test your cartographic knowledge and skill. The Map Spot opened in May 2009, and will

t

Members, join us for a private wine and cheese reception on June 6. Enjoy a talk by map collector and voyager Henry Wendt who will discuss maps from his private collection on display in this new exhibit. For more information, see page 27.

M a pp i n g the pa c i f i c co a st

remain open through October 2010. When you’re done with these two new temporary exhibits, re-visit the Museum’s permanent exhibits on navigation and wayfinding that have long been visitor favorites: the Nautical Instruments Shop and the newly upgraded Treworgy Planetarium. This summer is a great time to chart a course for all the map spots at Mystic Seaport!

9


AM E RI C A & T H E S E A P H O T O C O N T E S T

An American

Album Mystic Seaport magazine readers, you did it again. You wowed us with hundreds of images capturing your vision of America and the Sea, picturing breathtaking coastal locales from Maine to Alaska. With just two pages to show you the winners, we’ll let the images speak for themselves. And of our top picks, these are just a few of our favorites. For more judges favorites, go online to www.mysticseaport.org/judgesfavorites. a m e r i c a & the se a photo contest

10

Overall Grand Prize Winner “Bass Harbor Lighthouse” Bass Harbor, ME Bob Parisi ~ Northford, CT

ADULT: LIFE CATEGORY First Place “Ospreys” Orleans, MA Mikael Carstanjen ~ Orleans, MA

YOUTH: FIRST PLACE “Critter Litter” Black Point, East Lyme, CT Dan Forget ~ East Lyme, CT Age 17


AM E RI C A & T H E S E A P H O T O C O N T E S T ADULT: LANDSCAPE CATEGORY Honorable Mention “Sunrise in Tidal Pool” Cape May, NJ Emanuel Lekkas ~ Winston Salem, NC

ADULT: LANDSCAPE CATEGORY Honorable Mention “Three Tugs” Staten Island, NY

11

ADULT: LANDSCAPE CATEGORY First Place “Golden Falls” Shannock, RI Steve Wood ~ Wakefield, RI

ADULT: LIFE CATEGORY Second Place “Rowing beneath fair skies” Mystic, CT Ingrid Mathews ~ Wyoming, RI

Start shooting today for next year’s contest! Photographs will be submitted via Flickr.com this year, and will be accepted from July 15, 2009 through December 1, 2009. For complete contest information, go to www.mysticseaport.org/photocontest2009.

a m e r i c a & the se a photo contest

Rob Rintoul ~ Hamden, CT


ho m epo r t

A

Brilliant Voyage

hough I grew up in Southern California near the ocean, I waited 30 years and traveled 3,000 miles to experience my first sailing adventure. Last September, still a relative newcomer to both the East Coast and Mystic Seaport, I had the opportunity to view both from an entirely different vantage point—aboard the schooner Brilliant. ho m epo r t

12

The days leading up to my two-day sail were filled with encouragement and enthusiasm from Museum staff members. Being the sailing novice that I was—with a seafaring résumé that consisted entirely of one Caribbean cruise—I gratefully welcomed any words of wisdom. It seemed everyone I ran into had either sailed on Brilliant in the past, or was enviously awaiting their moment to do so. Designed by Sparkman & Stephens and launched in 1932 from the City Island, NY, shipyard of Henry B. Nevins, Brilliant is an icon within both the sailing community and Mystic Seaport. Since her arrival at the Museum in 1952, the vessel has been an offshore classroom offering both youth and adults the opportunity to learn traditional seamanship skills. More than 50 years have passed since she began her work as a sail training vessel, and close to 10,000 people can call themselves Brilliant alumni. And I was about to join the club. My six shipmates and I met up alongside Brilliant on a misty fall morning. After stowing our minimal belongings below deck and receiving fundamental instructions from our captain and mate (regarding everything from flushing the hand-operated head to proper emergency procedures), we were soon hauling in fenders, motoring out under the Mystic drawbridge and searching for the wind that would sail us to Greenport, Long Island.

Approximately 10 minutes had passed when I realized that sailing a schooner is not a Caribbean vacation. Memories of mai tais and shuffleboard were instantly replaced with schooner vocabulary 101. Starboard and port? What is a halyard, what is a winch and when do I use them? When is the right time to tack and what is heeling again? Being the crew member with the least amount of experience (i.e., none), I was completely overwhelmed. But then something slowly began to happen. Through the patient instructions from our captain, coupled with the repetitive, methodical work with my shipmates, I found myself becoming a sailor. I began to understand the direction of the wind and the role it played with tacking and jibing. I became aware of the difference between the foresail and the mainsail and the unique function they each held. I grew to respect and look forward to the downtime I was able to share with my crewmates, listening as my new friends shared insight not only about sailing, but about life as well. The next day my body ached from using muscles that I forgot I had. I’m pretty sure I didn’t smell that great and I had long since given up on my hair. But I didn’t care. Within 48 hours I had gone from not knowing where a boat’s stern was to helping sail Brilliant along with the rest of them. And that is an experience I’ll treasure long after the mai tais are gone.

Image above: Author Erin Richard and shipmate Chelle Farrand.

~ Erin Richard

Adult cruises onboard Brilliant are held on spring and fall weekends, while teens sail aboard Brilliant in summer. Charters are also available. See page 23, in the WindRose section of this magazine, to learn how to register for your Brilliant cruise. See the WindRose section of this magazine to learn how to register for your Brilliant adult cruise.


G a r d en i n g b y the se a

Peonies

perfection in bloom:

15 inch growth and finely dissected medium green leaves can easily complement smaller annuals and perennials. The most widely cultivated tree peony, P. rockii (suffruticosa), is a broad spreading shrub that can attain a size of five feet by five feet. As many as one hundred six- to eight-inch blossoms may grace this large leafed, deciduous, woody stemmed plant. These have been revered by royalty, cherished by gardeners, and grown for centuries for traditional medicinal purposes. Both Chinese and Japanese hybrids are available. Peonies can live 50 to 100 years. Like the discovery of lilacs on old farm sites, clumps of long-lived peonies can provide clues to prior land use. It is important to site peonies carefully, as they often sulk for a year or two following transplanting. The spreading roots of these somewhat greedy plants are best provided for by preparing a wide planting hole, liberally enriched with compost and bone meal, in well drained, slightly sweet soil. Planting depth is important; one inch below soil surface for herbaceous and four inches below for trees. Good hygiene is important; dead foliage should be removed, and not composted, to prevent the spread of fungal diseases and wilts. Part-day sun and gentle air circulation encourage perfect blooms. Flowering in late spring to early summer, post-rhododendron and pre-rose, the peony fills a gap in garden bloom sequences. The flowers of the longstemmed herbaceous plants are perfect for cutting, and possess an extended vase life. The shorter-stemmed tree flowers are elegant in low bowls. So follow Alice Harding’s advice, reserve four square feet and plant a peony that you and future generations will appreciate and enjoy! ~ leigh knuttel

Gardening by the Sea columnist Leigh Knuttel is the Arboretum Horticulturalist at Connecticut College. She was the Museum’s supervisor of grounds for many years and was responsible for many of the fascinating plants at Mystic Seaport.

13 g a r d en i n g b y the se a

“Had I but four square feet of ground at my disposal, I would plant a peony in the center and proceed to worship,” said Alice Harding, peony grower from the early twentieth century. With that proclamation, don’t peonies sound like “must haves” for the garden, deserving of the honor associated with their other title, King or Queen of the Flowers? For those of us who garden, peonies can be separated into three groups: herbaceous types, tree peonies and intersectional hybrids. The hybrids result from crosses between the tree and herbaceous types. Although botanists and geneticists continue to reclassify the peony family, plant form and structure can guide garden choices. Dying to the ground each fall, herbaceous peonies emerge from rosy buds and develop as shiny, deep red shoots. Maturing to handsome dark green foliage, the long stems are crowned by three to six inch, often fragrant, flowers. Colors range from white and yellow, through pinks to red. Blossom types may be single, anemone, double, or the full and frilly “bomb.” Most of the herbaceous types are derivates of either Paeonia officinalis (Rubra Plena) from southern Europe, or P. lactifolia, of northeast Asia. The latter, the Chinese Peony, was introduced to Europe in the 1780s, although it had been cultivated in China and Japan for hundreds of years prior. Fern-leaf Peony, P. tenuifolia, not as widely available as its large-leafed cousins, can be sited as a front of the border plant. Its compact 12 to


i n the g a l l e y

BLOSSOMS TO DINE ON I’m not a great gardener, but in the summer I love tending my herb garden, not just for its culinary delights but for the lovely purplish blue flowers that bloom during the summer months. The flowers of sage, chives, basil and many other herbs can be eaten, and always add a lovely edible garnish to your plate. I love grazing on chive buds and nasturtium flowers. Both are wonderful in salads and I especially love chive buds to season a simple goat cheese omelette. In both Italian and Hispanic cuisines, stuffed squash blossoms are a delicious savory and are often stuffed with cheese and deep fried. Since Roman times, flowers have been used in the kitchen to add beauty and flavor to a wide variety of dishes, both savory and sweet. Roses and lavender have long been used to infuse waters and wines. Honeysuckle and the entire viola family, such as violets and Johnny Jump Ups, add a delicious hint of sweetness to dishes. Day lilies are used in some Asian dishes and are said to taste faintly like chestnuts. (For an excellent list of edible—and inedible!—blossoms, go to About.com’s Home Cooking section and search on edible flowers.) This recipe is adapted from James Haller and Jeffrey Paige’s book Cooking in the Shaker Spirit. It combines some of summer’s greatest delicacies. You may use any delicate white fish, such as flounder or skate, instead of sole.

i n the g a l l e y

14

Jean Kerr is the author of Mystic Seafood: Great Recipes, History, and Seafaring Lore from Mystic Seaport, as well as Union Oyster House Cookbook and the forthcoming Windjammer Cooking. She is the editor of Taste of the Seacoast magazine and co-owner of Smith Kerr Associates Publishing.

BAKED GRAY SOLE in lobster nasturtiu m cream sauce 1/2 stick of unsalted bu tter 1/4 cup flour 3/4 cup white wine 2 1/2 cups light cream

15 nasturtium blossom s 1 cup chopped lobster meat 3 pounds of gray sole fill ets

1. Preheat the oven to 450˚F. 2. Melt the butter in a saucepan. Add the flour , and stir to make a rou Add the wine and light x. cream and stir until sm ooth and slightly thicken 3. Add the nasturtium ed. blossoms and lobster meat and stir until just 4. Place the sole fillets he ate d through. in a baking dish and se ason lightly with salt. 5. Pour the lobster nastu rtium sauce over the fill ets and bake for 10–12 until fish is flaky and op minutes aque. Serves 6.

To try a savory recipe for Fried Zucchini Blos soms, go to www.mysticseap ort.org/recipes.


HOMEPORT

armchair·sailor

Sloop by Daniel Robb (Simon and Schuster, 2008)

which the author tracks down the vestiges of New England’s thriving—if impecunious—culture of professional and backyard wooden boat builders. His loving descriptions of encounters with boat builders, sawyers, sail makers, hardware store clerks and boat nuts of all kinds would be worth reading even without the suspense of wondering whether or not Robb will be able to complete the restoration to his own satisfaction. Along the way we learn a good deal about Herreshoffs, the watercraft of southern New England and Robb’s quirky friends. This is not a book to read for technical information. Any issue of WoodenBoat will contain at least as much detail and wisdom on how to fix a boat. What you should read this book for is its combination of patiently crafted, unpretentious writing and clear-sighted inquiry into the practical details of what the subtitle of the book calls “old-fashioned values.” Those values are exemplified in both the craftsmanship and tradition that Robb celebrates in his boat and by the friends who help the project along. This is a book for anyone who shares a love for wood, wind, water and simplicity.

Dan Brayton is a Visiting Assistant Professor of English and American Literatures at Middlebury College and a Visiting Lecturer in Maritime Literature for Williams-Mystic. He is closely acquainted with small wooden boats.

New and Noteworthy in the Museum Store Intrepid by Bill White and Robert Gandt, foreword by John McCain The first official history of the legendary aircraft carrier that fought in WWII and Vietnam and continues to serve as a major air and space museum in NYC.

To order these or other books, call 860.572.5385 or shop online at www.mysticseaport.org/stores. And don’t forget your 10% members’ discount!

Rowable Classics: Wooden Single Sculling Boats and Oars by Darryl J. Strickler In this book, sculling aficionado Darryl Strickler writes of the history, design and use of single rowing sculls. Strickler started building boats and sculling at the age of 12 and still rows, more than 50 years later, always in wooden boats propelled by wooden oars.

A Kid’s Book on Boatbuilding by Will Ansel This kid’s guide narrates the sights, sounds and work of a boat shop, written by expert craftsman (and former Mystic Seaport) boat builder Will Ansel.

15 a r m ch a i r s a i lo r

aniel Robb’s delightfully quixotic book, Sloop, tells of his quest to rebuild his family’s Herreshoff 12 1/2. This particular “Buzzards Bay Boys’ Boat” sat in a driveway for years before Robb decided to exercise his woodworking skills—and his pen—to get her back afloat. Part memoir, part how-to manual with appealing sketches of local characters, Sloop describes Robb’s successful efforts as a first-time boat builder. At first glance, one cannot help wondering why the reframing of a small boat would merit a book-length description. But about a quarter of the way into the book the strands come together, and we learn that rebuilding his boat is a chance to “live deliberately,” as Thoreau wrote. “If you can sand, paint, and caulk, you can take care of your own boat, for the investment of several long weekends of labor each year. It is a small price.” Over the course of 300 highly readable pages, Robb develops the metaphor of a boat as the embodiment of ideals—simplicity, care and a harmony of materials. While his account of tracking down hard-to-find hardware, lumber and knowledge drives the story enough to make the book a page-turner, its real beauty lies in the care with


S e a M u s i c f e at i va l

16

Sea Music

The Barnacles playing at the 2008 Sea Music Festival.

f e s t i va l comes of age

Bringing sea music to the world for 30 years and for generations to come He struggled to capture the essence of Mystic Seaport’s Sea Music Festival in a few sentences. Finally, last year’s organizer, Rick Spencer, explained, “The Sea Music Festival touches something very deep in all of us, and you won’t hear this historic sea music played on the original instruments anywhere else.” This year’s 30th anniversary Festival from June 11-14 will indeed touch visitors deeply, leaving them with a new understanding of their own culture and scores of potential new friends who share a love of this unique musical genre. In the past three decades, Museum Chanteymen Geoff Kaufman, Craig Edwards and other Museum staff and volunteers have broadened the festival’s appeal. Several thousand music lovers now enter the Museum gates during the course of the annual event, including many young families. Children’s programs have expanded into two days of musical fun. Last year, children enjoyed watching costumed singers play Italian and Irish immigration songs on period instruments, and families who entered the Discovery Barn found musical programs geared for the young visitor. At one afternoon concert in the barn, the engaging Bob Zentz settled into a hay bale amid his collection of musical instruments.

Zentz threaded a story about each instrument into his 50-minute set, including some intriguing tales about the Australian didgeridoo and the concertina. Zentz told a traditional creation story for the didgeridoo, in which Aboriginal tribal women were collecting wood at sundown, when one woman picked up a log that had been hollowed out by termites. When she went to clear out the remaining creatures by blowing through the tube, not only did she make the instrument’s characteristic drone, but she also blew the last termites straight into the heavens, where they became twinkling stars. Smoothly changing instruments between songs, Zentz next taught choruses of familiar folk songs to his young audience. At the first note of the concertina, twin middle schoolers and a joyful three-year old started wiggling in time to a jangly Cajun rendition of “The Hokey Pokey.” Children’s activities at the Festival culminate in a boisterous Sunday afternoon parade. Young Festival-goers play kazoos, clackers, whistles and cymbals they’ve made in an earlier Festival workshop as they follow a high-octane percussionist around the grounds. The wider audience is an integral part of the Festival now, but it wasn’t always that way.


se a m u s i c f est i va l

Festival History

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Conceived by Dr. Stuart M. Frank, former research associate at Mystic Seaport amd former director of the Kendall Whaling Museum, the Festival began both as a chance to perform sea music for one’s peers and a place where ethnomusicologists, anthropologists and historians could exchange research findings. “In the early years, the Festival focused on the Anglo chantey tradition. Yet sea music is world music because it spans work songs and seafaring life of all cultures,” said Spencer. So each successive year, Festival organizers have expanded their invitations to singers and researchers from different cultures. These have included music and musicians from Portugal, Australia, Iceland, Poland, the Netherlands, France and Africa. Researcher Bennett Konesni spent a year studying fishermen’s songs on three continents through a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship. Last year he presented his findings about Ghanaian fishing songs at a morning seminar. He also taught the audience a native call-and-response song that reminds fishermen to preserve the habitat of the local leiea fish. “These songs transform work into something tolerable,” Konesni said, “and they also set the rhythm for pulling oars and hauling nets. Most importantly, they keep morale high.”

Divine gift of song

Researcher Bennest Konesni spent a year studying sea music on a Watson Fellowship.

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Many cultures revere ballad singers whose stories of tragedy and good fortune make the listeners feel as if they had been there. In the intimate setting of the Museum’s Oyster House, both Calico Jack and Joyce and Danny McLead sang of the horrors of press gangs. Abduction into slavery has proved a common theme in sea music from many countries. Commercial shipping and fishing was dangerous, the profit margins were slim so cheap labor was hard to find. The McLeods came to last year’s Festival from northern England. They sang of husbands who had been snatched by coal-barge bosses on the Tyne in the 1700s. The same sense of loss and despair rang true in the songs of Chesapeake Bay oyster-boat abductions rendered by Jane Meneely and Paul DiBlasi of Calico Jack. But not all the folk music of the sea dwells on loss. Marge Bruchac and husband Justin Kennick of Hand in Hand sang ancestral Native American and French Canadian songs. They call themselves Hand in Hand, said Bruchac, because neither settlers nor natives would have survived the 1754-63 French and Indian wars had they not reached out to one another. Kennick dressed in Scottish kilt and Bruchac in traditional wraps of the Abenaki. They used only a skin drum, a rattle and their voices to mesmerize their listeners. In the Algonquian and Abenaki languages, they spoke and chanted mystical and chilling sea legends and taught the audience a call-andresponse song of thanksgiving to parents, grandparents and the sea. As these chanteys recount, the ocean provides bounty as easily as it causes tragedy. Glinting like emeralds, the sparkly green eyes of headliner Danny O’Flaherty belied how shaken-up he was three

years ago living under the shadow of Hurricane Katrina’s devastation. O’Flaherty, a New Orleans resident, said he cleaved fast to nature and his traditional Gaelic ballads to pull himself through his blackest post-Katrina shock. “Now birds follow me when I whistle and walk through my woods at home,” he said, and like a happy human flock, audiences joined in O’Flaherty’s romantic and Celtic singing.


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Unique Performances

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The Sea Music Festival becomes a pilgrimage for some, while for others it’s a yearly revival of their roots. For performers such as Kenny Wolin, it was an honor to perform at last year’s event. “The Sea Music Festival is ground zero for maritime music,” he said, fingering a set of rhythm bones. The bones were just one example of the rare music-making tools played over the weekend. “Where else are you going to hear these instruments played by sailors pouring their hearts out in song?” said Wolin. A classically trained percussionist, Wolin is on active duty with the Marine Corps Band. Musically, he said, this genre is a nice departure from what he usually plays. But if sea music was a departure, Wolin’s performance style was a rocket launch. The clean-cut Wolin, kitted out with rhythm bones and wooden spoons, blew out all boundaries between the instruments and his

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body. In a frenzied crescendo of off-road percussion, Wolin accelerated the rhythm of clacking, tapping and paradiddling on his head and jaws, elbows, shoulders and even the soles of his feet. And the crowd clapped and stomped along. “I do have an eccentric involvement with instruments,” Wolin admitted.

Pub Nights

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Evening performances always warmly welcome new voices, while feeling like reunions of dear old friends. Performers and return visitors talk excitedly during the interval about music, travels and life. Like a flock of nightbirds, performers and evening concertgoers make their way over the Museum’s lamp-lit grounds and across the street to Mystic’s Frohsinn Hall. With nicely priced beer and plenty of space, the room gradually fills with music lovers. A few minutes pass before a Museum Chanteyman’s clear, sonorous bass rose over the crowd with a rousing version of “Bound for South Australia.” Those who didn’t know the lyrics picked them up quickly or faked

it. The musical ball starts bouncing when the Johnson Girls begin a French chantey and in swaths, the room boomed out the chorus. Before you know it, crooners in the middle of the room break out “Rolling Down to Old Maui” in layered harmony. Right on their heels, a very young woman nervously bobbled the first notes of “Jamestown Homeward Bound.” But at Pub Night, pitch and volume matter less than moxie and heart, because willing voices will always rush in to strengthen a singer like gales fill a sail.

Song Preservation

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Last year’s festival organizer Rick Spencer said, “We don’t know how many songs have been lost, but we know how many have been saved. Like all oral traditions, to perpetuate a legend or songs and thereby a culture, you must pass it on. While the Museum has a growing recorded collection of maritime music, there is nothing like hearing it live.” Sea music will continue to be recorded and archived by individuals and institutions such as the Museum’s own Collections and Research department. But the hard kernel of truth at the center of the Festival was that these chanteys and ballads will likely die unless they’re taught to the next generation. Nearly every year, the Festival honors deceased musicians who left a cultural bequest, such as folk music icons Tommy Makem and Stan Hugill. Makem, who lived in New Hampshire, died in 2006. He not only left behind a rich record of Irish music, but also a living legacy in his three sons, who sing as The Makem Brothers. Hugill, an Englishman, was called “the last chantey man.” He recorded many 19th-century sea songs and chanteys, primarily in the British maritime tradition, thereby preserving them for generations. Most musicians and historians at this Festival dedicate time and resources to pass down the music in performance. Likewise, the Museum’s music staff present chanteys in their historical context. Work chanteys are regularly demonstrated aboard the Museum’s vessels.

Left: Marge Bruchac and husband Justin Kennick sing ancestral Native American and French Canadian songs. Right: Fifer Marc Bernier leads the children’s parade.


se a m u s i c f est i va l To raise two massive sails of canvas high above the deck of the Morgan, the Museum’s own Don Sineti led two groups in “Whaling Johnny.” The Chanteens, a high school chantey-singing group from New Haven’s Sound School, spread themselves evenly between the work groups, and each person gripped a share of the fat, tawny halyards. “Oh, and this is not a competition,” grinned Don Sineti before he boomed “Haul Away!” Like fishermen’s songs, whaling chanteys were sung to strike the rhythm for hauling lines and, said Sineti, “to take your mind off of how boring the work is.” Once the sails were raised, Sineti bellowed “High Nuff!” and the chantey and hauling stopped. The chantey is a tool, explained Sineti, like a carpenter’s hammer. “So once the job is done, you put the tool away,” he said.

Family Reunion

The Johnson Girls perform Afro-Caribbean, Irish and Italian songs among others in their vast repetoire.

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Friends of the Festival

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Between annual Festivals, the sisters recharge their passion by working with Friends of the Festival, a group of Museum volunteers that raises donations earmarked for the Sea Music Festival. About half of the 30th anniversary Festival funding comes from these donations. Kaleidoscopic and myriad, the songs and stories at the Sea Music Festival will dazzle listeners with the dreams and realities of our common seafaring ancestors. When the last chantey’s final notes drift across the Mystic River, groups of new friends and old stroll out of the Museum’s gates. Many call “goodbye” to each other, and just as many reply “until next year.” ~ ELIZABETH YERKES

Music of the Sea Symposium The Music of the Sea Symposium explores the interaction between sea, music and song. Part of the Festival since 1979, it will expand this year as part of the Festival’s 30th anniversary. In partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard Academy and the University of Connecticut at Avery Point, the Museum will present a two-day program from a range of disciplines. Presenters may talk about history, folklore, literature, ethnomusicology or another related field, but each will address an aspect of maritime music from the great age of sail through present day. The Friday, June 12 symposium session is free and open to the public, and will be at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London. The program continues Saturday, June 13 at Mystic Seaport and is free for Museum members.

Sea Music f e s tiva l

June 11 ~ 14

To purchase concert tickets, weekend passes, read about this year’s performers and see the complete schedule of events, go to www.mysticseaport.org/seamusicfestival. EVENING CONCERTS: June 11-13, 7 p.m. (Tickets required) DAYTIME ENTERTAINMENT: June 13-14, 12- 5 p.m. (Museum admission required)

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Longtime Festival-goers consider each other as close as family could be without being related. For Gene and Anna-Marie Cartagena, the Sea Music Festival was literally where they became a family. “We were engaged at the Musuem’s lighthouse and 11 years ago, a week before the Festival, we were married,” said Anna-Marie. Each year of their marriage the Cartagenas return to the Festival to renew their vows. “We love Mystic Seaport, and especially this event. It’s a sense of belonging and family.” Another set of regulars is “The Heavenly Twins,” a moniker bestowed on them by Stan Hugill himself. They have come to every Festival together for 21 years. In fact, identical twins Pam Finkle and Sue Wachtelhausen said they’ve raised their children in the oral song tradition. “Don Sineti sang at my daughter’s wedding,” said Pam. “Life is about passions, and this historical period is my passion.” “For us, this is not just a sisters’ weekend; it’s being with a group of people with a common love,” said Sue.


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Spot On! Map Spot at Mystic Seaport is an all-new hands-on activity center where you can explore types of maps, learn how to read and create your own maps and test your knowledge of geography and wayfinding. Maps aren’t always scientific or factual. Imaginary or fantasy maps can be personal and fun. You can draw your own map of a favorite memory, a special wish or the setting of a favorite book or movie. Use a range of art materials to make your map a masterpiece – colored pencils, markers, stickers and stamps work great.

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1)

Choose a topic.

For example:

My Dream House

My Dog’s Day

My Summer Vacation

My Neighborhood Walk

My Life Plan

My Favorite Book

My Route to School

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2)

Sketch your map

on paper with a pencil. When you’re satisfied with your rough sketch, finish it with colorful crayons, markers, glue and glitter or other materials you have around your house.

3)

The finishing touches!

Add things like the title of the map, your name, a compass rose to show north and a legend explaining any symbols you’ve used.

Come visit Map Spot this summer to explore more about maps and how they’re made!


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rqrqrqrqrqrqrqrqrqrqrqrqrqrqqrq ~ June 26-28, 2009 ~

WoodenBoat magazine calls it “The most dynamic wooden boat show in the country.” Step aboard classic and contemporary boats of every class— power, sail, oar and paddle. Learn tips and skills at workshops and much more.

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at the show: 2,500 Number of wooden boats in display: more than 200 Number of wood-boat builders in attendance each year: more than 50 Number of (temporary) tattoos applied (to children): 226 Number of attendees at 2008 show: 12,900 Number of bars of pine tar soap sold by the WoodenBoat Store at the 2008 show: 31 Number of prizes awarded at the 2008 Concours d’Elegance: 27 Number of people to be honored at the 2009 WoodenBoat Show tribute dinner: 3 (William, John and Pat Atkin) Number of online visits to the WoodenBoat Show website on the first day of the 2008 show: 5,844 Number of feet of electrical cord run for the show: 4,000 Number of square feet of tent fabric in service: 28,000

www.mysticseaport.org/woodenboatshow As always, the WoodenBoat Show is free for Mystic Seaport members!

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Measured in linear feet, the quantity of wooden boats on hand


i n the g a l l e y

CONTENTS

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summer 2009

May June

June 24-July 8 The Art of Orienteering

June 26 New!

May 23-25

August

Fridays/Sundays in August New!

Lobster Days

“Restoring an Icon” Morgan exhibit opens

May 25

June 26-September 7

Decoration Day Ceremony

Hands-on History Toy Boat Building

Saturdays in August New!

June 26-28

July 31- Aug 2 New!

WoodenBoat Show

June 6-7

John Gardner Small Craft Workshop

June 6 New! Member Opening: “Mapping the Pacific Coast” exhibit

Music on the River (Sabino cruises)

Youth & Family Community Sailing

July

Fridays/Sundays in July New!

Maritime Mysteries (excluding August 1)

Moby-Dick Marathon & Sea Story Weekend

August 4-9 New! Get Out on the Water Days

August 14-16 Wine & Food Festival

August 15-16

Mystic Seaport Dinner Theater (excluding July 31)

Antique Engine Expo

Saturdays in July New!

June 13 Intro to Half Model Construction

Maritime Mystery

Garden Days Model Yacht Regatta Weekend

June 30-July 5

August 22

June 15-August 28

All-American Picnic Week

Sabino Dixieland Cruise

Teen sailing program on schooner Brilliant

July 4

August 29-30 New!

June 11-14 Sea Music Festival

June 16-20 Plein Air Painters painting on the grounds

Independence Day

July 18-19 New! Family Fun Weekend

July 18 New! June 20

Mabel Takes a Paddle

“Plein Air Painters of the Maritime Gallery” opening

July 25

June 20 Summer Solstice Sunset Party A Riverside Jazzfest

June 21-August 14 Joseph Conrad Sailing Camps

Sabino Dixieland Cruise

July 25-26 Antique & Classic Boat Rendezvous

July 28 Members only Plum Island Trip

June 22-August 14 Summer Day Camps w w w. m y st i cse a po r t. o r g

August 21-23 New!

Dog Days Weekend

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June 10-August 26 New!

June 29-August 21

Mystic Seaport Dinner Theatre (excluding August 2)


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Lobster days at

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Memorial Day Weekend, May 23-25 Saturday & Sunday, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Monday, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Crack your first claw of the season at Mystic Seaport’s Memorial Day Weekend Lobster Days. Lobsters in the rough are served up by Mystic Rotary Club members at the riverfront open-air Boat Shed along the Mystic River. Lobster Days at Mystic Seaport is the Rotary Club of Mystic’s primary fundraiser—proceeds are distributed to local charities supported by the club.

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24 Members receive a $2 coupon per member at the gate, valid for any single or twin lobster dinner. Go online to www.mysticseaport.org/lobsterdays for full details on lobster dinners, pricing and to purchase your tickets.

Meet the Lobster Lady Memorial Day Weekend, May 23-25 11 a.m. – 4 p.m., Museum Stores

Known as the quintessential “lobster lady,” Mystic resident Vivian Volovar has been lobstering commercially since 1978. She’ll be at the Museum Stores all weekend signing copies of her charming children’s picture book, The Lobster Lady. 1876 Decoration Day Ceremony May 25 12 – 1 p.m.

Join us this Memorial Day for a powerful ceremony dedicated to the memory of those lost in the Civil War. A reverent service led by costumed citizens of 1876 Greenmanville will begin at noon. Immediately following the service, join in a procession for the playing of taps and a wreath laying upon the Mystic River. w w w. m y st i cse a po r t. o r g

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“Mapping the Pacific Coast” ~ Opening talk & reception for members June 6 5–7 p.m.

Map collector, historian, vintner and sailor Henry Wendt greets members in the Mallory Building at this private opening reception for “Mapping the Pacific Coast.” Wendt will add insight to the histories depicted in the maps from his private collection, as well as share stories regarding how he came to collect these rare documents. Wine and cheese reception to follow. Members are welcome to dine at Seamen’s Inne after the reception for 20% off regular menu prices. Members only: $15 Program Code: #0078 Register online at www.mysticseaport.org or call 800.572.5339.

John Gardner Small Craft Workshop June 6–7

smallcraftworkshop.

SeaMusic 30th nua

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June 11 – 14

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Mystic Seaport is proud to host its 30th annual Sea Music Festival, one of the world’s premier sea music events. For more on the four-day festival, packed with concerts and workshops, see page 16 of Mystic Seaport magazine. And go online to www.mysticseaport.org/seamusicfestival to see the complete weekend schedule, read bios on the performers and buy your tickets online. Buy a weekend pass or an all-inclusive pass, and the first drink is on us!

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Get out on the water in all kinds of small craft—peapods, whitehalls, sharpie skiffs, wood and canvas canoes, kayaks, dories, dinghies and other boats as participants share their boats with other registered enthusiasts. Also, enjoy workshops, a book signing at the Museum Stores (Blue Water Patriots by Dr. James M. Volo) and a row down the Mystic River early Sunday morning. To learn more and register, go to www.mysticseaport.org/


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Summer Solstice Sunset Party June 20 (rain date June 21) 7 –10 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.)

Kick off summer with a jazzy evening of food, dance and fun. This year the 1921 schooner L.A. Dunton is front and center as the stage. Since she was launched during the Jazz Age, what better music by which to enjoy the sunset than jazz! And who better to make jazz come alive for us than the soulful tenor saxophonist Don Braden. An acclaimed jazz musician and historian, he’s played extensively with greats like Wynton Marsalis, Freddie Hubbard and Roy Haynes. You’ll most likely recognize his work from the “Bill Cosby Show.”

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Sunset is a magical time to be at Mystic Seaport, when rich colors play off the water and ships. Once the sun is down, the river serenade really begins. Chubb’s Wharf will echo to the sounds of Don and his quintet performing from the deck of the L. A. Dunton. And we are sure to have a few surprises, just like last year. Visit www.mysticseaport/summersolstice to hear a selection of Don Braden’s music, get details about the event and buy your tickets online. Event Tickets:

SummerSolstice SunsetParty

Members: free! • Non-members: $15 adult, $5 children (5–17) Program Code: #0040 VIP Seating on Chubb’s Wharf: Members Only: $20 (Limited—reservations required by June 10) Program Code: #0040VIP Dinner Tickets:

A riverside jazz fest—hot jazz, food & fun

June 20

Dinner is 6:30 - 8 p.m. Enjoy a fish-inspired menu at the Boat Shed on the river (cash bar). $35 (Reservations required by June 10) (Non-members must also purchase an event ticket) Program code #0039 Register online at www.mysticseaport.org/summersolstice or call 860.572.5339.

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“Plein Air Painters of the Maritime Gallery” Painting on the grounds: June 16-20 Opening reception: June 20

Again this summer, invited artists will gather at Mystic Seaport to paint the museum grounds and environs. Following the tradition of the plein air painters of the 19th and 20th centuries, artists can be found at their easels, capturing the shifting light along the Mystic River. Come and watch your favorite artists paint en plein air. Works are available for purchase in the Maritime Gallery. The exhibition runs through September 1, 2009.

WoodenBoat Show June 26-28

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The 18th annual WoodenBoat Show will be another glorious celebration of wooden boats, large and small. You can expect the return of many show favorites including the second annual “I Built it Myself” display. New this year, a martitime book sale and we’ll announce the winner of our 2009 Design Contest—come see the efficient, affordable and interesting small boat designs in competition. For more cool facts about the show, see By the Numbers: WoodenBoat Show on page 23, or go to www.mysticseaport. org/woodenboat.

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Independence Day Celebration & Children’s Parade July 4 9 a.m.– 5 p.m.

Experience Independence Day as it was celebrated in 1876! Bring a picnic, watch the whaleboat races, view the 27th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry and clap for the parade. Kids, make a special hat to wear in the parade and test your knowledge in an old-fashioned spelling bee. Listen as the citizens of Greenmanville recite the Declaration of Independence, followed by a band concert on the green. Finally, engage in a genteel game of croquet or churn ice cream and reap the delicious rewards. w w w. m y st i cse a po r t. o r g


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All-American Picnic Week June 30-July 5 9 a.m. — 5 p.m.

America’s birthday celebration lasts all week long! Get the whole family involved in some of America’s favorite pastimes, including a friendly game of tug of war or a sack race. Test your skill at a spoon and egg race, and see how fast you can make your way down the Green in a three-legged race. Enjoy music while picnicking on our Village Green. From 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., our Grill-on-the-Green will serve grilled hamburgers, hot dogs, chicken, chowder, lobster rolls, desserts and non-alcoholic beverages, as well as beer and wine.

w! e N Mystic Seaport Dinner Theater

Buy tickets online!

Friday and Sunday evenings from July 3-September 6 (except July 31 and August 2)

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Enjoy a three-course dinner outdoors at the Spouter Tavern, in the heart of the Museum’s waterfront village. Sip a glass of wine and enjoy conversation and great food in the summer evening air. Then, watch and listen as the Mystic Seaport TaleMakers perform Eugene O’Neill’s Ile aboard the schooner L.A. Dunton. O’Neill’s harrowing one-act echoes themes from our “Frozen In” exhibit, and tells about the unforgiving captain of an Arctic whaler, his gentle wife, and the obsession that threatens all they hold dear. For details, including pricing, schedule, menu and online ticketing, go to www.mysticseaport.org/dinnertheater. Recommended audience: ages 15 and up.

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Maritime Mystery Saturday evenings every week, July 4-Sept 5 (excluding August 1)

New this summer, our moving mystery tour has everyone talking.  Was it the druggist?  Or perhaps the shipsmith?  Mystic Seaport presents its first-ever selfguided whodunit event, where the audience gets to solve the mystery!  Follow the clues as you uncover the plot behind a tragic shipwreck.  Investigate leads, gather evidence, and interview witnesses and suspects (played by the Mystic Seaport TaleMakers) throughout our 19th-century village. This one-hour event is great for tweens, teens, and adults.  For tour schedules, pricing and to buy tickets online, go to www.mysticseaport. org/maritimemystery. Buy tickets online! w w w. m y st i cse a po r t. o r g


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Mabel Takes a Paddle July 18 1–3 p.m.

Dogs are part of the family, too! Children are invited to meet furry friend Mabel, the subject of a new book called Mabel Takes a Paddle by Emily Chetkowski. Emily tells the story behind the book, and then takes Mabel kayaking on the Mystic River.

Family Fun Weekend July 18-19

29 Member child: $7 • Non-member child: $10 Program Code: #0079 Register online at www.mysticseaport.org or call 860.572.5339.

Antique July 25-26

Classic Boat Rendezvous

Join us for the Antique & Classic Boat Rendezvous, a dazzling display of high-quality antique vessels, including cruisers, sailboats and runabouts. An award competition recognizes excellence in restoration, authenticity and workmanship. This year’s featured vessel is the newly restored 71-foot Germanbuilt motor sailor Little Vigilant. Launched in 1950, she has the lines of a classic Maine sardine carrier but her interior, rig and deck layout were designed for cruising. Dressed and in pristine condition, approximately 50 classic vessels create a colorful gathering along the Museum’s waterfront all day Saturday and Sunday morning. Sunday at 12:45 p.m., watch as the vessels make their way down the Mystic River in a jubilant, three-mile parade. w w w. m y st i cse a po r t. o r g

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Mystic Seaport is the place for family fun this summer—getout on the water, take a horse and carriage ride, visit the new Map Spot for kids, become a star in the interactive play, Tale of A Whaler, build a toy boat, climb aboard our biggest wooden boat the Charles W. Morgan and see it being restored, visit the Children’s Museum and Discovery Barn, and see the stars come out at our Planetarium shows. There’s so much to see and do for families at Mystic Seaport, the second day admission is free.

Copies of the book will be available for purchase. Bring your own leashed, dog-friendly pooch to the event—and then go for a paddle of your own out in one of the Boathouse rowboats (extra charge of $7 per member family). Children must be accompanied by an adult and must wear personal flotation devices in the boats.


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Sea StoryWeekend Moby-Dick marat h o n July 31-August 2 Moby-Dick Marathon, 12 p.m. Friday-11:30 a.m. Saturday Sea Story Weekend, Saturday and Sunday afternoon/evening

Kick off our new Sea Story Weekend with our annual Moby-Dick Marathon, a Mystic Seaport tradition celebrating the Charles W. Morgan and commemorating the birthday of Herman Melville. We start at 12 noon on Friday, July 31 with Chapter 1 of Moby-Dick, read by a costumed actor portraying Mr. Melville himself. The marathon reading continues

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over the next 24 hours, and will take place at Greenmanville Church and on the deck of the Charles W. Morgan. Participants may listen or take their turn reading a chapter aloud. Participation is free with Museum admission during regular Museum hours. There is a $25 fee for overnight participants ($23 members), which includes a coffee and pastry from the Bake Shop.

Buy tickets online!

Sea Story Weekend, a new event at Mystic Seaport, continues Saturday and Sunday with maritime tales, spoken-word presentations, and workshops led by some of New England’s best maritime storytellers.  Bring the family and enjoy an afternoon of Tales on the Green, filled with entertaining and moving stories, poems, and songs of the sea.  Grab your notebook for our writing and presentation workshops, where you can get tips and feedback on your work, learn to use song or rhythm to tell stories, or even write a yarn right there!  Present a piece of your own at our evening Open Mic.  Bring a lawn chair and a loved one for dinner and drinks on Chubb’s Wharf by the L.A. Dunton, while our performers regale you with Stories at Sunset.  Tales on the Green and workshops are free with Museum admission; admission to Stories at Sunset is $18 ($16 for members; food and drinks priced separately).  Limited seating; patrons are encouraged to bring lawn chairs.

Weekend Pass (Moby-Dick Overnight + Sat Evening + Sun Evening): Members: $50 • Non-members: $75

Moby-Dick Marathon Overnight (6 p.m. to 9 a.m.): Pricing includes a pastry and small coffee at the Bake Shop. Members: $23 • Non-members: $25 Stories at Sunset (Sat. & Sun. evenings): Members: $18 • Non-members: $16 per evening To purchase tickets, go online to www.mysticseaport.org/seastory or call 860.572.5322.

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Get Out on the Water Days August 4-9

Row, sail or motor your way around the Mystic River basin with a special on the water weekend. Take a ride on the 1908 coal-fired steamboat Sabino, or on board Resolute, sail aboard a historic catboat, row a wooden rowboat or catch the water taxi to downtown Mystic. It’s summer on the river at Mystic Seaport! w w w. m y st i c se a po r t. o r g


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Wine & Food Festival August 14-16

Sample regional wines and listen to fabulous live jazz while enjoying a menu of seafood, grilled fare and a variety of desserts prepared from products of local and regional farms at the Museum’s second annual Wine & Food Festival. The festival proudly features products of regional farmers, fishermen and vintners who practice sustainable agriculture and viniculture. Throughout the weekend, Seamen’s Inne Executive Chef Tim Quinn and his team will provide cooking demonstrations, culinary tastings and educational wine and food seminars on the Village Green. Museum admission is required.

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August 15-16

The transition from sail to engine power was a momentous event for the maritime industry – and the world. Experience it firsthand as collectors from around the country show-off full-size and miniature 19th- and early 20th-century marine engines. Inboards, outboards and steam engines will be on display in the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard. Learn more at www.mysticseaport.org/ antiqueengines.

Model Yacht Regatta August 21-23

Join us on the north lawn of the Seamen’s Inne to welcome remote-controlled J Class and East Coast 12-meter model yachts for three days of racing. Racers come from as far away as California to enjoy the best model sailing on the east coast. This year, the full size yachts Ranger and Velsheda are expected to join in the races. To learn more and register, go to www.mysticseaport.org/ modelyachtregatta

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Antique Marine Engine Exposition


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n D e d ra

ays

Whether you’re a gardener, want to become one or just love beautiful gardens, there’s something for everyone at our first-ever Garden Days. Enjoy daily tours of our historic and contemporary gardens, gardening talks, gardening booths and displays set up by local garden centers. Kids, there’s a special garden tour just for you—come discover all the unusual plants named for animals in our one-of-a-kind Children’s Museum Zoo Garden. And view our gardens virtually at our all-new online garden section, www.mysticseaport.org/gardens.

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{August

Dog Days

at Mystic Seaport August 28-30

It’s the end of summer vacation, and you can count on Mystic Seaport to go to the dogs! We’re bringing back those loveable Newfoundlands that demonstrated their lifesaving skills during our “Sea Dogs” exhibit a few years back, a new demo by the CT Canine Search and Rescue Team and a pack of other special activities for families— and your furry ones. Bring a canine friend! Watch www. mysticseaport.org for more details.

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c r u i ses & t r i ps

Music on the River Wednesdays, June 10-August 26 5:30 p.m.

Take it to the river! Every Wednesday all summer long, enjoy a 90-minute happy hour cruise aboard Sabino with live music and a cash bar. Event sponsor: Levine Distributors.

Buy tickets online! Members: $22 • Non-members: $25 Tickets for sale online at the Sabino booth, call 860.572.5351.

Sabino cruises with a Dixieland beat July 25, August 22 6:30–8:30 p.m.

Tuesday, July 28 7:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

Plum Island—off limits to everyone except their staff—began in 1954 as the nation’s first defense against foreign animal disease. The research center has opened another unique opportunity for Mystic Seaport members to visit. In June 2003, operational responsibility transferred from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The mission? To conduct research, deliver and stockpile key vaccines that will protect the health of livestock from foreign disease agents. The trip includes the roundtrip ferry ride from Old Saybrook, orientation, a guided tour of a Level 2 lab and a bus tour around the island. All visitors are required to submit personal information to the Plum Island Security Specialist for a background security check one week prior to the trip. Meet at the gazebo near the Plum Island Ferry Dock at Harbor One Marina in Old Saybrook. The boat leaves promptly at 7:45 a.m. and returns at 3:15 p.m.

Sabino booth at 860.572.5351 to purchase tickets. Members only: $25 ~ Deadline is July 20 Members: $45 • Non-members: $55

Program Code: #0067

Tickets for sale at the Sabino booth or call 860.572.5351.

Register online at www.mysticseaport.org or call 860.572.5339.

The Great Lakes: Cruising Through North America’s Magnificent Inland Seas September 12–19, 2009

Nearly fifteen thousand years ago, the last of the great glaciers retreated, leaving us with one of the great wonders of the natural world, the Great Lakes. Today, travelers are rediscovering the charms of the vast, sweet water. On the shores of Ontario, Erie, Huron, Michigan, and Superior, welcoming towns have changed little since the 19th century. Aboard the 100-guest Clelia II, with its combination of intimacy and elegance, the grandeur and pleasure of a classic Great Lakes cruise is revived. Prices start at $5,595/person in double occupancy. Call 860.572.5339 for details. Space is limited, so call now!

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Come aboard for a delightful downriver steamboat cruise with foottapping Dixieland music, plenty of delicious hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar. Dance to the tunes of the Mystic River Mud Band as they play old favorites, or sit on the old benches and enjoy the live music and camaraderie of an evening on the water. Sabino leaves from her dock near the main entrance to Mystic Seaport. Please call the

Members only! Special access trip to Plum Island, New York


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Hands-on History and Toy Boat Building June 26-September 7 Beginning June 26, build toy boats every day from 10-5!

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Try your hand at making maritime crafts. A different craft workshop will be offered each day of the week. Topics will include printing, candle dipping, smithing, carving and scrimshaw. And by popular demand, Toy Boat building for kids will be offered every single day of the week, beginning June 26. All workshops are $5 and available on a drop-in basis. Keep an eye out for other hands-on offerings for summer 2009—plans are in the works. For the daily schedule of craft workshops, go to www.mysticseaport.org/handsonhistory. Also, individual lessons in blacksmithing available upon request. Call Central Reservations to inquire. A regular series of smithing classes is offered in fall.

New! Painting the Maritime Landscape Come paint with one of the distinguished Maritime Gallery artists en plein air at Mystic Seaport. Learn the secrets of good composition, color mixing, choosing the right location and more. Some painting experience preferred. Class limited to 15 students.

Watercolor Dates

Time

Cost

June 1-June 5

9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

$190 / $160 (m)

Instructor: Lou Bonamarte is a noted Maritime Gallery artist who has won numerous awards from the American Watercolor Society, the Salmagundi Club, the Academic Artists Association and the American Professional Watercolor Club.

Oil Dates

Time

Cost

June 1-June 5

9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

$190 / $160 (m)

Instructor: David Lussier, who is trained as a commercial illustrator and is a renowned plein air teacher. He has studied at the Paier College of Art and at the Lyme Academy College of Fine Art.

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Summer Day Camp Programs Mystic Seaport offers a number of summer day camp programs for children of all ages.

Girls of Long Ago 8- to 10-year-olds Step back in time as you try your hand at 19th-century cooking, sewing and gardening. Make old-fashioned accessories for the home and enjoy girl talk with friends. Discover real stories of girls living aboard ships.

Junior Explorers 4- and 5-year-olds This high-energy, fast-paced program features hands-on activities in exhibits and ships, unique games and fantastic craft projects! Travel the universe on Astronomical Planetarium Day, explore the ocean deep and the Mystic River on Sea Critter Day, discover the secrets of sailors and ships on Jack Tar Day and many more surprises. Dates

Camp Type

Cost

June 22-26

Mon-Fri mornings or afternoons

$145 / $125 (m)

June 29-July 3

Mon-Fri mornings or afternoons

$145 / $125 (m)

Five half-day sessions. Morning classes meet Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Drop-off starts at 8:30 a.m. Afternoon sessions are from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Afternoon drop-off starts at 12:30 p.m.

Our Mystic Seaport Sampler combines active play and learning through art, music, crafts and games. Boys and girls get a kids-eye view of Mystic Seaport from our Planetarium, on the steamboat Sabino and along the riverfront.

Discover secrets, serpents and superstitions of the sea. Explore the facts and fiction of mermaids, ghosts and shipwrecks, all based on survivors’ sightings and captains’ logbooks. Make fabulous art projects, have hands-on activities in exhibits and do a bit of investigating as well!

A Sailor’s Life 8- to 10-year -olds Discover the secret lives of sailors. Learn sailors’ arts and crafts, like scrimshaw and knots, practice seamanship skills on a tall ship and cruise the Mystic River on the steamboat Sabino. Dates

Camp Type

Cost

July 6-10

Girls of Long Ago

$310 / $275 (m)

July 13-17

Girls of Long Ago

$310 / $275 (m)

July 20-24

Secrets, Serpents & Superstitions

$310 / $275 (m)

July 27-31

Mystic Seaport Sampler

$310 / $275 (m)

August 3-7

Mystic Seaport Sampler

$310 / $275 (m)

August 10-14

A Sailor’s Life

$310 / $275 (m)

Day camps meet Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Drop-off starts at 8:30 a.m.

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Mystic Seaport Sampler 6- and 7-year-olds

Secrets, Serpents & Superstitions 8- to 10-year-olds


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Conrad Summer Camp Ages 10-11 Designed for students with little or no sailing experience, this session gives participants the proper instruction to begin a lifetime of sailing. Sailing is done with a partner.

Conrad Summer Camp Ages 12-13 A class is for youngsters who have had little to no sailing experience and are still in need of basic fundamental review before moving forward. Solo sailing is encouraged.

Joseph Conrad Summer Camp An overnight summer sailing camp for boys and girls ages 10-15 For more than 50 years, young people have come to Mystic Seaport

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each summer to sail on the beautiful Mystic River and sleep on a tall ship. Learning by doing—in a friendly and supportive atmosphere—is the cornerstone of the Joseph Conrad overnight summer sailing program. Built in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1882, the Joseph Conrad is a square-rigger once used to train young Danish men for the mer-

Conrad Summer Camp Ages 14-15 This class takes students to the next level of learning. Instruction is given to provide students with the opportunity to sail solo.

Conrad Summer Race week Ages 13-15 This “final” class in the series provides students with experience sailing solo, as well as participating in a racing regatta. Dates

Level

Cost

chant service. Today, permanently moored on our waterfront, she’s

June 21-26

Ages 10-11

$790 / $735 (m)

fitted out with bunks for 50 campers, flush toilets, showers, heat

July 12-17

Ages 10-11

$790 / $735 (m)

and electricity.

July 26-31

Ages 10-11

$790 / $735 (m)

June 28-July 3

Ages 12-13

$790 / $735 (m)

August 2-7

Ages 12-13

$790 / $735 (m)

July 19-24

Ages 14-15

$790 / $735 (m)

July 5-10

Race Week, Ages 13-15

$790 / $735 (m)

August 9-14

Race Week, Ages 13-15

$790 / $735 (m)

During the six-day program, young people ages 10-15 sail our fleet of Dyer Dhows and learn the skills of the sea. Lifelong friendships are made through the spirit of teamwork that underlies the Conrad experience. Our staff includes a state-licensed director, experienced counselors and sailing instructors, many of whom are past

Conrad participants. Choose from four camps that best fit your child’s age group. The camps, while age-group specific, will focus on the skill level of the individual sailor. Whether you have sailed before or it it your first time stepping on a boat, the staff covers basic sailing skills right up to advanced techniques. Two sessions are devoted to racing for experienced sailors. Many campers return year after year to perfect skills, reunite with camp friends and enjoy another summer at Mystic Seaport. Program enrollment is limited to 40 for each session, so every camper gets individual attention and feels like part of the crew. Register today and get ready for a summer of sailing fun!

Overnight camps start on Sundays at 4 p.m and run through Fridays at 1 p.m.


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Sailing Programs aboard Schooner Brilliant

Brilliant for Adults

Experience the adventure and challenge of sailing. Help raise the sails, take the helm, cook the meals, stand watch and keep ship along with eight other shipmates aboard our famous, prize-winning, 62-foot schooner Brilliant.

Typically, we sail to Block Island (Rhode Island) or Shelter Island (New York) and usually lay to a dock in the evening when crew may go ashore. Each two-day sail begins at 9 a.m., returns at 4 p.m. the following day and includes an overnight aboard.

Owned and operated by Mystic Seaport and certified for ocean sailing, schooner Brilliant is reported by WoodenBoat magazine as “one of the best maintained classic yachts in the country—if not the world.” You must be physically fit, agile and a competent swimmer to participate in this program. Need-based financial assistance is available. For more information, go to www.mysticseaport.org/brilliant.

Two-day Sails

Dates

Cost

September 11-12

$410 / $360 (m)

September 13-14

$410 / $360 (m)

September 18-19

$410 / $360 (m)

September 20-21

$410 / $360 (m)

September 25-26

$410 / $360 (m)

October 3-4

$410 / $360 (m)

October 10-11

$410 / $360 (m)

Read a first-hand account of an adult Brilliant cruise on page 12.

Five-day Programs Each five-day program begins and ends at Mystic Seaport. Typical ports of call are Block Island, Newport, Cuttyhunk Island and Martha’s Vineyard. Programs run Monday-Friday. Cost is $950/$900 (m). Dates are June 15-19, June 22-26, July 13-17, July 20-24, August 10-14, August 17-21 and August 24-28.

Invite your friends and family to join you in the Brilliant experience. Four-day charters may be created by combining adjacent two-day sails or adding on to a Saturday to Sunday trip. Type

Cost

Two-day Sail

$2,900

Four-day Sail

$6,000

If you charter Brilliant, we must have at least six able hands to run the boat safely in difficult weather conditions. Charters for two-day sails or longer are limited to eight adults.

10-day Programs Our 10-day programs begin and end at Mystic Seaport. Participants may sail as far as Provincetown or Nantucket Island, subject to weather. Programs begin on a Monday and end 10 days later on a Wednesday. Cost is $1900/$1850 (m).

Charter Programs Did you know you can charter Brilliant for a group of eight teenagers, plus a group leader, during our summer season? Call 860.572.5323 to learn more.

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Charters

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Brilliant for Teens Ages 15-18, co-ed


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Community Sailing Classes Adult Sailing Classes (15 and up) In this two-day class, you’ll be introduced to the theory of sailing (why and how a boat sails), basic sailing and gear terminology, rigging and de-rigging a Dyer Dhow, equipment stowage and care, personal safety, knots, safety on the dock and on the water, points of sail, small boat handling, right-of-way rules and capsize and running aground procedures.

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Dates

Time

Cost

June 29-July 3

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

August 10-14

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

Classes meet Monday through Friday, for three hours each day.

Beginner

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Junior Beginner (ages 12-14)

Junior Intermediate Dates

Time

Cost

July 6-10

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

July 13-17

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

July 27-31

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

August 3-7

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

August 10-14

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

Dates

Time

Cost

Classes meet Monday through Friday, for three hours each day.

July 11-12

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

Junior Racing

July 25-26

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

August 8-9

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

Dates

Time

Cost

August 17-21

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

Classes meet Monday through Friday, for three hours each day.

Intermediate If you are comfortable sailing a small boat alone and have mastered beginner skills, this two-day course is for you. You’ll begin with a review of terminology and points of sail, then move to learning about safety, sail trim and advanced terminology. Class includes practice leaving and landing at docks, picking up moorings, man overboard, inland rules of the road, gear failure, wind and current, headers and lifters. Dates

Time

Cost

July 18-19

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

August 1-2

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

August 15-16

8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$250 / $220 (m)

Family Sailing Classes We’ll introduce you and your child (or children) to water safety, boat controls and basic sailing maneuvers through shore and on-the-water activities. Choose from either beginner or intermediate.

Family Sailing Classes - Beginner Dates

Time

Cost

June 29-July 3

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

$290 / $250 (m)

July 13-17

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

$290 / $250 (m)

August 3-7

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

$290 / $250 (m)

Above pricing includes one adult and one youth. $25 for each additional child (up to two more). Each five-day session meets Monday through Friday.

Junior Sailing Classes Ages 8-14

Family Sailing Classes - Intermediate

Our junior programs are for beginner and intermediate sailors. Classes use Dyer Dhows or JY15s. All equipment, except foul-weather gear, is provided. If you have a PFD, please bring your own. Competent swimmers ages 15 and older may enroll in adult classes.

Junior Beginner (ages 8-11) Dates

Time

Cost

July 6-10

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

July 20-24

12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

July 20-24

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$160 / $140 (m)

Classes meet Monday through Friday, for three hours each day.

Dates

Time

Cost

July 20-24

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

$290 / $250 (m)

August 15-16

12:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

$290 / $250 (m)

Above pricing includes one adult and one youth. $25 for each additional child (up to two more). Each five-day session meets Monday through Friday.


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Planetarium Programs Since early times, navigators have used the heavenly bodies to determine their ship’s position at sea. Daily programs in the Planetarium illustrate the night sky for visitors, while classes offered by the Planetarium provide an in-depth look at navigation and astronomy.

New! The Art of Orienteering: Beginners Learn how the compass works, learn basic map reading and how to navigate on land in this summer orienteering session. Course includes introduction to tools and methods including estimating distance travelled, how to use a compass for taking bearings, read a map and use compass and map together for basic techniques of land navigation. Great family activity for children ages 12 and up accompanied by an adult. Dates

Time

Cost

June 24-July 8

Wednesdays, 5 p.m. – 7 p.m.

$65 / $60 (m)*

* Adult and child (ages 12-18) combo $110 / $100 (m). Classes meet for three two-hour sessions.

Have a specific topic in mind? Gather a group and let us know what you would like to learn. We seek to support your curriculum or special interests. Here are a few course possibilities: Stars of a Voyage to Freedom (Amistad) Stars and Navigation of the Great Explorers Stars and Constellations of the current season’s sky To discuss program content possibilities, please call 860.572.5302, ext. 5151, or email planetarium@mysticseaport.org.

Anchor Watch: An Overnight Program for Youth Groups Connect your youth group to the traditions of America and the sea during a fun-filled overnight adventure at Mystic Seaport. You’ll sleep aboard the 1882 square-rigged training ship Joseph Conrad after an evening of maritime activities. Rise and shine the next morning for a hearty breakfast, then join in a group activity led by Museum staff. Afterward, you’re free to spend the day exploring Mystic Seaport on your own. The program runs Fridays and Saturdays from mid-March through mid-May, and mid-September through mid-November. Call for available dates.

Cost: $75 per person includes overnight accommodations aboard the training vessel Joseph Conrad, pizza snack, evening activities, craft materials, breakfast, a Mystic Seaport patch and two days of admission (the day of arrival and the following day).

Group Size: The group size is a minimum of 20 participants, maximum of 45. One supervising adult is required for every 10 children. You may combine small groups from your area. Groups with fewer than 20 participants will be charged $1,500.

Eligibility: Open to all youth groups, ages 6 –14. For more information: Call Central Reservations at 860.572.5322. Dates available on a first come, first served basis.

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Special Group Planetarium Programs

Education


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John Gardner Boatshop Courses

Traditional Boatbuilding

Named in honor of the boatbuilder, educator and author who founded Mystic Seaport’s boatbuilding courses more than 30 years ago, the John Gardner Boat Shop continues to research, document, replicate and teach the craft of traditional boatbuilding.

Introduction to Half-Model Construction Learn the basics of half-hull construction by carving your own model of a classic sailboat. Following a demonstration of the basic techniques used to build a waterline-lift model, you’ll begin working on your own model. Discussions of techniques, materials, tools and finishes continue throughout the day as you work to complete your project. At the end of the course, you’ll go home with a new family heirloom! Class size is limited to six students.

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Dates

Time

Cost

June 13

9 a.m. – 5 p.m. SOLD OUT

$300 / $250 (m)

September 5

9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$300 / $250 (m)

November 14

9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$300 / $250 (m)

Create your own half model of Brilliant, Mystic Seaport’s Sparkman & Stephens 62’ schooner yacht.

Varnishing Techniques for Traditional Boats So, now that you have your new or restored traditional boat, how do you protect it and keep it beautiful for years to come? Our full-day finishing class begins with discussions of appropriate materials, tools and surface preparation. Then, you’ll begin hands-on practice on sample boards in various stages of completion. All materials and your own badger-hair brush are included. Class size is limited to seven students (minimum five). Dates

Time

Cost

September 26

9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$220 / $170 (m)

Classes meet Saturday through Wednesday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Learn by doing! Gain hands-on experience in nearly every phase of construction of a traditional plank-on-frame, smooth or lapstrakeplanked boat. Discussion topics include wood types and sources, books and periodicals and necessary tools. This comprehensive course will prepare you for any boatbuilding project. No previous experience is necessary. All tools and materials provided, including a copy of the Mystic Seaport Lofting Manual. Dates

Time

Cost

October 10-13

9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$850 / $800 (m)

Scrimshaw Scrimshaw was and is a decorative art of the mariner to fill up times of boredom or unrest on a whale ship or yacht. Students will learn to use the basic tools and techniques to produce a small piece of scrimshaw in this class. Dates

Time

Cost

October 24

9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

$175 / $125 (m)


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Williams-Mystic students writing in their journals along the California coast.

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Graduate Education

Williams-Mystic: The Maritime Studies Program of Williams College and Mystic Seaport

Munson Institute Summer Graduate Programs

Williams-Mystic, the Maritime Studies Program of Williams College and Mystic Seaport offers undergraduates a hands-on, interdisciplinary semester focused on the world’s oceans. Classes requiring original research and writing are conducted at Mystic Seaport in maritime history, marine sciences, environmental policy and literature of the sea. Taking hands-on learning even farther, Williams-Mystic students explore America in a way unlike any other — from a sailing voyage on a tall ship to traveling both the Pacific and Gulf coasts on three extended field seminars. Sophomores, juniors and seniors from any accredited four-year institution may apply for a fall or spring semester. Admission is competitive. Students earn a full semester of credit and transcript from Williams College. Need-based financial aid is available. For an application, please visit www.williams.edu/williamsmystic or call 860.572.5359, ext. 2.

Maritime history as it is taught at the Munson Institute embraces a broad range of subjects, including the rise of seaports as unique communities and the role of minorities and women in them, social and cultural aspects of the seaman’s world and how maritime commerce has linked Americans to the world beyond. During six weeks in residence in 19th-century housing, Munson Institute students can take a survey course, a seminar or complete independent research. The Munson Institute is open to teachers, graduate students, advanced undergraduates, auditors and all others interested in immersing themselves in maritime history.

American Maritime History Survey Dates

Time

Cost

June 22-July 31

9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

$1200 for credit / $600 to audit

Meets Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. Scholarships available.

Maritime History Seminar Dates

Time

Cost

June 22-July 31

Begins at 1:30 p.m.

$1200 for credit / $600 to audit

Meets Mondays and Thursdays. Scholarships available. For more information, call 860.572.5359.

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Undergraduate Education


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How To Register All registration forms can be found on the web at: www.mysticseaport.org/registration and can be faxed, emailed or mailed.

By Phone 860.572.5322 By Fax 860.572.5398 By Mail Reservations

Mystic Seaport P.O. Box 6000, 75 Greenmanville Avenue Mystic, CT 06355 By E-mail To register by email, visit us on the web for a registration form. The forms can be emailed to: reservations. desk@mysticseaport.org. Courses are filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Payment is due in full at the time of registration. Any program with a code has online registration. Registering for an ABYC program? Call 410.999.4460.

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Important Information • In the event of extreme weather, Mystic Seaport may cancel a class or program. A full refund will be issued if the participant cannot be rescheduled. • Occasionally, Mystic Seaport photographs or videotapes visitors while on the grounds for use in a variety of publicity and promotional materials and to advance our educational mission. We thank you for your cooperation and support.

Special Discounts for Members

Cancellation Policies

Our partners at Foxwoods and MGM Grand are offering the following special discounts for Mystic Seaport members this summer.

Planetarum, Community Sailing, Shoreside Trades and John Gardner Boat Shop Courses Cancellations made up to 30 days prior to the start of a course will receive a refund less an administrative fee of 25% of the course cost. Cancellations made 15 to 29 days prior to a class will receive a refund less an administrative fee of 50% of the course cost. No refund will be given if cancelled within 14 days of the course.

Schooner Brilliant Adult Sails and Teen Sails and Joseph Conrad Program Cancellations made up to 30 days prior to the start of courses will receive a refund less an administrative fee of 25% of the course cost. The administrative fee will be 50% for Brilliant charters. No refund will be given for cancellations made within 30 days of any Brilliant or camp courses. Mystic Seaport program prices are subject to change without prior notice.

Illuminations – Cirque Dreams The newest stage spectacle from Le Cirque. July 5 to September 6 Regular ticket price: $30 general admission Discount: 25% off To order tickets, go to www.mgmatfoxwoods.com/cirque. Enter the promo code: seaport Questions? Call 866.MGM.0609

Legends: The World’s Greatest Live Tribute Show June 2 to September 6 Regular ticket price: $25 general admission Discount: 25% off To order tickets, go to www.foxwoods.com/legends. Enter the promo code: seaport Questions? Call 800.200.2882

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member gear Charles W. Morgan Umbrella

baseball cap

Navy 42". Auto open. Folds to 15.5". Wind Reflex technology prevents frame damage if umbrella inverts. $15 • ITEM CODE #0011

Canvas cap with member burgee logo. Leather strap. Mesh lining to promote cooling. Breton red, khaki or yellow. Specify color choice. $23 • ITEM CODE #0016

flashlight

brilliant sport pack

Ocean blue, aluminum flashlight with member burgee logo features 17 white LED lights, a pushbutton on/off switch and hand rope. Batteries incld.

Black microfiber. 15"x12". Unique double-draw top/shoulder strap combination. Zippered gusset expands to 5" on the bottom.

$15 • ITEM CODE #0077

$15 • ITEM CODE #0023

TWO-BOTTLE COOLER TOTE

burgee

Lightweight yet sturdy, two-bottle cooler tote, perfect for wine. Comes with a high-quality combination wood-detailed corkscrew/bottle opener. The front pocket and detachable padded bottle divider make this a perfect picnic or boat accessory. $35 • ITEM CODE #0069

Durable 400-denier nylon. UV inhibitor to reduce fading. Anti-microbial coating to prevent mildew. No-fray bond. Two brass grommets. $32 • ITEM CODE #0012 • SMALL 12"X18" $42 • ITEM CODE #0013 • LARGE 16"X24"

Proceeds from the sale of these items contribute to the education and preservation efforts of Mystic Seaport. All prices include shipping and handling. Tax, where applicable, not included. Available exclusively at our Membership Office (860.572.5339) or visit www.mysticseaport.org/membergear to download order form.

Member Gear & Member Program Order Form Member Information

give the gift of membership and receive a free baseball cap.

Name Address Phone

City Email

Payment Information

Amex

Zip

Offer valid through 07/31/09. Visit us online at www.mysticseaport.org to order.

Membership ID#

Merchandise

Payment by check: make check payable to Mystic Seaport Payment by Credit Card Visa Mastercard

State

CODE

DESCRIPTION

specify (color) if applicable

QTY

UNIT PRICE

SUBTOTAL

Discover

Expiration Date Contact Membership Office for international rates prior to placing order.

Account Number Signature

Mail Orders: Mystic Seaport Membership Office

Programs & Classes CODE

DESCRIPTION

MEMBER

CT deliveries and 6% sales tax baseball cap tax exempt

$

MERCHANDISE TOTAL

$

NON-MEMBER

QTY

UNIT PRICE

specify (date) (youth or adult) (luncheon choice) if applicable

75 Greenmanville Ave. Mystic, CT 06355-9990

Call-in Orders: Membership Office Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 860.572.5339

PROGRAMS TOTAL

$

GRAND TOTAL r e g i ste r f o r m e m b e r sh i p p r o g r a m s on l i ne at w w w. m y st i cse a po r t. o r g

$

SUBTOTAL


Nothing beats a day on the water at Mystic Seaport. And there are so many ways to enjoy it. Cruise the Mystic River on the steamboat Sabino. Take a relaxing spin on our classic power boat, the Resolute. Hop aboard our free water shuttles. Let us take you for a sail in a classic catboat. Or captain your own boat – row or sail. TO LEARN MORE CALL 888.973.2667.

SUMMER 2009

OR VISIT WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG.

75 Greenmanville Avenue PO Box 6000 Mystic, CT 06355-0990 Dated Material Do not hold

Nonprofit organization US postage PAID Mystic Seaport, Inc


Mystic Seaport Magazine 2009 Summer