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SPRING |SUMMER 2014

PREPARING THE

Charles W. Morgan FOR HER 38TH VOYAGE


OVER 60 YEARS of

SUMMER CAMPS At Mystic Seaport

EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION AT ITS BEST!

R

WHY LANDLOCK YOUR KIDS this summer when a whole new world awaits on the

water? From day camps to overnight camps and sailing programs aboard historic vessels like the Joseph Conrad and Brilliant, Mystic Seaport offers all sorts of unforgettable ways for children of all ages to earn their sea legs. Learn more at www.mysticseaport.org/summercamps


CONTENTS

TM

Mystic Seaport magazine is a publication of Mystic SeaporT

IN THIS ISSUE

President STEPHEN C. WHITE

SEASCAPES . ..................................… 4

executive vice presidents SUSAN FUNK MARCY WITHINGTON

ADVANCEMENT NEWS................... 5-6

Editor Göran R BUCKHORN editor@mysticseaport.org

MUSEUM BRIEFS .......................... 7-9 RESTORING THE MORGAN . ...... 10-11

14

PRODUCTION Susan HEATH

RIGGING THE MORGAN ............. 12-13

contributors Walt Ansel Mary K. Bercaw Edwards Sarah Cahill Elysa Engelman Kip Files

Chris Freeman Andrew German Dan McFadden Katharine Mead Laura Nadelberg Krystal Rose

THE MORGAN’S NEW CAPTAIN . ..... 14 THE 38TH VOYAGE ..................... 15-19 THE MORGAN’S CREWS............. 20-23

Design Karen Ward, THE DAY PRINTING COMPANY

ON BOOKS ................................. 24-25

PHOTOGRAPHY Evelyn Ansel Kane Borden Göran R BUCKHORN Dan McFadden Dennis Murphy

Andy Price Mary Anne Stets MYSTIC SEAPORT PHOTOGRAPHY ARCHIVES

FROM THE COLLECTIONS............... 26

DRAWINGS Evelyn Ansel

16

2014

ON THE COVER: SHIPYARD RIGGERS ALEX PEACOCK AND SARAH CLEMENT INSTALLING THE FORE TOPMAST ON THE CHARLES W. MORGAN.

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CONTACT US

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VISITOR INFORMATION: 860.572.5315 • 888.973.2767 ADMINISTRATION: 860.572.0711 MEMBERSHIP: 860.572.5339 PROGRAM RESERVATION: 860.572.5322 MUSEUM STORE: 860.572.5385 MARITIME GALLERY: 860.572.5388 VOLUNTEER SERVICES: 860.572.5378

During spring and summer, the Museum will be open daily 9AM-5PM

ADDRESS: 75 GREENMANVILLE AVE. P.O. BOX 6000 MYSTIC, CT 06355 -0990 WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG

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SPECIAL EVENTS at MYSTIC SEAPORT

S E A S C A P E S Be Part of History

I

have a wonderful painting hanging in my office of Flying Cloud by Warren Sheppard. It depicts a solitary ship in a good sea. Much of the scene is left to

interpretation, and I have discussed its potential meaning with many who have visited my office. Does the painting depict a scene at sunrise with wonderful possibilities ahead, or is it dusk with an impending storm? My interpretation of this Sheppard is that dawn is breaking and there is great opportunity and potential ahead for the ship – this is precisely how I see the Charles W. Morgan’s 38th Voyage. We can only begin to imagine just how significant this voyage will be for her, Mystic Seaport, and the maritime community. For the first time in more than 90 years, the Morgan will be freed from her dock lines and once again set out to sea under sail. The long MYSTIC SEAPORT PRESIDENT STEPHEN C. WHITE

hoped-for moment has arrived; take a minute to reflect on what this 38th Voyage means on so many levels. After decades of care from shipwrights and curators at Mystic Seaport, by venturing down the

Mystic River, she will transcend all that she has been while at dockside and return to being the fullest expression of “the Morgan.” This will be the moment when the Morgan’s spirit will truly arise, and from this voyage, we will learn much about whaling ships and capture knowledge that can only be gained from being at sea. It is, of course, important to highlight her homecoming in New Bedford, MA, in late June. While much has been made over time about the Morgan’s departure in 1941 from the New Bedford region, I believe much more will be made of her homecoming. Then, almost 73 years ago, the Charles W. Morgan was tattered

APRIL

27 to June 15 — MAY 3-4 — 10-11 — 17 — 24-26 — 26 —

Modern Marine Masters Exhibition and Sale Pirate Days PILOTS Weekend Morgan Departure Lobster Days Decoration Day

JUNE 12-15 — 13 — 18 — 22 to Sep 21 — 27-29 — 27-29 —

Sea Music Festival Planetarium Summer Evening Series begins Insider Garden Tours begin Plein Air Painters of the Maritime Gallery WoodenBoat Show Small Craft Workshop

JULY 4 — 19 — 26-27 — 31 to Aug 1 —

Independence Day Members America's Cup Regatta Antique & Classic Boat Rendezvous Moby-Dick Marathon

AUGUST 7-10 — 9 — 15 — 16-17 — 25-30 —

Model Yacht Regatta Morgan Homecoming Celebration “Sketches of the Morgan Voyage” opens in Maritime Gallery Antique Marine Engine Expo Cruise the Maine Coast

SEPTEMBER 14 — 21 — 27 — 28 —

Coastweeks Regatta By Land and By Sea: Antique Vehicle Show Annual Members’ Meeting & Recognition Day 35th Annual International Marine Art Exhibition opens

and at risk; now she is strong and proud, and indeed a stirring image of what she once was. She returns as the pride of both New Bedford and Mystic Seaport, and great preparations are underway for her return, organized by the New Bedford community. It doesn’t take much to imagine the magnitude of the moment when she goes up the Acushnet River and passes through the hurricane gates and is proclaimed home again. So, what a summer it will be! Life at Mystic Seaport will remain as alive as ever with all our summer events taking place in celebration of our maritime heritage. Put the Sea Music Festival, the WoodenBoat Show, and Antique & Classic Boat

SAVE THE DATE!

Mystic Seaport Members’ Annual Meeting

Saturday, September 27, 2014

Rendezvous on your calendars, and be sure to join us by land or by sea to visit the Morgan in port or view her underway during the 38th Voyage, a sight not likely to recur in our lifetimes. You will find the itinerary on page 15 in this edition of the Magazine, which will help you to plan to be part of history. See you on the Morgan!

STEPHEN C. WHITE President

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The image detail used in Stephen White’s “Seascapes” is by SERGIO ROFFO, The Lookout, Carmel, CA, 30" x 48" For more information on this artist, please contact:The Maritime Gallery at Mystic Seaport, 860.572.5388


A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

GARY JOBSON: RECIPIENT OF THE

On November 5, 2013, for the eighth consecutive year, trustees, friends, and supporters of Mystic Seaport gathered to present the America and the Sea Award for lifetime achievement in fields related to the American maritime experience. The 2013 Award went to Gary Jobson in recognition of what he has achieved as a sailor and spokesman for the sport of sailing. In the 1980s, Gary Jobson was the voice of sailing. His commentary during televised races for the 1987 America’s Cup in Australia helped introduce sailboat racing to a global audience for whom the sport was poorly understood if contemplated at all. Gary built a tremendous legacy of sailing excellence as a victorious skipper and valued crew member from his days as a champion collegiate sailor, to the pinnacle of ‘round the buoys sailing, the America’s Cup. Always a teacher, Gary has shared his insights, experience, and wisdom with aspiring young sailors throughout the United States and the world.

WELCOME GOWRIE GROUP Gowrie Group, a prominent local insurance agency, is the newest member of the Mystic Seaport Community Partner Program. Gowrie Group joins the many prestigious businesses that support the work and mission of Mystic Seaport through shared values, business collaboration, and philanthropy. The company was founded in 1974 by longtime Museum member and sailor Carter Gowrie. Over the past four decades, Gowrie Group’s reputation for excellence in insurance solutions and customer service has led the company to become one of the top privately held insurance agencies in New England and the largest marine insurance company in the United States. Under Carter Gowrie’s leadership, Gowrie Group has developed a specialty insurance program called The Burgee Program that is designed specifically to protect yacht clubs and community sailing organizations. The company’s deep roots in sailing and yachting along with its commitment to service and quality makes Gowrie Group a natural partner for Mystic Seaport. “The vision Mystic Seaport had to undertake a complete restoration of the Charles W. Morgan and actually go sailing underscores how important Mystic Seaport is to the history of the sea. Our

The Award Gala was held at the elegant Pierre Hotel in Manhattan, where some 300 Museum members, friends, and philanthropic supporters turned out to honor Gary and support the mission of Mystic Seaport. The Gala was made possible by the generosity of our ardent supporters, led by Gold Sponsors Charlie and Irene Hamm, Peter and Cynthia Kellogg, Bill Koch, and Rolex. The America and the Sea Award Gala has become the marquee fundraising event for Mystic Seaport. The auction raised $80,000 to purchase twelve new JY15 sailboats to replace the aging fleet used in our Joseph Conrad Summer Camp and Community Sailing programs. Thanks to the generous support from all of our sponsors, ticket buyers, and auction bidders, the total amount raised during the evening was $467,000. Chris Freeman is Director of Development.

“ The vision Mystic Seaport had to undertake a complete restoration of the Charles W. Morgan and actually go sailing underscores how important Mystic Seaport is to the history of the sea. Our involvement in the risk planning and insurance for the Morgan project and the Museum is a great source of pride for Gowrie Group.” — Carter Gowrie, CEO of Gowrie Group

involvement in the risk planning and insurance for the Morgan project and the Museum is a great source of pride for Gowrie Group,” said Carter Gowrie, CEO of Gowrie Group. “Gowrie has excelled in meeting the Museum’s insurance needs, and since day one their professional team has been a pleasure to work with,” said Mystic Seaport President Stephen C. White. Gowrie Group’s support in the months ahead will help Mystic Seaport to sustain the high quality programs that have become a hallmark of the institution. Gowrie Group’s portfolio of offerings includes commercial, home/auto, boat/yacht, and equine insurance, as well as employee benefits and safety services.

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A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

JOHN ROUSMANIERE: RECIPIENT OF THE 2014 W.P. STEPHENS AWARD In 1988, when Mystic Seaport created an award to recognize “significant and enduring contributions to the history, preservation, progress, understanding, or appreciation of American yachting and boating,” it was fitting to call it the W.P. Stephens Award, as William P. Stephens (1845-1946) had been known as the “Dean of American Yachtsmen” and “the grand old man of American yachting.” At a ceremony at the New York Yacht Club on January 29, John Rousmaniere became the sixteenth recipient of this award. John is widely admired in yachting circles for his peerless seamanship and genial manner as a watch mate. His work as a historian and author puts him at the top of any list of 20thcentury maritime writers. He has written 15 maritime histories, including: The Golden Pastime: A New History of Yachting (1986), A Berth to Bermuda: One

them to the aesthetic pleasures of sailing. Perhaps John’s best-known work is Fastnet: Force 10 (1980) about the tragic 1979 race when 25 crews had to abandon their vessels, 136 sailors were rescued and 15 perished. John was in the race, sailing aboard the yacht Toscana, and his experiences during that race resulted not just in a gripping story, but in an abiding passion for sharing the lessons he learned about safety at sea. He helped to found the US Sailing/Cruising World Magazine JOHN ROUSMANIERE AND HIS WIFE LEAH.

Hundred Years of the World’s Classic Ocean Race (2006), and The Low Black Schooner: Yacht America, 1851-1945 (1986), as well as histories of numerous yacht clubs that cover the history of yachting in America. In A Class By Herself: The Yawl Bolero (2006), he introduces the

Safety at Sea Seminar Program, people and ideas behind this storied yacht. John’s two books of photographs, A Picture History of the America’s Cup (1989) and Sleek: Classic Images from the Rosenfeld Collection (2003) present readers with images full of dynamic energy and emotion while also introducing

which has helped thousands of yachtsmen to become better prepared to sail safely in rough weather. He has also given them a shelf full of compelling literature to read while off watch in calmer seas. Chris Freeman is Director of Development.

SPRIGS & TWIGS CELEBRATES FIVE YEARS AS A MUSEUM PARTNER Sprigs & Twigs, the Gales Ferry-based landscape service company founded in 1997, is celebrating its fifth anniversary as a Mystic Seaport Community Partner. Ken Wilson, director of the Museum’s Facilities department, said, “I have had the pleasure of working directly with Bill and Linda Lillie and their staff. In all instances, I have found them to be professional and responsive in the work they do for us. Their tree crews are among the best I have ever worked with. Overall, they help us to maintain Mystic Seaport in a manner that would not be attainable without

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represents one of shared values and principles based on delivering high quality products and services to the Museum guests to enhance their experiences,” said Bill Lillie, CEO of Sprigs & Twigs. Support from our community partners is a vital ingredient to our continued success. Mystic Seatheir assistance.” Over the years, Sprigs & Twigs has sponsored the Museum’s popular holiday program, Lantern Light Tours. Additionally, they have sponsored and participated in our Garden Days event. They have designed and installed several perennial beds, including

SPRING / SUMMER 2014

the butterfly garden by the Mallory Building and the beautiful plantings at the entrance to the south parking lot. “Sprigs & Twigs is proud of our on-going partnership with Mystic Seaport that began five years ago. The Sprigs & Twigs relationship with Mystic Seaport

port is fortunate to have steadfast and dedicated partners like Bill and Linda Lillie at Sprigs & Twigs.


MUSEUM BRIEFS

EXPANDING DIGITAL EDUCATION AT MYSTIC SEAPORT The Education Department at Mystic Seaport is developing a new digital education initiative that is transforming how the Museum provides educators with access to its extensive resources using today’s technology. Through this initiative, Mystic Seaport has the potential to significantly increase the Museum’s educational impact to a national audience. The two primary components of this initiative are a new website for teachers and new virtual programs. The new website for teachers, known as Mystic Seaport for Educators (MSE)— http://educators.mysticseaport.org — was launched in November 2013 and is the cornerstone of our new digital education initiatives at the Museum. It is a museumschool partnership, demonstrating how enhanced and customized collections access — developed by and for teachers — can enrich K-12 classroom learning and student achievement and proficiency. The MSE website has been and will continue to be developed by Museum staff together with educators. To facilitate ongoing resource creation for the website, the Museum has developed the MSE Fellows Program, which uses the expertise of educators from public and private schools to create new content for the website and share it with other teachers. Each summer, ten teachers from Connecticut and Rhode

Island will be selected through a competitive process to participate in the “Fellows Program.” We hope to expand the resource creation program to teachers nationwide throughout the coming years. The website presents primary source materials from Mystic Seaport in new and exciting ways using these features: Artifact Articles: Brief information and context about an artifact in the collections, as well as questions for deeper thought and classroom ideas. Living Documents: Documents of the past come to life with sound, transcripts, and informational pop-ups. Active Maps: Geospatial representations of objects and manuscripts from our collections. Feature includes classroom ideas. Resource Sets: Thematic “packages” that include samples of each type of website feature (artifact articles, living manuscripts, maps, lectures, and interviews) all connected by a central theme. Lectures & Scholar Interviews: Audio recordings of popular lectures at the Frank C. Munson Institute of American Maritime Studies at Mystic Seaport, as well as MSE teacher/scholar interviews. Another key component of our digital education initiative is our new Virtual Education Programs. Using Skype technology and state-of-the-art equipment in our production studio, we have the capability to provide students across the country and world with virtual access to our collections and our Planetarium resources right in their classrooms. We have already provided virtual programming for students in Bloomington, IL, and Pine City, MN, and will be completing

DIGITAL GIZMO WEB DESIGNER JULIET JACOBSON DISCUSSES THE MYSTIC SEAPORT FOR EDUCATORS PROTOTYPE WITH LOCAL PINE POINT SCHOOL TEACHER JON MITCHELL.

45 virtual programs during spring 2014 with 1,000 5th-grade students in ten districts in northeastern Connecticut. During a virtual program, although students might be watching a screen, they are engaged in an interactive learning experience with a Museum educator, who strives to help teachers meet the Common Core State Standards. In every program, students are prompted to refine their critical thinking skills by learning to analyze artifacts, documents, or events. Both of these programs have been three years in the making and would not have been possible without the generous support of funders and Museum staff, but also, most importantly, participating educators, who worked hard to provide meaningful connections to the resources of Mystic Seaport. Sara Cahill, director of Education, and Krystal Rose, manager of Digital Education Initiatives.

ABOVE: MUSEUM TEACHER DEAN HANTZOPOULOS AND MANAGER OF DIGITAL EDUCATION INITIATIVES KRYSTAL ROSE EXPLAIN BALEEN AND BALEEN PRODUCTS TO STUDENTS IN BLOOMINGTON, IL, WHILE IN FRONT OF THE STUDIO GREEN SCREEN. LEFT: 5TH-GRADE STUDENTS FROM BLOOMINGTON, IL, SKYPE WITH MUSEUM EDUCATOR DEAN HANTZOPOULOS DURING A MYSTIC SEAPORT VIRTUAL PROGRAM.

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MUSEUM BRIEFS

2013 ORION AWARD WINNER: EMILY SCHIMELMAN This past fall Mystic Seaport presented the 2013 Orion Award to Emily Schimelman, 4th-grade teacher at Hamden Hall Country Day School in Hamden, CT. The Orion Award recognizes educators for their commitment to utilizing the Museum’s collections, programs, and learning resources to create meaningful and innovative learning experiences for their students. With the help of Mystic Seaport staff, Emily created a year-long unit on American whaling, life at sea, and the 1841 whaleship Charles W. Morgan. The hands-on, project-based unit focuses on artifacts, primary sources, artwork, music, acting, journal writing, and critical thinking to inspire lifelong learning through exploration. As the point person for our new partnership with Hamden Hall, Emily has fostered a constructive relationship of program development and evaluation for both institutions. We chose to honor Emily with the Orion Award because she understands that primary sources and hands-on research are more than just a fun experience—they create an opportunity for students to develop and apply critical thinking and problem-solving skills, which are integral components of the new Common Core State Standards being implemented in schools today. Sarah Cahill is Director of Education at Mystic Seaport. For information about the Orion Award, and to nominate teachers to receive this award, please go to www.mysticseaport.org/orionaward

SARAH CAHILL AND 2013 ORION AWARD WINNER EMILY SCHIMELMAN.

SUSAN FUNK ELECTED PRESIDENT OF NEMA In November 2013, Susan Funk, executive vice president of Mystic Seaport, was elected president of the New England Museum Association (NEMA). “We’re very excited to have Susan on board,” said NEMA Executive Director Dan Yaeger. “Her leadership and commitment to the organization will help take us to the next level of success in serving the museum field.” Having worked at Mystic Seaport for 25 years, Funk oversees and coordinates the Museum’s Education, Exhibitions, Maritime Studies, Curatorial,

Watercraft, Human Resources, and Visitor Services departments. She is responsible for operational and strategic planning and program evaluation, and she is a member of trustee committees and management. She served on the NEMA board between 2002 and 2010, and since 2012. “Susan’s new role with NEMA validates her leadership in the field, and underscores how fortunate Mystic Seaport is to have had her on the staff all these years,” said Stephen C. White, president of Mystic Seaport.

JAMES CARLTON AWARDED FELLOWS’ MEDAL At a meeting in October, the California Academy of Sciences named Dr. James T. Carlton, professor of marine sciences and director of the Williams-Mystic Maritime Studies Program at Mystic Seaport, the 2013 recipient of the Academy’s Fellows’ Medal. The California Academy of Sciences, based in San Francisco, is a world-class scientific and cultural institution that is committed to leading-edge research and educational outreach. It awards the Fellows’ Medal to “especially prominent scientists who have made outstanding contributions to their specific scientific fields.” “I was very honored and surprised to receive

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the Fellows’ Medal from the California Academy of Sciences, one of the country’s leading scientific institutions. I am deeply humbled to be in the company of the other scientists who have been medalists,” Carlton said. Carlton has directed the Williams-Mystic Program since 1989 and is a professor of Marine Ecology. His research focuses on the environmental history of coastal marine ecosystems, including invasions of non-native species and modern-day extinctions in the world’s oceans. His research sites include the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, the Hawaiian Islands, Argentina, and South Africa.


MUSEUM BRIEFS

BARCLAY COLLINS NEW CHAIRMAN OF MYSTIC SEAPORT At the Museum’s Annual Members’ Meeting on September 27, 2013, J. Barclay Collins, II, was elected the new chairman of the Mystic Seaport board of trustees. He succeeded Richard Vietor, who had served as chairman for six years. Collins, who has been a Museum trustee since 2008, recently retired as the Executive Vice President and General Counsel of Hess Corporation. Prior to joining Hess, he was Vice President and General Counsel of City Investing Company and an attorney with the New York law firm Cravath, Swaine and Moore. Collins is a passionate advocate for health care, education, and the arts. He serves as the chairman of the board of the United Hospital Fund of New York and is on the board of the New York Botanical Garden, among other philanthropies. An avid sailor, he is a member of the New York Yacht Club and the Shelter Island Yacht Club. “We are very excited to have Barclay assume leadership of the board. He brings a level of professional expertise and institutional knowledge, and he has a passion for our mission that will help us succeed at developing new and exciting ways for the public to explore our collections and understand the importance of our shared maritime heritage,” Stephen C. White, president of Mystic Seaport, said in a statement. White also praised Richard Vietor, who had been chairman since 2007: “The Museum is truly grateful for Richard’s leadership during one of the most challenging periods in the

RICHARD VIETOR, FORMER CHAIRMAN OF THE MYSTIC SEAPORT BOARD OF TRUSTEES, HANDS OVER A MUSEUM NAME BADGE TO THE NEW CHAIRMAN, J. BARCLAY COLLINS, II.

history of the institution. He guided us deftly through a difficult economic environment to not only put Mystic Seaport on sound financial footing, but also to enable us to embark on some of the transformational initiatives critical to the future of Mystic Seaport, including the 38th Voyage of the Charles W. Morgan and the construction of a new state-of-the-art exhibition building to transform the north end of our grounds.” At the Members’ Meeting, the Museum also welcomed four new trustees to the board: Grant Cambridge, of Pasadena, CA; Sheila McCurdy, of Middletown, RI; Cayre Michas, of New York, NY; and Waring Partridge, of New Haven, CT.

CALLING ALL CONRAD CAMPERS! Save the Dates: Friday, September 12, and Saturday, September 13, 2014, for a Conrad Campers and Counselors Reunion to celebrate the program’s 65th season. Remember the first time you stepped aboard the Joseph Conrad? How about lectures in the YTB classroom? Rigging a Dyer Dhow for the first time and launching it into the Mystic River? Whatever age you are and whatever year you participated, come reunite with past and present Conrad Campers and Counselors on September 12-13 and share your memories. Since many of you have moved or even changed your names over the past six decades, please email us with your current mailing address so we can keep you informed of our plans and send you an invitation. Contact our Conrad Camp Director Hallie Payne at hallie.payne@mysticseaport.org Spread the word and let’s see how many campers we can connect. Welcome! SPRING / SUMMER 2014

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hen asked how the final stages of the restoration of the Charles W. Morgan is progressing, Shipyard director Quentin Snediker likes to quote the late Capt. Harry Jackson, a legendary figure in the U.S. Navy submarine community, “All ships are built in the last month.” With the departure date of the ship’s 38th Voyage looming, the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard is abuzz with activity. Shipwrights fabricate spars on the main shop floor, a crane lowers davits for the new whaleboats onto the hull, in the forge

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ABOVE: THE CHARLES W. MORGAN AT HER BERTH IN THE SHIPYARD THIS SPRING. ABOVE RIGHT: SHIPYARD DIRECTOR QUENTIN SNEDIKER.

RIGHT: A VIEW OF THE HOLD SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF A PLATFORM THAT WILL SECURE THE BALLAST IN PLACE AND PROVIDE SAFE ACCESS AND STORAGE DURING THE VOYAGE. FAR RIGHT: THE MUSEUM'S EASTERN-RIG DRAGGER ROANN WILL BE A SUPPORT VESSEL FOR THE MORGAN ON HER VOYAGE.

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oM .W selrahC eht fo hcnuaL ehTThe Launch of the Charles W. Morgan on July 21, 2013

• 70+ HULL PLANKS • 14 SPARS • 200 BLOCKS • 19 NEW SAILS • 280 FRAME FUTTOCKS groM eht ,egayov nediam reh nOOn her maiden voyage, the Morgan

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a shipsmith hammers out new chainplates, and a fresh coat of paint is brushed onto the paneling in the captain’s cabin. These are just a few of the tasks taking place on any given day to get the ship ready for sea. Where the restoration up to the launch of the Morgan was focused on the hull structure and fabric, the work since has gone in many different directions. “We have the deck structures, 14 new spars, painting and finishing, the ironwork, a platform in the hold to secure the ballast and provide visitor access, the list goes on,” said Snediker. “The ballasting alone is a very big job, requiring complex and precise engineering.” Launching the hull was the end of just one phase of the Morgan’s restoration. Since she was hauled in November 2008, the hull was thoroughly evaluated and documented, and the hold was opened up to enable work on the frames. That was followed by exterior planking and substantial structural restoration in the bow and stern. While the whaleship is being historically restored to represent the period from 1900 to 1910, the realities of taking her back to sea

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,stnirpdnah ’sthgirwpihs ehtthe shipwrights’ handprints,

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,krow rieht htiw noitarotser otto restoration with their work,

ht fo krow eht ni evol fo hcuot ehtthe touch of love in the work of their hands,

,niaga ,reh desserp tahtthat pressed her, again,

.snaeco fo ecarbme eht otniinto the embrace of oceans.

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SHIPWRIGHT TOM DANIELS PUTS THE FINISHING TOUCH ON A SPAR.

River Press.

RIGGERS PREPARE TO HAVE A CRANE LIFT A WHALEBOAT DAVIT ONTO THE SHIP.

require some modern departures to ensure the ship’s safety and the well-being of her crew and passengers. “Most of the work we would have done anyway, but the necessities of sailing the ship raised the level and complexity of the systems that would be installed,” said Snediker. Although, due to her historic nature, the Morgan will not be certified as a Passenger Vessel by the U.S. Coast Guard, the Shipyard is adhering to the standards of inspected vessels. “This will give us a standard of safety that is universally recognized,” said Snediker. Obviously, a ship that was built in 1841 never had many of the technologies needed today. A machinery space was built in the rear of the hold for bilge pumps, an electrical generator, and holding tanks for a marine sanitation system. She is also getting new electrical, fire-fighting, and security systems. Through the consultation of Dockside Electronics of Mystic and the generosity of Raymarine, Inc., the Morgan and her escort vessel Roann will have a complete state-ofthe-art navigation and communications suite, including an Automatic Identification System (AIS) to broadcast the ship’s location, course, and speed to other vessels. One of the benefits of AIS will be a map on the Museum’s website that will track the ship and her escort vessels in real time using the

AIS signal. At any given moment during the entire 38th Voyage, website visitors will be able to check and see where the ship is and who else is nearby. Once the voyage is complete and the ship has returned to her berth at Chubb’s Wharf at Mystic Seaport, much of the gear will be removed and the ship will resume her role as a static exhibit. Amid all the frenetic activity, it is beginning to sink in that a project that has consumed more than five years is nearing an end. “When you are in the middle of a big restoration like this, you don’t really step back and see the big picture,” said shipwright Tom Daniels. “She’s all parts and projects and not a fully functioning individual. But when you see the ship underway doing what she was designed to do, that’s when you say ‘Oh, this is what it looks like!’” “That will be very cool,” he added. Lead shipwright Rob Whalen echoed the sentiment, “You can get lost in the day-to-day work, but the significance of the moment she goes down the river and passes through the Mystic bridge will not be lost by anybody.” That trip down the river is scheduled for May 17. Until then, the Shipyard staff will be very busy proving Capt. Jackson right. Dan McFadden is Director of Communications. SPRING / SUMMER 2014

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RIGGING THE MORGAN

O

ver the last several years, much of the attention directed toward the restoration of the 1841 whaleship Charles W. Morgan has focused on the immense amount of work done on the hull. But the Mystic Seaport riggers have been just as busy researching and rebuilding the rig for the vessel. “It has been a monumental process to piece together the old and the new, and to determine the historical accuracy of the various parts,” said Alex Peacock, one of the riggers. The first stage in the project was to remove, catalog, and inspect the existing rig just before the whaleship was hauled in 2008. The goal was to restore and reuse parts and material wherever possible, but time and the ravages of weather take a toll on a rig. Certain spars, the bowsprit and jibboom for example, were in pretty bad shape and replacements would need to be fashioned. An early decision that had to be made was which period to represent. Like any vessel

that worked for a long period of time—in the Morgan’s case 80 years—the rig was altered and modernized in various ways as technology and techniques evolved. Though she was originally sailed as a full-rigged ship for the first two decades of her career, the Morgan spent most of her years whaling as a bark (a full-rigged ship has square sails on all masts, whereas a bark loses the square sails on its after mast in the stern and only has fore-and-aft sails). The Morgan has a further refinement in that her topsails, the second and third square sails from the deck, are “split,” meaning the original topsails were each divided in two to create two easier-tohandle sails. This was a typical change for vessels late in the age of sail. “It was an expensive change and a substantial investment for the owners, but it paid off in terms of a more flexible rig and reduced labor needed to sail the ship,” said Matthew Otto, the lead rigger on the project who has been with the Museum since 2002. The Shipyard eventually settled on focusing the restoration on the period 1900 to

RIGGING A WHALESHIP TOP: LEAD RIGGER MATTHEW OTTO SIGNALS THE CRANE OPERATOR DURING THE LIFT OF A SPAR ONTO THE SHIP. RIGHT: RIGGER ALEX PEACOCK WORKS TO COMPLETE AN EYESPICE ON A PIECE OF STANDING RIGGING. OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP: SAILMAKER NAT WILSON AT WORK IN HIS LOFT IN EAST BOOTHBAY, ME. OPPOSITE PAGE, RIGHT: A CRANE LOWERS THE MAIN TOPMAST INTO POSITION IN A CAREFULLY CHOREOGRAPHED OPERATION.

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1910. Although at the latter end of her career, her rig and configuration at this time were most representative of her whaling career, and there was a substantial photographic record that was essential to accurately recreating her configuration. In fact, the rig will be a “snapshot” of her from 1906 to 1908. One minor deviation from the historical record is that the main shrouds will be wire, whereas they were hemp until 1915. This was done for both safety and the difficulty of finding suitable hemp. Fortunately, much of the wire standing rigging could be reused. Once strung out, each piece was stripped, cleaned, brushed with denatured alcohol, and inspected. If deemed serviceable, it was painted with cold galvanizing, wormed, parceled, and served in the traditional manner with liberal amounts of tar.


The Launch of the Charles W. Morgan on July 21, 2013

RIGGING THE MORGAN On her maiden voyage, the Morgan

rounded the Horn and gained the Pacific.

center sheaves where possible and manufacturing new wooden bodies in-house, the team, both staff and volunteer, has been able to meet the need. The job of making the new suit of 19 sails was contracted out to Nat S. Wilson’s loft in East Boothbay, Maine. Wilson, an authority on traditional sail making, actually made the first set of demonstration sails for the Morgan back in 1973. The Rigging Loft has a sense of urgency about it that goes beyond the looming sailing date. Each task is addressed with focus and intensity as they know the safety of the passengers and crew and the security of the ship are at stake. “The job will really be done when the ship is back at her berth at Chubb’s Wharf,” said Peacock. “Then we can breathe a sigh of relief.”

Gone three years and four months,

she made homeport,

her hold a cornucopia

of 2,400 barrels of oil,

10,000 pounds of whalebone.

The year was 1841.

This year, 2013,

she is launched again,

to sail for pleasure,

then lie anchored, as testament,

to the men who built her,

to the shipwrights who have restored her,

to the 80 years she sailed,

to the 1,000 men who sailed her,

to the 37 voyages,

to the boats launched from her,

to the oil, rendered,

from the blubber by her tryworks,

to her surviving the fire

from the wreckage of the Sankaty,

that struck her in New Bedford’s harbor;

all this, then, testament

to the very ship of her,

her planed planks bearing

the shipwrights’ handprints,

whose fingertips shaped her

to restoration with their work,

the touch of love in the work of their hands,

that pressed her, again,

into the embrace of oceans.

~ Philip Kuepper

Philip Kuepper, a former employee of the Mystic Seaport Bookstore, is a poet living in Mystic. Philip has had his work published in Poetry, The Washingtonian Monthly, RFD magazine, The New York Times, Promise Magazine, and The Mystic River Press.

“There’s no way around it; it is a very labor-intensive process,” said rigger Sarah Clement as she carefully used a serving mallet to wind marline onto a freshly parceled stay. “Each stage requires careful and precise attention to detail and builds upon previous work; you have to do it right all along the way.” The riggers are very conscious that a lot rides on the quality of their work. The decision to sail the vessel heightened the quality of components that would be needed in the rig. This added substantially to the project and some additional challenges to sourcing traditional materials. “The running rigging is the highest qual-

ity manila in the world, specially made for Mystic Seaport,” said Otto. “It took 18 months just to get the first batch onto the property from the Philippines.” Otto explains that manila grading was deregulated in the 1930s, and what is acceptable commercial quality today would not even be gradable back then. The difference is the length of fiber: the longer the fiber, the stronger the line. “It is beautiful stuff,” Otto added. “Blond, almost platinum in color.” Blocks were another challenge. The ship needed around 200 new blocks, which would have been prohibitively expensive to purchase commercially. But by recycling the

Dan McFadden is Director of Communications at Mystic Seaport.

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I am humbled and honored to be named the captain of the Charles W. Morgan for her 38th Voyage.

The Opportunity of a Lifetime

I

By CAPT. KIP FILES

am humbled and honored to be named the captain of the Charles W. Morgan for her 38th Voyage. For me, as a mariner who specializes in traditional sailing, it is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Nothing like this has happened in my lifetime, and nothing like it will happen again. Our most important goal is to achieve a safe voyage for the ship and all who sail on her. The Charles W. Morgan is an irreplaceable artifact of America’s maritime heritage, and her well-being is paramount in whatever we do. Our operating orders have been developed with that priority, and we will have a tug, a RIB (rigid inflatable boat), and the Museum’s Eastern-rig dragger Roann standing by at all times when under way to offer assistance if needed. A typical sailing day will involve being towed out of and into port— just as the Morgan would have been during her whaling career. We will sail as much as possible, but at the end of the day, the ship needs to be safely berthed in the next port of call, so some additional towing will be likely. The Morgan hasn’t sailed in 90-some-odd years, and there’s nobody around who can tell us how she sailed back in the day. The rig is not unfamiliar to me and the hull is not unfamiliar to me, but each vessel is unique. So the biggest challenge I see is figuring out how she maneuvers under certain sail configurations and seeing how she handles in different conditions. I’ve seen her out of the water, and judging from her lines, I expect she will sail better than we think she will.

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We are fortunate in this day and age that there are a lot of mariners with experience sailing traditional square-rigged vessels. When I started in this business in the 1970s, there just weren’t that many people with the knowledge and skill in the United States. That has changed dramatically and we have assembled a very talented crew to be responsible for the ship during her voyage. One of the questions I am often asked is whether the Morgan will have an engine installed. She will not, as she has never had one. My own vessel, the three-masted schooner Victory Chimes, has no engine, so I am familiar with the constraints. Obviously, it limits your maneuverability and how you approach certain situations. But you get used to it; there are certain things you can and cannot do. One of the key things you do not have is the ability to stop: you can’t start the engine and throw her in reverse. So you have to figure out how you are going to maneuver her at all times and how to perform for every part of the ship’s operation. Just having a role in this adventure is hugely exciting for me. The Morgan represents a largely forgotten part of our history and we are going to tell that story in an amazing way for a new generation. I am thrilled to be a link in the chain of this historic vessel’s story and to be able to take her back out to sea to show everyone what it was like to sail on her in the 19th century. So let’s hope for fair winds and good weather! Kip Files is the captain of the Charles W. Morgan for her 38th Voyage. A native of Maine, he is the co-owner and captain of the schooner Victory Chimes, which sails out of Rockland as part of the state’s windjammer fleet.


WHERE IS THE

CHARLES W. MORGAN?

How Will the Morgan Get from Port to Port?

The Dockside Exhibition

Sailing the Morgan is not your typical voyage. Due to her status as a National Historic Landmark, the vessel will work her way up the coast of New England in a series of one-day sails, so she can be safely secured in the next harbor by nightfall. Obviously, weather conditions are a determining factor in the decision to head to sea each day, therefore each transit leg is scheduled with a three-day window of opportunity with the intention that the ship will sail on the first acceptable day. The plan is for the vessel to be towed out of port, set sail, and then pick up the tow at the end of the day to make the next harbor. We will have two teams of videographers and photographers following the Morgan on each leg to enable us to have complete coverage on our website and social media channels throughout the 38th Voyage. For more details on the specifics of the itinerary and the transit legs, please visit www.mysticseaport.org

On select days in port, the vessel will be open for boarding and feature a dockside exhibition program that will include historic interpretation, live demonstrations, music, and much more. This will be an experience and we hope you make plans to visit the ship on one or more of her stops. The Morgan will leave Mystic Seaport for New London on May 17 and then be open to visitors on the following days: New London, City Pier – May 24-25, 31 and June 1 Newport, Fort Adams State Park (boarding only; no dockside exhibition) – June 17 Vineyard Haven, Tisbury Wharf – June 21-24 New Bedford, State Pier – June 28-July 6 Boston, Charlestown Navy Yard (berthed next to the USS Constitution) – July 18-22 Massachusetts Maritime Academy – July 26-27

During the week of July 8, the vessel will be using Provincetown Harbor as the base for a series of day sails near Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctu-

ary in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Although the ship will not be available for boarding, there will be extensive online coverage on our website and elsewhere.

Members’ Mornings During Members’ Mornings, Mystic Seaport members will have exclusive access to the Morgan at her port visits. Between 8 and 9 a.m., skip the lines and come aboard before the general public on the following days: New London – May 24-25, 31 and June 1 Newport – June 17 Vineyard Haven – June 23-24 New Bedford – June 30, July 1 and 5 Boston – July 21-22 Massachusetts Maritime Academy – July 27

Please note: All dates are subject to change based on inclement weather and unforeseen operating conditions.

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T H E 3 8 T H V O YA G E

A Voyage of Learning and Sharing

P

By ELYSA ENGELMAN otentially hundreds of thousands of visitors will board the Charles W. Morgan during her different port visits this summer. When the whaleship leaves a port

for the next transit, only a small number of crew will be on board, as Coast Guard regulations restrict the total number of people who can travel on each leg. Conscious from the beginning that the demand for these spots on board would be greater than the supply, the Museum has approached the allocation process carefully, thoughtfully, and with an eye toward the project’s national audience, both today and in TOP: OARS IN A NEWLY BUILT WHALEBOAT FOR THE MORGAN’S 38TH VOYAGE. MIDDLE: THE CHARLES W. MORGAN AT CHUBB’S WHARF AT MYSTIC SEAPORT. ABOVE: MEMBERS OF THE MUSEUM’S DEMONSTRATION SQUAD LOWER A WHALEBOAT FROM THE MORGAN.

the future. Everyone on board during a voyage leg will contribute to the logistical and programmatic success of the voyage in some way. On each leg of the 38th Voyage, Mystic Seaport staff will collect and record aspects of the experience for future generations. The Museum’s pho-

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THE SHIP RITE

The Launch of the Charles W. Morgan on July 21, 2013

On her maiden voyage, the Morgan

rounded the Horn and gained the Pacific.

Gone three years and four months,

she made homeport,

her hold a cornucopia

of 2,400 barrels of oil,

10,000 pounds of whalebone.

The year was 1841.

This year, 2013,

she is launched again,

to sail for pleasure,

then lie anchored, as testament,

to the men who built her,

to the shipwrights who have restored her,

to the 80 years she sailed,

to the 1,000 men who sailed her,

to the 37 voyages,

to the boats launched from her,

to the oil, rendered,

from the blubber by her tryworks,

to her surviving the fire

from the wreckage of the Sankaty,

that struck her in New Bedford’s harbor;

all this, then, testament

to the very ship of her,

her planed planks bearing

the shipwrights’ handprints,

whose fingertips shaped her

to restoration with their work,

the touch of love in the work of their hands,

that pressed her, again,

into the embrace of oceans.

~ Philip Kuepper

Philip Kuepper, a former employee of the Mystic Seaport Bookstore, is a poet living in Mystic. Philip has had his work published in Poetry, The Washingtonian Monthly, RFD magazine, The New York Times, Promise Magazine, and The Mystic River Press.

tographers and videographers will capture images, ambient sounds, and interviews for future exhibit, film, and archival purposes. Depending on the weather, wind, and progress, staff hope to fulfill a long wish-list, including setting sails, lowering whaleboats while underway, using traditional navigational tools, and studying how the vessel handles under different conditions. In addition to the captain, mates, crew, Museum staff, and select supporters, each leg will have a number of public participants. A key aspect of the public-history aspect of the 38th Voyage is bringing in outside experts to experience, record, and share the multisensory experience with a broad range of different public audiences. This is in keeping with the vessel’s history — after all, some of the most interesting perspectives on American whaling voyages were recorded by “outsiders”: greenhands on their first voyage, a captain’s wife describing the whalehunt in letters home, or a gifted artist documenting shipboard life. While rooted in history, the 38th Voyage is not a reenactment, but rather an opportunity to add to the ship’s story with contemporary perspectives. To broaden these perspectives, the Museum invited applications for a coveted spot on a day-long voyage leg. The call for proposals from potential “38th Voyagers” was issued in November 2013 and publicized through the Museum’s social media and website, emails to Mystic Seaport members and to teachers, as well as fliers at museum conferences and postings on job boards. The call resulted in nearly 300 complete proposals from a range of individuals, including maritime historians, literary scholars, animators, marine biologists, journalists, educators, and whaling descendants. Proposed projects included a spectrum of creative ideas, including classroom lesson plans, poems, comic books, novels, sculptures, scholarly articles, musical compositions, puppet and magic-lantern shows, blog posts, documentary films, and scientific studies. During their assigned legs, 38th Voyagers will be busy collecting and recording their

impressions in their own ways, whether through cameras, notebooks, sketchpads, or audio recorders. Some will contribute to the scientific and historic documentation of the voyage by analyzing the ship’s construction and movement, taking samples of the ocean and air through which she moves, or studying the wildlife. Others will climb the rigging, stand watch, and interview the captain and crew. They will also conduct conversations with Morgan passengers and members of the media on board.

MARINE

EXPERIMENT

T

he marine biologists and students of the Williams-Mystic each 38th Voyager will complete his or her program at Mystic Seaport have begun individual personal or professional project. an interesting experiment. This sumThese final works will be shared with Mumer, the Morgan will be the platform seum visitors and a larger public through the for studying how coastal vessels may have dispersed marine animals and Museum’s website, in upcoming exhibits, plants from port-to-port in the fouling publications, and educational programs. communities on their hulls. Prior to While multiple 38th Voyagers will be on the vessel’s launch last July, Shipyard board to provide a range of short-term perstaff mounted experimental marine spectives on the voyage, there will only be plywood panels on the Morgan’s one “Stowaway.” He or she will be immersed sternpost. When the vessel departs in all aspects of the Charles W. Morgan’s the Mystic River, she will carry her new historic 38th Voyage while living on board fouling communities of organisms livwith the ship’s crew. The Stowaway will ing in the water (which will be carefully learn all the jobs associated with living and documented prior to sailing). At the working on a 19th-century vessel, including same time, new panels will be installed sail-handling, steering the ship, and scrubwhich will monitor the accumulation bing the deck. Those on shore will be able to of additional species over the next 84 follow along through the Stowaway’s daily days of sailing and port visits. When dispatches on the Museum’s website and the Morgan returns in early August, she social media. will still have some Clearly, the days at of the original panels sea will be busy ones, she left with in midregardless of wind and May, as well as fouling weather. The onboard communities that will activities of Museum reflect her itinerary staff, the 38th Voyagboth north and south ers, and the Stowaway The team leading the development of 38th of Cape Cod. These will ensure that this Voyage programming is, from left to right, will be the first experivoyage will reach a Katharine Mead, the Charles W. Morgan ments of their kind on 38th Voyage Program Assistant; Susan broad, national audithe Atlantic coast of Funk, Executive Vice President of Mystic ence as one of the bestNorth America. Seaport; and Dr. Elysa Engelman, the documented and most During the months following the voyage,

visible voyages ever.

Museum’s exhibit researcher/developer.

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T H E 3 8 T H V O YA G E

The Morgan Dockside Exhibits By KATHARINE MEAD

W

hen the Charles W. Morgan arrives at the 38th Voyage ports of call, she will offer more than the usual visiting historic vessel. A large dockside exhibit will provide local visitors with the best interpretation and education elements from Mystic Seaport, as well as new perspectives on whales, scientific research, and the maritime heritage of each port. This dockside exhibit will be trucked by land as the Morgan takes to the sea, reunited in a new configuration in each city for the public to enjoy for multiple days. Visitors will find a vibrant and engaging exhibition, centered on the Morgan herself, colorfully dressed with signal flags. Additional international flags will be displayed highlighting her global ports of call from 1841 to 1921. Visitors will be able to explore the dockside exhibit at their own pace before or after boarding the Morgan, and Museum staff will help answer questions, guide activities, and ensure visitors that they get the most out of their visit. Upon arrival, visitors will be greeted at the entrance tent and

A SCALE MODEL OF THE 44-FOOT INFLATABLE SPERM WHALE THAT WILL GREET VISITORS DOCKSIDE. INPUT FROM WHALE SCIENTISTS AND CONSERVATIONISTS INFORMED THE DESIGN. IT IS BEING MANUFACTURED BY MINNESOTABASED LANDMARK CREATIONS.

invited to watch a short video providing an overview of the 38th Voyage, the history of the Morgan, and contemporary connections. Families with young children might choose to start with the hands-on activities by adding a drawing or message to a large whale sculpture, volunteering to join a performance of the signature Mystic Seaport production, Tale of a Whaler, or trying an interactive activity like knot-tying. Other visitors may choose to watch casks, rope, or ironwork take shape during

a demonstration of shoreside trades, search for information about an ancestor or local resident who served on the Morgan, or study exhibit panels with photos and stories about the whaleship’s historic career, restoration, and current voyage. Next up could be a sea music performance or the new theater piece Moby-Dick in Minutes. Many of the waterfront venues provide areas for observing whaleboat rowing and sail handling. Early morning visitors may even catch a glimpse of a full-size (44 ft.) sperm whale model rising as it inflates for the day. All of the dockside activities will be completed with the unforgettable experience of boarding the Morgan. Port and national partners will play important roles as well. Local museums, historical societies, and other cultural groups will host their own tents with small displays, handouts, and activities to tell vital stories about their port, infusing a local flavor that makes each dockside display unique. Mystic Seaport is also partnering with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's

THE MUSEUM'S EXHIBITS DESIGNER JEFF CREWE CREATED SCALE MODELS OF EACH DOCKSIDE LAYOUT, BEGINNING WITH NEW BEDFORD (LEFT). STAFF AND PARTNERS USE THE MODELS TO MAKE DECISIONS ABOUT STAFFING, LOGISTICS, SCHEDULES, AND ALL ELEMENTS CONTRIBUTING TO THE VISITOR EXPERIENCE.


(NOAA) Office of Marine Sanctuaries to highlight ongoing research and conservation of whale populations in Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. NOAA, with its own tent and volunteers, will provide breathtaking images of North Atlantic whales taken from research vessels along the Morgan’s route. The dockside exhibit will also offer seating, shade, member services, and access to restrooms and local food vendors. Whether the visit lasts 45 minutes or 4 hours, there will be plenty to see, do, try, and learn. Planning for this traveling exhibit started several years ago, involving staff from nearly every department of the Museum. Exhibit staff have been busy prototyping exhibit activities and displays, making digital and physical models of each dockside plan, and

ABOVE: VISITORS WILL BE INVITED TO SHARE THEIR CREATIVITY, REFLECTING ON WHALES AND OCEAN HEALTH AS PART OF A COLLABORATIVE ART ACTIVITY. THESE TAGS WILL ATTACH TO A SCULPTURAL WHALE FORM. LEFT: COMPUTER-GENERATED DESIGNS HELP ENSURE THE DOCKSIDE EXPERIENCE WORKS EQUALLY WELL IN ALL THE PORT VENUES.

building the exhibit elements for durability and easy transport. The interpretation team has created staffing models and training materials, while membership and visitor services have focused on the logistics. This will ensure that the visitor experience has the same high-quality and content-rich character as other Mystic Seaport programs and exhibits. The visit of this one-of-a-kind vessel resonates strongly with the history of each selected port city. Mystic Seaport members may wish to visit the Morgan in multiple places, to see how she reflects different stories in each port. New London, New Bedford, and Provincetown once comprised three of the top five American ports by number of departing whaling voyages (Nantucket and San Francisco completed the list). New London and Newport lit the world with whale oil and spermaceti candles. Many captains and crew members of the Morgan hailed from Martha’s Vineyard. It will be a whirlwind summer tour for the whaleship, one to rival any vacation itiner-

ary. New Bedford will welcome the Morgan to her old homeport with city-wide festivities spanning nine days. While moored in Provincetown Harbor, the Morgan will make day trips to Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary with researchers on board and whale watch boats sharing the waters, bridging centuries of whale observation. In Boston, the Morgan, rebuilt with timbers unearthed in the Charles River, will dock next to the USS Constitution, bringing the two oldest American vessels afloat closer than ever. As the 38th Voyage comes to an end, the Morgan will participate in the Cape Cod Canal Centennial while docked at Massachusetts Maritime Academy. Partner organizations in each of these ports will add local expertise and perspective to the 38th Voyage with featured areas within the dockside exhibit. Although the Morgan has been accessible to the public for more than 70 years at Mystic Seaport, and well over 20 million people have walked her decks during that time, this traveling exhibit and related

programs will provide a new experience. Residents of the port cities will see a threemasted vessel on the horizon, recalling a time when sailing ships were commonplace and the cycle of arrival and departure marked the passing days and years. As the Morgan docks alongside modern fishing boats and other vessels, visitors will have an opportunity to consider commerce past and present. In the dockside exhibit, visitors can share their responses to her 38th Voyage, including what it reveals of the past and inspires for the future. In mid-May, the Morgan will leave Mystic Seaport for the first time since she arrived in November 1941, bringing with her lessons learned from decades of research and visitation on the Museum grounds. She will return to Mystic Seaport in the beginning of August having shared her stories with new audiences and added a new chapter to her long history. Katharine Mead is the Charles W. Morgan 38th Voyage Program Assistant. SPRING / SUMMER 2014

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THE MORGAN’S CREWS By ANDREW GERMAN

A

s the Charles W. Morgan is prepared for her ceremonial 38th Voyage, the vessel offers us a perfect opportunity to look at the way a shipboard community reflected the larger world of racial and ethnic diversity. Nineteenth-century New England whaleships have long been known for their extremely diverse crews, and by looking at the Morgan’s crew lists we can bring life to that general impression. The Morgan’s whaling career lasted for nearly three generations, and her voyages commonly took her halfway around the world from her homeport. Across her 37 voyages, her crews reflected both the changes in seafaring between 1840 and 1920, as well as the regions of the world where she spent her time. For her first voyage, 1841-44, the ship had a relatively homogeneous crew, at least 14 of whom came from the captain’s home island of Martha’s Vineyard. This was typical of whaling voyages of earlier decades—before the industry expanded through the 1830s—when

A World of

Diversity Aboard the Charles W. Morgan

ABOVE: A CA. 1865 PHOTO OF SAMUEL F. DAVIS OF FALMOUTH, MA, WHO SERVED AS BOATSTEERER ON THE 1853-56 VOYAGE AND SECOND MATE (PRESUMABLY DAVID CARRINGTON’S CABIN-MATE) ON THE 1856-59 VOYAGE. 1987.66.2. LEFT: A GROUP ABOARD THE CHARLES W. MORGAN MINCING BLUBBER. 1975.383.89. OPPOSITE PAGE: WORKING AT THE WINDLASS TO HOIST THE LARBOARD ANCHOR, THE MORGAN CREW PREPARES TO GET UNDERWAY IN SEPTEMBER 1916. 94.53.97.

sufficient labor could be found locally and a whaling voyage was, in many respects, a community venture. As an example of this spirit, Captain Thomas A. Norton would offer navigation lessons to the crew, and 20 of them took advantage of this chance to learn a skill necessary for command. At

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THE MORGAN’S CREWS

least three of them would become whaling captains. It would take Captain Norton’s relative William R. Norton just eleven years to rise from greenhand on the Morgan to captain of the bark Mercator. But with several men recruited in New York and several “foreigners” with Portuguese-sounding names, the Morgan’s first crew also represented the shift in whaling labor to the use of young and often unskilled rural men who sought opportunity or adventure, as well as natives of the islands at which whaleships called during their voyages. On this first voyage we can identify Thomas Kanaka as a Polynesian (Kanaka being the Hawaiian word for man or person). But how about George Morgan? You might think he was a relative of the owner, sent to sea to shape up or to begin a seagoing career. Actually, he was a Tahitian teenager, signed aboard during the voyage and probably christened by the Morgan’s officers. George Morgan sailed on the second voyage as well. And then there is Zenas Gould (called Henry Gould in Charles Morgan’s account book), who sounds like the son of

a venerable New England family. Indeed he was, being a Wampanoag, or “Gay Head Indian,” who came aboard as a 15-year-old greenhand and was then recommended for the position of boatsteerer (harpooner) for the second voyage. The case of the last two men points out the difficulty of identifying racial heritage by name alone. This is particularly true with African Americans, a few of whom served aboard the Morgan. Historians Briton C. Busch, in Whaling Will Never Do for Me (1993), and Jeffrey Bolster, in Black Jacks (1997), demonstrate that opportunities for African-American seafarers declined after the 1830s. Although historian Martha Putney has identified more than 3,000 African Americans who served on New Bedford vessels between 1803 and 1860, Busch finds the average to have been only two per vessel during the 1840s and less than one per vessel in the 1850s. How do we identify African Americans? Names rarely help, and many weatherbeaten seafarers were described as having dark complexions and black hair in the

descriptive lines on seamen’s protection documents and crew lists. On the other hand, a “yellow” (light-skinned black) complexion is an almost certain marker, as is the combination of a black complexion and “woolly” hair. Since the documents were written by and for whites, they commonly denoted white and straight-haired Polynesian sailors by hair color and blacks by hair texture. If we use either yellow complexion or a combination of black complexion and woolly hair to identify U.S.-born (rather than Cape Verdean or West Indian) black sailors, we come up with six men in the Morgan’s first seven voyages, 1841-67. The first identifiable African American aboard the Morgan served on the third voyage, 1849-53. He was Benjamin Olney, 23, of Newport, RI, described as having a “yellow” complexion. His surname suggests he descended from slaves of the prominent Olney family. He later served as a whaleship cook, a common position for black seafarers of the time, so he may have cooked on board the Morgan. SPRING / SUMMER 2014

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THE MORGAN’S CREWS The largest number of African Americans served on the Morgan’s fifth voyage, 1856-59, at a time of increasing conflict over slavery in the U.S., which led to the Civil War. Two of these three men are of particular interest. First, there’s David Carrington, 34, of Newburgh, NY. Carrington signed aboard the Morgan as third mate, with a 1/55 lay. If African Americans rarely overcame racial prejudice to be offered command of a vessel, they did rise through merit to subordinate officer positions with moderate frequency. Yet, Carrington is the only AfricanAmerican officer to have served on the Morgan. The Whaling Archives of the New Bedford Free Public Library adds to our slim knowledge of Carrington by reporting that he was a boatsteerer during the ship Mary’s 1850-52 voyage, served as third mate of the Minerva Smyth during her 1852-55 voyage, then followed his Morgan voyage in an unrecorded

GEORGE P. CHRISTIAN, LEFT, GREATGRANDSON OF FLETCHER CHRISTIAN OF THE BOUNTY MUTINEERS, WAS BOATSTEERER, SECOND MATE, AND MATE FOR MANY YEARS ON THE MORGAN. ON THE RIGHT, ANTONE ALAMEDA, OF PORTUGUESE DESCENT, WAS THE 4TH MATE ON THE MORGAN'S VOYAGE 30 (1904-06) AND VOYAGE 31 (1906-08). 1977.280.

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capacity on the 1859-62 voyage of the Gov. Troup, during which much of the crew mutinied. Carrington’s success is a contrast to the more typical seafaring career of the other African American from the Hudson River Valley in the crew. Henry Francis of Fishkill, NY, had gone whaling as a greenhand aboard the bark United States in 1840. He spent nine years on that vessel as a seaman before joining the Ansel Gibbs as cook in 1849. As the Morgan’s cook, the 38-year-old Francis received a 1/150 lay—a little more than a third of Carrington’s rate of pay. But two years into the voyage, perhaps because of his long experience, Francis was promoted to boatsteerer, a considerable jump in responsibility and pay. The other African American of particular interest on this voyage was James Hamlin, 28, who was born in the late 1820s in the prosperous seaport of Norfolk, VA. The 1850 federal census lists him as a laborer, living near the Norfolk waterfront. But six years later, when he signed on board the Morgan, he was already an experienced seaman. In the 1880 census, Hamlin is called a mulatto (mixed race) and is still listed as a sailor, living near the New York waterfront with his wife, also a Virginia-born mulatto. Unfortunately, the Morgan’s 1856-59 voyage is among the least well documented of her voyages, so we have very little information on Carrington, Francis, or Hamlin and their experiences on board. After the Civil War, the African American presence aboard the Morgan was replaced by African West Indians and by African Portuguese from the Cape Verde Islands. West Indians included Jamaican boatsteerer George Brown, who served from 1886 to 1898, and British West Indian Jim Antone, 22, who drowned in September 1888 when a whaleboat capsized in the Sea of Okhotsk. Outwardbound whaleships commonly stopped at either the Azores or the Cape Verde Islands to take on provisions and fill out their crews. Cape Verdean names (or New England interpretations of them) appear on nearly all of the Morgan’s crew lists and in officers’ positions after the Civil War. An example is Honorio A. Martin, who was a crew member on the 1886-87 voyage, fourth mate 188789, second mate 1889-90, and third mate 1897-1901. Natives of the Azores, or “Western Islands,” served in lesser numbers than Cape Verdeans, but were represented by men such as Antonio de Medeiros on the 1856-59 voyage and Second Mate Frank Enos on the 1892-93 voyage. As reflected in the Morgan’s first crew, Pacific


THE MORGAN’S CREWS islanders were commonly recruited as replacement labor aboard American whaleships. After the Morgan began operating out of San Francisco in 1887, her crews reflected even more islands of the Pacific. Men from Guam served on most of her voyages from San Francisco. Enos Aflague, Joaquin de la Cruz, Lino Patricio, Jose Santos, and Pedro Taitano, who were Spanish subjects when they signed aboard in 1897, became Americans during the 1898 voyage, for the U.S. had received Guam from Spain by the treaty concluding the SpanishAmerican War. The first Japanese sailor to serve aboard the Morgan was N. Matsutara, 22, who shipped on voyage 17 in 1890. Thereafter, ten or more Japanese men sailed in the Morgan. One, whose name was interpreted as Takashasha (or Takahas Tome Taro in the log), died of consumption (tuberculosis) on board in June 1898. The Morgan called at Norfolk Island, between Australia and New Zealand, during the 1893-95 voyage. There, at least three members of the Christian family and four Quintals signed aboard the Morgan. They were all descendants of the Bounty mutineers, whose English-Tahitian families had been moved from Pitcairn Island to Norfolk Island in the middle of the nineteenth century. George P. Christian remained with the vessel for most of her voyages during the next 20 years, often serving as second mate. Emanuel F. Morgan, a native of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean, joined the Morgan at Hakodate, Japan, in 1897 and served as first mate on several voyages through 1906. Captain John S. Layton, who was in command when Emanuel Morgan joined the crew, was a native of New Zealand, who had gone to sea as a teenager and settled in New Bedford in the 1860s. Another New Zealander was Richard McLachlan, who served as fourth mate on the 1903-04 voyage. McLachlan later posed for Bela Lyon Pratt’s sculpture, A Dead Whale or a Stove Boat, which stands next to the New Bedford Free Public Library. Captain James Earle’s wife Honor was also a New Zealander. She made several voyages on the Morgan and was listed as assistant navigator on voyage 31, 1906-08. For an example of the trend in whaling labor, consider the crew list for voyage 16, 1889-90. American-born men came from Massachusetts, New York, Virginia, Ohio, Missouri, Wisconsin, Montana, and California. Europeans aboard came from Austria, Belgium, England, Germany, Portugal, and

Sweden. Island men came from the Cape Verdes as well as the West Indies, St. Helena, Mauritius, and Guam. And 22-year-old Emidio Fernandez of Peru represented the long maritime ties between North America and South America. John E.D. Smith was a literal shellback who twice gave his place of birth as “at sea” (other times he named locations in New York or Massa-

THE EARLE FAMILY ON BOARD THE MORGAN, CA. 1903. JAMES EARLE WAS A NATIVE OF MARTHA'S VINEYARD AND THE CAPTAIN OF THE MORGAN DURING NINE VOYAGES BETWEEN 1890 AND 1907. HE MARRIED HONOR MATTHEWS, A NEW ZEALAND SCHOOL TEACHER, DURING THE 1895 VOYAGE. THEIR YOUNG SON JAMES, "JAMIE," CAME WITH THEM ON THE 1902-03 VOYAGE. 1973.899.231.

chusetts). He appears to have been the John Smith who signed aboard as a boatsteerer at Talcahuano, Chile, in 1868. Thereafter identified as John E. or John E.D., he made seven of the Morgan’s succeeding nine voyages, missing only two one-year voyages from San Francisco. He finally left the Morgan in 1891 when nearly 60, after spending 21 years with the ship, mostly as carpenter, cooper, and shipkeeper. He put in more sea time aboard the Morgan than anyone else. We know a great deal about the Charles W. Morgan, how she was built and altered, where she went, and how she operated as a whaleship. The challenge is to make her live, to see her as an insular world peopled by a diverse and fascinating

From Interpreter to Director of Publications, Andrew German spent 29 years on the staff of Mystic Seaport in various roles. He is now a freelance writer and editor living in Mystic.

population, like that nation whose flag she flew. SPRING / SUMMER 2014

| Mystic Seaport Magazine | 23


ON BOOKS

The Hunted Whale By JAMES MCGUANE (W. W. NORTON, 2013, 208 PP) Reviewed by MARY K. BERCAW EDWARDS

G

orgeous photographs fill James McGuane was led to Murphy’s book McGuane’s The Hunted Whale. through material culture. While photoMcGuane can find the beauty even graphing a whaleboat donated by Murin rusty hawseholes on the 1841 whaleship phy in the collection of the Cold Spring Charles W. Morgan (pp. 34 and 39). The Harbor Whaling Museum, Paul DeOrreader turns over page after page in awe. say suggested that McGuane read MurMcGuane is a master photographer as well phy’s work. Murphy sailed aboard the as a blacksmith and sculptor. His artistic whaleship Daisy in 1912 as a naturalist sense, but also his feel for iron and tools in search of pelagic birds. As McGuane come out in his photographs. Although notes, Murphy “handled the paradox of the book is entitled The Hunted Whale, the being an erudite gentleman confined emphasis is on the material culture of the among a crew of tough (mostly) illiterate hunt rather than on the whales themselves. Portuguese islanders with aplomb” (p. It is not only McGuane’s photographs, but 17). Murphy proved an able chronicler also his captions that draw in the reader. of shipboard life under the cantankerous In his Acknowledgments, McGuane Captain Benjamin D. Cleveland, later one thanks Matthew Stackpole (Mystic Seaport), of the captains of the Charles W. Morgan. James Russell, Jim Lopes, Mike Dyer, and Newly-married, Murphy kept a diary for Stuart Frank (New Bedford Whaling Muhis wife Grace, which he later reworked seum), Ben Simons, Elizabeth Oldham, and into the aptly-titled Logbook for Grace. Bob Hellman (Nantucket Historical AssoMcGuane interlaces Murphy’s words ciation), and especially Paul DeOrsay (then The Hunted Whale with his photographs, allowing the reader at Cold Spring Harbor Whaling Museum), to interact directly with both. is a photo essay of the all of them deeply involved in the material Inevitably, with a book that includes culture of whaling; it is no wonder that his so much information, there are a few highest caliber. information is so accurate. The Hunted errors. Melville’s Battle-Pieces was pubWhale is a photo essay of the highest caliber. lished in 1866, not 1861 (p. 48). Mast hoops postdated Melville’s McGuane does not rely, as so many accounts of whaling do, time at sea; until the mid-19th century, men stood on the cross-trees on Herman Melville’s words in Moby-Dick (1851). There is only clutching the mast with no other protection (p. 66). The bunks on one glancing (p. 48) and one implied reference (p. 66). Melville’s the Morgan are two high, not three (p. 69). McGuane states twice language is stunningly beautiful, but one of the great strengths of that whalemen shared bunks (pp. 69 and 151), the first time specifiMcGuane’s work is that he makes the artifacts themselves stunningly cally in reference to the Morgan, but the Morgan carried enough beautiful, no matter how incongruous that might seem. Twisted bunks for all the men. McGuane includes a bibliography but no harpoons (pp. 96-97), worn scabbards for whaling irons (p. 105), a notes, so the source of his information is unclear. Such small errors, rusted can of sperm oil (p. 142), wooden hoops for whale oil casks however, do not detract from a book that should be read, studied, (p. 164), cracked and discolored sperm whale teeth (p. 195), and a and long cherished. bulkwark’s repair on the Morgan (p. 43) are all rendered handsome A specialist in Herman Melville, Dr. Mary K. Bercaw Edwards is an Associate by McGuane’s flawless eye. Professor of English and Maritime Studies Faculty at the University of ConMcGuane’s emphasis on material culture brings the humans necticut. She also serves as Mystic Seaport’s demonstration squad foreman. involved in whaling to the forefront. The skill of the shipsmiths, coopers, captains, boatsteerers (the 19th-century term for harpoonTO ORDER THESE OR OTHER BOOKS, ers), and whalemen can be seen in what they created: harpoons please call 860.572.5386. or email msmbookstore@eventnetwork.com that bent but did not break, casks that did not leak, journals and DON’T FORGET YOUR 10% MEMBERS’ DISCOUNT! logbooks, lovely scrimshaw, and more. REMEMBER WE SHIP ANYWHERE! McGuane also foregrounds humans by including passages from WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG/BOOKSTORE Robert Cushman Murphy’s Logbook for Grace (1947). Fittingly,

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E D I T O RO'N S P B IOCOKKSS

Mystic Whaleboat Memories

LEFT: WALT ANSEL HELPING HIS FATHER, WILL, WORK ON A MUSEUM BOAT IN SPRING 1981. ABOVE: WALT AND EVELYN ANSEL. BELOW: WILL ANSEL.

M

y dad, Will Ansel’s, whaleboat building efforts at Mystic Seaport were very big on my horizon as a kid in the 1970s. Will, with Maynard Bray’s support, set out to build the first 19th-century style whaleboat since the last Beetle boats of the 1930s. While beautiful as seabirds, these whaleboats were tools intended for one deadly job and were entirely utilitarian. Their short life span (one to two whaling voyages) was reflected in their practical and quick construction. Beautiful sea boats, great for rowing and sailing, whaleboats also often undertook astonishingly long survival voyages, and there are many accounts of their roles in rescuing their crews from dire circumstances. Although whaleboats were almost extinct outside museums in the 1970s, their legacy was well known. Mystic Seaport needed whaleboats to outfit the whaleship Charles W. Morgan after she was floated off her sand berth in December 1973 and was moved to the Museum’s Shipyard for bottom restoration. Will was charged with the task to build, research, and actively use replica whaleboats at the Museum. His book The Whaleboat: A Study of Design, Construction and Use from 1850 to 1970 (1978; 2nd ed. 1983) was the product of this effort. The 38th Voyage of the Morgan with her complement of ten newly built whaleboats presents an opportunity to revisit and re-

publish this unique study. The new edition Leo pronounced it a “good job.” I remember clearly her graceful look with a white hull, a of the book, which will be published in midrobin’s egg blue sheer strake, and black rails. May, will have two additional parts. One will Together with Mystic Seaport’s demonbe a detailed construction chapter for the stration interpreters (“The Mod Squad”), Beetle whaleboat written by me. The other Will quickly put the new whaleboat to use, will be an in-depth description of the 2013 rowing and sailing her on the Mystic River. National Whaleboat Building project by my Testing this unique craft on the river was to daughter, Evelyn, who thereby will be the open a window back in time third generation Ansel to be to 19th-century whaling. Sea involved in telling the story trials also consisted of a race of the American whaleboat. around Fishers Island against Will first chose to build a modern boats and a rough Leonard whaleboat replica weather passage to Newport, from a boat shop near New RI, under the command of Bedford, MA. This handsome Jan Miles, then mate of Briland beefy boat was chosen liant. These many intensive because it had one of the few PHOTOGRAPH © EVELYN ANSEL boat trials resulted in a broken line plans (at the time) that mast, boom, and rudder fittings. had been drawn by a competent boat The new boat and her crews proved that designer, William Hand. With plans in hand, whaleboats were indeed amazingly able, Will set out to build the boat on the deck seaworthy, and a quick craft that histories inside the carpenter’s shop in the Shipyard had alluded to. where the live oak break table sits today. As a young kid crouched in the bilge, Before getting too far along, Will was spray flying over the hard-pressed whaleintroduced to Leo Telesmanik, the man boat, I have to admit that my feeling of terror behind the Beetle Catboat. As an apprentice was well mixed with history and romance. If in the 1930s, Leo had helped build the last you have a chance, pick up the new edition few New Bedford whaleboats while workof The Whaleboat; the rest of the story is ing for the Beetle Boat Company. Leo was a there —and if you need to build a whaleboat legendary boat builder, who came to Mystic to outfit your whaler, you should be all set. to teach and pass along the finer points of planking a whaleboat to Will. When the Mystic-built “Leonard boat” was launched,

Walt Ansel is a senior shipwright at the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard at Mystic Seaport.

SPRING / SUMMER 2014

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FROM THE COLLECTIONS

THE

STORY

A BOU T

A

P I C T U RE

A Whaling Captain’s Lap Desk I

By LAURA NADELBERG

t’s always exciting for a museum to add to its collection, but even more so when the new acquisition “comes home” to other items that once belonged together. Such is the case for this artifact, a lap desk, which was recently added to the collection of Mystic Seaport. On board ships, space was limited, and special consideration was given to make sure every inch of the vessel was utilized to the best of its ability. Small and portable, lap desks could be placed on any flat surface to provide a stable area for writing. This lap desk is of particular interest to the Museum, as it belonged to whaling Captain Frederick H. Smith of Dartmouth, MA, and was crafted by him (possibly with the help of his wife, Sallie) in 1876 during a voyage aboard the bark Ohio. The desk is small, but the craftsmanship is certainly impressive, especially taking into consideration that it was constructed on board the vessel in the captain’s spare time. Made of mahogany, it features a sloped lid, with storage on the inside for papers, writing supplies, and letters. The sloped top meant that the desk was able to remain compact

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while in use, as opposed to requiring the user to open it in order to access the writing surface. This allowed for better use of space on board the Ohio. At the top and sides, intricate walrus-ivory inlays depict designs such as stars, a diamond-shaped key insert for locking, and a plaque at the top that indicates both ownership and craftsmanship by Captain Smith through the faint engraving

CAPT. 1876 FREDERICK H. SMITH BARK OHIO Both Smith and his wife Sallie were skilled scrimshanders with many of their fine pieces currently in the collection of Mystic Seaport. Not only did the couple create traditional work, but many of the pieces with which they are associated also took on utilitarian purposes and were intended for everyday use. From canes to clothespins, pipe bowls to jagging wheels, the Smiths crafted beautiful and unique scrimshaw pieces that are now considered prime examples of maritime folk art. Currently, Mystic Seaport has more than 150 different artifacts that were once owned

by the Smiths. These artifacts include letters, journals, and logbooks written while aboard Ohio, numerous pieces of scrimshaw work, and a box of whale oil samples taken by Captain Smith himself. In 2013, the Museum was fortunate enough to acquire a collection of letters from Sallie Smith to a friend, written while aboard the Ohio. These letters help to provide a glimpse into the life of a woman on an active whaling vessel. The addition of this lap desk to the collection is a great opportunity to continue to add to the depth of the story of the Smiths. Helping to grow the collection, it allows researchers, students, visitors, and employees to gain more insight into the lives of people who made such an impact on maritime history and culture. Laura Nadelberg splits her time between the Collections Research Center (CRC) and the Education Department. She has recently taken on the role of Collections Cataloger and continues to work as the Assistant Manager of Digital Education Initiatives with the Mystic Seaport for Educators website.

To get more information about Mystic Seaport’s Collections Research Center and online resources, please visit http://library.mysticseaport.org


TOP: LEAD RIGGER MATTHEW OTTO ALOFT ON THE CHARLES W. MORGAN. RIGHT: COLLECTIONS ACCESS MANAGER MARIBETH BIELINSKI HELPS STUDENTS WORK WITH PRIMARY SOURCES MATERIALS. LEFT: MANAGER OF DIGITAL EDUCATION INITIATIVES KRYSTAL ROSE CONDUCTS A VIRTUAL FIELD TRIP WITH STUDENTS IN MINNESOTA.

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EACH AND EVERY DAY, the skilled and experienced staff of Mystic Seaport bring the Museum to life, providing dynamic and inspirational programs for thousands of students, members, and visitors. Your philanthropic support to the Museum’s Annual Fund is incredibly important to us and helps to fulfill our mission in various meaningful ways. PLEASE MAKE YOUR GIFT TODAY! The America and the Sea Society is the leadership gift society within the Annual Fund at Mystic Seaport. If you want more information, please contact Elizabeth Benoit at 860-572-5302 ext 5144. www.mysticseaport.org/support


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Mystic Seaport Magazine - Spring/Summer 2014  

Preparing the CHARLES W. MORGAN for her 38th Voyage

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