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SPRING |SUMMER 2016

Celebrating

EmmaC.Berry

150 Years!


EXPERIENTIAL EDUCATION AT ITS BEST!

OVER 60 YEARS of

SUMMER    CAMPS At Mystic Seaport WHY LANDLOCK YOUR CHILDREN this summer when a whole new world awaits on the

water? From day camps to overnight camps and sailing programs aboard historic vessels like the Joseph Conrad and Brilliant, Mystic Seaport offers all sorts of unforgettable ways for children of all ages to earn their sea legs. Learn more at www.mysticseaport.org/summercamps


CONTENTS

IN THIS ISSUE

TM

Mystic Seaport magazine is a publication of Mystic SeaporT

SEASCAPES . ..................................… 4

President STEPHEN C. WHITE executive vice presidents SUSAN FUNK MARCY WITHINGTON

ADVANCEMENT NEWS ...................5-7

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADVANCEMENT Elisabeth Saxe

MUSEUM BRIEFS .......................... 8-9

Editor Göran R BUCKHORN editor@mysticseaport.org

SHIPS, CLOCKS & STARS .................10

PRODUCTION Susan HEATH

Q&A ................................................. 11

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Design Dayna Carignan, Mystic Seaport karen Ward, THE DAY PRINTING COMPANY

EMMA C. BERRY 150 YEARS!...... 12-15

contributors Arlene Marcionette

QUAD UPDATE . .......................... 16-17

Dan McFadden Paul O’Pecko Quentin Snediker

NEW EXHIBIT . ........................... 18-19

Ken Wilson PHOTOGRAPHY Joe Michael Dennis Murphy Andy Price Mary Anne Stets Mystic Seaport Photography Archives

ON BOOKS .................................. 20-21

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ON THE COVER: TOP: EMMA C. BERRY AT HER BERTH

FROM THE COLLECTIONS . ............. 22

SPRING / SUMMER

BY THE THOMAS OYSTER HOUSE. PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDY PRICE/MYSTIC SEAPORT

MIDDLE: EMMA C. BERRY RETURNS TO THE MYSTIC RIVER IN 1969. MSM, 1969-6-83.

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BOTTOM: EMMA C. BERRY GETTING READY TO BE LAUNCHED AFTER HER FIRST RESTORATION AT MYSTIC SEAPORT DURING THE YEARS 1969 AND 1971. MSM, 1971-495.

CONTACT US VISITOR INFORMATION: 860.572.5315 • 888.973.2767 ADMINISTRATION: 860.572.0711 ADVANCEMENT: 860.572.5365 MEMBERSHIP: 860.572.5339 PROGRAM RESERVATION: 860.572.5322 MUSEUM STORE: 860.572.5385 MARITIME GALLERY: 860.572.5388 VOLUNTEER SERVICES: 860.572.5378 Please go to the Museum’s website for information on the Spring and Summer schedules ADDRESS: 75 GREENMANVILLE AVE. P.O. BOX 6000 MYSTIC, CT 06355-0990 WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG–––

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SPECIAL EVENTS at MYSTIC SEAPORT

S E A S C A P E S The Spirit of the Mystic River

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ome might argue that Mystic Seaport is defined in part by its location on the Mystic River; others might say that the Mystic region is defined in part by the presence of Mystic Seaport. Whatever the case, it is clear that over time the Mystic River and the land now occupied by Mystic Seaport have enjoyed an extraordinary relationship. Compared to greater Mystic and Noank, Mystic Seaport is a virtual infant, yet we strive to help our visitors, members, and researchers understand the heritage of the river, the people whose lives have been defined by the river, and the commerce that has evolved within the estuary itself. Local residents are fortunate that the Mystic River Historical Society and the Noank Historical Society join us in preserving manuscripts, photographs, and objects that define this heritage and allow us to better articulate the history that creates the strong sense of place along the river. At Mystic Seaport, we hope to get as many people out on the river as possible, whether in small boats going out from the Boathouse, the Sabino, or our launches. It is from the river that we begin to have a better understanding of its heritage. Visitors to Mystic Seaport can also step back in time when they visit the Mystic River Scale Model, a beautiful depiction of the Mystic River during the height of the shipbuilding industry between 1850 and 1880. Today, the river continues to impact the local economy with shipyards, marinas, oyster beds, restaurants, and recreational boating. Right now, Mystic Seaport is in the midst of updating its Strategic Plan, and one important element of the plan calls for the Museum to maximize the potential of its relationship with the river. Many who worked and enjoyed the Museum in the 1970s and 1980s may remember the late trustee Waldo Howland’s insistence that the Museum be, at the very least, as much water-based as it is land-based. As you can see from the cover and Quentin Snediker’s feature article, this issue of the Magazine is dedicated to the 150th anniversary of the Emma C. Berry. While Mystic Seaport is noted for so many of its important and nationally recognized vessels, not one more fully embodies the spirit of the river than the Emma C. Berry, which was built downriver in Noank. 150 years later, this National Historic Landmark vessel represents a time of a great, vibrant economy along the banks of the Mystic River. Further, the sheer beauty of this “smack” reminds us that a working vessel can be exceptionally pleasing to the eye. As you visit the Museum this summer, I encourage you to linger at the bowsprit of the Emma C. Berry to enjoy her lines, to remember her heritage, and to see her as an icon for Noank and the Mystic River. STEPHEN C. WHITE, President

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APRIL

30 to June 12 — MAY 14–15 — 21 — 28–29 — 30 —

New Horizons in Modern Marine Art Exhibition and Sale PILOTS Weekend Over Life’s Waters: The Coastal Art Collection of Charles and Irene Hamm opens Salute to Summer Decoration Day

JUNE 9–12 — 24 — 18 to Sep. 25 — 24–26 — 24–26 —

Sea Music Festival Planetarium Summer Evening Series begin Plein Air Painters of the Maritime Gallery WoodenBoat Show Small Craft Workshop

JULY 2 — 3 to Aug. 28 — 4 — 23 — 23–24 — 31 to Aug. 1 —

New Arts events on the Quad begin Summer Music Sundays Independence Day Docktails and Dancing Antique & Classic Boat Rendezvous Moby-Dick Marathon

AUGUST 5–7 — Model Yacht Regatta 20–21 — Antique Marine Engine Expo SEPTEMBER 18 — 24 — 25 —

Coastweeks Regatta Members’ Annual Meeting & Recognition Day By Land and By Sea: Antique Vehicle Show

OCTOBER 1 — 1–Dec. 31 — 8 — 8–10 — 15-16 —

Mystic River Oyster Festival 37th Annual International Marine Art Exhibition and Sale Beer Tasting Chowder Days PILOTS Weekend

SAVE THE DATE!

Mystic Seaport Members’ Annual Meeting & Recognition Day

Saturday, September 24, 2016 9:30 -11:30 a.m. The River Room, Latitude 41°

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG OR CALL 860.572.5339

The image used in Stephen White’s “Seascapes” is by Al Barnes (1937-2015), Laying On, watercolor, 21" x 29"


A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

NATHANIEL PHILBRICK: RECIPIENT OF THE 2015

Previous Recipients of the America and the Sea Award 2006 Olin J. Stephens, II 2007 David McCullough 2008 Thomas B. Crowley, Jr., and the Crowley Maritime Corporation 2009 William I. Koch 2010 Sylvia A. Earle 2011 The Honorable John F. Lehman 2012 Jon Wilson and WoodenBoat 2013 Gary Jobson 2014 Charles A. Robertson

LEFT TO RIGHT: MYSTIC SEAPORT PRESIDENT STEVE WHITE, RECIPIENT OF THE 2015 AMERICA AND THE SEA AWARD NATHANIEL PHILBRICK, AND CHAIRMAN OF THE MYSTIC SEAPORT BOARD OF TRUSTEES J. BARCLAY COLLINS.

The year 2015 marked the 10th anniversary of the Museum’s America and the Sea Award Gala, an annual celebration during which Mystic Seaport confers its highest honor to a distinguished member of the maritime community. On October 14, 2015, Nathaniel Philbrick, the New York Times bestselling and National Book Award winning author of historical non-fiction, joined the esteemed ranks of award recipients at the Museum’s largest single fundraiser. The award, established by Mystic Seaport in 2006, recognizes an individual or organization whose contributions to the history, arts, business, or sciences of the sea best exemplify the American spirit and character. Philbrick is recognized as a leading historian and has written extensively about the American maritime experience. In 2000, he published the bestseller In the Heart of the Sea, winner of the National Book Award for non-fiction, and in December 2015, Warner Bros. Pictures released a motion picture based on the book, directed by Ron Howard.

Philbrick’s other books include Sea of Glory, which won the Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Naval History Prize and the Albion-Monroe Award from the National Maritime Historical Society; Mayflower, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize; The Last Stand; Bunker Hill, winner of the New England Book Award; Why Read Moby-Dick?; and Away Off Shore. He is the founding director of the Egan Maritime Institute and a research fellow at the Nantucket Historical Association. The award gala was a great success, with overall net revenue exceeding $325,000. Sotheby’s Vice President Geraldine Nager Griffin ran a lively auction, which included items such as tickets to the In the Heart of the Sea movie premiere courtesy of Warner Bros.; a two-night Nantucket Boat Basin package; a limited edition Chelsea Clock and Barometer set; Nelson H. White’s oil painting The Palm Tree; dinner with worldclass sailor Gary Jobson; an overnight trip aboard steam yacht Cangarda; a Pearl Seas

SAVE THE DATE 2016 America and the Sea Award Gala October 22 at Mystic Seaport

Cruises excursion to Cuba; and a Nantucket stay, complete with personal tour of the island by Philbrick. The paddle-raise generated funds for a new program at Mystic Seaport, “Writing Stem to Stern,” named for the honoree. The author will share his approach to writing and research and our Museum educators will lend their teaching tools and objects from the Museum’s collection to inspire literacy among 150 middle-school students from New London’s Bennie Dover Jackson Middle School. Thanks to the generosity of all who raised their paddles, we exceeded our $50,000 goal by $11,000, allowing the program, which kicked off in March, to have an even greater impact. The evening’s entertainment was provided by Mystic Seaport’s own Dayne Rugh and Nantucket’s Coq Au Vin, with Philbrick’s son Ethan on cello. Arlene Marcionette is Advancement Administrative and Events Manager.

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A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

MAKE SABINO STEAM AGAIN

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n December 2014, the Museum’s 1908 steamboat Sabino was hauled out of the water for a major restoration. The original goal was to have

her restored and returned to operation for the summer of 2016. The Sabino restoration relies on private and public funding. So far Mystic Seaport has raised $622,000 for the project, including federal and state grants totaling $520,936. The balance has come from private sources. With just a little more than $200,000 needed to complete the

project, the single largest expense is to replace her Almy watertube boiler, which was installed in the 1940s. We are working to contract with a designer and fabricator. Once that is complete and the fundraising has concluded, the work can commence. We now invite Museum members, friends, and supporters who wish to see Sabino plying the river under her own steam to step forward and make a contribution to help shipwrights in the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard finish the restoration. Gifts at any level are welcome and may be made by check payable to Mystic Seaport with SABINO in the memo line or online at: engage.mysticseaport.org/pages/donation/sabino If you wish to support this project by naming a bench on the upper deck of Sabino, please contact the Advancement office at 860.572.5365. Thank you for your interest, support, and enthusiasm for Sabino. Full Steam Ahead!

CCA VISITS THE MUSEUM

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n December 29, Mystic Seaport hosted members of the Cruising Club of America (CCA) for a day-long event centered on the award-winning exhibit “Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude”. In addition to a narrated tour of the exhibit, CCA members enjoyed the Planetarium show Proof in the Pacific, visited the exhibit “Voyaging in the Wake of the Whalers”, and attended a luncheon hosted by Museum president Steve White and Museum Board of Trustee member Sheila McCurdy. The Cruising Club of America, now in its 85th year, has a membership of 1,300 blue water sailors dedicated to the “adventurous use of the sea” through the development of excellent seamanship, the design of seaworthy yachts, safe yachting procedures, and environmental awareness. Mystic Seaport has a long and valued relationship with CCA, and the Museum holds the CCA archives, making them available to members, researchers, or individuals planning their own adventure at sea. The Cruising Club of America Olin J. Stephens II Reading Room moved last year to the third floor of the Stillman

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A PART OF THE CCA EXHIBIT “ADVENTUROUS USE OF THE SEA” IS NOW IN THE NEW OLIN J. STEPHENS READING ROOM IN THE STILLMAN BUILDING.

Building as a result of the Thompson Exhibition Building project. Half of the CCA exhibit “Adventurous Use of the Sea” was moved to the new Olin J. Stephens Reading Room and the entire exhibit was recreated digitally. We invite you to view the exhibit online at: www.mysticseaport.org/cca


A D VA N C E M E N T N E W S

MYSTIC SEAPORT – PARTNERING WITH BUSINESSES, SMALL AND LARGE

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hat do companies as varied as United Technologies, Comcast, and Citizens Bank have in common? They all support Mystic Seaport, each in a unique way that provides value to the Museum, our members, and the visitor experience, and allows a corporation to enjoy an exclusive connection with the Museum tailored to its goals. Sponsorship for the world-class exhibit “Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude” was provided by United Technologies, financial support that allowed Mystic Seaport to become one of only four venues world-wide to host the remarkable, awardwinning exhibit. In turn, the Museum contacted Comcast, which generously donated media time, making 30-second spots available for the “Ships, Clocks & Stars” exhibit gratis, an example of a non-monetary Gift-

in-Kind donation that involves a company’s donation of products or services that serves or advances Mystic Seaport. Another example is Veto Pro Pac’s donation of tool bags to be used by staff on boatyard work and vessel restorations. This past year, numerous other companies stepped forward to sponsor events at Mystic Seaport, including the Dyer Dhow Derby by Gowrie Insurance, the Adventure Series by StoneRidge, Lantern Light Tours by Citizens Bank, and the 40th annual Antique & Classic Boat Rendezvous by Grundy Insurance for Classic Boats. Many companies, large and small, also support our annual America and the Sea Award Gala, providing an opportunity for corporate recognition, as well as employee and client participation in a fun, premiere event. Mystic Seaport also works with for-profit

and non-profit organizations of all sizes to make our venue available for off-site meetings, team-building events, or company day visits for employees and their families. In this past year alone, companies such as Bank of America, Mohegan Sun, and Waterford Hotel Group have taken advantage of these programs. Companies tell us that strategic corporate giving enhances their brand and helps attract and retain valued employees. In working with our corporate partners, the Museum strives to create a mutually rewarding relationship that recognizes and supports the donor. To learn how your company or your employer, large or small, can join the list of donors, contact John Urban at john.urban@mysticseaport.org

DONATE YOUR BOAT TO MYSTIC SEAPORT

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or the past several years, Mystic Seaport has considered boat donations to the Museum’s Yachts on Exhibit Program. The program utilizes donated boats for the purposes of exhibition and on-water activities. The Museum consistently refreshes this display of vessels through new acquisitions and deletions. The intention is to add a variety of boats—be they power or sail, traditional or contemporary—to the waterfront presentation without accessioning new vessels to the Watercraft Collection, thereby adding diversity to the visitors’ experience. As the leading maritime museum in the United States, Mystic Seaport is uniquely positioned to accept donated boats, as it is the Museum’s mission to inspire an enduring connection to American maritime history by displaying more contemporary yachts. Some boats in this program are available for use in Museum programs and as limited charter vessels (both bareboat charters and charters with captain and crew supplied) with the understanding that these charters serve to promote the Museum and its programs. One example is the boat Wireless, which was donated by Waring and Carmen Partridge. “We were delighted to give Wireless to Mystic Seaport,” said Waring Partridge. “It was important to us to know that she will have an appropriate new use in the Yachts on Exhibit Program.” If you are interested in learning more about the Yachts on Exhibit Program, please contact Dana Hewson, vice president for Watercraft Preservation and Programs, at: dana.hewson@mysticseaport.org or 860.572.0711, ext. 5061. THE 84-FOOT STEEL KETCH WIRELESS, WHICH WAS DONATED TO MYSTIC SEAPORT BY MR. AND MRS. WARING PARTRIDGE, IV, IS PART OF THE YACHTS ON EXHIBIT PROGRAM.

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MUSEUM BRIEFS

THE MUSEUM NAMES NEW DIRECTORS

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utumn Payne has been appointed the new Director of Membership and Volunteer Services. Before coming to Mystic Seaport, Payne spent the past ten years at Macaulay Honors College at the City University of New York, most recently serving as the Director of Annual Giving and Special Events. Between 1998 and 2005, she worked in variAUTUMN PAYNE ous roles for a broad range of museums, including the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, the New York Hall of Science, the American Museum of Natural History, and the Brooklyn Museum.

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ave Willis has been promoted to Director of Information Technology (IT). Willis began working for Mystic Seaport almost 21 years ago in the Museum’s Food Service, eventually becoming the head for vending and catering operations. His time spent in Food Service was shared with a deep interest in technology. When an opening became available in the Museum’s IT departDAVE WILLIS ment, Willis started working for IT at entry level. However, his role expanded and for many years now, he has been the “go-to guy” for all computers at the Museum and for the last few years IT’s main point of contact. “Dave has been a stalwart member of IT since he joined the department in 1994. He will oversee all responsibilities for IT and especially managing day-to-day communications with The Walker Group, an IT Solutions firm based in Farmington, CT, which specializes in providing IT support for Not-ForProfit clients,” said Marcy Withington, executive vice president. In a statement, Willis said: “For me, it’s the best of both worlds—I both enjoy working with technology and I also hold a long-term love for our Museum, its people, and its mission.”

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BETTY M. LINSLEY AWARD TO THE CHARLES W. MORGAN

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n November, the Association for the Study of Connecticut History (ASCH) awarded the 2015 Betty M. Linsley Award to Mystic Seaport for the book The Charles W. Morgan: A Picture History of an American Icon. The award recognizes the best work on a significant aspect of Connecticut’s history published by, for, or on behalf of a Connecticut historical society or organization. It was presented to the Museum at ASCH’s annual fall conference at Central Connecticut State University. Peter Hinks, the ASCH awards committee chairperson, said in his presentation speech: “This volume vibrantly chronicles how Mystic Seaport, with numerous collaborators, led one of the most important recent maritime restorations in New England—the refurbishing of the Charles W. Morgan, […]. The compendium of pictures alone is extraordinary […] The volume is a marvelous celebration of the Morgan.” The book was published in December 2014 by Mystic Seaport in collaboration with the “THIS VOLUME VIBRANTLY CHRONICLES newspaper The Day of HOW MYSTIC SEAPORT, WITH NUMERNew London, CT. The OUS COLLABORATORS, LED ONE OF THE book was written by AnMOST IMPORTANT RECENT MARITIME drew German and Dan RESTORATIONS IN NEW ENGLAND—THE McFadden. Primary photographs were taken by REFURBISHING OF THE CHARLES W. the Museum’s photograMORGAN, […]. THE COMPENDIUM OF phers Dennis Murphy and PICTURES ALONE IS EXTRAORDINARY Andy Price. Also contrib[…] THE VOLUME IS A MARVELOUS CELuting to the project were EBRATION OF THE MORGAN.” the Museum’s Mary Anne Stets and Suki Williams. — PETER HINKS, THE ASCH AWARDS COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSON


MUSEUM BRIEFS

STEVE WHITE – NEW PRESIDENT FOR ICMM In early November, at the 17th Biennial International Congress of Maritime Museums in Hong Kong, China, the ICMM General Assembly elected Mystic Seaport President Steve White as new ICMM President. President White thanked the host of the 2015 Congress, the Hong Kong Maritime Museum, and Kevin Fewster, the organization’s outgoing president, for his “tremendous amount of energy” over the past two years. The ICMM mission is to bring maritime museum professionals together from all over the world for regular conferences and to create a strong network of maritime museums and people. The organization also offers opportunities to exchange collections or staff; loan exhibitions; planning, research, educational programming, and public relations; and procurement of supplies for maritime preservation projects.

THE MUSEUM’S DYER DHOW FLEET

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n October 17, Mystic Seaport held the 66th annual Dyer Dhow Derby, which was sponsored by the insurance agency Gowrie Group, a Museum premier corporate partner. The regatta was won by Catherine Swanson, Henry Maxwell, and Dylan Flack, sailing for the New York Yacht Club. A core component of the Museum’s sailing fleet is the Dyer Dhow. This 9-foot boat, which was first built in the early 1940s by The Anchorage, Inc., in Warren, R.I., and named after the company’s founder, Bill Dyer, has a flat bottom design that offers great stability, which is perfect for teaching sailing to all ages. The Museum’s fleet of Dyer Dhows is used year-round in the THE 67TH ANNUAL DYER DHOW Joseph Conrad Overnight Summer Sailing DERBY WILL BE ON OCTOBER 15, Camp and Community Sailing programs. 2016. FOR MORE INFORMATION, The Mystic Seaport Dyer Dhow fleet PLEASE VISIT: WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT. is always looking for improvements and maintenance in order to keep the dinghies ORG/EVENT/DYER-DHOW-DERBY operable for years to come. Monetary donations are helpful in keeping the fleet afloat. Funding is used for new sails and continued maintenance of the fleet such as new paint, rails, thwarts, and other needs. If you are interested in donating to the Dyer Dhow fund, please contact our Advancement Department at 860.572.5365. The 67th annual Dyer Dhow Derby will be on October 15, 2016. For more information, please visit: www.mysticseaport.org/event/dyer-dhow-derby

WELCOME TO HOME PORT Last winter, Mystic Seaport opened Home Port, a new family activity center in the P.R. Mallory Building. It is primarily an activity spot for families with children ages 8-12. Here, children can explore their artistic side at the drawing station or set up a puppet show in the puppet playhouse. They can select among traditional games to play such as board games or Skittles; there is also a craft table that features a variety of different projects. In addition, there is a story nook shaped like the prow of a boat for quiet reading.

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S H I P S , C L O C K S & S TA R S

“SHIPS, CLOCKS & STARS” – A SMASHING SUCCESS

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fter slightly more than six months on display in the Museum’s R. J. Schaefer Building, the “Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude” exhibit was packed up at the end of March. The exhibit, which was developed and created by the National Maritime Museum in London, UK, in 2014 for the 300th anniversary of the first Longitude Act, which was passed by the British government in July 1714, is now on its way to its next destination, the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney. This will be the endpoint of the exhibit’s world tour—after being shown in London and before coming to Mystic Seaport, it was five months on display at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. It was one of the most popular exhibits in many years at Mystic Seaport. “‘Ships, Clocks & Stars’ was a huge success for the Museum measured in number of visitors, dwell time, and related programming. More importantly, the exhibit content created a powerful interdisciplinary opportunity for activity around campus and across departments. This exhibit, along with ‘Voyaging in the Wake of the Whalers’, has succeeded in signaling the kind of exhibitions our members and visitors can expect from Mystic Seaport,” said Steve White, president of Mystic Seaport. “During my almost nine years at Mystic Seaport, I have never seen visitors stay so long

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in an exhibit, as they did in ‘Ships, Clocks & Stars’”, said one of the exhibit’s interpreters, Ron Dennis, who is the lead interpreter in the Museum’s Nautical Instruments Shop. “Being a navigation history buff, coming through the doors for the first time, I was automatically drawn to the replicas of H1, H2, and H3. Kudos to the fellows who built these replicas.” Dennis continued: “There were many beautiful artifacts in the exhibit, but personally I became fond of the longcase clock that John Harrison made in the mid-1720s. The clock includes two of his greatest inventions, the temperature-compensated pendulum and the low-friction ‘grasshopper’ escapement.” These innovations were designed to make the clock run more accurately and consistently and were later adapted by Harrison in his maritime timekeepers.

Hank Savin, another of the exhibit’s interpreters, also had a favorite, Larcum Kendall’s K1: “It was really exciting to see a timekeeper such as K1, which Capt. James Cook took on his second and third voyages to the Pacific. Also, many visitors found it fascinating that Harrison could create his sea-clocks during the 17th century. Obviously, the man was a genius.” “The exhibit really shined in our space. We received many compliments from visitors who had seen a previous installation of the show in London or Washington, D.C., and appreciated how the same story and artifacts look different in each place,” stated Elysa Engelman, director of the Exhibits Department. “Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude” was sponsored by United Technologies.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: RON DENNIS ADMIRING JOHN HARRISON’S LONGCASE CLOCK; REPLICA OF HARRISON’S H3; REPLICA OF HARRISON’S H1; HOW H1, H2, AND H3 WERE DISPLAYED IN THE R. J. SCHAEFER BUILDING.


Q & A

Q&A

with Brilliant Captain Nicholas Alley

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icholas Alley has been Captain of the Museum’s schooner Brilliant since March 2012. Alley, a licensed captain for more than 30 years, has sailed on Westward, Harvey Gamage, Spirit of Massachusetts, and Pride of Baltimore II, all famous sail-training vessels. Mystic Seaport Magazine asked Nicholas a few questions. Where did you learn how to sail and when did you start working with children? I learned how to sail when I was about 12 years old at Community Boating on the Charles River in Boston and sailing with my father. I began working with children as a volunteer tour guide for the Boston Museum of Science and a volunteer ski instructor for the Youth Enrichment Service during high school. The 1932 Brilliant, which has been with the Museum since 1953, plays a special role at Mystic Seaport and is always in the public eye. Is she a good ambassador for the Museum? Brilliant is a very good ambassador for Mystic Seaport. With the Museum flag flying from her mainmast, she is easy to recognize, beautiful, and well-known along the Eastern Seaboard. She has a reputation of being well-sailed, well-maintained, and has touched thousands of lives. We regularly meet dockside visitors who have sailed or worked aboard Brilliant or who have some

connection to her. No matter where she goes, people are attracted to her simple beauty and timeless varnished elegance. What makes Brilliant the perfect vessel to teach teens how to sail? Any vessel is a compromise of desirable qualities and sail-training vessels are no exception. There is no “perfect” sail-training vessel. However, some of the attributes that make a good training vessel are the ability for many hands to work the ship; a safe, strong, and seaworthy hull; and a rig that is simple enough to understand and robust enough to handle mistakes. Brilliant was built as a strong cruising yacht using the highest standards of the day. Her schooner rig is simple and offers many different sail configurations to deal with different weather and crew needs. She can be snugged down to ride out a gale and can also set a lot of canvas to move her along in the lightest of breezes. All that sail handling requires hard work, communication, teamwork, and dedication. She is large enough for a crew of 12 and small enough to be manageable with a crew of two to three. Brilliant also sails with adults. Is there a difference between teaching adults versus teens? Yes, there is a difference. We use a much more structured environment with the teens,

who know what to expect and when to expect it, and that helps to keep things moving along. Kids are also not afraid to make mistakes and are willing to take chances and try new things. Adults tend to spend more time learning the process and understanding why we are doing something. They can be more settled into their routines and like a little more flexibility in their involvement and timing. What would be your three best pieces of advice for sailing novices to think about before they go sailing on Brilliant? My three pieces of advice for novice sailors would be: 1) Keep an open mind; the lifestyle aboard is very different than life ashore and willingness to try new things will only enhance the experience. 2) Ask questions and listen. We take novice sailors out almost every day and are very good at explaining what is going on and what is expected of people. Our favorite question is “How can I help?” 3) Read the handbook. It is available on the Museum’s website and has a lot of helpful information and answers to many of the frequently asked questions. Learn more about Brilliant’s sailing program by visiting www.mysticseaport.org/brilliant

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EmmaC.Berry:

Revisiting Her History, Context, and Significance

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By QUENTIN SNEDIKER

n 1866, our country’s flag had only 36 stars, Andrew Johnson was the 17th president of the United States, and the nation was in the throes of recovering from the “Great Rebellion,” the American Civil War. Locally, a new bridge was under construction across the Mystic River, the third such bridge in that location and the first to be built of iron. On Tuesday, June 5, 1866—some discrepancy exists as to which day the launch took place—the weather was “cloudy and foggy the entire day, wind from the east – rather light.” (A passage from John Latham’s journal, quoted by Robert Palmer, grandson of Deacon Robert Palmer, in his speech at Emma C. Berry’s re-launch in 1971.) High tide at the mouth of the Mystic River occurred at about 7:30 a.m. On the east-facing shore of the village of Noank, near the mouth of the river at the foot of Latham Lane, in what was known as the North Yard (one of three in the area owned by Deacon Robert Palmer), John A. Latham launched a new smack sloop for Captain John Henry Berry—the Emma C. Berry, named after Capt. Berry’s seven-year-old daughter. EMMA C. BERRY RETURNS TO THE MYSTIC RIVER AT THE TIME OF HER DONATION TO THE MUSEUM IN 1969 WITH THEN SHIPYARD SUPERVISOR MAYNARD BRAY AT THE HELM. THE DELIVERY UP FROM BAY HEAD, N.J., WAS WELL CHRONICLED BY ARTHUR KRAUSE, MAYNARD BRAY, AND MIKE STURGIS IN THE LOG OF MYSTIC SEAPORT, VOL. 21 NO. 3, SEP. 1969. MSM, 1969-6-83.

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This sloop was only one of 13 vessels of five tons or more built on the Mystic River that year, including three other sloops about the size of Emma C. Berry, as shipyards in the Mystic area responded to the growing economy spurred by peace, increased immigration, and innovation. According to noted maritime historian Howard I. Chappell in writing about Manhattan, a Noank-built well smack sloop of 1854, “Noank shipbuilders had a great reputation for fine seagoing sloops, having built such craft for the fisheries and for whaling, sealing, and coastal trade since colonial times.” John Latham was an experienced builder and one-time partner with Palmer. Latham built Emma C. Berry for Capt. Berry on his own account through an agreement with Palmer on his land. Berry was a well-known and successful local fisherman, who previously had owned several vessels. Palmer’s yard was to survive well into the 20th century, at one time being the largest wooden vessel construction yard on the east coast—presently the site of Noank Shipyard. Emma C. Berry is described as a “well smack” due to the watertight compartment with drilled holes in her planking


open to the sea. This enabled her catch of live fish to survive and be fresh to market at a time when ice was a valuable commodity and the concept of refrigeration on board was decades in the future. No original plans are known for the Emma C. Berry. Her design and construction followed local vernacular practice. It appears she was adapted from a model made by Palmer for “a small smack for Roswell P. Sawyer.” Palmer’s journal for January and February 1866 discuss his agreement with Berry and the modifications to Sawyer’s design. On February 26, he writes “we are to build two feet longer and one foot wider” than Roswell Sawyer’s new smack. The agreed cost for Berry’s new smack was to be $1,275. It was not uncommon for several hull iterations to be built from the same model with some modifications like these. Capt. Berry intended his new sloop for short trips in the mackerel fishery. As was common practice in those times, Berry owned only one half of the Emma C. Berry, and four other partners shared the other half equally thereby spreading the risks of ownership. He sold his interest only a few months later, but within two years Berry ordered a new larger schooner smack to be built, Mary E. Hoxie. Emma C. Berry continued to fish out of the Mystic and New London area. In 1887, she was changed to a schooner rig, requiring less labor to handle under sail. In 1894, she was

NEW BOOK ON THE

EMMA C. BERRY

T ABOVE: A COMPLETE RESTORATION DEMANDS A SEA TRIAL. IN 1992, SHIPYARD STAFF SAILED EMMA C. BERRY AS A SLOOP FOR THE FIRST TIME IN 105 YEARS. SHE WAS REMARKABLY HANDY ALLOWING US TO CARRY SAIL THROUGH BOTH BRIDGES ON HER RETURN TO THE MUSEUM. THE AUTHOR HAD THE HONOR TO ACT AS CAPTAIN. THE SAIL IS DESCRIBED IN THE LOG OF MYSTIC SEAPORT, VOL. 45. NO. 3, WINTER 1993. MSM, 1992-3148. ABOVE TOP: SHIPWRIGHT JAMIE KIRSCHNER PAINTS EMMA C. BERRY’S BEAUTIFUL TRAIL BOARDS DURING THE FALL 2015 HAUL-OUT. THEY WERE CARVED BY SHIPWRIGHT ROGER HAMBIDGE IN 1988, REPLICATING THOSE SHE CAME TO MYSTIC SEAPORT WITH, NOW ACCESSIONED. MSM, 2015-11-0540.

o celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Emma C. Berry, the Noank Historical Society has published Celebrating the Emma C. Berry by Lawrence R. Jacobsen. Built in Noank in 1866, the vessel was donated to Mystic Seaport in 1969 and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1994. With accompanying photos, illustrations, and a well-written text, Jacobsen, a longtime volunteer in the Shipyard, guides the reader through Berry’s adventures, misfortunes, and rescues, illustrating that the tale of this graceful boat is also the story of the good people who owned and crewed her and those who saved her to become what she is today—the last known fishing smack still in existence.

Celebrating the Emma C. Berry is available in the Mystic Seaport Bookstore and retails for $15.00. To order a copy, please call: 860.572.5386 or email: msmbookstore@eventnetwork.com

LEFT: HAULED IN THE FALL OF 2015 ON THE HAYS AND ROS CLARK SHIPLIFT, EMMA C. BERRY GOT A BIT MORE ATTENTION THAN HER USUAL ROUTINE AS THE MUSEUM PREPARES TO CELEBRATE THE 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF HER LAUNCHING IN THE SUMMER OF 2016. HAUL-OUT PERIODS OFFER A RARE OPPORTUNITY TO APPRECIATE THE BEAUTY OF HER HULL FORM. MSM, 2015-10-0447. SPRING/SUMMER 2016

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TOP: WATERCOLOR BY JOHN F. LEAVITT SHOWING EMMA C. BERRY OFF NOANK UNDER ORIGINAL SLOOP RIG, PAINTED IN 1969 BEFORE RESTORATION. A NOTE ON THE BACK OF THE PAINTING STATES, “AS SHE MIGHT HAVE APPEARED IN HER EARLY YEARS.” LEAVITT WAS A SCHOONER MAN, AUTHOR, MARINE ARTIST, AND ASSOCIATE CURATOR AT MYSTIC SEAPORT. THE PAINTING APPEARED IN THE LOG OF MYSTIC SEAPORT VOL. 27, NO.2. MSN, 1969.161. CENTER: PEN AND INK BY LEAVITT, ALSO FROM 1969. NOTE ON BACK STATES, “SLOOP AND SMACK EMMA C. BERRY / BUILT BY R.J PALMER 1866 IN NOANK AND SMALLER TYPE.” THIS ALSO APPEARED IN A LOG ARTICLE VOL. 27, NO. 4, JAN. 1976. MSM, 1975.158. BOTTOM: MODEL OF EMMA C. BERRY IN A BOTTLE BUILT BY DON PEARSON. A BEAUTIFUL MINIATURE REPRESENTATION OF THE VESSEL BUILT OF WOOD IN 1/20 SCALE (.050” TO A FOOT). THIS IS ONE OF ONLY TWO MODELS OF THE VESSEL IN THE MUSEUM’S COLLECTION. MSM, 1974.347. OPPOSITE PAGE: THIS IS THE EARLIEST KNOWN IMAGE OF EMMA C. BERRY. SHE IS LYING ALONGSIDE C. H. BEAL’S WHARF AT BEALS, ME, CA. 1920. MSM, 1966-4-82.

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sold to Maine, continuing to fish and then carry lobsters until 1924. After two years on a bank, her wet well was removed and she began life anew as a cargo vessel. By 1931, she was pretty tired and rather forlorn. The same year, she was discovered by yachtsman and boat yard owner Slade Dale of Bay Head, New Jersey. Dale described his love affair with Emma C. Berry in a two-part article in the June and July issues of Yachting Magazine in 1933. In 1969, he donated Emma C. Berry to Mystic Seaport. Though she is sometimes overshadowed by the larger and more impressive schooners and square-riggers in the watercraft collection of Mystic Seaport, 2016 marks the 150th anniversary of the launch of Emma C. Berry, reminding us that she is their equal in historic significance. This is evidenced by her recognition as a National Historic Landmark in October 1994. She is the last surviving example of a once common design thought to have originated in New York shipyards a decade or two earlier but refined and perfected in our local waters. Government records indicate that at least 100 sloops were built in the Noank/Mystic area between 1793 and 1866. These vessels became so identified with our region as to be given popular designation as “Noank sloops.” Their successful design influenced boat builders as far away as Key West, Florida. Considering her size and the fact that she was never involved in heroic exploits, much has already been written about Emma C. Berry and her history, starting with Dale. Most recently, late naval architect and Museum volunteer Larry Jacobsen’s Celebrating the Emma C. Berry, published in 2015 by the Noank Historical Society, is a great piece of work and provides a succinct overall view of her history. We often refer to the Charles W. Morgan as “iconic” but surely many of the Museum’s vessels can be thought of as such. As Mystic Seaport preserves historic vessels, they are more than mere survivors of a long vanished age of wooden ships. They have become symbols of our nation’s maritime past representing more than themselves to our modern culture. In the Emma C. Berry case, one measure of her iconic nature is in the number of commercial models offered over time. No less than four models have found their way into hobby stores and catalogues. Two were offered by Sterling Models; the first one in the 1960s and a larger one intended to be radio-controlled in 1971. Two years after her designation as a National Historic Landmark in 1994, Model Shipways offered a kit adapted by noted naval architect and model builder Ben Lankford—this model finishes 26-3/8’’ long. More recently, a built model by Sail Classics has been offered, which was carefully edited by Museum staff before production. Surprisingly, the Museum only has two models of Emma C. Berry in its ship model collection: one full-rigged and the other a ship-in-a-bottle. Emma C. Berry has undergone several major rebuilding efforts and countless periods of maintenance and repair throughout her life. The first known significant rebuilding took place in Maine when Milton Beal took her off a mud bank and removed her well and she began carrying cargo. The second was in the mid-1930s soon after Dale acquired her. She was again restored in the 1970s at Mystic Seaport. This effort was excellently chronicled by Willits D. Ansel in the Museum publication Restoration of the Smack Emma C. Berry 1969-1971 a publication which had a profound effect on this author’s career choice. One of the goals of this attempt was to return her to her sloop-configuration and install a wet well, a most distinctive aspect of her original smack sloop design. In 1987, a second effort at the Museum replaced her topside planking, reconfigured the deck and deck framing, and renewed elements of her backbone structure. It also returned her to a color scheme thought to more accurately depict her Noank character based on sketchbooks from artist Reynolds Beal. Throughout these rebuilding endeavors, many details of her original construction have been lost, yet her principle dimension and form have remained the same. Reasoning that any complete restoration would include a sea trial, we sailed Emma C. Berry in 1992 for the first time in 105 years. She performed well being quite handy. Perhaps someday we will have an opportunity to sail her again.


As a follow-up to the second restoration work, the staff of the Henry B. duPont Preservation Shipyard at the Museum constructed a tender for the Emma C. Berry—a typical Noank “sharpie”, in local vernacular. These often overlooked, once ubiquitous, vital little craft were an essential part of any vessel operation. Extensive research was undertaken to define form and construction of details for this skiff using photographs, local historians, and again calling on sketches by Beal. The sharpie has a flat bottom with small degree of rocker built with three side planks. After nearly two decades in storage, she has been reconditioned by Shipyard volunteers and will be displayed alongside Emma C. Berry this summer season. Fortunately, we also have the tender Dale carried aboard in our Museum small craft collection: Patience, a Greek sponge boat from Tarpon Springs, Florida. In the fall of 2015, the staff at the Shipyard began to focus attention on Emma C. Berry. The vessels of the Museum’s in-the-water collection have a routine schedule for haul-out maintenance. Medium vessels, of the Emma C. Berry’s size, are hauled on a routine cycle every two years. The system is somewhat imperfect in that major projects, such as the Charles W. Morgan’s 38th Voyage, sometimes cause a disruption. With this work cycle Emma C. Berry got a bit more attention than usual, as the Museum and the local community begin to prepare to celebrate the 150th anniversary of her launch. Why did Emma C. Berry survive while so many of her sisters were lost to history? As long as Emma C. Berry had economic viability (that is, she could earn more than she cost to keep by adapting to whatever trade or cargos could pay), she survived. Larry Jacobsen attributes it to “forward thinking design changes and being in the right place at the right time—or at least staying out of the wrong places.” All true, but there is something more. By 1931, she was pretty much used up. It was that extra measure of attention and care that owners lavished on her because she was a “good-looking boat.” It captivated Slade Dale and he was smitten. Perhaps it is her almost indescribable sense of aesthetic design: a pleasing balance of length to beam, freeboard, rake of the stem, elegant stern all coming together in a way that is naturally appealing. Whatever It is, Emma C. Berry has “It”—like movie star Clara Bow, who in the 1920s was known as the “It Girl.” One of Bow’s films was Down to the Sea in Ships, which featured the Charles W. Morgan. Certainly, the Emma C. Berry is one of this author’s favorites among the vessels in the Museum’s fabulous watercraft collection. Much of the information in this article is based on material from the Shipyard Documentation Shop at the Museum. The vast majority of this work was accumulated during the Emma C. Berry’s restoration project between 1986 and Quentin Snediker is Director 1990 by Nancy d’Estang, former of the Henry B. duPont supervisor of the Shipyard’s Preservation Shipyard. Documentation Shop, and Kevin Dwyer, former lead shipwright.

EMMA C. BERRY VISITING NOANK ON THE OCCASION OF THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF HER LAUNCH AND COMMEMORATING THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE NOANK HISTORICAL SOCIETY, JULY 4, 1966. A CROWD OF MORE THAN 500 WERE SAID TO BE IN ATTENDANCE. MSM, 1994.53.305.

“SMACK”

W

et wells such as Emma C. Berry’s have been known in Europe since the 1500s. A “smack” is defined as a small decked vessel sailing under various rigs and formerly used for fishing or trading. In the Atlantic coast fisheries of the United States, the term is generally limited to boats above five tons which, according to law, must register at the customs house. They are built with or without wells. Locally, however, the word seems to be more restricted to welled vessels.

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Q U A D U P D AT E

T

By KEN WILSON he construction of the Thompson Exhibition Building continues to proceed forward and is on

schedule to open early this fall. Now that the main structure is nearing completion, the work inside the building can commence in earnest. As a result of the exposed structural design of the building, the majority of the interior work is focused on the building’s mechanical systems. The most prominent among these is the Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) heating and cooling system. A GSHP system accesses stored energy in the earth. GHSPs circulate a mixture of water and glycol through closed pipe loops buried

in the ground. We chose to use a vertical loop system of 20 bore holes or wells 465 feet deep versus a horizontal loop field based on the limited land area available. As the fluid circulates underground, it absorbs heat from the ground. The warmed fluid passes through the heat pump, which uses electricity to extract heat from the fluid. Switching the direction of heat flow, the same system can be used to circulate the cooled water for cooling. The heat is exhausted to the relatively cooler ground rather than delivering it to the hot outside air as an air conditioner does. As a result, the heat is pumped across a larger temperature difference and this leads to higher efficiency and lower energy use. This system, in addition to using the earth as an energy source, also transfers

FROM LEFT: GOV. DANNEL MALLOY AND STEVE WHITE

STATE INVESTS $2 MILLION The State of Connecticut awarded the Museum a $2 million grant to support the construction of the Thompson Exhibition Building. The funds are generated by state bonds and are used to finance infrastructure improvements and other enhancements to public and private entities in Connecticut. Noting that Mystic Seaport is a major draw for the southeastern portion of the state and a leader in a $14 billion tourism industry, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy said he was pleased to be able to support the project and the region with this grant.

Thompson Building: A GSHP System Good for the Environment

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Q U A D U P D AT E

ABOVE: THE THOMPSON EXHIBITION BUILDING SEEN FROM THE QUAD. OPPOSITE PAGE: THE WEST FACADE OF THE THOMPSON EXHIBITION BUILDING FACING THE MYSTIC RIVER.

energy within the Museum itself, further improving energy conservation. This technology makes ground source heating an economically viable solution. With geothermal technology, there are no shortages or additional problems that sometimes occur with other types of power. This means that we will not get a shortage if the weather is not cooperating, as there is practically a boundless supply of power. It is also intrinsically basic and dependable. Another component of the project is the storm water management system. Historically, all of the storm water that falls on our property flows into the river. The improvements to the McGraw Gallery Quadrangle provided us with an opportunity to improve the quality and reduce the quantity of water leaving our property. This was accomplished with the installation of an underground collection and recharge system, which not only catches all the surface water, it has also been designed to collect the roof runoff from a majority of the buildings around the Quad. All surface water runoff is collected through a series of specifically designed catch basins that contain internal filter membranes, which collect the solid contaminants. The surface water, along with all the roof drains, is then piped to an underground recharge basin. Rather than simply discharge the water directly into the river, this basin allows a portion of that water to be absorbed into the ground. In certain areas, we have also included porous pavement. This type of pavement design also provides for the filtration and recharge of a percentage of the storm water passing over this surface. The primary role of the Thompson Building is to provide Mystic Seaport with a world-class exhibit space. This level of exhibit space comes with very high environmental standards. The Museum will use these technologies as the gateway to become a leader for using clean, efficient energy solutions to solve and meet our planet’s long-term goals. The use of a GSHP with an on-site backup generator—combined with the finished floor of the building set above the 100-year flood elevaKen Wilson is Director of tion—almost guarantees Facilities and the McGraw Quad a building safe from any project leader. natural disaster.

A DONOR’S PERSPECTIVE

M

y wife Suzanne and I are inspired by the transformation underway through the Museum in Motion Campaign, and we are pleased to support this campus reimagining. We believe it positions Mystic Seaport for growth, enhances the Museum’s exhibition capabilities, and allows for fresh and innovative approaches to connecting with our nation’s maritime heritage. The new and renovated galleries will make the Museum’s remarkable collections accessible as never before and will expand the capacity of Mystic Seaport to host high-caliber traveling exhibits from other outstanding cultural institutions world-wide. We believe this project further confirms the Museum’s stature as the country’s pre-eminent maritime museum. We are thrilled that through the changes underway, including year-round capabilities, Mystic Seaport has a greater opportunity to engage current and future generations and to educate a broad and diverse audience regionally, nationally, and internationally. We encourage all who share our commitment to first-class, immersive museum experiences to participate with us in the campaign. The Museum’s advancement staff is ready to assist you. Please join us in making this transformational project a reality. Rich Clary is a long-serving Trustee of Mystic Seaport, Vice Chair of the Board and Chairman of the Museum in Motion Campaign. To support the Campaign, please contact Elisabeth Saxe, vice president for Advancement: 860.572.5364 or elisabeth.saxe@mysticseaport.org

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NEW EXHIBIT

An Art Collection of Two Centuries of American Coastal Waters A

For the upcoming new exhibit, “Over

Life’s Waters: The Coastal Art Collection of Charles and Irene Hamm”, which will open on May 21, 2016, in the Schaefer Building, Mystic Seaport Magazine had a chat with Irene and Museum trustee Charles Hamm

in their home on Mason’s Island in Mystic.

T

By GÖRAN R BUCKHORN he collection of Charles and Irene Hamm comprises 165 pieces of what the Hamms describe as

“American Coastal Art,” which they have donated to the New Britain Museum of American Art in New Britain, CT. The exhibit at Mystic Seaport will showcase nearly 65 oil paintings from the collection. “When we started buying art 50 years ago, it was to keep as memories of places we sailed to or visited,” Irene Hamm said. “Instead of buying a postcard, we bought a painting.” “However,” Charles Hamm filled in, “when we seriously started collecting art in the 1980s, we were not interested in what is called ‘maritime art’ as that, to us, indicates historical events and grand battle scenes between war ships that you often can see in Dutch and English art, paintings that are

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supposed to give the beholder a feeling of national pride. That was not for us.” Instead, the theme of the collection became scenes by American artists, dead or alive, of the American east coast, from Maine down to Florida. “We wanted the art to reflect our interest and the essence of the sea: the experience of being on a boat, the water, the wind, the breeze, and individuals enjoying sailing in small boats,” Charles Hamm said. “Though, to Irene and me, the art always came first; we never bought a painting for the signature.” In their “Collectors’ Statement,” the Hamms explain how they selected the art for their collection: “We chose works in which we believe there is a fine art regardless of whether the artist is generally considered first-class. All artists make better and less good art. We have found that lesser-known artists can turn out great


NEW EXHIBIT

art and we love to include their work in our collection.” “The collection has many paintings from Monhegan Island in Maine. It’s so beautiful up there,” Irene stated. Many artists went to Monhegan during the last two centuries because of the wonderful scenery, and that is reflected in the collection. So, do the Hamms have special paintings that speak to them, works that have become their favorites? “I am especially fond of Fishermen’s Homecoming by Jay Hall Connaway [18931970], a painting from Monhegan, where he lived in the 1930s and 1940s. The women standing waiting for the fishermen, while the sea is wild, is really different from many of the other, more peaceful sceneries in the collection,” Irene Hamm explained. “But I also love paintings by James Fitzgerald and the abstract works by Paul Pollaro.” And what about Charles Hamm’s favor-

ite? “I have many favorites,” he remarked, “each and every one for a special reason, but if I have to mention one, it’s Swampscott Dory by William Partridge Burpee [1846-1940], with a green painted beached dory, a work boat reminding us that ‘coastal life’ was not only pleasure, but also hard work.” While Irene Hamm loves the sea and sailing and enjoys living close to the ocean and collecting seascapes, she has never studied art. Her husband, on the other hand, studied painting and sculpture at Phillips Exeter Academy, but after attending Harvard Uni-

versity, he began a career in advertising and marketing, and later went into banking. After his retirement, Charles Hamm returned to art and painting, and among the oil paintings that will be on display in the Museum’s exhibit is his colorful Sunset at Home, which depicts the bay outside the Hamms’ house on Mason’s Island. When asked if he is still painting seascapes, it is Irene Hamm who answers, “No,” she said, “Charles is painting ‘abstractions.’” “Yes,” he said with a smile, “I’m going modern.”

Göran R Buckhorn is editor of Mystic Seaport Magazine.

CLOCKWISE FROM OPPOSITE PAGE TOP LEFT:

FISHERMEN’S HOMECOMING, OIL ON MASONITE, 20 X 30 IN., BY JAY HALL CONNAWAY; SUNSET AT HOME (2006), OIL ON MASONITE, 12 X 15 ½ IN., BY CHARLES HAMM; FRANK PIERCE CUTTING FISH, OIL ON CANVAS, 20 X 26 IN., BY JAMES FITZGERALD; SWAMPSCOTT DORY (1891), OIL ON CANVAS, 18 X 24 IN., BY WILLIAM PARTRIDGE BURPEE; IRENE AND CHARLES HAMM IN THEIR HOME ON MASON’S ISLAND IN MYSTIC.

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ON BOOKS

A Genius at His Trade: C. Raymond Hunt and His Remarkable Boats By Stan Grayson Foreword by Llewellyn Howland, III (Old Dartmouth Historical Society and the New Bedford Whaling Museum, 2015, 290 pages)

Reviewed by GÖRAN R BUCKHORN

F

or the last couple of years, we have the yacht design firm Paine, Belknap and Skene seen books published about famous in Boston, and, though untrained, proved to American yacht designers, for example have a real eye for architectural lines. W. Starling Burgess and L. Francis Herreshoff— In 1932, Hunt and his friend Waldo Howbooks that have been reviewed in Mystic Sealand started Concordia Company, doing boat port Magazine. To these elegant publications, brokerage and yacht design business together. we can now add an equally beautiful book Some months after having married about another American boat deBarbara Dean in December 1932, signer and naval architect, Raymond Hunt managed to sell his first de“Ray” Hunt, A Genius at His Trade: sign—with Howland putting up the C. Raymond Hunt and His Remarkmoney—Plover, an 11½-foot class B able Boats by renowned maritime dinghy. Hunt improved the design author Stan Grayson. Hunt’s crewith a wider beam, and with Ploations include boats like the classic ver II, Howland won the 1933 Class Concordia yawls, the original popuB championship, beating much lar 13-foot Boston Whaler, and the more experienced sailors; Howland speedy V-bottom powerboat. gave Hunt’s design the credit for As a young boy growing up in Duxhis victory. STAN GRAYSON bury Bay, MA, Ray Hunt (1908-1978) During the 1930s, Hunt continued was very athletic and distinguished to design vessels, now also larger himself in sports like ice hockey and swimones like the 66.3-foot ketch Nam Sang and the ming. However, it was as a sailor that he would 39.10-foot Escape. The latter yacht was built to meet his biggest triumphs, winning his first replace the cherished cutter by the same name race at the age of 13. While Hunt became a star owned by Waldo’s father, Llewellyn Howland, in different sports, he did not have the same which had been destroyed in the 1938 Hursuccess in the academic world, having to leave ricane; it came to be the first so-called Contwo prep schools after short spells, finishing cordia yawl. Hunt also continued sailing and his formal education in December 1925. The racing his own boats (winning the prestigious following month he went to sea on a fishing 1938 Prince of Wales Cup at Bermuda in the schooner, making three trips as a “working chartered Indiana Scout) or crewing on others. guest,” even going out in the dories. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, Hunt did a As a 20-year-old, Hunt bought yachtsman short stint in the Coast Guard, using his own Chandler Hovey’s R boat Gypsy, renamed her Kathryn M for “off-shore patrol,” looking out Menace IV, and sailed her to Florida and back; for enemy submarines. Thereafter, he was a small mishap occurred when Hunt ran her called in to help with designs at the Navy’s aground off Beaufort, N.C. In 1929, he won the Bureau of Ships. He worked out plans for a R-class championship at Marblehead with his destroyer—a model was tested in a tank with boat. A year later, Hunt started as a protégé at very good results—but his new design was

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scrapped by the Navy’s traditionalists. Frustrated, he turned the 35-foot model into a lobster boat, naming her Unreasonable, and kept lobstering throughout the war, making good money. Back at designing boats after the Second World War, 1950 saw the launch of Sea Blitz, a 42-foot powerboat with a 1500 horsepower Packard 12, which according to Hunt was “strictly experimental.” This was typical for Hunt, working traditionally, but daring to experiment with his designs. He worked at the drawing table on all sizes of vessels, from fancy yachts to popular small boats, like the Boston Whaler, which was introduced in 1958. During the 1960s and the beginning of the 1970s, Hunt continued be active, sailing, racing, and designing boats, but when Barbara suddenly died in 1975, he was deeply affected and died three years later. Despite the attention Hunt got and the success that followed with almost all his designs, he never referred to himself as a yachtsman or a naval architect. Maybe he was happy to be a sailor, remembering his beloved father’s words: “You can carry on yachting as long as you live.” A Genius at His Trade is a marvelous piece of work with Grayson’s elegant style and the gracefully designed pages. It should find a spot on the bookshelves of any sailor, yachtsman or -woman, whether they sail or power a vessel, be it 8-foot or 100-foot. Göran R Buckhorn is the editor of Mystic Seaport Magazine. As a boy, he taught himself how to sail in smaller dinghies in his native country of Sweden. Though not an experienced sailor, he has crewed on smaller yachts on the Öresund straight between Sweden and Denmark.


BOOK NOTES

RE-READ

The Saltwater Frontier

Why Read Moby-Dick?

By Andrew Lipman

By Nathaniel Philbrick

The Saltwater Frontier by Andrew Lipman takes a fresh and exciting look at colonial history of the coastal areas from Cape Cod to the Hudson River. In this skillfully written book, which is free from academic stuffiness, the author paints a picture, not of “dumbstruck” Indians who stared at approaching sails on the horizon, but of Native Americans who met colonists as fellow mariners. The Saltwater Frontier proves that there were three great maritime cultures, the English, Dutch, and Natives, that met on New England waters. At first, these cultures coexisted, with Natives harvesting extra corn, which they sold along with dugout canoes to colonists, but soon bloody conflicts broke out, which saw hundreds of settlers and thousands of Indians killed. These battles later escalated into the cruel “King Philip’s War” (1675–1678). The war led to thousands more deaths among the settlers and the Indians and also to enslavement of up to four million of the Natives. Interestingly, Lipman also briefly mentions how whaling shaped the coastal Indians’ postwar era and how they became an important part of the American whaling industry. The Saltwater Frontier is a brilliant book.

Brilliant Beacons: A History of the American Lighthouse By Eric Jay Dolin On the 300th anniversary of the first constructed lighthouse in America, Boston Lighthouse, which was lit in September 1716 on the small island of Little Brewster, Eric Jay Dolin tells the rich, colorful, and fascinating tale of these towers of light in his Brilliant Beacons. Dolin, acclaimed author of Leviathan, Fur, Fortune, and Empire, and When America First Met China, gives a wealth of information about the people who were involved in these beacons of safety: engineers, politicians, sea captains, and keepers—the latter, men and women who bravely put their lives on the line during dramatic rescues to save mariners in peril. Not only well written, Brilliant Beacons also generously provides illustrations of lighthouses that throughout the ages have played such an important role of the development of the United States.

In History’s Wake: The Last Trap Fishermen of Rhode Island By Markham Starr Author and photographer Mark Starr, former supervisor of the Museum Shipyard’s Documentation Shop, now has several beautiful photo books under his belt. In the latest one, In History’s Wake, Starr documents Rhode Island trap fishermen and their unique subculture in the world of commercial fishing. In 132 stunning black-and-white photographs, the fishermen are portrayed during different aspects of their daily work. Starr’s descriptive captions give us stories of the fishermen, fishing process, construction of the boats, and the hard work on a fishing boat.

I have never read Moby-Dick. This might seem a daring statement, especially in a publication published by Mystic Seaport, which is the keeper of the 1841 Charles W. Morgan, the last wooden whaleship in the world. Though, I have made two serious attempts, alas, I only managed to get into a couple of chapters before I gave up. “Moby-Dick is a long book, and time is short,” Nathaniel Philbrick writes in his highly entertaining Why Read Moby-Dick? (2011; paperback 2013), and I agree. As the author of the award-winning In the Heart of the Sea (2000), Philbrick, who was the recipient of the Museum’s 2015 America and the Sea Award, is naturally the perfect pilot to guide us—both non-readers and fans of Moby-Dick—through the content, context, and creation of Herman Melville’s novel. For Moby-Dick, published in 1851, Melville found inspiration from Shakespeare and the bard’s “dark characters.” Melville’s Berkshire (Massachusetts) neighbor, Nathaniel Hawthorne, did not influence him literarily but inspired him on an emotional level. Melville showed his gratitude by dedicating Moby-Dick to Hawthorne. Melville had also read Owen Chase’s narrative of how the Essex had been struck and sunk by a whale in 1820. The year after Moby-Dick was published, Melville met the master of the Essex, Capt. George Pollard, on Nantucket Island, a “reserved survivor who had learned to live with disappointment,” Philbrick writes. Soon enough Melville had to deal with his own disappointment— during his lifetime Moby-Dick was a total sales fiasco. For certain, Philbrick is building up a good case in his small book why everyone should read Moby-Dick , “the greatest America novel ever written.” I have now put Melville’s book on my bucket list.

Göran R Buckhorn is the editor of the Mystic Seaport Magazine.

FOR CHILDREN

The Boy Who Fell Off the Mayflower – or John Howland’s Good Fortune By P. J. Lynch In The Boy Who Fell Off the Mayflower, award-winning Irish illustrator P. J. Lynch debuts as a writer to tell the story of the young servant John Howland, who left London in 1620 aboard the Mayflower seeking a better life in the American colonies. From a teenage perspective, Lynch takes the reader on the voyage and all that entails: the fear of crossing the Atlantic Ocean, severe storms bringing on seasickness, and for some passengers, death—and in John’s case, the terrifying incident of being tossed overboard by a huge wave into the ocean. The hardship is not over for John and his fellow passengers when they reach New England, where illnesses and other dangers lurk around the Pilgrims. P. J. Lynch proves not only to be a highly skillful illustrator, whose detailed wonderful artworks bring the story to life, but also a superb writer, who captures key moments in the early history of the American settlers in New England. TO ORDER THESE OR OTHER BOOKS, PLEASE CALL 860.572.5386 OR EMAIL MSMBOOKSTORE@EVENTNETWORK.COM DON’T FORGET YOUR 10% MEMBERS’ DISCOUNT! REMEMBER WE SHIP ANYWHERE! WWW.MYSTICSEAPORT.ORG/BOOKSTORE SPRING/SUMMER 2016

| Mystic Seaport Magazine | 21


FROM THE COLLECTIONS

T HE

STORY

A BOU T

A

P I C T U R E

Maps and Charts BY PAUL O'PECKO

T

wo recent grants received by

Europe to Africa. However, these bound

Mystic Seaport support work

texts and charts tell only a small part of

being done on the Museum’s

the mapping story held in the Library.

collection of more than 10,000 charts and

The chart collection, primarily 19th- and

maps. The Acorn Foundation of New York

early 20th-century in nature, represents

gave funding to Mystic Seaport to bring in

the entire world’s oceans. Many of the

an outside expert, Richard Malley, former

charts come from known ships with iden-

Head of Collections at the Connecticut

tified shipmasters and have the penciled

Historical Society, to survey the collection

routes that carried the vessels far and wide

in terms of its scope and relative historic

in search for whales or their delivery of

importance in comparison to other U.S.

passengers and cargo. One such chart was

collections and to assess the overall physi-

owned by Capt. Joseph Warren Holmes of

cal condition of the collection. This work

Mystic, CT, who sailed around Cape Horn

was instrumental in attracting additional

a total of 84 times, more than any other

funds to further the work on the collection.

sailing-ship captain. The heavily-used

The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation of

chart shows multiple tracks leading to

New York also granted the Museum funds

Cape Horn on the southern tip of South

to convert the existing card catalog of the

America, where they all converge into one

collection to electronic format, which will

massive black line before they separate

make it possible for researchers to access

out into single tracks again in the Pacific.

the catalog for this “hidden treasure” for

The Library also holds the entire col-

maritime research and education online.

lection of charts of Irving Johnson (1905-1991), which were used on

The G.W. Blunt White Library at Mystic Seaport houses this collection and is home to the most comprehensive maritime

his multiple circumnavigations with his wife Electa and school-aged young adults.

history research collection in America. Among other topics, the

Thanks to these two foundations, these charts will become much

Library contains a wealth of information on navigation, from

more accessible and useful to the researching public. The next phase

first editions of rare books by and about Cook, La Perouse, and

of funding for this collection will focus on scanning select charts to

Wilkes to one of the most complete sets of the Atlantic Neptune,

make the images available on the web. This is a rich resource with

commissioned by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty in

many untapped opportunities for study. So, the next time you need

England during the lead-up to the American Revolution in order

information on the variations in the coastline of the Kattegat from

to chart the east coast of the American colonies. One of the few

1801 to 1810 to 1832, you know where to go!

copies in America of the five-volume Portugaliae Monumenta Cartographica, a collection of charts commemorating the 500th an-

Paul O’Pecko is Vice President of Collections and Research and Director of the G. W. Blunt White Library at Mystic Seaport.

niversary of the death of Prince Henry the Navigator, can be found in the Library, along with its priceless hand-made Portuguese cabinet. The beautifully illustrated 1671 edition of the English Pilot by John Seller was the first British publication to show the coast of

22 |

Mystic Seaport Magazine |

SPRING/SUMMER 2016

To get more information about the Collections Research Center of Mystic Seaport and online resources, please visit http://library.mysticseaport.org


MORE DAYS

MORE DISCOVERIES MORE FOR YOUR MEMBERSHIP THANK YOU FOR BEING A MEMBER OF MYSTIC SEAPORT. YOUR MEMBERSHIP IS TO THE AMERICAN MARITIME EXPERIENCE AND OUR MISSION. AS A MEMBER, YOU ARE PART OF A COMMUNITY WITH EXCLUSIVE BENEFITS. In addition to unlimited admission to the Museum, Members enjoy free entry to events such as the WoodenBoat Show and Chowder Days, discounts at the Museum Stores and restaurants, and reduced rates for classes and programs. Now that Mystic Seaport is open year-round, there are endless opportunities to make more discoveries. Renew or upgrade your Membership by calling the Membership Office at 860.572.5339 or visit us online at www.mysticseaport.org/join


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