Issuu on Google+

G

ood day, good health , Victoria Myronyuk! 

After reading your project in the newspaper  I  have decided to write about  my  dream that wasn't  leaving me  during  66 years after  the end  of the  war. Although, probably, now   it is   too late and there is  no need, but I  haven’t  managed to write about it earlier.  I send you  documents and  photo to believe  in what  I wrote is   truth,  I  was     a  witness     of what was happening. Throw   it away, and a letter  apparently doesn’t  make sense.  Horshkoderya is my maiden name.  Thank you cordially and  low bow for your noble deed for people.  My   congratulations   and   sincere   good   wishes   to   all   Americans   from  Ukrainian  woman!    I want all  America to know that one American soldier saved my life and  also more than hundreds  of  Ukrainians  and other Ostarbeiters  (Eastern  workers) in Germany in   the war of 1941­45. We worked in a crockery  factory in   town Vindish­Ushenbah (Windischeschenbach). At the end of  April 1945 American troops entered the city without a fight and liberated  us from German slavery.    The soldiers guarded the factory and our barracks on its territory. One  night two armed  strangers   broke through  the factory.  The guard­saviour  won,  shoot one, and  captured the other, who admitted that he was ordered  to   shoot   all   in   the   camp.   Soldiers   treated   us     with   good   faith,   even  sympathetically. One came up   to Tanya, she was 14, patted on the head  and   said,   baby,   we   understood     “a   child”,   and   gave   fairing   –   sweets  probably last ones that  he had. We were freed from work, given out  by loaf  of bread for  two people and  nutrition was improved.They sometimes came  on our entertainment – songs, dances. Once the boys were playing  guitar,  balalaika, and I played on   mandalina, girls and boys danced. One of the  soldiers gathered sweets from everybody   and emptied it to my veil. One 


joked. High soldier stood watching the dance and behind him there  stood a  low one. He  climbed on  a bench and showed with the   gesture that they  are equal now. Everybody had fun. At first we  were scared  of them, then  we learned  that they are good, gentle people. There was any rape, even an  attempt.  They didn’t  tarnish their conscience and didn’t shame  their army.  They   transported     us,   Ukrainians,     with   their   machines   in  Czechoslovakia in the city Budeyvitsa and transferred to our authorities.  Hundredfold thanks to the American liberators­saviors. I returned home to  my  native Ukraine where I live until now. 


КонькоDone