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mymagazine

for Wagoner Public Schools

Volume 1 • Issue 1

Mentoring Youth • Wagoner Edition


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mymagazine • october 2009 • volume 1, issue 1 Notice of Non-Discrimination: Wagoner Public Schools provides equal opportunities without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, qualified disability or veteran status in its educational programs and activities, in access to them, in treatment of individuals with disabilities, or in any aspect of their operations. This includes admissions, educational services, financial aid, and employment. This notice is provided as required under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Questions, complaints or requests for additional information regarding ADA, Section 504, Title VII/ADEA and/or Title IX may be forwarded to the designated ADA, Section 504, Title VII/ADEA or Title IX compliance officer, the site principal or other district administrator. Students and parents may also bring complaints to the assistant principal, counselor, or a teacher. The administrator or staff member notified shall immediately report the complaint to the site principal. The site principal will notify the appropriate compliance officer. For advertising information call 687-6149 or e-mail us from ads@mymagazinenow.com. Material in this publication may not be reproduced in any form without permission. Copying, reproduction or transmittal of this publication by any means is strictly prohibited without the permission of the publisher. The publisher reserves the right to edit or omit all materials submitted for publication, including advertisements, article contributions and event listings. Although this publication is thoroughly edited, the publisher is not liable for any damages due to editing, changes, cancellations, errors and omissions. All corrections should be directed to our editor. All work submitted for publication is assumed to be the provider’s original work, and the publisher accepts no liability as a result of publishing such works. MY Magazine® is a nationally registered trademark. Unauthorized use of The MY Magazine name or logo is prohibited. We want to hear from you. Send your comments and suggestions to ads@mymagazinenow.com

The District Vision ..................................................................................................................................... 3 Lincoln PreSchool..................................................................................................................................... 4 Ellington Elementary .............................................................................................................................. 5 Stars Academy ............................................................................................................................................ 6 Teague Elementary.................................................................................................................................. 7 Central Intermediate Grade Center............................................................................................... 8 Wagoner Middle School ...................................................................................................................... 9 Wagoner High School .........................................................................................................................10 Wagoner Public Schools Calendar...............................................................................................11

Content/Photography Coweta Public Schools Advertising Jermaine Mondaine Editing Beth Spaulding

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Publisher Franklin Graphics Founder Jermaine Mondaine Layout Design Franklin Design Staff

table of contents

Exp. 11-17-09

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District Goals Indicators of Basic Early Literacy), Accelerated Reader program, ParentCONNECTxp, benchmark testing every six weeks, standardized test scores, parent/teacher conferences, individualized education plans, STAR Reading/ STAR Math, STAR Early Literacy Assessment and SuccessMaker. Some examples of the curricular and instructional models/designs in place due to this analysis are Guided Reading, SRA Multiple Skills, Response to Intervention, Acelus. SuccessMaker, Comprehend pro, vertical and horizontal alignment of curriculum, curriculum mapping, differentiated instruction, inquiry based learning, innovative technology in the class rooms, interactive SMART-boards.

Vision: The vision of Wagoner Public School District is learning at the speed of life-the momentum for a lifetime of achievement. This vision means that quality will always be at the forefront as students are motivated and prepared to be successful during their school career and beyond. Indicators of the accomplishment of our vision will be decreased drop out rates, increased number of successful college freshmen, increased success rate on criterion referenced and end of instructions tests, cutting edge technology throughout the district and an increased graduation rate.

District Goals: Transparency Transparency allows all stakeholders the ability to observe professional accountability as it relates to the superintendent, site administration, faculty, and staff. It also includes the perception of community members and the effectiveness of the relationships developed. Continue to Improve the Curriculum Innovative and successful educational models ensure continuous progress in student learning. School effectiveness is measured in the following ways: Parent/Teacher surveys – Opinion surveys of parents and Office of Accountability Indicators Report Adequate Yearly Progress Report Program reviews – All research based programs provide data which is reviewed on a continual basis to assess effectiveness. Accountability Numerous evaluative tools are in place to ensure that the needs of the students are being addressed. Some of the monitoring and evaluation tools used are DIBEL (Dynamic

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Wagoner Public Schools uses data analysis in order to evaluate program efficacy and guide decision making in regards to curriculum. The implementation of Aurora Learning Community Association (ALCA) assists administrators and teachers in using student assessment and evaluation data to make informed decisions for instructional improvement and tracking student performance on a year to year basis. The use of assessment results is invaluable as quality indicators of program success. ALCA has proven to be most beneficial in disseminating the Oklahoma Core Curriculum Tests (OCCT) results. This makes it possible to review subject area PASS objectives and locate areas of concern for students on a year to year basis and to look for data trends. EDITOK, an Oklahoma based company, is providing intensive professional development Continue to Weave the Net of Security A commitment of the district is to have a highly operational emergency management plan. This requires team work and collaboration not only within the district’s sites and departments but also with pertinent local, state and federal agencies. The district has completed safe school audits, a district level emergency operation plan with site specific protocol, safety drills, site safety committees, professional development training. The security at the school has been increased through the Readiness Emergency Management Grant. The district now has 99% of the members of the school crisis team trained in National Incident Management System: ICS 100 – Introduction to the Incident Command System, IS200- ICS for single resources and initial action incidents; IS700-Introduction to (NIMS) and IS800-National Response Framework, and Introduction. NIMS training provides continuity with local, state and federal agencies. In addition to this training, security monitors are in place at all buildings, and all sites except the high school have a buzzer system for entry.

Re: Survey for Flu Vaccination Clinic at School Dear Parent/Guardian: Flu season has arrived. Working closely with the Heath Department, we are helping to prevent the spread of the 2009 H1N1 and seasonal flu by providing voluntary immunizations with the FluMist and/or the injectible flu vaccine. Keeping students and teachers healthy and in school is important for the education process. Children can be sick with the flu for a week or more having fever, headache, extreme fatigue and body aches. Additionally, children with underlying health conditions, such as asthma or diabetes, may become ill enough to require hospitalization. Children are often the main source of flu infection for everyone else, spreading the flu to other classmates, family members, and the community. The single best way to help prevent the spread of the 2009 H1N1 and seasonal flu is to get a flu vaccination each year. If enough parents indicate an interest in wanting their children to receive the flu vaccination at school, the Health Department will set up a clinic on our school campus. Only the FluMist (intranasal vaccine – not a shot) will be available over the next few weeks; the injectible vaccine is due to come later. To give your consent to have your child vaccinated with the H1N1 FluMist, please read and complete all the attached forms and return them to your child’s school by Friday, October 9, 2009. No student will be immunized without the completed paper work by the parent or guardian. If the number of consent forms returned warrant a clinic at our school, parents/guardians will be notified of the date and time of the clinic. We will also keep you informed of any other information regarding the vaccines, the illness, etc. We encourage you to contact your child’s healthcare provider if you have additional questions about the H1N1 flu vaccine or contact the H1N1 Hot Line at 1-866-278-7134. Thank you for allowing us to help keep your child healthy this ye


Lincoln PreSchool

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incoln Preschool is full of 160 happy, excited, energetic and precious four year olds. Our school has eight classroom teachers and one teacher who sees each one of these children every single day. In this first issue we would like to focus on that teacher, Mrs. Marilyn Tubb and all that she accomplishes with the youngest students in the Wagoner school system. Mrs. Tubb is our Mrs. Tubb with Parris Cody, Zeke Ramsaran site exploratory from Mrs. Weaver’s class class teacher. She teaches Art, Library, Music and PE to our students. Her classroom is set up with learning centers created Mrs. Blan kenship’s especially for four year olds and the unit they are currently studying. This past student: Bradley M axwell month the children have been to the ocean! How exciting is that for children living in northeastern Oklahoma? Classroom projects have been many and varied. Some have included making starfish (using Shredded Wheat,) painting beautiful saltwater fish and studying seashells and the creatures that live inside them. The children have also enjoyed singing new songs about the ocean and learning to play instruments and move to the musical beat. Every day the children listen to books that Mrs. Tubb has specifically chosen to further enhance the ocean unit. During PE times the children have enjoyed pretending to be at the beach and catching a large beach ball. They’ve also enjoyed playing “pass the octopus.” We hope that this very brief explanation gives you a little more insight into how Wagoner four year olds spend a portion of each day at Lincoln Preschool. , Maci Dorr, ey Parisotto n d y S : ts n e ’s stud Ms. Freeman ssey s, Brianna Co Alexis Mullin

Mrs. Simpson’s stud

ents: Paige Bowlin

, Kiah Bobo

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Ellington Elementary

....Every Child, Every Day!”

Ellington Elementary Staffers Ziplined to Teamwork!!

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n August Ellington staffers attended the Team Building Ropes Course at HelmZar in Tulsa. Staff members spent the morning working on team building exercises and games – learning to build trust and depend on each other. In the afternoon everyone donned on their safety gear and took to the sky having a blast at zip-lining, walking rope bridges, climbing rock walls and scaling spider web ropes – all while cheering each other on and making some great memories. “What a terrific way to start our year together!! We took away an amazing feeling of team spirit and learning to depend on each other! Watching our colleagues conquer their fears, make it to the top and jump off to zip line – unbelievable fun! I am just so proud to be their leader!! As a team there is nothing we cannot conquer!” Janet Dotson, Principal, Ellingto g n Elementaryy

RtI Underway at Ellington Elementary

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llington is a proud pilot school for RtI for the State Department of Education. RtI is an intervention program that works along with the district’s assessment program. WPS uses DIBELSS to assess their K-3rd grade students in reading. RtI takes the DIBELS results and teacher input and places students on tiers according to the needs of the student. Tier 1 is whole group learning – normal instruction given by the classroom teacher. About 60% of students should fall into Tier 1. Tier 2 is an intervention level where the classroom teacher works with small groups of students up to a 1:6 ratio on the skill they need improvement on. The classroom teacher conducts Tier 2 interventions 3 X a week at 20 minutes per intervention time. About 30% of students fall into the Tier 2 level. Tier 3 is an intense intervention level conducted by a certified staff member other than the classroom teacher – usually a special education teacher or speech pathologist. Tier 3 is a 1:3 ratio on the skill where improvement is needed. Tier 3 is 5X a week for 20 minutes per intervention time. About 10% of students fall into the Tier 3 level. Progress in monitored every week in Tier 2 andd Tier 3 and a committee meets once every 3 weeks to assist in decision making and progress for eachh student on Tier 2 or Tier 3. Students are removed from Tier 2 when they reach benchmark. Students ts are moved from Tier 3 to Tier 2 when they show significant improvement and then are moved into Tier 1 when they have reached benchmark. If students do not gain improvement in Tier 3 then a committee reviews the data and makes a decision if the student should be referred for testing. We have seen some amazing results during our first year of RtI and can’t wait to see what Ellington can do during our second year! Our goal is to have 100% of our students on benchmark by the end of the first semester!!

Outstanding Studen

ts at Ellington!!! Pictured are the August Little Bulldogs of the Month! Way to go First Graders!!! 5

“It’s A Great Day At Ellington!” Ellington Staffers Qualify for Grants! g staff or

Wow! Do we have an amazin rs have applied what!?! Several of our teacheDonors Choose for grants through Sonic and of dollars for and have received thousandsoms. From dignew activities for their classro ading Rocks” ital cameras and printers to “Re new cd/book corners with cd players and allwhat these sets – stop by and check out grants! teachers have received through


Stars Academy my Prinitycaripe feaelle d a c A S R A T S the our commun Messageveerffrberoforem, families in American societydianands an might d caregivers, who

More than d more guar k outside rced to seek wor being transient, an fo bs g jo in of be in n, ra re st ild e eet eir ch ing th it is difficult to m time to raising th at r th ei th ity al te re ca e di th de prefer to ds, along with setting, have itional classroom s on our househol ad tr a in s ed ne the home. Strain more ning eed and become pmental and lear cc lo su ve ts de s ’ en ild ud st ch y lp ademy he ever tter programs to l world. STARS Ac be ca r ni fo ch ed te y ne gl e sin th created d and increa ic Schools, who pete in a fast pace in Wagoner Publ ts en ud st d ge -a prepared to com fficulty teen t who have had di ram. We provide bu og , pr ed a ng ch le al su st ch ju ly educais al ered high quality g to be academic nt in ill ce w td en an ud e st bl a pa are ca setting, with r teaching the itional classroom p environment fo ou gr rle al sm thriving in a trad a g in ity to acceler. Along with offer and the opportun n io ct ru st in s ill r goal tion opportunity sk e instruction. It is ou S offers unique lif ed AR as ST , r-b ts te ec pu bj m su co h to their CORE classrooms prior attainment throug al it on ed iti cr ad d tr an e th ng , ni in ate lear , and excel students with students return to to empower our m ai r ou is it , se that many of our gh-stakes ery ca competitive on hi e uation. But in ev or ad m gr ol em ho th e sc ak gh hi cope to m ith better skills to enrich their lives, w ill w em at th th m e ar dg to , le s) aduknow ey successfully gr of-instruction exam th dat en th e re at su st en as h to tests (suc adults, and y to prosper. es they will face as e workforce read th or with the challeng a highly ge lle co r te have been given ol and en I at ho sc th rt gh po hi re m to fro d to offer ate goals, I am please united and ready e e es ar th e ll W lfi . fu rs lo to r se un viIn orde need to better en of teachers and co ey aff th st t or ed p at pp v iv t ti su ot o d m nd on aan or for ed and illeed skill agiinnee fo imag t im ith tthhee eedduuuccaaattitioon cuulltlt to rk oorr diifficu stuuuddeennttss with k st da s sk isk i ris ri -r m t-r tem at a se ly al ay ic m e em re d u ad tu ac ac ls.s.. TThhoouugghh the fuu oaalls ht tthhee Way. y Wiillll Ligghht m em d andd rreeaacchh tthheeiirr ggo ad c Ac on an sio siion S A AR S ST , w nnoow agooonneerr’’s sttudents of Wag so s me of

Jeff Sharrock Principal

Ms. Andra Fuller Tea TTeeac ach che her he er off tthe hee M Mo onth on th h

STARS Faculty and Staff: Melba Tammy Ponds-MS INT, Marsey Carter-HS INT, Ginger Page-English, h Brunger-Indian Education, Andra h, Telena Jones-Math, David Runn Fuller l -Science, els-Counselor

Jean McGlothlin Student of the Month 6


Teague Elementary T

he students, faculty, and staff at William R. Teague Elementary are having a great year. At the present time we have 203 second grade students and 208 third grade students. This is an increase of approximately (25) twenty five students above the 2008-2009 school year. Additional staff this year includes the following: Kallie Barnes, Second Grade Teacher; Kara Kelley, Third Grade Teacher; Kathy Jones, Secretary; Stacie Edwards, Teachers Assistant; Becky Ratliff, Teachers Assistant; Dayla Johnson, Teachers Assistant. Our second grade classes are taught by their homeroom teacher who teaches all subjects. Our third grade teachers do team teaching with one teacher teaching reading and language arts. The other teacher on the team teaches math, science, and social studies. Our students spend a minimum of (2) two hours each day studying reading and a minimum of (2) two hours each day studying math. Additionally, all students are taught music, physical education, art, computers, and library skills. We are fortunate to have Teri Hoffman, school based social worker, in our school. Teri works diligently with our students and families to help with attendance and school supplies. Teri helps the other schools when needed. Buddy Thayer, our custodian, works ten (10) hours each day. He arrives at school by 5:00 am and ends his day at 4:00 pm. He is paid two (2) hours of overtime pay each day. Buddy takes great pride in our school and keeps it c ea e . Thee halls a s aandd floo o s aaree sswept eptt aandd mopped ep opp pped ed da a y, tthee ba bat t oo s aaree clean. oors daily, bathrooms c ea cl eane nedd aan ne andd al aalll cl cclassrooms las assr ssroo ooms oo ms aare re vvac acuu ac uuume medd cleaned vacuumed daililiy. da daily. dditittioon to BBud dd uddy ud dy w o ki or k ng aatt Inn aadd addition Buddy working s ho sc hool ol hhee is tthe he ccus usstoodi dian ian ffor or FFir irst rst school custodian First Bapt Ba ptisst Ch hurrch iinn Wa Wago goone n r.r Baptist Church Wagoner. Our fa ffaculty cultltlty and cu annd st staff aff at W ili liiaam m RR.. Our William T ag Te ague ue EElementary leme le ment me ntar nt aryy ha ar hhass a me memb mber mb eer Teague membershipp of of fififfty-three ftyfft y-th ythre th reee (53) re (53) 3) employees. eemp mplo l ye lo yees e. es ship

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Central Intermediate

Bulldog News

T

he Bulldog News is in its second season of producpro rodu odu ducc-tion. The fourth and fifth grade students off Ce Central enttra raall Intermediate School write, film, and report each eaacchh segseg egment themselves. This is a progressive program teachm te eacchhing kids interviewing and writing skills. Bulldog N News ew ws is is ‘where tomorrow’s announcers begin today.’

POWERHOUR

PowerHour is a before and after school program for students att C Central entr en tral al Intermediate. It is funded by the 21st CCLC grant. The focus is twofold; keeping children safe after school and provide project based learning. The CIS library is available before school begins to do homework and access educational websites. In the afternoon, students eat snacks, finish homework, and participate in a variety of fun classes. This month students made caramel apples, played educational games on the computer, played volleyball and did a hands-on science experiment. The focus is to expose students to actitivities they would not normally have an opportunity to participate in during the traditional school day.

SSchool chool B Beautification eautification

CISS st CI staff affff sp sspent ent a da en dayy w wo working orkkiinng to together th tto “b “beautify” b tif ” tthe h bbuilding. ild ldi TTeachers h andd other h staffff members trimmed bushes, edged, worked on flower gardens, painted and mowed the lawn. Staff volunteers agreed to help get the school ready for the new year. Principal Kelli Dixon coordinated the one day event. “It is important for students to see we take pride in our building just like we take pride in teaching them at CIS”, she said. “Even our PTO President Brenda Barney came out to help support the project. We have the best people at Central.”

Character Education Program

A

t Central Intermediate School character makes a difference. There is a strong focus this year for students to model positive character traits. It requires students to do the right thing and make wise choices. Students will explore six character traits in the classroom. Our goal is for students to practice good decision making skills on a daily basis. Possessing a strong character defines how students are viewed. These qualities will help mold their future. Students learn through lessons, games, art, and music which teach respect, trustworthiness, responsibility, caring, Citizenship, and fairness. “Schools that invest time and energy in character education see fewer behavioral problems and an increase in academic excellence”, says school counselor Marjorie McKinney. CIS is enthusiastic about teaching character traits and having opportunities to practice learning through different expressions and experiences. “There is a payoff for showing good character; it makes you a better person. Once you know what is right you will do what is right.”

Students of the Month The Student o f the Mo

nthh award is g dents. This aw th iven outstanding chard gives teachers the op to 4 and 5th graders wh o are dedicated p o ar rt ac u n te ity to recogniz ris tics in behavio one student fr stue ind r receive a trip om their homeroom classand academics. Each mon ividuals who display to Braums for th ice cream andfor the honor. They are par 18 teachers choose to a Student of th e Month t-shirf a select group to t.

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Wagoner MIddle school COUNSELOR’S CORNER

WMS Counselors are Kim Biby and Belinda Mealer. They are available to counsel with students in 6th, 7th and 8th grades.

We are happy to be working with GEAR UP again this year. We are excited to be adding SMART Boards to our classrooms. * OHLAP is the Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program for 8th, 9th, & 10th grade students whose family income is $50,000 or less. Those students can earn FREE College Tuition. You apply online at www.okpromise.org or see your counselors. Parent Resource Center- Check out the information center in the main office.

SSeptember eptember SSTUDENTs TUDENTs ooff tthe he M Month o nt h 6A - Caleb Fraser, Danyel Caesar 6B - Nick Hornbuckle, Gabby Roberts 7A - Dusty Hutchens, Halli Chandler 7B - Chris Sharrock, Emma Wilson 8A - Dusty Swanson, Jazmine Watson 8B - Corey Tipton, Skylar Bruce

SSeptember eptember CCitizens itizens ooff tthe he M Month o nt h 6A - De’Leca Jackson 6B - Christian Denton 7A - Ryann Jacobson 7B - Karrigan Morris 8A - Antayzia Henderson 8B - Megan Fessler

ccoming oming events: events: 9/24 9/25 / 10/6 10/15 10/16 0/16 10/30 10 0/30

Pep Assembly Report p Cards 8th grade Explore - Test Fall Break Fall Break School Pictures Pic P ictu ic ture tu ress re

STUDENT COUNCIL NEWS: THE VOTES ARE IN!!! WMS Student Counci l Members 8th Grade Kenzie McFarland, Sy dney Stafford, Brooklyn Broad, Beth Johnson, Trenton Rice, Skylar Bruce, An tayazia Henderson, Dillon Sayers, Kori Th omas 7th Grade Hailey Nail, Raven M ahee, Bailee Thomas, Hope Means, Dusty Hu tchens, Ryann Jacobson, Halli Chandler, Sheridan Jones 6th Grade Cameron Nichols, Jory Brumnett, Maloree Smith, Karrigan Kimb all, Reiss Biby, Lantz Woodburn, Hann ah Miller SPONSOR: COURTN EY VERNNON

: l a p i c n i r p from the

S. We k to WMd to a c a b e m r a elco ing forw We are lookear this year. ru y p super technology g sing on n gettin u are foc and working o of our core chases Boards in all aSMART oms. My Magt. “ d e ll a classro w magazine c is fall on Sep n tio th. *A ne oming out th informat. We ch mon n a in e c a t is n o ” io lc ric zine recognit our dist 9. It wil 25, 200very school in WMS tidbits innt events, and e want everyabout e have valuable owns on curre als at WMS. Wrs, powerhour hope to les, team rund will be our gonities like tuto ed by our Schedu ents and staffudent opportu events sponsorazine. There for stud now of our st ternoon, and th in this mag Get involved one to k orning and af ed every mon at our school. . in the m council featuryone to enjoy y to the future student thing for ever child’s journe is some tipate in your and par

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9

Pictured: Mrs. Giddons, Mrs. Smith & Mr. Shade

Lewinda Gidd Larry Shade - ens- 8B History Kristal Smith 8B Science - 7B Geography Amy Morris- Sp Brenda Cochra ec. Ed aide Cindy Beck - Can - Cafeteria feteria manag er


Wagoner High school

Chain Reaction C

hhain ha i RReaction in eaction is a new club at Wagoner High School this year. The idea for the club came about when a group of soonto-be-seniors gathered for a game night and they began talking about what they wanted to accomplish before they graduated in May. Various students discussed the many ways they felt the community of Wagoner had invested in them over the years: teachers who spent extra time helping them, coaches who had inspired them, times that members of the community had come out to support their activities, and the role models they saw on their job sites. They decided that one good turn deserves another and that they wanted to be known as the class that gave something back. They wanted to invest in the community that had invested in them, and they hoped the younger classes would take notice of their efforts and follow suit. They wanted to create a chain reaction and that’s what they decided to call themselves. The goals of Chain Reaction are to raise money for local, state, national, and international charities, to donate volunteer labor to community service projects, and to inspire other students within the Wagoner Public Schools to make a difference in their community. Members of Chain Reaction have done volunteer work for WPS, for the local hospital, and for the Main Street restoration organization. They plan to help the City of Wagoner decorate the town during the Christmas season and would like to help restore the parks. Anyone who would like more information or who would like to contact Chain Reaction about an event can call the high school at 485-5553 and ask for Alex Baker or Michelle Maxwell.

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2009-2010 Calendar Professional Development Meetings /Holidays

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May Sa 1

End of 4th 9 weeks 47 days

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End of 1st Semester 45 days

School Year: 175 Days Taught + 5 Professional Meetings = 180 Days for 2009-2010 Yellow Holiday/No School * Graduation Gold Snow Make-Up Day State Testing Day _ End of Grading Period ( ) Parent Teacher Conference Day

Bold Blue

Professional Day/No School First and Last Days of School

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wagoner 10-2009