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mymagazine • owasso • october, 2009 • volume 1, issue 1

table of contents

Superintendent’s Message................................................................................. 1 Bond Issue Letter...................................................................................................... 1 Bond Issue Needs List............................................................................................ 2

Got Videos?.................................................................................................................. 3

Owasso Special Olympics................................................................................... 4

Encyclomedia!............................................................................................................ 5

Owasso Nurse’s Note............................................................................................. 6 Ator Elementary........................................................................................................ 7

Bailey Elementary..................................................................................................... 8 Hodson Elementary................................................................................................ 9

Mills Elementary......................................................................................................11

Northeast Elementary.........................................................................................13 Fun Section................................................................................................................14 Smith Elementary..................................................................................................19

Stone Canyon Elementary................................................................................21

Seventh Grade Center.........................................................................................23 Owasso Mid High School..................................................................................25

Ram Alternative Academy................................................................................26

Owasso High School............................................................................................27

Owasso Band............................................................................................................28 Owasso Athletics....................................................................................................29 Owasso School Calendar...................................................................................31

Publisher Franklin Graphics Founder Jermaine Mondaine Layout Design Chuck Boswell Content/Photography Owasso Public Schools Advertising Jermaine Mondaine, Randy Pinney Editing Cheryl Golightly Owasso Public Schools For advertising information call 687-6149 or e-mail us from ads@ mymagazinenow.com. Material in this publication may not be reproduced in any form without permission. Copying, reproduction or transmittal of this publication by any means is strictly prohibited without the permission of the publisher. The publisher reserves the right to edit or omit all materials submitted for publication, including advertisements, article contributions and event listings. Although this publication is thoroughly edited, the publisher is not liable for any damages due to editing, changes, cancellations, errors and omissions. All corrections should be directed to our editor. All work submitted for publication is assumed to be the provider’s original work, and the publisher accepts no liability as a result of publishing such works. MY Magazine® is a nationally registered trademark. Unauthorized use of The MY Magazine name or logo is prohibited. We want to hear from you. Send your comments and suggestions to ads@mymagazinenow.com

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Superintendent’s Pages

2009 Fall Bond Issue Welcome to the first issue of Owasso Schools’ MY Magazine! We are excited to kick-off this ambitious endeavor that will highlight our school system as well as give deserved recognition and information about what our students are accomplishing on a daily basis in their school. This project is fully funded by the advertisers within the magazine. I encourage you to support them with your business. This month we will feature the upcoming bond issue as well as several other student activities. On July 20th the Owasso Board of Education voted unanimously to call a fall bond issue scheduled for a vote on Tuesday, October 13th . The bond issue is the result of planning by the Long-Range Bond Committee comprised of patrons, parents, teachers and school administrators. The Bond Committee began work on this bond issue last January as it takes months of fact finding and planning to prepare for a school bond election. The community of Owasso has a compelling history of supporting school bond elections with only one failed election in its history that dates back to the beginning of statehood. In the past five years a tremendous commitment has been made to Owasso Public Schools by the citizens of Owasso. Almost 80 million dollars has been put into the improvement of the infrastructure (over 100 new classrooms!) of our school system in grades PK-4-12 to bring the district up to a 6A suburban school level facility-wise. Our student capacity has been raised from 8,000 students in 2003 to 10,500 students in 2009. Today our vibrant and growing district has 9,040 students so planning for future student growth is essential. Many other items were also purchased from those monies to support the total operation of the district which includes buses/transportation, furniture, maintenance upgrades, technology, textbooks, band instruments and band uniforms. I would invite all of our patrons and parents to see where the lion’s share your bond tax dollars have gone the past five years by going to the district website at www.owasso.k12.ok.us and also view the proposed projects (here as well as the website) for the upcoming bond issue election on Tuesday, October 13, 2009. Most importantly this bond issue will not raise your taxes and will enable Owasso Public Schools to continue to raise the bar with regard to the overall quality of our school infrastructure as well as meeting our academic needs. Dr. Clark Ogilvie, Superintendent

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Owasso Schools Bond Issue Needs List Security Entrances Bailey, Hodson, Smith, Ator, Mills & NE....... $4,200,000 Build-Out 2nd Floor of New High School Wing............................. $3,500,000 Technology Upgrades District Wide.................................................. $2,500,000 Maintenance/Equipment Upgrades @ All School Sites.............. $1,800,000 Replacement of FB/Soccer, BB Infield Turf & Track Surface....... $1,105,000 Textbooks.................................................................................................... $1,000,000 Transportation........................................................................................... $1,000,000 HVAC Upgrades for Old High School Wing..................................... $ 415,000 PAC Equipment Upgrades/Concert Band Shell............................. $ 350,000 Total W/Int. & Fees..................................................................................$19,700,000 ***This Bond Issue Will Not Raise Taxes!!!

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Got Videos?

We do with SAFARI Montage!

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wasso Public Schools has selected the award-winning SAFARI Montage VideoOn-Demand and Digital Media Management solution to deliver digital content to the classrooms of its 9,000 plus students. SAFARI Montage is a video-on-demand server that comes preloaded with the finest, broadcast-quality educational videos available. Students, teachers, and parents will recognize popular titles from publishers such as PBS, National Geographic, Scholastic, Disney Education and Sesame Street. The district purchased this program through previous school bond funds. Using SAFARI Montage as a digital resource warehouse is an easy way for teachers to meet the needs of educating our students. This program is user friendly and teachers learn to use it quickly. Teachers access SAFARI Montage through the district’s intranet. They can search for specific content based on the subject matter they are studying. Teachers then preview the video and create their own playlists for future reference. These playlists can also be shared among the school’s faculty. These videos are divided into chapters so the teacher can choose what segment to show the class based on that day’s instruction.

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n e e r c S y la P e g a t SAFARI Mon

Kelley Raby’s 2nd hour Mid-High students watch a video clip from SAFARI Montage.

What our teachers are saying… “I like that I can use SAFARI Montage to present information in a different manner.” Jennifer Villines, 4th, Bailey Elementary “I appreciate being able to use it during those unplanned “teachable moments.” Kelly Walters, 3rd, Stone Canyon Elementary “Because the video is divided in segments, I can plan instruction between segments and show the video for reinforcement.” Edwina Roller, 5th, Ator Elementary In the future as money permits, Owasso Public Schools would like to add additional content packages along with other SAFARI Montage products. One of those products, SAFARI Montage Creation Station is an easy-to-use tool that allows teachers and students to create, manage and share their videos over our network.


owasso special olympics

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he Owasso Special Olympics program provides the opportunity for athletes of all ability levels to participate in track events and Unified Bocce competition. Participation on the team is free to athletes and their families and the program is funded entirely through private donations and fundraisers. On September 11th , the Owasso Civitan Club sponsored a Spaghetti Dinner in support of the team. Students sold tickets for the dinner and Mrs. Anderson’s class at the High School raised over $500 for the team! The second annual Ram Road Rally for Owasso Olympians was held on September 12th and runners and walkers showed their support for the team by participating in the 5K run or the 1 mile fun run.

For more information about the team or upcoming events visit www.OwassoOlympians.com.

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encyclomedia!

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wasso Public School librarians attended the annual Encyclomedia conference at the Cox Center in Oklahoma City, September 17, 18. Over one hundred sessions were available for librarians, counselors and teachers to choose from to enhance or improve methods of instruction to students from pre-school through high school. Vendors were also available to demonstrate the newest and most innovative technologies, as well as book authors to visit with teachers about their latest works. Pictured during Thursday’s lunch are: Front row, left to right: Shauna Fender, Ator librarian; Julie Thompson, Barnes librarian; Marna Watkins, Owasso High School librarian; Cindy Jolley, Eighth Grade Center librarian; Leslie Smith, Hodson librarian; Ronda Cole, Northeast computer instructor. Back row, left to right: Laura Harris, Stone Canyon librarian; Susan Dallis, Northeast librarian; Dana Owens, Mills librarian; Ashley Hopper, 7th Grade librarian; Jennifer McCutchen, Bailey librarian; Jaynie O’Dell, 6th Grade librarian; Cheryl Golightly, district library coordinator; and LeaAnn Johns, Smith librarian.

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E: T O N S E RS U N L O O H SC OWASSO ds a e r p S u l How F Person Person to

is from ht to spread g u o th re his is a s nd sneezes. (T uenza viruse a fl s in h t g a u o th c y f a o roplets a cough The main w respiratory d roplets from in d n n o e h rs e w p n e to p person air and can hap through the spread.”) This d e t ll le e p p ro ro p “d d re iruses e call ted person a y. Influenza v c rb fe a in e n n a le f p o o e se of p or sneeze plets on mouth or no spiratory dro e re th s n e o h c d u te to or si n depo own mouth ir when a perso e d th a s e re h sp c u e b ir hands. nd then to may also washing the r an object a o re n fo o e b rs ) e p se r o e anoth uth or n their the bend of one else’s mo e to m in so r ze e (o e d of all se sn no ase the sprea to cough or re c n their e re d d l il il h w c it h b c or sneeze into his ha to tea l T h a g . c u ”) ti o h ri c c g s u is e o o it c eone d ampire r. This is why germs. If som ands or use hand sanitize call this the “v e ’s e rn rs o u -b n ir S a P s eir h elbow (O infectiou em to wash th th t n read of se n e th hand bating the sp m o c n o se n e of defe is our best lin g in sh a w d Han ctions. any other infe d n a ing 1 day ld o /C lu F thers beginn o t c fe in ck. to ay be able r becoming si m e s ft lt a u s d y a a y d h -7 lt up to 5 ptoms Most hea develop and en days. Sym v s m se n to a p th m r sy e g s before y. That mean e virus for lon d o th b ss e a p th y rs a te m virus en fore you Children ays after the eone else be d m r u so fo to to u be e fl n e start o e people can to pass on th m o le b  S . a k e c b si y a re may ile you a that you m ose persons as well as wh th , , k e c si m ti re a is u th o g know y s. Durin no symptom e v a h t u b s u the flu vir infected with ers. e virus to oth still spread th enter o 7th Grade C ss a w O & S Schools H en, R.N. - O fe/Drug Free a S & y m e d a Debbie Hold h, Ram Ac asso Mid Hig w O – . .N R , ore Jaimee Sizem entary ortheast Elem N – . .N R , n to ugh Donna McNa tary(s) arnes Elemen B & r to A – . er, R.N Shana Brunn ntary(s) Smith Eleme & n so d o H – , R.N. Amy Grahlen nters th & 8th Grade Ce 6 o ss a w O , R.N. – ) Kristin Dyson Elementary(s n o y n a C e n iley & Sto .N. – Mills, Ba R r, e w lo C a c Bec

ok! o L r e s o l C A Take u l F e n i w S

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Ator Elementary

DO YOU MEASURE UP? F

ifth graders at Ator Heights Elementary saw how they “measured up” using the metric system. Students started out the year in Science with a Metric Olympics. They participated in these events: the Paper Plate Discus, Straw Javelin, Cotton Ball Shot Put, Right Handed Marble Grab and Left-handed Sponge Squeeze. Students used metric skills to find distance, mass and volume. Practicing the scientific processes involved in an experiment during a Gummy Bear Lab, students continued to use measurement. Students made predictions, measured, tested hypotheses, measured again and shared results. During the course of the activity students worked on converting fractions to decimals and converting millimeters to centimeters. Measurement skills are reinforced throughout the year. Science students will be tracking the growth of rats in November. Math students can look forward to a measurement project called “Leapin’ Lizards.” Experiential learning creates memorable experiences so students retain and apply concepts.

bby Pinkstaff work on Ethan McBride and Bo a Gummy Bear. finding the mass of

Finding the mass for their Gummy Bears Jessie Inglima, Maddy Hamm, and Olivia are Smith.

Stewart, Jesse Stoukal, Kaleb adison Kaitlin White, and Ms during Smith measure mas arble the Right-handed M Grab.

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Chloe Leonard, Conner Kylman, converting metric measurementMason Keesling, Caleb Pudden and Dalton Major are working on after the Cotton Ball Shot Put.


B

ailey Elementary is implementing a new approach to help students improve their academic skills. This approach is called Response to Intervention or RtI. Response to Intervention is a research-based process that provides early interventions for students who need extra attention and support with specific skills in reading, math, spelling, written expression or behavior. At Bailey we believe that ALL students can learn! Our teachers, from Kindergarten through 5th grade, are embracing this new approach with excitement and anticipation of outstanding results. Not every child learns at the same rate or even in the same way. Some students work better in small groups and some students work better one-on-one. RtI provides the framework that helps the teachers identify

by Kenna Cataudella, RtI Coordinator

specific skills that need a boost. If we can prevent “small cracks” in learning from becoming “large gaps” then all students will reach their grade level expectations and beyond! The essential elements of an RtI approach are: the provision of research-based interventions in the general education classroom; monitoring and measurement of student progress in response to the instruction and interventions; and use of these measures of student progress to shape instruction and to make the best educational decisions for our students. Teachers gather data throughout the intervention process in order to measure a student’s progress. Data-driven decisions are then made by our RtI Team which consists of our principal, RtI Coordinator, Speech/Language Pathologist, Resource teacher, Reading Specialist, ELL teachers and our Counselor. Our team meets every two weeks to look at the data and then set new goals. Last year, Response to

Intervention was in its infancy at Bailey as we began the process with our first graders and their reading skills. Our first grade teachers worked hard to identify students who needed extra support. The teachers spent time researching, creating and implementing interventions. Excitement was fueled as teachers, parents and students saw success as their academic skills grew and improved! One first grade teacher said, “RtI helped us ‘zero in’ on students who were missing some skills and then to help them learn those skills.” Another teacher said, “I saw HUGE progress in the students who were struggling. The small-group skills instruction helped build their confidence because they felt successful! Response to Intervention is changing the way we “do” school at Bailey Elementary. A little extra help is going a very long way with our students. Goals are being set, expectations are being reached and students are successful!

Bailey Elementary

RtI

…A New Way to “Do” School

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Hodson Elementary 9

D

id you ever dream of going to a far away land? Maybe the birthplace of civilization; a place speckled with ruins of ancient days; where you could stand on the ground where an event like the Olympics began. That is exactly what two Hodson teachers did. Karla Price, 4th grade teacher and Leslie Smith, Library Media Specialist, traveled to Greece this past summer. Karla and Leslie applied for and received a Fund for Teachers Fellowship to travel to Greece for nine days. Collaboration between this teacher and Librarian provided guidance for their tour. They wanted to use myths, so their tour included seeing the peninsula where the ruins of the Temple of Poseidon stood and where King Ageaus threw himself into the sea (according to the myth Theseus and the Minotaur). It was amazing to Leslie how every aspect of the Greek historical sites had some sort of myth attached, providing a rich resource for teaching this genre of literature. Research also was in their plan and visiting the museums and ruins provided the basis for the Greek art and architecture that the students will study in their

classroom and Library during the school year. Karla was especially drawn to the architecture with its Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian columns. It was amazing the magnitude of the structures, the detail, and especially the longevity of these ancient works of art. Along the lines of art, the duo visited a potter’s studio to learn the traditions of Greek pottery. This visit prompted both Karla and Leslie to want to take a pottery class when they got back home! A surprising bonus on their trip was to be on a tour with a Greek born Australian author. Bethlehem Georgellis authors and illustrates a series about an Australian Koala and his adventures with the gods of myths. She had one of her books

just leaving Tulsa Airport

Exotic National Costume

on board and the girls filmed her reading her latest book Zeus the Koala and the Peace Odyssey. Experiencing the food, the dance, the costuming, the scenery, the miles and miles of olive trees and more made for a trip of lifetime. Karla and Leslie are eager to share with their fellow teachers and all of the students of Hodson and anyone else who might be interested. Plans are in the making for a cultural event in the spring highlighting Greece and hopefully the many other countries that have helped to shape our world.

at e g a st heatre r e cent amphit an


Karla and a column

the entrance to stadium at Olym the pia

! n o n e h t r a P e at th

with auth or Be thleh em G eorge llis

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Mills Elementary

I Agree,

Bully Free!

S

tudents at Mill Expectations s Elementary know first h spent the firstmodel school doesn’t take and what it means to be “B ully Free”. This bullying lightl two weeks lear Students le y. In fa Great ning ab why she teacharned how to cope with b out bullying, the sciencect, Mrs. Brothers’ fourth gra If I can elimin es this curriculum, she statullies, stand up to them, an behind it, and its impact o de class people that caate some fears and help th ed, “Students tend to star d how to rebuild them. W n society. a bully-free cl n handle tough situationsem feel safe, then our soci t the year with a multiple sehen asked around and isassroom.” The unit ended and stand up to what isn ety will inherit a group of yo t of fears. ’t ri by displayed outs u ide their door creating a banner to declarght. Students also learn m ng ore for all to see. e that they wo n’t bully anyo in ne

This fourth grade class is taking a stand against bullying!

Nature Journals

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Declaring Creativity at M ills Elementary! The group po in the outdoosresclafsor a picture sroom.

M

rs. Runner’s 2nd /3rd very creative manne grade Multi-age class at Mills Elementa encouraged studentr using “Punctuation Station” curriculumry began the year by studying punctuat s to create declarativ ion in a . One activity include back to the classroom e sentences. d a nature creating declarative . These items were used during their While on the nature hike, students collehike. The hike activities such as thessentences about their nature item and discussion on declarative sentences. Studcted items to bring themselves to differe e allow students to correlate real worldconcluded the unit by creating a nature ents practiced The students’ highlig ntiated instruction in the classroom an experiences with their studies. These collage. Learning she facilitated each ht was seeing their teacher, Mrs. Runnerd reach more students in their preferredtypes of lessons lend lesson with energy an , wearing her Engine m d excitement! er hat and blowing heode of learning. r train whistle as

Enhance Learning D

uring the first fe learned throughwthweeks of school, Mrs. Bergeron’s Sensational ienc e use of Nature Journals, a conc and Mr. Paul’s multiage classroo ept learned over th m Jeff O. Mills e Workshop sponso The students mSc El e summer whens at red by the Unive ad e ob se rv they attended aementary rs ations using their ity of Tulsa in part captured observat se ne ns rs io hi es improve journalin ns using a digital camera. Expl while in the outdoor classroo p with local entities. g skills. A zoo trun or g sample jour m They drew in jo in our area. In ad k, from the Tulsa in nals online assist.ed urnals and di tio Zo n, o, th them as they wor provided an oppo e Tulsa Zoo presen Skills. Both were in ked to rt te un d year as the study scteractive and interesting. Studtwo programs to the students: Idity to study animal tracks common ents will continue entifying Animals ientific concepts fro to utilize their jour and Observation m Macro to Micro naling skills throug . hout the

Students get f items provided ace to face with by the Tulsa Z oo.

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Northeast Elementary 13

How would you like to custom order your own 2010 Camaro from Classic Chevrolet? It could be yours with only one winning $50.00 raffle ticket! Hurry now to buy your ticket! There are only 2,000 tickets available through the Northeast PTO and all First Bank of Owasso locations. All proceeds will go to Northeast Elementary to change the playground surfacing from pea gravel to a rubber, cushioned surface similar to the track surface. The winning ticket will be drawn on October 23rd during the NEE Fall Carnival. For more information contact Jennifer Rhames, NEE PTO President, at 918-625-9093.


connect the dots

Puzzle Mazes

word recognition

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15


16

Connect the dots counting by 2’s


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October 1-31, 2009 Sunday-Friday Noon to Dusk and Saturday’s 9:00 AM-Dusk

www.fumcowasso.org

Located behind First United Methodist Church of Owasso just off of Highway 169 & 106th Street North Please visit our website to see all the great activities going on throughout the month and to see the Missions the Patch helps support!

Hours: Mon-Fri.; 9:00-5:30 • Sat.; 9:00-11:30

Tags & Titles

Phone: 918.272.9000 • FAX: 918.371.8855

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Smith Elementary

Books for African Children

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summer mission trip to Africa led to the discovery of a major problem in a small library at the Happy Child Learning Center in Nalerigu, Ghana, Africa. The discovery was made by Sallie Kennedy, a retired teacher / reading specialist from Norman, Oklahoma, who was accompanied on the trip by her husband Lonnie, son Chris, and granddaughter Holly Johns. Lonnie and Sallie are the parents of Lea Ann Johns, Hayward Smith Elementary Library Media Specialist. Chris is her brother and Holly is her daughter. The problem discovered was the fact that the library had very few books. Since returning from Africa, Mrs. Kennedy has collected and sent several boxes of books to stock the shelves of the library. Holly Johns, now a senior at NSU, came to Smith Elementary and shared a Power Point presentation about the trip to several first grade classes. Mrs. Tami Hall, a first grade teacher and her students got excited about the possibility of helping with the project and collected books from their homes to send to Africa. They were joined by Mrs. James’ and Ms. January’s first grade classes as well. They also started a “Pennies for Postage” drive to raise money for the shipping fees as it is very expensive to ship boxes of heavy books to Africa. They presented their project in the cafeteria showcase. The showcase included many different artifacts from Africa that were collected by Mrs. Johns and Mrs. Batchelor, the music teacher at Hayward Smith Elementary. First grade students enjoyed learning interesting facts about African culture and the many different animals that live there.

citizenship

we love reading!

M

M

s. January’s 1st grade students have created personalized hats to wear to school on the day we celebrate their meeting of the monthly ng readi challenge of 10 books per month!

rs. Consalvi’s and Mr. Wilkins’ Classes studied the US Constitution. We were celebrating US Constitution week and US Constitution day which was Thursday September 17. We learned about the three branches of Government, Preamble, and the Bill of Rights. The students really enjoyed this mini Unit on Government. It is very important to teach about our government and also learn about the Life Principle of Citizenship. We learned that we have many privileges that we hope will never be taken away.

self portraits

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M

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s. James students drew self-portraits for Open House. They also filled out a sheet of paper with clues about them and put them out in the hall for parents to try to guess which portrait was their child’s. Children in the picture are: Chloe Wilkins, Tre Lewis, Courtney Conley, and Sage Anderson

fun team-building!

he third grade students at Smith Elementary participated in some fun team-building activities during the first days of school. Students were placed on class teams and competed against each other in some unique events. Students pictured are enjoying the Balloon Relay Race in which they had to run with a balloon between their knees to a given location then pop it for the next teammate to begin. Other events included the Hula Hoop Chain and Rock, Paper, Scissors Baseball. These events were a fabulous way to start off the new school year, allowing everyone to relax while getting to know their classmates and new teachers. The third grade teachers at Smith are Mrs. Sandy Cleary, Mrs. Cindy Muse, Mrs. Alisa Schroeder, and Mrs. Trina Haggadone.


geography!

Fifth graders at Smith Elementary started the year on the right foot by studying geography. Mrs. Reutlinger, Mrs. Crockett, and Mr. Sprague’s students expanded their knowledge by creating latitude/longitude globe balloons. Other fifth grade activities included creating a floor model of the latitude and longitude grid system.

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Stone Canyon Elementary 21

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elcome to Stone Canyon Elementary, Owasso’s newest elementary school; housing 340 K-5 students and 300 Pre-K students. The school is within the beautiful Stone Canyon Community at 177th E Ave. The schools unique design offers many distinctive ways to assist the teachers to create a more conducive learning environment. Designed in a pod layout; the nature center theme designates each pod. The insect distinction helps the younger students locate their classes easily while giving all students a sense of outdoors. Each pod is designed with a central gathering area to conduct group presentations or grade level instruction. The pod design allows teachers and students to focus on lessons with fewer distractions. Our dynamic faculty works together to educate students in academics and in key characteristics to become great leaders of Owasso. We would like to thank everyone for their help in getting Stone Canyon Elementary ready for the 09/10 year.

! n u f l l footba rd ss Mrs. Walters’ 3 grade clath wi ” us tio nc bu AM gets “R tball two Owasso varsity food an s ke players! Gage Dy over Matt Logsdon brought d an es ch wi nd sa am ice cre encouraged the kids tothe come out and support d Owasso Rams! Gage an Matt signed autographs and helped the third le graders with their Freck Juice projects!


Freckle Juice for

Everyone!

H

es? Mrs. ave you ever wanted Freckl ished fin rd Walters’ 3 grade class just the a two week novel study on y have all book Freckle Juice and the t the way decided they are happy jus ed many they are! Their study includ wrote their fun activities. Each student d typed own Freckle Juice recipes an worked They them in the computer lab. velop a de to s up gro e tiv in collabora d filmed new product and wrote an e groups their own commercials! Th vertise their also designed posters to ad groups all new product! After some sm all are we w ho t ou ab s discussion own ways, different and special in our Glad I Am the students created “I Am unit by ME!” posters. They ended the eckle Faces” decorating cookies with “Fr ” and drinking “Freckle Juice.

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Sevenrh Grade Center 23

! y h p a r g geo G

eography students experienced an activity called “From Globes to Maps” in Mrs. Faulk’s 7th Grade class.  Students worked with either an orange or a tennis ball to represent the globe.  Oranges were marked with the equator, prime meridian, and several continents.  They were then cut in half and had the middle scooped out, resulting in two hemispheres.  Then students flattened their “globes” finding that the globe could not be flattened without tearing.  Students with tennis balls were given a map that looked as if many parts were missing at the north and south poles.  After marking the equator and prime meridian, students glued the flat map to their tennis ball “globes”. Students discovered that the land was indeed all present, as the pieces of their maps came together at the poles.   Students discussed their results, and then looked at different map projections in the textbook, discussing the advantages and disadvantages of each.  The activity impressed upon students that maps cannot represent the earth with complete accuracy, although cartographers accomplish an amazing job!


new smartboards!

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ath teachers at the Owasso 7th Grade Center started the year off in full swing enjoying the benefits of their Smartboards. Pictured is Jake Williamson from Lauri Stewart’s math class while they are playing a game to review mean, median, mode and range. Fundraisers along with donations from local businesses and families made it possible for all 5 of the math teachers to purchase these Smartboards last fall. Students that normally will not speak out or come up to the front off class now find an interest in being a part of the activities. The learning becomes alive and significant to the students through enjoyable interaction. It also makes it much easier for the students to collaborate and help one another through solving various tasks. This type of learning makes it more meaningful for the students and they retain the information more successfully. Once they saw the incredible benefits there was no doubt but to acquire them. Now the upcoming bond election has added technology funds to make it possible to hopefully acquire Smartboards for every teacher in the district.

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Owasso  Mid High   School

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he Owasso High School Yearbook Staff is ready to “rope” in some amazing memories for the 2009-2010 yearbook. While the staff has already been hard at work on events that have taken place since school began in August, they are gearing up for yearbook sales which kicked off the first week of October. All mid-high and high school students should receive a yearbook order form in the mail, and ordering is as easy as returning the form by mail, or ordering online. This year, both schools are offering an incentive for ordering early. The beginning price for each book has been discounted from last year to encourage early orders. With each new ordering period, the price will increase. To get the best deal, order in October and secure your copy of the 2009-2010 yearbook! Online orders may be placed at www.jostensyearbooks.com.

! E D I R P M RA

S

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re Dallas Delk is all about howing off her homemade Ram attire, Sophomo h school celebrated school spirit! Both the high school and the mid-hig ed dress up days for each the start of school with “Howdy Week” and them omed the return of Owasso day of the week! Members of Student Council welc Both schools displayed every students and greeted new students to the district! to kick off the school year. students name within its halls! It was a great way


The Ram Academy is the alternative high school for the Owasso Public School System. We are a non-punitive dropout prevention, intervention, and recovery program designed to meet the needs of at-risk youth. Students are considered to be at-risk of dropping out of school for a variety of reasons having to do with their social background, academic background, and personal history. The Ram Academy provides these students with a caring, nurturing, nonjudgmental environment. We start each nine-week period with 75 students adding new students as seniors graduate out of the program. We serve approximately 120 students throughout the year. The Ram Academy is a NOTABLE program. We implement and follow state-mandated criteria for alternative education. We use an intake and screening process, we collaborate with state and local agencies, we provide individualized and effective instruction, we offer counseling and social services, we develop a graduation plan for each student, and we provide life skills instruction and art education. The Ram Academy has been recognized as an EXEMPLARY program by State Superintendent Sandy Garrett and by the State School Board Association.

Importance to the Community

Ram Alternative Academy

Who We Are and What We Do

The Owasso Ram Academy is important to this community and to society in general because we graduate students who would otherwise be dropouts. Each year nearly one million students fail to graduate with their class. Last year the Ram Academy graduated 41 Owasso youth. Statistically, high school dropouts are more likely than graduates to be unemployed or to change jobs frequently, to have poor health, to live in poverty, to become incarcerated, to need public assistance, to have children who drop out, and are less likely to vote or to participate in civic duties. According to Dr. Cecilia Rouse, an economist at Princeton University, each dropout costs the nation $260,000 over the course of his/her lifetime. Multiply our 41 graduates by $260,000 and you have over 10 million dollars in potential savings for the local, state, and national economies.

Mission Statement The Owasso Ram Academy’s mission is to motivate and to prepare at-risk students through close working relationships, a strong support system, encouragement, and the improvement of basic skills and self-esteem so that they can become productive members of the global community.

Curriculum

Core Classes: English I-IV, Algebra I, Intermediate Algebra, Geometry, Math of Finance, U.S. History, World History, Oklahoma History, Government, Biology, Physiology, Environmental Science, Physical Science Elective Classes: Computer Applications, Creative Writing, Current Events, Drama, Debate, Geography, Health, Leadership, Modern History, Music Appreciation, Novels, Poetry, Psychology, Speech, Sociology, Street Law, WWII Life Skills Rotation: Tribes, 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens, Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff for Teens, Study Skills, Financial Literacy Skills, Teaching Tolerance, Character Education, Career Exploration, Life Strategies for Teens. Extra-Curricular Activities: Student Council, Green Team

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Owasso High School

National Merit Semi-Finalists O

wasso HS is proud to recognize five seniors who meet the criteria for National Merit Semifinalists. The National Merit scholarship corporation released the names of students across the country that have achieved a qualifying score on the PSAT exam which places them in the top one percent of test takers. Students will now compete to become finalists in the competition. Criteria includes: SAT test scores, student grades, student essay and recommendation from the High School. These five students are William Baysinger, Jesse Kovacs, Emily Maxwell, Robert Shoup, and Brian West. Will is the son of Laura and Billy Baysinger. Will has been a

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member of the Varsity basketball team at OHS for three years. He plans on majoring in Nuclear Engineering and is considering MIT, and Washington University in St Louis as his college choices. His favorite class has been calculus. Will hopes to continue playing basketball at the collegiate level. Jesse is the son of Stephen and Lisa Kovacs. Jesse attended Hodson elementary for part of his elementary days here in Owasso. He hopes to major in International Relations or Psychology and is considering University of Washington, Georgetown, Boston College, Tulane and Wash. U in St Louis. His favorite class has been AP Psychology. As a hobby, Jesse is a guitar player and hopes to one day live outside the US. Emily is the daughter of Aimee Costlow. She has enjoyed English and French while in high school. Emily is an avid photographer

and intends to major in photography in college. She is considering Watkins College of Art, Design and Film, Savannah College of Art and Design or Rhode Island School of Design. Rob is the son of Bob and Terri Shoup. He attended Hodson elementary in Owasso. Rob plans on majoring in Pre-Med and is considering OU, OSU, TCU, Baylor, KU, TU, Washington, Duke and Stanford. His favorite high school class has been Calculus with Mrs Zamor. Brian is the son of Gary West and Janet West. He plans on majoring in Business Administration and is considering TU, Harvard and MIT. Brian’s favorite high school class has been AP Psychology. In his spare time Brian enjoys dancing the West Coast Swing.


4- Had been named either a Sudler Flag or Sudler Trophy recipient by the John Philip Sousa Foundation. The Flag is given for excellence in Concert Band Performance, the Trophy for excellence in Marching Band. Both are internationally recognized awards, and while only one was required for the purpose of The Instrumentalist article, the Owasso Band has been awarded BOTH in recent years. Only 5 bands nationwide can claim these 4 honors; Owasso is the only Oklahoma band of these 5. The other groups are: Lassiter High School from Marietta, GA, North Hardin High School from Radcliff, KY, Duncanville High School from Duncanville, TX and Westfield High School from Spring, TX. This Fall the band is preparing an exciting program entitled The City of Lights, based loosely on the city of Paris, France. Different sections of the

show include Monuments, Catacombs, Moulin Rouge and Le Tour. Included in the band’s competition schedule are performances at Union and Broken Arrow High Schools (October 3 and 10 respectively), Bands of America Super Regional at the Edward Jones Dome in St. Louis, MO (October 17) and the Bands of America Grand National Championships in the Lucas Oil Dome in Indianapolis, IN (November 12-14). The band recently hosted the Owasso Invitational Marching Contest on September 26 at Owasso High School. 20 of the finest bands in the region competed. The Pride of Owasso marched in exhibition at the end of finals. The band is led by drum majors Mark Johnson, Nathanael Rake, Amanda Davis and Stratton Ahlborn. The City of Lights includes fine solo performances by Kristi Smylie (flute), Victoria Dwyer (oboe), Kaylyn Hicks (bassoon), Whitney Campbell (bass clarinet), Kerry Hartley (clarinet), Sara Oxford (English horn), Sam Rauh (trumpet) and Amber Neighbors (mellophone). Highlights of the show include 17 students performing on concert French Horns (Catacombs), a red windmill (Moulin Rouge) plus a rousing finale (Le Tour; use your imagination!). Be sure to see the Pride of Owasso at a football game or band contest near you! For information about performances please visit www.prideofowasso.com or call 272-1856.

Owasso Band

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he 2009 Pride of Owasso begins another award-winning year with yet another accolade. The Instrumentalist magazine, a monthly publication for musicians and music educators, published a recent article about band rehearsal techniques. Owasso Head Band Director David Gorham was interviewed for the piece. In the article it was reported that only a handful of high school bands nationwide could claim the following: 1-Had marched in the Tournament of Rose Parade in Pasadena, California; 2- Had performed as an Honor Band at the Midwest Band and Orchestra Clinic (held in Chicago, IL each year, this clinic features performances and workshops by the best musicians and music educators on an international scale); 3- Had been named a Finalist at the Bands of America Grand National Championships (held each year in Indianapolis, IN Grand Nationals is recognized as the true national championship for marching bands);

! s e v i r r A r e h c a e T e s e n i h C w e N

Our new Chinese instructor Yao Yi Jiang at the Tulsa airport when we picked her up in early August. Pictured from left to right: Matt Roberts, OHS Principal; Yao Yi Jiang, Chinese instructor; Kathleen Wehmeyer, OHS Special Education teacher and host family; Leslie Wright, OHS French teacher and mentor.

Yao Yi and our Native American Student dancers. This was at a faculty luncheon before school started. Pictured from left to right: Josh Graham, Keetoowah; Grant Deer, Kiowa and Cheyenne; Yao Yi Jiang; Christian Rangel, Keetowah and Navajo; Brionna Graham, Keetoowah; and Savannah Waters, Ponca, Kiowa, and Creek.

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OWAsso Athletcs

Facilities update:

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at Owasso Public Schools


The Owasso Athletic Department wants to let the community know how happy we are with the progress of Owasso Schools. We are proud to announce that by the end of the semester we will be utilizing all of our new and upgraded facilities.

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he Wellness Center on the north end of the football field will open this fall and we will have an open house for the community once it is furnished. The Center will house the high school football team on the first floor along with the weight room. The new concession and visitor’s restroom are on the eastside of the first floor as well. The second floor will have the cardio weight room and also house the athletic training area for our athletes. We will have the large banquet room and coaches offices on the third floor. There are two classrooms and

multiple meeting rooms in the facility as well. The facility will serve hundreds of our student-athletes each school year. The facility is a beautiful addition to our high school campus and the Owasso patrons should be proud of the opportunities provided by the Owasso Wellness Center. The center’s weight room will also be available for our faculty and staff at a later date. There will be a small monthly fee and hours are yet to be determined but should be early morning and late afternoon. We have also moved into the addition on the east side of the high school gymnasium. It houses the Athletic offices, wrestling room and coaches offices and new basketball locker rooms. There is a new training room on the first floor as well as beautiful new lobby and concession. The second floor has a team film room and also a conference/hospitality room. The single story field house just southeast of the football field is being renovated to house girl’s soccer on the west end and cross country and track on the east end. There are new locker rooms

as well as coach’s offices in the facility. The present facility on the northwest corner of the football field will house 9th grade football and boys soccer. The weight room will continue to be so but will have new equipment added. With the addition of our new tennis courts at the 8th grade center and the facilities already in place at our other venues, Owasso Athletes can be proud to be a part of one of the finest districts in not only Oklahoma but in the Midwest. The October bond election will have important athletic upgrades on it as well. With the passing of the bond, we will put new turf on the football/soccer surface, new infield turf at our baseball field and a new surface on our track. Thank you for supporting Owasso Schools and Owasso Athletics.

Ram Pride!

Danny Hightower Owasso Athletic Director

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owasso

SCHOOL CALENDAR-2009-2010 FIRST QUARTER

 august 2009 S M T W T F 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 12 13 14 16 17 18 19 20 21 23 24 25 26 27 28 30 31

S 1 8 15 22 29

M

S M T W T 3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 24 25 26 27 28 45 Days Taught 4 Professional Days 31

FIRST QUARTER TOTALS

 september 2009 S

 january 2010

New Teacher Orientation...............................................August 12, 2009 Teachers Report (Professional Days)........... August 13,14,17,18, 2009 First Day of School (Wednesday).................................August 19, 2009 Labor Day.............................................................. September 07, 2009 Fall Break.............................................................. October 15, 16, 2009 Parent Teacher Conference......................................... October 19, 2009 End of First Quarter.................................................... October 23, 2009

3 Non-Calendar Days

SECOND QUARTER

 february 2010

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W

T

F

S

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

Start of Second Quarter.............................................. October 26, 2009 S Thanksgiving Holidays............................... November 25, 26, 27, 2009 End of Second Quarter............................................December 18, 2009 Winter Break......................................December 21 – January 01, 2010 7

13 14

15

16

17

18

19

SECOND QUARTER TOTALS

20 21

22

23

24

25

26

27 28

29

30

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S

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11 12

13

14

15

16

17

18 19

20

21

22

23

24

25 26

27

28

29

30

31

S

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T

W

T

F

S

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15 16

17

18

19

20

21

22 23

24

25

26

27

28

29 30

S

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T

F

S

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13 14

15

16

17

18

19

20 21

22

23

24

25

26

27 28

29

30

31

31

M

W

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S

1

2

3

4

5

6

8

9

10

11

12 13

37 Days Taught 14 15 Professional Days 21 22 13 Non-Calendar Days

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17

18

19 20

23

24

25

26 27

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S

1

2

3

4

5

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7

8

9

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12 13

14 15

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18

19 20

21 22

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25

26 27

28 29

30

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Start of Fourth Quarter..................................................March 22, 2010 Last Day for Students.....................................................May 27, 2010* 4 5 6 7 Last Day for Teachers (Professional Day)........................ May 28, 2010

1

2

3

8

9

10

THIRD QUARTER

Start of Third Quarter................................................. January 04, 2010 Martin Luther King Holiday........................................ January 18, 2010 Parent/Teacher Conference........................................February 12, 2010 President’s Day Break................................................February 15, 2010 End of Third Quarter......................................................March 12, 2010 Spring Break............................................................ March 15-19, 2010

THIRD QUARTER TOTALS

48 Days Taught 0 Professional Day  april 2010 7 Non-Calendar Days

FOURTH QUARTER

FOURTH QUARTER TOTALS

 december 2009

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82 Days Taught 4 Professional Days  march 2010 16 Non-Calendar Days

 november 2009

M

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FIRST SEMESTER TOTALS

 october 2009 S

F S 1 2 8 9 15 16 22 23 29 30

SECOND SEMESTER TOTALS

YEARLY TOTALS

Approved 11/10/2008

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11 12

13

14

15

16 17

18 19

20

21

22

23 24

29

30

45 Days Taught 1 Professional Day 25 26 27 28 0 Non-Calendar Days *4 Bad Weather Days Included  may 2010

93 Days Taught S M T W T F 1 Professional Days 7 Non-Calendar Days 3 4 5 6 7 4 Bad Weather Days 2

9

10

175 Days Taught 16 17 4 Bad Weather Days 5 Professional Days 23 24 23 Non-Calendar Days 30 31

11 18 25

12 19 26

13 20 27

S 1 8 14 15 21 22 28 29


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Date

9/4 9/11 9/18 9/25 10/2 10/9 10/15 10/23 10/30 11/6

7590 Owasso Expwy - 918.272.3012

Ram Football - 2009 Schedule Opponent

Muskogee Broken Arrow Jenks Enid (HC) Union U.S. Grant Ponca City Choctaw Yukon Stillwater

Place

Muskogee Owasso Jenks Owasso Union Owasso Ponca City Choctaw Owasso Owasso

12101 E. 96th St. N. - 918.376.9937

Time 7:30 7:30 7:30 7:30 7:30 7:30 7:30 7:30 7:30 7:30

11604 N. 135th E. Ave. - 918.371.0632


owasso_10-2009