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MICHAEL FORMAN

PORTFOLIO SEGMENT I

BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE

MASTER

OF

INTERIOR

DESIGN JULY 2013


michaelforman

42 W Newton Street, Apt 4-21 • Boston, MA 02118 954.551.0713 • michaelsforman@gmail.com

education

Boston Architectural College ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Candidate for Master of Interior Design, January 2012 - Present Suffolk University Law School ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Juris Doctor, cum laude, May 2009 ! Class Rank: Top 24%! ! Licensed to practice law in the states of Massachusetts and New York

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Boston, MA Boston, MA

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University of Florida ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, cum laude, May 2006 ! Major: Management, Minor: Entrepreneurship ! GPA: 3.85 (4.0 scale)

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Gainesville, FL

skills Design & Graphic Communication • Create plans, sections, and elevations using AutoCAD 2013 and by orthogonal hand-drafting. • Utilize SketchUp, Revit, Photoshop, and Microsoft Office. • Develop efficient room layouts, select furniture, fabrics, fixtures, lighting, and accessories. • Coordinate with contractors for residential demo and renovation of bathrooms and kitchens. • Create architectural models with wood, chipboard, corrugated cardboard, foam, and other medium. • Possess an advanced level of general computer and tech knowledge, with special regard for Apple products

experience !

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Jonathan Adler! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Boston, MA Design Associate! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! June 2012 – March 2013 • Worked daily with designers and homeowners to select custom furniture, textiles, lighting, and accessories. Provided complimentary in-home interior design services to Jonathan Adler clients. • Maintained and organized sales and custom order records, approval forms, and inventory transfers. • • Communicated regularly with furniture manufacturers, vendors of products, and various Jonathan Adler warehouses. Apple, Boylston Street Flagship Store!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Boston, MA Specialist! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! October 2009 – December 2011 • Provided customers with individually tailored solutions and extensive information on past and present technologies in an extremely fast paced environment. • Taught in-depth group workshops as well as individualized personal training sessions • Trained Apple Retail employees with a focus on building exceptional customer service skills, the ability to deal with ambiguity, and the confidence to efficiently utilize resources in order to find answers.


experience (cont’d.)!

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Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities, Legal Division ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Boston, MA Legal Intern! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! June 2008 – May 2009 • Performed extensive research on various areas of energy regulation including electricity deregulation, decoupling, and rate setting; drafted comprehensive memoranda advising the Department. • Synthesized recent Department rulings and created a searchable database for attorney use at hearings. Law Office of A. Joseph Ross ! ! ! ! Boston, MA Law Clerk ! ! ! July 2007 – October 2007 • Researched landlord and tenant issues related to residential real-estate transactions. • Drafted memoranda, motions, and 93A demand letters for submission to court and opposing council.

memberships, awards, & scholarships ASID Student Member! !

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Distinguished Oral Advocate (Oral Advocacy Competition, Suffolk University Law School)! !

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2007

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2006 - 2009 2002 - 2006

Trustee Academic Scholarship (Suffolk University Law School) ! ! Florida Bright Futures Scholarship (University of Florida) ! !

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2012 - Present


CONTENTS STUDIO WORK 11 17 27

Transcriptions: Musical Analysis The Body Sentient MIT Legatum Center Redesign

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The Charlesmark Hotel Redesign Medical Hotel

MATERIALS & METHODS 57

The Gallows Restaurant Study

LIGHTING DESIGN 63 63

Custom Fixture Design Retail Store Fit-Out


CONTENTS

OTHER WORK Freehand Drawing

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Rendering for Interior Design

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Color Theory

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PRACTICE

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A-1 STUDIO SPRING 2012

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SPRING 2012

A-1 STUDIO TRANSCRIPTIONS: MUSIC ANALYSIS INSTRUCTOR: MILA CHUN • DURATION: 3 WEEKS

INITIAL EXPLORATIONAL DIAGRAMS

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This studio project required students to transcribe music into architectural form. Using analysis as a critical tool, we repeatedly listened to a song and carefully identified relationships within the music. Those relationships were interpreted as graphic analytical drawings and continually reinterpreted through rigorous iterations in both two dimensional and three dimensional form.

I chose to analyze a piece by Philip Glass: “Koyaanisqatsi: Pruit Igoe” from Glass: Koyaanisqatsi, 1982

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INTERPRETIVE DRAWINGS WITH CHARCOAL Several attempts were made to create graphic notations of that “map� the musical relationships discovered. Distinct shapes were used to reference various instruments, while heavier markings convey the more intense and ominous sections of the piece.

Drawing 2

Drawing 3 Drawing 1

A more formal iteration was developed and drafted based on the analytical drawings above.

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An axonometric drawing is used to better convey the relationships between each component of the analysis. Here, the long rectangular shapes of varying thicknesses and heights represent the loud and powerful “blasts” of sound from the tuba, which to me signified the most important components of the piece. The “S” shapes and tilted lines that run along the bottom of the drawing represent the short, repetitive beat that plays throughout the entirety of this section. This beat serves to anchor the music, act as a datum, and connect each “blast” to the next. The floating rectangular shapes occurring on either side of the prominent pillars represent quick trumpet blares. Working in elevation, plan, and section, the design is continually developed in an attempt to move away from thinking about the music, and focusing more on defining and ordering space.

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After further analysis of the section, plan, and elevation sketches, another axonometric iteration is developed which takes into consideration relative scale, hierarchy, datum, threshold, transparency, and layering. I began to define space within the prominent rectangular “blasts” and considered how the “S” shapes might interact with them. Openings within these rectangles begin to define a path of travel throughout the piece. Equally important is the negative space and voids created.

Freehand Axonometric

Section Cuts

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Drafted sections of the axonometric drawing help us comprehend the shapes and spaces as a part of a sequence. They also allow us to begin considering how each space might be understood at a human scale.

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FINAL PLAN & ELEVATION

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A final iteration of the musical transcription is carefully drafted making use of line weight to display each element’s materiality, thickness, and opacity.


In these final drawings, it becomes evident that musical analysis has been left behind and architectural thinking now embraced. In my efforts to conceptualize three dimensional space, it became crucial to think of the these shapes and spaces as a system of components working together at a human scale.

FINAL DESIGN

AXONOMETRIC

SECTION CUTS

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SPRING 2012

A-1 STUDIO THE BODY SENTIENT INSTRUCTOR: MILA CHUN • DURATION: 5 WEEKS

In this project, students were required to invent techniques of analytical drawing to pursue a close study of the body, bodily motions, and the ways space is comprehended through the body. From those studies and the development of a wearable device that demonstrated the findings of our studies, we ultimately designed a threshold in the existing lobby of The BAC.

3 The motion I chose to analyze was the act of pushing a desk. The above photos (when looked at from right to left) break down that motion into a sequence of five distinct moments. Using those photographs I developed the orthogonally projected sketches below which allowed me to extract information that I otherwise wouldn’t have understood. My analytical drawings explored the concepts of force, tension, angular relationships, I looked at the movement of my head and followed my gaze from start to finish. I analyzed how how the movement of my back follows and differs from the movement of my arms. Finally, I looked at how pressure and tension flowed throughout my body (from my feet to my back, to my hands) in order to move the desk.

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The above study shows how my back, head, and resulting gaze work together throughout the motion. It also demonstrates how the movement of my body with the desk creates areas of defined space. After exploring several concepts, I decided to focus on an apparent connectedness between the forward motion of my arms and the upward tilt of my head. I found that they moved as if they were one, and seemed directly tied to each other. My head moved not because it is necessary to look up when my arms moved forward, but instead be cause I wanted to see where the desk was headed as I pushed. The more I considered how my body joined with the surrounding space, the more apparent a rotational motion became. As seen in the diagrams below, my body seemed to carve out a circular pattern as i pushed the desk forward.

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The purpose of the wearable body device I developed was to further explore the connectedness between the motion of my arms and my head / gaze. I also wanted to put a unit of measurement to that connection.

Head Strap

The device consisted of straps attached to my head and wrists that joined a nylon rope. The rope ran along my neck and arms and through a tube that “measured� this motion based on how far the rope traveled through it.

Measurement Tube Strapped to Back

Wrist Straps

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NOTES AND EXPLORATORY SKETCHES

In addition to looking at how my body joined with space to create a circular motion, I also examined the physical joints that connected the parts of my body device to each other. In a deeper analysis, I chose to focus on the knots that connected the ropes. I began by studying the general idea of knots: what they do and how they work. I came away with an idea of a collapsing / tightening of space found in the center of a knot as opposite ends or a rope are pulled.

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LOBBY THRESHOLD NOTES

Based on my studies of the “joints� between body, context, and device, I translated these relationships and fi n d i n g s i n t o t h e d e s i g n o f a threshold: an explicit or implicit boundary (joint) between to types of spaces. This threshold was to be located in the lobby of The BAC building on Boylston Street.

This threshold design was required to define an area for movement, and an area for rest. Here I used the concepts of rotation and collapsing space to translate my joint analysis into an architectural proposal.

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LOBBY THRESHOLD NOTES

Curved wall in center of room helps define a rotational circulation area.

Haphazardly crossed design is graphically reminiscent of the interweaving of material found in a knot.

Study areas inside wall b e c o m e i n c re a s i n g l y “tighter� to suggest the idea of collapsing space.

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FINAL DRAFTS

Dual flow pathway represents opposing forces

ELEVATIONS

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PLAN

Sunken level = collapsing space


DRAFTS + MODEL

Modeling the final threshold design helps one to understand these concepts from multiple angles, and easily allows the room to be envisioned at the human scale.

FINAL DESIGN

The final result is a room that conveys the concepts of rotation and collapsing space not only visually, but in an experiential way.

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ID STUDIO I SUMMER 2012

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SUMMER 2012

ID STUDIO I MIT LEGATUM CENTER REDESIGN INSTRUCTOR: ELAINE BELLO & CRANDON GUSTAFSON • DURATION: 3 WEEKS

ABOUT THE LEGATUM CENTER: The Legatum Center for Development and Entrepreneurship was founded at MIT on the belief that economic progress and good governance in low-income countries emerge from entrepreneurship and innovations that empower ordinary citizens. The Center administers programs and convenes events that promote and share discourse on bottom-up development.

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The Center is seeking a redesign of their current office space that will optimize communication and exchange of ideas between and among the Fellows.

DESIGN REQUIREMENTS After meeting with the Director of the Legatum Center as well as several Fellows, the client’s expectations and desires for the space became clear: • The priority is creating a space for the Fellows to work, collaborate, escape, and create. • Fellows want an open, collaborative space for getting work done. The ability to meet as a group is key. • Fellows want a large area to meet informally / socially with each other and guests (an event space). • The flexibility to accommodate a two person meeting or a 15 person meeting is ideal. • The space should feel professional enough to host meetings with investors, but not so “business-like”

to stifle creativity or innovation’

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PHOTOS OF EXISTING CONDITIONS

Open dining / gathering area off of kitchen

The Legatum Center’s current space is largely unfinished and lacks any sort of cohesive design concept. Mismatched, handme-down furniture fills each room and offers little to no opportunities for interactive collaboration.

Large open space with conference table

Cubicle area near meeting rooms

DESIGN GOAL AND CONCEPT My goal was to create an office environment with very distinct spaces for different purposes: an informal cafe / social gathering space, a dedicated work space, an open collaboration space / event space, and a lounge area for Fellows. However, while each space is designed to serve a specific function, they should all offer the ability to work, socialize, and collaborate. Fellows should never feel that they are in the ‘wrong spot’ for the task they are working to accomplish. No matter where you are, you can get it done. 28

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PRELIMINARY SPACE PLANNING Public Spaces

Private Offices

In order to stay within a realistic budget, few walls will be moved. Instead, current spaces will be repurposed and redefined to create a more cohesive and collaborative environment.

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All central areas designed to be designated as either work space or meeting space

Offices for administrators and directors are places mostly around the perimeter of the space, to free up the center of the office for open collaboration


SKETCHES AND PERSPECTIVES “Cafe” Area off of Kitchen

Upon entering the Legatum Center through it’s lobby, the first space encountered is a large gathering room off of the kitchen. Since this is a visitor's initial introduction to the Center, I wanted to create an inviting and disarming space. Designed to resemble a cafe, this area will be a very informal, and casual space where one can eat, work, or have a spontaneous meeting with a colleague.

“Work” Area Just past the kitchen / gathering area is a large corner section filled with cubicles. While ideal for a dedicated work space for Fellows, the current layout and furniture section discourages collaboration. interaction. Configurable, multi-person desks with no dividers would promote communication and interaction.

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FINAL FLOOR PLAN

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REFLECTED CEILING PLAN

2x2 Florescent Light

2x4 Florescent Light

Pendant Fixture

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CAFE / SOCIAL GATHERING Much like the kitchen is the heart of the home, the Cafe will be the heart of the Lagtum Center. The purpose of this space is to inspire socialization, collaboration, and innovation through a relaxing and familiar setting. Curved banquettes and cafe style seating remind fellows of the casualness of a cafe. Large center table with outlets an workstations offers an ideal location for collaboration; the accompanying benched seating aims to keep people engaged through active posture

Ash Pendant by Tom Raffield

Hampton Line of Banquettes by AGATI Furniture

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Site Collection by Davis Furniture

Perspective A 33

Crack Bowl Light by Korean Designer Kwon Jae Min


COLLABORATION / EVENT SPACE

B

This large, open space will serve two functions: - Fellows collaboration space - Large event space

Light moveable furniture pieces by Turnsone’s Campfire Collection make the space highly configureable to suit all fellows needs, be it a two person meeting or group brainstorming session. Ottomans, couches, writeable tables, and privacy screens all inspire and encourage collaboration and active gathering

Perspective B

The Campfire Collection, by Turnstone (Steelcase)

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DEDICATED WORKSPACE

C

The Bivi Collection by Turnstone (Steelcase)

Perspective C

Located in a more secluded area of the office, the fellows’ dedicated workspace is intended larger or long term projects. Configureable desks allow fellows to set up a semi-permanent workspace for an extended period of time. Materials can be left out or put away in private drawers. Surrounded by offices and meeting rooms, this space offers a more of a “work” tone than the more social spaces such as the cafe or event space. However, collaboration is still inspired and encouraged through the configureable multi person desks which offer a built in sofa for spontaneous meetings and interactions.

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FELLOWS LOUNGE

This area of the Legatum Center is designed to be a retreat for Fellows. Furnished with sofas and lounge chairs, this space is intended to offer the ability to relax and take a break from work. Although this is the one area of the office not intended for work, the lounge still offers the ability to meet, collaborate, and converse if necessary. A large table and conversational style seating provide an ideal forum for productivity.

A new dividing wall is to be erected separating the event / collaboration space from the lounge. A combination of glass and wooden slats provide the ideal amount of privacy while not severely secluding its inhabitants from the rest of the office.

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ID STUDIO I FALL 2012

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FALL 2012

ID STUDIO II CHARLESMARK HOTEL REDESIGN INSTRUCTOR: ELAINE BELLO & CRANDON GUSTAFSON • DURATION: 3 WEEKS

PROJECT GOAL: The purpose of this project was to redesign and update a small hotel in the center of Back Bay, Boston. Self described as a “modern European boutique hotel,” the Charlesmark suffers from a number of design issues related to confusing space planning, poor furniture layout, and outdated finishes.

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EXISTING CONDITIONS

The reception desk is small and easily missed, as it blends seamlessly into a small, long hallway of dark wood paneling.

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A narrow and unmarked set of uninviting steps separates the groundlevel bar/reception desk from an expansive lounge area.

Most of the ground level space is taken up by an enclosed bar, which doesn’t open until 5pm, resulting in “dead space.”

Although the upper level offers ample seating and room to gather, it remains greatly underutilized by hotel guests


DESIGN INSPIRATION

A welcoming and clearly defined reception area

Open spaces with clustered seating, encouraging guests to linger

Modern and innovative backlit materials.

Layered, strategic lighting that adds depth and highlights paths & focal points. 40

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INITIAL SPACE-PLANNING SKETCHES Preliminary Space Planning / Defining Function Areas • Maintain current location of bar, but decrease total space devoted to that area • Enlarge entry / reception area to create a proper “lobby” • Relocate stairs to upper level, and push back start of that area by several feet

Location of Diving Structures and Stairs • Consider relocation of wall that divides bar and reception area • Incorporate seating into reception area • Rectangular reception desk design design along East wall

Furniture Layout • Remove dividing wall entirely to create one large great room for lobby / bar • Incorporate multipurpose seating that serves both guests checking in as well as bar-goers • Develop conversational seating areas on second floor to draw hotel guests upstairs.

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CIRCULATION PATHS

CURRENT

PROPOSED 42

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FINAL FLOOR PLAN

FURNITURE & FINISHES SELECTIONS

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FINAL PERSPECTIVES

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FALL 2012

ID STUDIO II MEDICAL HOTEL INSTRUCTOR: ELAINE BELLO & CRANDON GUSTAFSON * DURATION: 6 WEEKS

PROJECT GOAL: For this project, our client was a mid-priced hotel located near Boston’s Logan Airport. The hotel has been approached by Mass General Hospital to offer accommodations to medical tourists. While still functioning as a general purpose hotel open to all, our redesigned hotel would cater especially to those traveling to Boston for medical purposes.

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Students were required to select a specific type of patient to design for when developing concept, layout, and finishes. Specific deliverables included designs for an extended stay family-style suite with an ability to house at least four individuals, as well as designs for a new lobby and front entry area.

PATIENT: My medical hotel facility has been designed to cater to cancer patients and their families. Cancer treatment can be an incredibly long and arduous process, often requiring daily or weekly trips to the hospital for various therapies and checkups. Those who do not live close to MGH could mitigate travel time by checking in her long term. Additionally, my hotel design would provide onsite access to common infusion therapies and other medical services as is now becoming common with such facilities. 45

SITE LOCATION:


DESIGN INSPIRATION

CONCEPT AND GOALS:

PERSPECTIVE SKETCHES

With a “high-end nature� concept driving my design, I started by keeping these goals in mind: Utilize the innate healing power of nature. Preserve patient dignity and privacy, while offering an option for socialization. Design to "drive away fear." Implement universal design to create a space both patients and able bodied individuals can enjoy.

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INITIAL SPACE-PLANNING SKETCHES Keeping in mind that healthy family members would also be an important client of the hotel, it was crucial to include amenities that the average guest would enjoy, such as a restaurant, fitness center, retail shopping, and bar, While health, safety, and accessibility were of paramount concern in laying out the hotel, it was also of great importance to design a space in no way resembled a medical facility. By designing to “drive away fear,” my goal was to make patients forget where they were, and why there were there. Since they’re in a hotel, why not make them feel as if they are on vacation?

Separating the highly public spaces from those only frequented by patients and their families, privacy can be ensured and patient dignity can be maintained.

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The circulation paths of various types of guests were considered, and areas of intersection were addressed by providing ample room for uninterrupted travel.


All medical facilities, (including infusion therapy rooms) are located in a secluded wing of the hotel, occupied only by those undergoing treatment.

At the entrance to the medical facility wing is are patient lounge areas to ease the transition from hotel to doctor.

The extended stay family suites are located close to the patient lounge and medical facilities. They are also quite distant from other hotel rooms, to ensure privacy.

The lobby has been turned into a large, open, and inviting space that will dramatically welcome visitors.

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FINAL RENDERED FLOOR PLAN

Additional Guest Rooms

Medical Facilities

Pool

Fitness Center

Retail Extended Stay / Family Suites

Kitchen Lobby

Offices Restaurant 49


CHEMOTHERAPY INFUSION ROOM

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PERSPECTIVE A While many cancer patients prefer privacy and personal space during times of treatment, just as many often find solace undergoing chemotherapy in a social setting. Research indicates that for many, the camaraderie experienced in receiving infusion therapy can make the unpleasant experience much more bearable and even translate to faster recovery times. This infusion room offers the flexibility of group or semi-private therapies using moveable dividing walls between chairs. Patients are immersed in nature through the indoor floor to ceiling terrarium, as well via the large windows overlooking an outdoor garden. Wall Veneer

Flooring

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PATIENT LOUNGE AREAS

PERSPECTIVE A A

Stone Feature in Floor

Flooring These areas are intended to be a retreat for patients. The patient lounge (pictured at bottom) and garden viewing area (pictured left) both offer a relaxing, semi-private space for socialization with other individuals also seeking treatment. The lounge area consists of comfortable sofas and chairs, and provides an ideal place for group conversation or games with fellow patients and their families. The garden viewing area is made up of brightly colored lounge chairs that overlook a lush garden space. The floor to ceiling windows serve to seamlessly connect the sterile lounge with the garden, bringing the outside in and connecting patients with nature.

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FAMILY SUITES / EXTENDED STAY Kitchen

Accessible Bathrooms This sample “Family Suite� offers an ideal living situation for a family that has been uprooted from their homes while the patient undergoes long term treatment. Located away from the standard hotel suites for non medical guests, these suites offer a private, homelike experience complete with the same amenities they might find in their own home. Accessible kitchens and bathrooms ensure that guests who may find themselves in wheelchairs during their stay will be able to access these amenities.

Master Bedroom

Living Room

Private Bedroom

Double Bedroom Upholstery

Flooring

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LOBBY / RECEPTION FLOOR PLAN As the first space a guest encounters upon entering the hotel, the lobby and reception area immediately convey the calming nature concept that drives this entire hotel design.

B

The high end finishes and social atmosphere strive to encourage guests to forget that they are there for unpleasant reasons, and instead embrace the idea of vacation / retreat. Rich, natural materials such as wood and stone evoke a connection to nature. Two large rectangular seating areas reminiscent of a campfire offer a fun setting for socialization. Groups of conversational style seating and a lobby bar also encourage interaction.

A

Upholstery

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Veneer for Campfires

Flooring


LOBBY PERSPECTIVES

PERSPECTIVE A Reception desk

PERSPECTIVE B Camp fire inspired seating area

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MATERIALS &METHODS FALL 2012

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FALL 2012

MATERIALS & METHODS GALLOWS RESTAURANT STUDY INSTRUCTOR: KARIN DAX

PROJECT GOAL: As a part of a semester long project, students were required to choose a space that we found inspiring, and research/explore the materials used in realizing its concept. Further, we were asked to detail and model a specific component of the space, examining how it was constructed.

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I chose to study The Gallows Restaurant in the South End.

Designed by architect Stephen Sousa, The Gallows is a South End gastro-pub located where actual city gallows once stood in the 1600s. To convey a a sense of history while maintaining a high end aesthetic, Sousa thoughtfully mixed aged materials like reclaimed wood, copper, and iron, with modern touches of leather, cork, and hand blown glass. An unexpected implementation of custom light fixtures provides a warm, inviting glow. 57


Rendered Dining Room Perspective

Rendered Plan

Rendered Elevation

DINING ROOM WALL SCONCE

I chose to more closely examine the restaurant’s unique dining room wall sconces. Planks of reclaimed pine from an old barn line the walls and randomly peel pack to reveal an unexpected light source.

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BRAD FINISHING NAILS

HAND DRAWN VIEWS OF SCONCE

BRICK WALL RECLAIMED PINE

1x2 FURRING STRIPS

Elevation

Section KERF CUTS

Detailed Section 59


MODEL These wall sconces have become an iconic part of The Gallows’ decor, and their construction is one of the more interesting elements in the space to ponder. The hand drawn elevation and section to the left explains how the seamless look was achieved. The exploded detail revels what materials were used. Here, drafting skills and rendering skills were put to the test in order to cleanly and accurately convey material differences.

Constructing a model of cardboard, chipboard, and foam blocks, helped greatly in comprehending exactly how the materials fit together to create the sconce.

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LIGHTING DESIGN SPRING 2013

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SPRING 2013

LIGHTING DESIGN

CUSTOM FIXTURE DESIGN INSTRUCTOR: AMBER HEPNER * DURATION: 4 WEEKS

DESIGN CHALLENGE:

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PROPOSED SOLUTION:

I chose to use the drum stick as my main source of inspiration in creating this fixture. The beat of a drum stick is a loud and powerful sound, that when multiplied and controlled, creates a singular cohesive rhythm. Using hundreds of “drum sticks,” I wanted to create a light fixture that represented the essence of a drum beat: hundreds of individual pieces or beats that when looked at as a whole, form something beautiful.

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Design an electric powered luminaire that incorporates music as a theme. A hanging pendant whose shape and resulting light distribution captures the controlled chaos of percussion.


FIXTURE DESIGN The entire structure consists of dowels of varying thicknesses and lengths, held together by a combination of wood adhesive and copper wire. Though each piece is seemingly secured to the next in a chaotic and haphazard way, the overall shape of the structure is intended to mimic that of a traditional chandelier.

PRELIMINARY SKETCHES 64

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A core structure is first formed by securing the largest dowels to each other with copper wire.

PLAN

S u b s e q u e n t l y, various smaller dowels are glued on top, making the core appear more substantial.

30�

Smaller dowels glued to core

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ELEVATION 16 gauge lamp wire

15�

Largest dowels secured with copper wire here.

Keyless light socket (Max Wattage:660)

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FINAL DESIGN

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SPRING 2013

LIGHTING DESIGN

RETAIL STORE FIT-OUT INSTRUCTOR: AMBER HEPNER * DURATION: 8 WEEKS

For this project, students were asked to develop a design concept for a retail boutique that focuses on lighting strategies to best highlight and display their products.

CONCEPT In developing a lighting concept for this retail store, I’ve envisioned a client (and store clientele) that is young, modern, and sophisticated. Their aesthetic is decidedly urban yet vintage. The overall feel for the space should be moody, dramatic, and industrial. However, I want the lighting to add a modern touch, and be instrumental in creating numerous specific focal points that are the products.

The overall lighting concept for my space can be described as geometric and dramatic. While the space’s ambient lighting will be somewhat dark and dim, accent lighting on walls and the ceiling will act almost as artwork, creating visual interest in shapes and patterns that mimic the store’s architecture and display cases. Glowing forms and backlight panels direct patrons as to where to look, where to walk, and what to explore. Display areas for products will use much brighter lighting methods to showcase the merchandise, as well as give customers a practical setting for examining it.

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PRELIMINARY SKETCHES

Through the use of inspirational images and sketching, I developed a number of methods for creating ambient light, displaying products, creating bold graphics, and connecting the lighting scheme with existing architecture.

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INITIAL SPACE PLANNING RCP

Over all space is open-concept. Main display areas are located on the east and west walls, the cash register against the real wall, and seating in the center surrounded by custom floating display stands. Ambient light provided by two sets of rectangular track lights. Task lighting above register provided by three pendants. Display wall shelves to be lit from within, while display stands boast a lit geometric graphic design.

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The floor plan and RCP highlight the furniture layout, as well as the the light sources located on the ceiling and ground.

FLOOR PLAN

Register

Inset Display Walls

Pendant Lights

RCP

Track Lighting

Bench Seating Floating Display Stands

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ELEVATION SIDE WALL (EAST)

Tops of Inset Display Shelves: - LED recessed lighting to provide direct downlighting of products on display

Bottom & Sides of Inset Display Shelves:

MATERIALS RENDERING

-Glass panels with fluorescent tubes behind them

Custom Display Stands: - Softly lit light strips travel around geometry of the display stand

LIGHTING RENDERING

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ELEVATION REAR WALL

Positionable Track Lighting: - Spot products on standalone display cases - Spot art displayed along walls - General ambient light for space

MATERIALS RENDERING

Graphic Linear Panels: - Back lit frosted panels offset from the wall provide art-like accent lighting that highlights texture of back wall

Industrial Hanging Pendant: - Provide task lighting for register

LIGHTING RENDERING

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FIXTURES INDUSTRIAL PENDANT LIGHT CUSTOM DISPLAY STANDS

RECESSED LED LIGHTING FOR TOP OF DISPLAY WALL INSETS

FLORESCENT SHELF FOR BOTTOM OF DISPLAY WALL INSETS

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SUSPENDED TRACK LIGHTING SYSTEM


FINAL DESIGN PERSPECTIVES

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OTHER WORK 20122013

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SPRING 2012

FREEHAND DRAWING

STILL LIFE / MIXED MEDIA INSTRUCTOR: MIKE DANIELS

Freehand drawing helps hone the essential skill of observation. Drawing from life forces us as designers to see things, places, and people as they are, and allows us to transcribe those details to paper.

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FALL 2012

RENDERING FOR

INTERIOR DESIGN INSTRUCTOR: LINDA WORKS

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MARKER + COLORED PENCIL


WATER COLOR

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WATER COLOR 87


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WATER COLOR 88

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SPRING 2013

COLOR THEORY

EXPERIMENTS&OBSERVATIONS INSTRUCTOR: MAUREEN FINLAY

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TRANSPARENCY Color Aid paper is used to create the illusion of transparency, depth, and space. Four overlapping hues generate three levels of transparency. 89


ADVANCING/RECEDING This experiment required us to work with the directional tendencies and spatial characteristics of color relationships in order to create compositions that demonstrate the appearance of “advancing” and “receding.”

ADVANCING

RECEDING 90

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COLOR RELATIONSHIPS

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In this experiment, the roles and proportions of hues in a single composition are shifted, altering its visual balance. The composition’s mood and spatial perception changes as the background, dominant, and accent colors change.


COLOR INTERACTION/ BEHAVIOR

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Goal: Develop a two dimensional geometric form with value and hue to create the appearance of multiple three dimensional forms, space, depth, and transparency. The design must provide the perception of open areas, closed areas, solid and transparent surfaces, color balance, and the dimensional tendencies of color use.

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COLOR AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT For the final Color Theory experiment, we were directed to develop two contrasting proposals for a specific tenant type in a built environment. The goal was to use color to sculpt the physical, perceptual, and emotional character of the space. The strength of our color relationships would ultimately determine the success of our concepts. I chose to design two types of pizza restaurants: 1) A relaxing and inviting sit down restaurant where patrons could enjoy a leisurely meal. 2) A hectic and uncomfortable take out joint in which diners have no desire to linger.

SIT DOWN PIZZA RESTAURANT

TAKE-OUT PIZZA RESTAURANT 93


FINAL DESIGN

The key to a calming and enjoyable dinging experience was to create a space that feels larger and more spacious than it actually is, while still implementing visually stimulating focal points. My final sit-down restaurant design utilized mostly cool colors that harmonize well, and make the space feel large. The rear wall is a lighter shade than the side walls causing the back of the restaurant to recede, making the room feel deep. The neutral grey floor is slightly darker than any of the other walls, anchoring the space and contrasting with the pure white ceiling.

In order to create an environment in which patrons would want to “get in” and “get out,” I designed a space that feels cramped, chaotic, and impossible to relax in. The take out restaurant features bold, dark hues on the walls and ceiling, making the restaurant feel smaller. A dark purple rear wall and ceiling cause those elements to advance uncomfortably, while heavy black furniture scattered throughout the room makes the space feel cluttered.

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PRACTICE 20122013

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PRACTICE AT THE BAC It wasn’t very long after I graduated from law school that I realized I wanted to do something else. It’s not that I didn’t enjoy law or find the legal field interesting. It was that I finally realized I had been suppressing a side of me that dreamed of doing something creative; that was fascinated by design and architecture; and that wanted to absolutely love whatever it was I was going to be doing every day of my life for the next 50 years. The BAC’s concurrent approach to education was one of the biggest reasons I decided to take the plunge and follow my passions by enrolling in the Master of Interior Design program. The ability to work toward a degree while still earning a living was absolutely crucial for someone like me. But perhaps more importantly, the immediate and requisite first-hand exposure to the design field made me feel confident that I would be doing everything I could to make the transition into this new career as smooth and efficient as possible. Balancing full time school and (near) full time work is tough. But after a year of doing it, I can honestly say I can’t imagine taking a different approach. With no prior training or education in the arts, everything I am being exposed to now is brand new to me. And being able to experience design from different sides (the working world and the academic world), has forced me to become totally immersed in the field. Recently the education I’ve gotten from the BAC has greatly supplemented my work at Jonathan Adler, and vice versa. For example, taking a Materials and Methods class while having to discuss fabric selections with Jonathan Adler clients has helped ensure I’m providing them with good advice. Similarly, constantly having to help different clients with space planning issues has given me excellent practice that can directly be applied to my studio projects. The fact that I am constantly working with real life clients and design professionals encourages me to take my experiences here at the BAC just as professionally. I am excited that I have the opportunity to immediately apply the things I am learning in class to my working life, and look forward to furthering my career as quickly as possible.

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CLIENT: TANYA This Jonathan Adler client sought assistance in redecorating her current dining room. The client provided me with photos and dimensions of her space, and we worked together to arrive at a color palette that matched the rest of her home. I presented her with several furniture layout options as well as upholstery choices.

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Upholstery Options for Dining Chairs 100

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CLIENT: SUSAN

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Susan approached Jonathan Adler for assistance in redecorating her living room. She wanted to drastically update almost all of her major furniture pieces, while still maintaining a mid-century modern feel. Working with her current rug and two side chairs, I selected a new sofa, modular entertainment set, and an oversized coffee table.

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CLIENT: SHELBY I assisted this Jonathan Adler client with selecting a set a lamps to accompany a sofa and console table she had recently acquired. Using 3-D modeling software, I was able to help her better visualize how the pieces would work together in her living room.

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