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How To Get The Most Out of Your Ice Cream Maker A
Mini‐Guide
Full
of
Tips,
Professional
Secrets
and
Advice
 (That
You
Won’t
Find
in
the
Manual)
 
 by
 Homemade-ice-cream-recipes.com


How To Get The Most Out Of Your Home Ice Cream Maker 
 2
 


Whether
this
is
your
very
first
ice
cream
maker
or
not,
I’ve
put
this
 mini­guide
together
for
you
to
help
you
understand
how
your
home
ice
 cream
maker
works,
so
that
you
can
consistently
produce
fabulous
ice
 cream
for
you
and
your
family
to
enjoy.
 
 It
has
been
my
experience,
through
years
of
experience
with
all
types
ice
 cream
machines,
that
the
instructions
that
the
manufacturer
includes
in
 the
manual
just
don’t
cover
everything
that
can
go
wrong.

 
 The
tips
and
professional
secrets
here
are
the
result
of
years
and
years
of
 making
ice
cream
for
my
family
and
friends,
and
for
the
customers
who
 frequented
my
restaurants.

 
 It
is
with
great
pleasure
that
I
share
them
with
you
in
this
little
guide.
 
 I’ve
tried
to
cover
every
possible
situation,
but
if
you
have
any
questions
 that
this
guide
hasn’t
answered,
just
post
them
on
my
Homemade
Ice
 Cream
Recipes
website,
and
I
will
answer
them
personally.



 



 
 


Enjoy!


Gina


NOTE:

Throughout
this
guide,
“ice
cream”
includes
frozen
yogurt,
sorbet,
sherbet,
etc.


TABLE
OF
CONTENTS
 
 SEMI­AUTOMATIC
ELECTRIC
ICE
CREAM
MAKERS
…………………….
Pages
3
to
7
 AUTOMATIC
ICE
CREAM
MAKERS
……………………………………………...
Pages
8
to
10
 HAND
CRANK
ICE
CREAM
MAKERS…………………………………………….
Pages
11
to
14
 
 
 
 
 Copyright
©
–
www.homemade‐ice‐cream‐recipes.com



How To Get The Most Out Of Your Home Ice Cream Maker 
 3
 
 



12
TIPS
FOR
GETTING
THE
MOST
OUT
OF
YOUR
 SEMI­AUTOMATIC
ELECTRIC
ICE
CREAM
MAKER
 


By
“semi­automatic”,
I
mean
the
kind
of
electric
ice
cream
machine
that
 requires
you
to
freeze
the
canister
separately.

 
 Due
to
its
reasonable
cost
and
very
good
results,
it’s
the
most
commonly
 used
type
of
home
ice
cream
maker
today.

 
 This
is
what
some
of
them
look
like:
 
 


Left
to
right:
Cuisinart
ICE‐20
Frozen
Yogurt
Ice
Cream
Sorbet
Maker;
Rival
 GC8101‐WN
1‐Quart
Gel
Canister
Ice
Cream
Maker;
Cuisinart
ICE‐40
Flavor
Duo
 Frozen
Yogurt
Ice
Cream
Sorbet
Maker



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Copyright
©
–
www.homemade‐ice‐cream‐recipes.com



How To Get The Most Out Of Your Home Ice Cream Maker 
 4
 


There
is
another
type
of
manual
ice
cream
maker
that
works
on
the
same
 principle,
but
it’s
not
electric.
This
advice
applies
to
that
type
as
well.

 
 Here
is
a
picture
of
that
other
type:
 
 


1‐Quart
Hand‐Cranked
Ice
Cream
Freezer
from
Lehman’s



 
 
 
 1)
READ
THE
MANUAL.
The
most
obvious
tip!
Read
those
ice
cream
 maker
instructions,
don't
just
scan
them.
Those
few
paragraphs
can
save
 you
a
lot
of
heartache
and
money
later
on.

 
 However,
it's
been
my
experience
that
the
manufacturer's
information
 is
insufficient.
Read
on
and
you'll
avoid
disappointments.
 
 2)
CHECK
YOUR
FREEZER.
Make
sure
your
freezer
is
cold
enough
to
 freeze
the
coolant
inside
the
walls
of
your
container
until
it's
solid.
This
 means
0
degrees
F
(‐18
degrees
C)
or
colder.
(I
place
mine
outside
in
the
 winter!)
 
 3)

FREEZE
THAT
CANISTER
SOLID.
According
to
my
Cuisinart
ice
 cream
maker
manual,
it
can
take
up
to
24
hours
to
freeze
the
coolant
 inside
the
canister's
walls.
So
it's
a
good
idea
to
keep
the
canister
in
the
 freezer
at
all
times.
That
way,
it
will
be
ready
to
use
at
a
moment's
 Copyright
©
–
www.homemade‐ice‐cream‐recipes.com



How To Get The Most Out Of Your Home Ice Cream Maker 
 5
 


notice.

 
 Follow
the
manufacturer's
recommendation
and
place
it
in
a
plastic
bag,
 and
close
it
tightly;
otherwise,
it
might
pick
up
odors.
 
 3)
SHAKE
THAT
CANISTER.
To
find
out
if
the
canister
is
frozen
enough,
 take
it
out
of
its
plastic
bag
and
shake
it
vigorously
next
to
your
ear.
If
 you
hear
no
liquid
moving
around
whatsoever,
it's
ready.
If
you
hear
the
 slightest
shaking
in
there,
put
it
back
in
the
freezer.
This
is
very
 important!
 
 4)
MAINTAIN
THE
COLD.
Don't
wash
the
canister
just
before
using
it.
 The
idea
is
to
keep
it
as
frozen
as
possible
for
as
long
as
possible.
Pour
 in
the
mixture
and
start
the
motor
without
delay.
 
 Don't
install
your
ice
cream
maker
near
a
heat
source
like
a
stove
or
a
 heater.
Rather,
move
it
to
the
coldest
spot
in
the
house
if
you
can.

 
 5)
WATCH
THE
QUANTITY.
Never
exceed
the
maximum
quantity
 recommended
by
the
manufacturer.
In
fact,
you
get
better
results
if
you
 make
a
lesser
quantity
than
recommended.
This
is
because
the
cold
will
 last
longer
if
it
has
to
chill
a
smaller
quantity,
allowing
you
to
churn
your
 ice
cream
for
a
longer
time,
which
introduces
more
air,
resulting
in
a
 lighter
ice
cream.
 
 6)
COOL
THE
MIXTURE.
Another
way
to
make
the
coolant
last
longer
is
 to
cool
your
mixture
as
much
as
possible
before
pouring
it
into
the
 container.
Do
it
over
an
ice
bath
(a
large
bowl
with
ice
cubes
and
water
 in
it,
large
enough
to
surround
your
mixing
bowl.
Stir
occasionally
and
 replace
the
ice
if
necessary)
–
or
in
the
refrigerator
for
several
hours.

 
 The
best
method?
Cooling
in
an
ice
bath,
then
refrigerating
for
several
 hours
–
or
leaving
in
the
fridge
overnight
(and
up
to
three
days)
–

 always
in
a
tightly
covered
container
to
avoid
picking
up
other
flavors.
 
 Copyright
©
–
www.homemade‐ice‐cream‐recipes.com



How To Get The Most Out Of Your Home Ice Cream Maker 
 6
 


7)
RESPECT
THE
TIMING.
Assuming
you've
done
everything
else
right,
 don't
ruin
it
by
running
your
machine
not
long
enough,
or
too
long.
In
 both
cases
you
won't
get
ice
cream,
you'll
get
slush.

 
 Too
long
is
just
as
bad
as
not
long
enough,
because
once
the
coolant
has
 lost
its
cooling
effect,
it
will
start
to
melt
your
ice
cream.

 
 So,
use
the
timing
recommended
by
the
manufacturer,
and
be
vigilant:

 keep
checking.
I
have
found
that
the
best
time
to
turn
off
the
machine
is
 just
before
the
mixture
stops
sticking
to
the
sides
of
the
container.

 
 The
only
exception
is
the
one
mentioned
in
5)
above:
with
a
smaller
 quantity,
you
can
churn
longer
because
the
coolant
lasts
longer.
 
 8.
PLAN
AHEAD.
Decide
in
advance
if
you're
going
to
be
serving
your
 ice
cream
right
away
–
some
people
prefer
it
that
way,
soft
and
creamy
–

 or
if
you're
going
to
freeze
it
so
it's
more
like
commercial
ice
cream.
The
 "ripening"
process
also
develops
the
flavor
and
texture.

 
 The
result
is
two
very
different
products
and
you
should
try
both
before
 you
decide.
One
tip:
if
you
want
to
serve
your
ice
cream
in
cones,
you
 definitely
have
to
harden
it.
 
 Depending
on
the
recipe,
and
on
the
temperature
of
your
freezer,
your
 ice
cream
may
get
very
hard
and
difficult
to
scoop;
in
that
case,
just
 transfer
it
to
the
refrigerator
for
a
few
minutes
before
serving.

 
 8)
COOL
EVERYTHING.
Homemade
ice
cream
doesn't
contain
additives
 that
keep
it
from
melting,
so
it
melts
pretty
quickly.
You
can
delay
the
 melting
by
placing
your
storage
container,
and
the
bowls
or
cups
in
 which
you're
going
to
serve
the
ice
cream,
in
the
freezer
for
a
while.

 
 9)
WORK
QUICKLY.
For
the
same
reason,
you
should
always
work
 quickly,
especially
if
the
weather
is
hot.
This
is
especially
important
if
 your
recipe
calls
for
layering
different
flavors
or
ingredients.
 Copyright
©
–
www.homemade‐ice‐cream‐recipes.com



How To Get The Most Out Of Your Home Ice Cream Maker 
 7
 



 10)
STORE
CAREFULLY.
Never
use
the
ice
cream
machine's
canister
to
 store
the
ice
cream,
and
always
cover
your
storage
container
tightly
to
 avoid
picking
up
other
flavors.

 
 11)
WASH
THE
CANISTER.
Leave
it
at
room
temperature
until
it
no
 longer
freezes
the
water
you
put
into
it,
wash
it,
dry
it
thoroughly,
wrap
 it
up
and
put
it
back
in
the
freezer
so
it
will
be
ready
the
next
time
the
 desire
to
make
ice
cream
strikes
you.
 
 12)
DEAL
WITH
THE
NOISE.
All
electric
ice
cream
makers
are
noisy,
 but
the
nice
thing
about
these
non‐automatic
models
is
that
they
are
 light
and
easy
to
move.
If
the
noise
bothers
you,
just
move
your
machine
 to
another
room
while
it's
making
your
ice
cream.
Just
remember
to
set
 a
timer
so
you
won't
forget
it!
 
 All
that's
left
is
for
you
to
enjoy
your
homemade
ice
cream.
Don't
forget
 to
share
it!
 
 
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Copyright
©
–
www.homemade‐ice‐cream‐recipes.com



How To Get The Most Out Of Your Home Ice Cream Maker 
 8
 






6
TIPS
FOR
GETTING
THE
MOST
OUT
OF
YOUR
 AUTOMATIC
ELECTRIC
ICE
CREAM
MAKERS
 
 By
"automatic",
I
mean
the
kind
of
ice
cream
machine
that
does
all
the
 freezing
and
churning.
You
just
pour
the
ingredients
into
the
canister,
set
 the
timer
and
voilà!
35
to
60
minutes
later,
the
family
is
enjoying
that
 special
frozen
dessert
you
made
for
them.

 
 This
is
what
some
of
them
look
like:
 
















Left
to
right:

Musso
4080
Lussino;
Cuisinart
Supreme
ICE‐50BC



 
 1)
READ
THE
MANUAL.
The
most
obvious
tip!
Read
those
ice
cream
 maker
insctructions,
don't
just
scan
them.
Those
few
paragraphs
can
 save
you
a
lot
of
heartache
and
money
later
on.
 
 On
the
other
hand,
I
have
noticed
that
the
manufacturers
haven't
 considered
everything
that
can
go
wrong
with
their
ice
cream
machines.
 So
–
read
on!
 Copyright
©
–
www.homemade‐ice‐cream‐recipes.com



How To Get The Most Out Of Your Home Ice Cream Maker 
 9
 



 2)
START
OUT
COLD.
You'll
save
a
lot
of
churning
time
if
you'll
make
 sure
that
everything
is
very
cold:
your
mixture,
of
course,
but
also
that
 little
metal
pail
or
canister.
 
 This
means
cooling
the
mixture
over
an
ice
bath
(a
large
bowl
with
ice
 cubes
and
water
in
it,
large
enough
to
surround
your
mixing
bowl.
Stir
 occasionally
and
replace
the
ice
if
necessary)
–
or
in
the
refrigerator
for
 several
hours.

 
 The
best
method?
Cooling
in
an
ice
bath,
then
refrigerating
for
several
 hours
–
or
leaving
in
the
fridge
overnight
(and
up
to
three
days)
–
 always
in
a
tightly
covered
container
to
avoid
picking
up
other
flavors.
 
 While
your
mixture
is
cooling,
place
the
canister
in
the
freezer
for
a
 minimum
of
20
minutes
before
filling
it.
 
 If
you're
unable
to
chill
everything
completely,
you'll
have
to
allow
extra
 time,
as
the
machine
will
first
have
to
chill
the
pail,
then
the
mixture
–
 and
only
once
those
are
cold
enough
will
it
be
able
to
start
the
actual
ice
 cream
making
process.
In
that
case,
you
may
run
out
of
time
and
have
to
 reset
the
timer
for
additional
churning.

 
 That's
the
main
advantage
of
automatic
ice
cream
makers:
with
the
non‐ automatic
type,
once
the
coolant
has
gone
warm
inside
the
walls
of
the
 canister,
you
have
to
stop
the
machine,
whether
your
ice
cream
is
ready
 or
not.
 
 On
the
other
hand,
the
non‐automatic
models
require
only
20
to
25
 minutes
to
freeze
ice
cream,
so
if
you're
used
to
that
type,
adjust
your
 timing
accordingly.
 
 3)
ASSEMBLE
THE
COMPONENTS
PROPERLY.
Don't
rely
on
the
 manufacturer
to
give
you
a
step‐by‐step
illustrated
guide
for
assembling
 your
machine
(Cuisinart
certainly
doesn't!).
So,
pay
close
attention
to
 Copyright
©
–
www.homemade‐ice‐cream‐recipes.com



How To Get The Most Out Of Your Home Ice Cream Maker 1 
 0
 


the
way
things
fit
together
before
turning
that
dial.

 
 For
instance,
the
canister
may
have
to
be
fitted
into
some
grooves,
the
 lid
may
have
to
be
facing
a
certain
way,
etc.
Each
model
is
different,
so
 take
your
time
assembling
your
machine
before
setting
the
timer.
 
 4)
WATCH
THE
QUANTITY.
Never
exceed
the
maximum
quantity
 recommended
by
the
manufacturer.
In
fact,
you
usually
get
better
 results
if
you
make
less
than
the
maximum
amount.
 
 5)
RESPECT
THE
TIMING.
If
you're
making
a
recipe
other
than
those
in
 the
manual,
find
a
similar
one
in
the
manual
for
determining
the
correct
 time.
For
instance,
soft
ice
cream
can
take
around
40
minutes,
hard
ice
 cream
60
minutes,
and
frozen
drinks
take
less
time.

 
 6)
DEAL
WITH
THE
NOISE.
All
electric
ice
cream
makers
are
noisy.
If
 the
noise
really
bothers
you,
you
could
simply
shut
the
kitchen
door
and
 stay
in
another
room
while
your
ice
cream
is
being
churned.
Some
 models
are
noisier
than
others;
you
could
check
the
reviews
before
 making
your
purchase,
and
see
what
others
are
saying
about
it.
 
 All
that's
left
is
for
you
to
enjoy
your
homemade
ice
cream.
Don't
forget
 to
share
it!



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Copyright
©
–
www.homemade‐ice‐cream‐recipes.com



How To Get The Most Out Of Your Home Ice Cream Maker 1 
 1
 


10
TIPS
FOR
GETTING
THE
MOST
OUT
OF
YOUR
 HAND
CRANK
ICE
CREAM
MAKER
 
 Call
it
a
hand
crank
ice
cream
maker,
a
hand­cranked
or
a
manual
ice
 cream
maker,
it's
the
one
that
doesn't
require
a
source
of
power
beside
 good
old
elbow
grease,
and
whose
source
of
freezing
is
a
rather
precise
 blend
of
ice
and
rock

salt.
 
 This
is
the
type
of
ice
cream
maker
that
started
it
all.
Some
say
it
makes
 the
best
ice
cream;
that's
probably
why
it's
still
around
in
spite
of
the
fact
 that
it
costs
more
than
most
more
modern
alternatives.
 
 Here
are
some
pictures
of
hand­cranked
ice
cream
makers:
 


Left
to
right:
White
Mountain
4‐Quart
Hand
Crank
Ice
Cream
Maker;
20‐Quart
Ice
 Cream
Freezer
from
Lehman’s;
Rival
4‐Qt
Ice
Cream
Maker
FRRVCB40‐BL



 Note
that
the
last
one
doesn’t
have
a
crank:
instead,
it
has
a
motor,
so
it
 requires
electricity.
But
I’m
showing
it
here
because
all
the
directions
 about
ice
and
salt
apply
to
that
type
of
ice
cream
maker
as
well.
 
 
 Copyright
©
–
www.homemade‐ice‐cream‐recipes.com



How To Get The Most Out Of Your Home Ice Cream Maker 1 
 2
 


NOTE:
There
is
another
type
of
hand­cranked
ice
cream
maker
that
 doesn't
require
ice
and
rock
salt;
instead,
it
has
a
canister
with
a
coolant
 gel
inside
its
walls.
If
that's
the
type
you
have,
refer
to
the
directions
for
 the
Semi­Automatic
Ice
Cream
Maker,
on
page
3.
 
 It
may
look
like
this:
 



 
 
 
 
 
 1)
READ
THE
MANUAL.
The
most
obvious
tip!
Read
those
ice
cream
 maker
instructions,
don't
just
scan
them.
Those
few
paragraphs
can
save
 you
a
lot
of
heartache
and
money
later
on.

 
 However,
it's
been
my
experience
that
the
manufacturer's
information
 is
insufficient.
Read
on
and
you'll
avoid
disappointments.
 
 2)
GATHER
YOUR
INGREDIENTS
IN
ADVANCE.
You
need
ice
and
rock
 salt
and
a
thoroughly
cooled
ice
cream
mixture,
an
old,
clean
blanket
or
 large
towel
or
lots
of
newspapers.
 
 The
manufacturers
recommend
preparing
the
ice
cream
mixture
the
day
 before
and
refrigerating
it
until
you're
ready
to
use
it,
but
if
you're
using
 a
non‐electric
ice
cream
machine
chances
are
you
don't
have
a
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How To Get The Most Out Of Your Home Ice Cream Maker 1 
 3
 


refrigerator!
In
that
case,
get
extra
ice
and
cool
your
mixture
really
well
 over
an
ice
bath
and
let
it
rest
in
a
renewed
ice
bath
for
as
long
as
 possible.

 
 3)
ICE/ROCK
SALT
PROPORTIONS.
A
4‐quart
freezer
uses
 approximately
10
lbs
(20
kilos)
of
ice
and
2
1/2
to
3
cups
(600
to
700
 ml)
of
rock
salt.
Larger
freezers
will
require
more
ice
and
salt,
but
in
the
 same
proportions.
 
 Crushed
ice
works
better
than
coarse
cubes;
it
melts
more
evenly
and
 produces
a
smoother
ice
cream.
 
 4)
WATCH
THE
QUANTITY.
The
canister
should
never
be
more
than
 two‐thirds
full,
to
allow
for
expansion.
Never
exceed
the
maximum
 quantity
recommended
by
the
manufacturer.

 
 5)
PACKING
THE
ICE
AND
SALT.
Do
this
in
layers:
a
few
inches
of
ice
 followed
by
a
good
sprinkling
or
salt;
repeat
until
you
nearly
cover
the
 canister.

 
 6)
STAY
COOL.
Don't
work
near
a
heat
source
like
a
stove
or
a
heater.
 Rather,
move
to
the
coldest
spot
in
the
house
if
you
can,
or
in
the
 deepest
shade,
if
outside.
 
 7)
CRANK
THE
RIGHT
WAY.
This
sounds
like
a
superstition,
but
it's
 not:
always
crank
to
the
right
(clockwise)
and
don't
change
direction.
 Crank
relatively
slowly,
to
give
each
drop
of
mixture
a
chance
to
come
 into
contact
with
the
cold
canister
wall.
 
 8)
TROUBLESHOOTING.
Be
patient,
but
not
too
much!
If
you
don't
feel
 any
drag
after
20
minutes,
your
brine
isn't
cold
enough.
But
it's
salt,
not
 ice,
that
you
have
to
add.
 
 9)
LET
YOUR
ICE
CREAM
RIPEN.
If
you
like
soft
ice
cream,
you
can
eat
 it
right
away,
but
trust
me,
it
will
taste
much
better
after
some
ripening.


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How To Get The Most Out Of Your Home Ice Cream Maker 1 
 4
 



 Remove
the
dasher,
replace
the
lid,
re‐pack
more
ice
and
salt
around
the
 canister
and
cover
with
a
blanket,
a
large
towel
or
several
layers
of
 newspaper.

Let
sit
for
an
hour
or
so.
The
ice
cream
will
continue
to
 freeze
and
harden
during
that
time.
 
 10)
STORE
CAREFULLY.
Always
cover
your
storage
container
tightly
to
 avoid
picking
up
unwanted
flavors.

 
 All
that's
left
is
for
you
to
enjoy
your
homemade
ice
cream.
Don't
forget
 to
share
it!



 



 


Pssst!

Here’s
one
final
secret:
to
make
the
most
scrumptious
ice
 cream,
it’s
not
enough
to
have
good
equipment
and
know
how
to
 use
it.
You
need
great
recipes!
Get
them
at
 
 
 
 
 


Homemade-ice-cream-recipes.com

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©
–
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Ice Cream Maker Guide