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HENRY HERALD • CLAYTON NEWS • JACKSON PROGRESS-ARGUS FEBRUARY 2019 WINTER EDITION

GUIDE

HENRY - CLAYTON - JACKSON'S PREMIER HEALTHCARE MAGAZINE

INSIDE

• Pain free life — close to home • ThermiVa: Reclaim. Restore. Revive. • Treat skin with care

Stephanie Gordon, MD Gynecology-Robotic Surgery Urogynecology

• The important role played by physical therapists • Why kids under 21 should see a pediatric orthopedic specialist • Senior living options abound

Jason Arnold, MD Dermatology & Mohs Surgeon

Coy Leverette III, MPT Physical Therapy

Katharine Simmon, PA-C Dermatology

J. Bernard Bush, MD

Leiv Takle, MD Ophthalmology

Keval A. Patel, MD Gastroenterology

Joshua S Murphy, MD

Archie Ramaswami, MD Pediatric Gastroenterology

John Andrachuk, MD Sports Medicine and General Orthopaedics

Sports Medicine

Orthopaedic Surgeon

Scott Cahoon, MD Sports Medicine, Orthopaedics, and Joint Replacement

Allen Filstein, MD Dermatology

Trent Rice, MD Gynecology-Urogynecology

Dana C Olszewski, MD

Orthopaedic Surgeon

Jai Eun (Jenny) Min, MD Gastroenterology

Me'Ja Day, MD Ophthalmology


INDEX

HELPING YOU MAKE THE BEST CHOICE IN HEALTH CARE

ASSISTED LIVING Dream Catcher Senior Care Communities 286 4-Points Rd. Jackson, GA 30233 770-775-2794 DERMATOLOGY Georgia Dermatology C. Russell Harris, MD John Fountain, MD Allen Filstein, MD Darryl Hodson, MD Jason Arnold, MD Katharine Simmon, PA-C Deb Moore, PA-C 1349 Milstead Rd. Conyers, GA 30012 770-785-7546 101 MLK Jr. Drive Forsyth, GA 31029 478-994-5281 FAMILY PRACTICE Eagles Landing Family Practice 50 Kelly Rd. Ste 200 McDonough, GA 770-957-1887 65 Old Jackson Rd. McDonough, GA 678-490-0080 2200 Hwy 155 N Ste 100 McDonough, GA 678-490-0341 1240 Eagles Landing Pkwy Ste 110 Stockbridge, GA 770-389-3855 211 Fairview Road Ellenwood, GA 30294 678-289-6747 1058 Bear Creek Blvd. Hampton, GA 30228 770-707-0808 3758 Hwy. 42 South Locust Grove, GA 30248 678-561-9430 Image Center 1100 Hospital Drive Stockbridge, GA 30281 678-432-6161 Sleep Center 2200 Hwy. 155 North Suite 110 McDonough, GA 30252 770-898-3003

FAMILY PRACTICE Jackson Medical Building Jorge Moreno Jr., MD Seema Moreno, Occupational Therapy 375 McDonough Road Jackson, GA 30233 (770) 775-4622 FINANCES GEL Finance Gale Edwards Jannet Cervantes 817 Pavilion Ct. McDonough, GA 30253 678-956-1181 GASTROENTEROLOGY Atlanta Gastroenterology Pediatric and Adolescent Division Archie Ramaswami, MD Vickie Browne, MSN, NP-C Amanda Hinson, MSN, RN, FNP-C Ralph C. Lyons, MD David M. Martin, MD Keval A. Patel, MD Christopher A. Brown, MD Hitesh R. Chokshi, MD Mark D. Edge, MD Paige Espenship, RD, LD David Rabin, MD Kimberly Savage, RN, MSN, CAPA, ACNP- BC Meridian Mark Plaza 150 N. Park Trail Suite B Stockbridge, GA 30281 770-507-0909 SE 34 Upper Riverdale Rd. Suite 201 Riverdale, GA 30274 678-904-0094 HOSPITALS WellStar Sylvan Grove Hospital 1050 McDonough Rd. Jackson, GA 30233 770-775-7861

OBSTETRICS/GYNECOLOGY/ UROGYNECOLOGY The Women's Center, PC Stephanie Gordon, MD Trent Rice, MD 2750 Owens Drive Conyers, GA 30012 678-413-4644 140 Eagles Spring Court Stockbridge, GA 770-302-0878 ORTHOPAEDIC/SPORTS MEDICINE Children's Healthcare of Atlanta 1500 Hudson Bridge Rd. Stockbridge, GA 404-255-1933 Resurgens Orthopaedic Uzondu Agochukwu, MD Mark Albritton, MD John Andrachuk, MD Bernard Bush, MD Scott Cahoon, MD Maurice L. Goins, MD David A. Goodman, MD Peter S. Harvey, MD Scott A. Kelly, MD Gary W. Stewart, MD Christopher J. Walsh, MD 105 Regency Park Drive McDonough, GA 30253 770-305-7555 6635 Lake Drive Morrow, GA 30260 770-968-1323 OPHTHALMOLOGY Takle Eye Group 1075 Bandy Parkway Suite 110 Locust Grove, GA 30248 770-228-3836 PHYSICAL THERAPY Physical Therapy in Motion Coy Leverette, III, MPT 106 Vinings Drive McDonough, GA 30253 770-288-2441 REHABILITATION Westbury Medical Care & Rehab 922 McDonough Rd. Jackson, GA 30233 770-775-7832

LOOK FOR OUR SUMMER EDITION OF THE PHYSICIANS GUIDE PUBLISHING JUNE 2019


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ORTHOPAEDICS

Pain Free Life — Close to Home

H

ave you ever uttered, “My aching back!” or climbed a flight of stairs and thought, “My knees can’t take much more of this”? Maybe you injured yourself playing on the football or baseball field. Or perhaps activities that once seemed effortless have become more difficult. If you can relate to these all-too-common complaints, you are not alone and your solution just got easier.

Thanks to Resurgens Orthopaedics living with pain is becoming less common for residents in and around the Metro Atlanta area. In addition to providing surgical and non-surgical treatment for back and joint pain Resurgens Orthopaedics offers a full range of orthopaedic services at 24 convenient locations. Resurgens Orthopaedics is a leader in orthopaedic care. If pain prevents you from fully enjoying your daily activities or limits your range of motion Resurgens Orthopaedics

offers sophisticated techniques and effective services to treat your pain at the source. With five physicians serving the East Georgia region Resurgens is able to get you moving again, and back to what you love! Resurgens physicians provide specialized expertise in the areas of sports medicine, joint replace-

helping your community get back on their feet, back to work, and to living their lives to the fullest.

ment, neck and back, spine care, hand surgery, shoulder and elbow surgery, and general orthopaedics just to name a few. Resurgens Orthopaedics provides comprehensive musculoskeletal care in a single location, from injury to diagnosis and treatment to rehabilitation services. Resurgens is

Whether it’s getting back to work, playing with your kids, or just being comfortable again, patients are their first priority. They enjoy hearing from former patients about the care they receive and listening to how they got back to the sports and activities they love. When the need for orthopaedic care arises, patients can trust they are getting the finest care available. Go ahead and take a closer look at Resurgens Orthopaedics to uncover capabilities and standards for orthopaedic care that cannot be found in any other practice. They always appreciate referrals, but you don’t need one to see a Resurgens specialist. Don’t wait to treat your pain – Schedule an appointment online today at Resurgens.com/Covington.

Get Moving Again With Our Expert Specialists

Mark J. Albritton M.D.

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Maurice L. Goins M.D.

John A. Andrachuk M.D.

David A. Goodman M.D.

24 Convenient Locations to Serve You

www.resurgens.com

J. Bernard Bush M.D.

Peter S. Harvey M.D.

Scott J. Cahoon M.D.

Scott A. Kelly M.D.

Charles E. Claps D.O.

Gary W. Stewart M.D.

Christopher J. Walsh M.D

Schedule your appointment today!

678-422-4292

HENRY HERALD • CLAYTON NEWS • JACKSON PROGRESS-ARGUS • PHYSICIANS GUIDE • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2019 • 3


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GYNECOLOGY

ermiVa Reclaim. Restore. Revive. Worldwide, women want to reclaim their younger “pre-baby” bodies, restore their satisfaction, and revive their relationships.

A

new feminine rejuvenation system, called ThermiVa, is • Stress incontinence: reduces accidents and leakage and possibly even reduces urge symptoms, helping women avoid offering women a bold option for improving their lives and the need for mesh slings in their vagina. boosting their self-esteem. This radically simple, nonsurgical solution is helping women reclaim the confidence • Orgasmic dysfunction: increases sexual sensitivity and and aesthetics of their youth, in spite of multiple child births, produces more coordinated, stronger muscular contractions, strenuous vaginal childbirth, or the effects of menopause. enabling women to achieve orgasm in a shorter period of time. Vaginal laxity, dryness and genital irritation can range from a slight annoyance for these women to imposing a major barrier What's more, ThermiVa does all this without surgery or the to enjoyment of a satisfying quality of life, particularly sexually. associated recovery time. With ThermiVa, women can alleviate:

How ThermiVa Works

• Vaginal laxity: tightens the vagina at the opening and along ThermiVa is a painless, noninvasive, in-office treatment which the full length of the vagina, noticeably heightening sensation requires no downtime for women. ThermiVa treatments deliver controlled thermal energy to gently heat the labial and vaginal for both the patient and partner. areas. A small, single-use wand directs heat deep into tissues • Vulvar laxity: tightens labial tissues and reduces sag, resulting to encourage the natural production of collagen and shrink in softer, smoother skin and greater comfort in tight clothing. tissues. Most patients find the heat level quite comfortable similar to a hot stone massage treatment - and there's no need • Vaginal dryness: adds softer, thicker skin and more moisture for anesthesia, numbing shots or creams. Total treatment time both internally and externally, making daily life, as well as is less than 30 minutes, and women are able to resume all sexual intercourse, more comfortable, without the use of activities—including sexual intercourse—immediately after lubricants. treatment.

ThermiVa treatments use radiofrequency energy to gently heat tissue, WITHOUT discomfort or downtime.

Is ermiVa right for you? Schedule a consultation with a physician at e Women’s Center today, at either the Stockbridge office 770-302-0878 or the Conyers office 678-413-4644. ey’ll help you determine your best option for feminine rejuvenation and discuss how this groundbreaking procedure can help you achieve your goals for a happier more confident life.

womenscenterga.com

4 • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2019 • PHYSICIANS GUIDE • HENRY HERALD • CLAYTON NEWS • JACKSON PROGRESS-ARGUS


GYNECOLOGY & UROGYNECOLOGY

Urogynecology and Gynecological Services

Dr. Stephanie Gordon

Dr. Trent Rice

• Well Women Health Care and Comprehensive Annual Exams • Pap Smears, Breast Exams, and In-office Ultrasounds • Full range of Contraception Options • Menopausal Management – Traditional and Alternative • Adolescent and Pediatric Gynecology • Infertility Workups • Hormone Replacement Therapy including pellets ($175) and compounded medicines • Bladder Problems — Unwanted Urine or Bowel Leakage • Repair of Pelvic Prolapse, Relaxation and Surgery for Bladder and Bowel Leakage — Abnormal Bleeding and Ovarian Cysts • Osteoporosis Screening and Treatment • Screening for Sexually Transmitted Diseases For all of the information you need about our office visit us online at

WomensCenterGa.com

Kimberly Mathis, NP

Maria Epling, NP

Katisha Patterson, NP

STOCKBRIDGE 770-302-0878

CONYERS 678-413-4644

Providing individualized care for women at every stage in life. MOST MAJOR MEDICAL INSURANCE ACCEPTED

HENRY HERALD • CLAYTON NEWS • JACKSON PROGRESS-ARGUS • PHYSICIANS GUIDE • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2019 • 5


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PHYSICAL THERAPY

The important role played by physical therapists

An injury or illness can impact a person’s mobility and ability to perform everyday activities. While medicine and other treatments can help the situation, physical therapists are often sought to help individuals get back on track. Physical therapists frequently work with patients’ larger

medical teams to provide customized care depending on patients’ needs. Physical therapists may begin their treatment plans by gathering patients’ histories and reviewing any tests and imaging the patients may have had. This information, combined with physical examinations and studies of the injuries or illness, will help physical therapists to establish treatment plans for the patients. Men and women who have been told they need physical therapy can heed to the following tips as they look for therapists to work with. • Get a referral from your primary doctor or orthopedist. With some insurance plans, a referral will be needed for treatment. Otherwise, use your insurance plan’s provider directory to find a physical

therapist who accepts your insurance.

time while others may see two or three patients at a time.

• Check your insurance benefits to determine how much coverage you have for physical therapy. You may be limited to a certain number of sessions or have a no restrictions at all.

• Find out who will be treating you. You may be assigned the same therapist each time. If you are getting services at a therapy group, you may have a different therapist for each visit.

• Many physical therapists are board certified in one speciality. They have passed tests and have documented hours treating certain conditions. This can be helpful if you require a pediatric specialists or one who has expertise with the back or neck. Any physical therapist or therapist’s assistant should be qualified and licensed.

• Always ask questions before and after a treatment so you can continue to work on the healing process on your own and so you know which activities are safe, which should change as your treatment progresses. Physical therapists play an integral role in helping restore patients’ mobility and helping them avoid further injury so that patients can maximize their quality of life.

• Ask if you will be the physical therapist’s only patient at an appointment. Some treat on individual at a

Physical Therapy in Motion Inc. 106 Vinings Drive, McDonough, GA 30253 phone: 770.288.2441 • fax: 770.288.2442 www.ptmotioninc.com

PHYSICAL THERAPY IN MOTION AND AQUATIC THERAPY CENTER SPECIALIZING IN AQUATIC AND LAND THERAPY A Soothing Wave of Therapeutic Intervention!

Aquatic Therapy provides physical rehabilitation in the dynamics of a heated pool.

• Alleviate pain assoc. with Arthritis, injury, or generalized muscular soreness

• Decrease stress in joints, vascular swelling and muscle spasms

• Increase circulation, flexibility, strength, sensory awareness, and function

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Conveniently located on exit 221 (Jonesboro Rd) off I-75 south, 1/2 mile west in Towne Center Park.

Call Now! (770-288-2441) for a 1-on-1 personalized appointment Physical or Aquatic Therapy

We accept most commercial Insurances, walk-ins, and referrals from Healthcare Providers.

Morning and Evening hours available!

Physical Therapy in Motion Inc. continues to help patients get on the move!

6 • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2019 • PHYSICIANS GUIDE • HENRY HERALD • CLAYTON NEWS • JACKSON PROGRESS-ARGUS


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3 fun ways families can get fit together

T

he buddy system is widely used to help men and women get in shape. Friends can encourage their workout partners to get off the couch on days when their motivation might be waning, and partners can return that favor when the roles are reversed. And the benefits of the buddy system are not exclusive to adults, as families can rely on it to make sure moms, dads and kids each get the exercise they need. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ongoing exercise can help people of all ages control their weight, improve their mental health and mood and reduce their risk for various diseases, including heart disease and type 2 diabetes. And the benefits may go beyond those normally associated with exercise, particularly for young people. A 2009 analysis of the fitness records of 1.2 million Swedish men born between 1950 and 1976 found that the more exercise they had during adolescence, the more likely they were to be professionally successful as adults. Getting fit as a family can be easy.

The following are just a few ways parents and their children can get in shape together.

1. Start dancing. Dancing isn’t just a fun activity, it’s also a very healthy one. While dancing might often be categorized as a recreational activity, such a categorization overlooks the many health benefits of cutting a rug. Dancing is a great cardiovascular exercise that works multiple parts of the body. Routine cardiovascular exercise has been linked to reduced risk for heart disease and other ailments. In addition, a 2009 study from researchers in South Korea found that hip hop dancing can boost mood and lower stress.

2. Schedule daily exercise time. Parents and their children are as busy as ever, so it makes sense to schedule family exercise time just like you schedule family meals or outings to the museum. Kids who compete in sports may already

get enough physical activity each day. The CDC recommends children participate in at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day, so kids who aren’t playing sports can spend an hour each day sweating alongside mom and dad.

3. Walk after dinner. Families who routinely dine together can delay doing the dishes to walk off their meals. A walk around the neighborhood after dinner provides solid family time, but it’s also a great

way to stay healthy. A 2017 study from researchers at the University of Warwick that was published in the International Journal of Obesity found that people who took 15,000 or more steps each day tended to have healthy body mass indexes, or BMIs. That’s an important benefit, as an unhealthy BMI is often a characteristic of obesity. Getting fit as a family can be fun and pay long-term dividends for parents and children alike.

DERMATOLOGY

Treat skin with care According to the American Cancer Society, skin cancer accounts for the largest number of cancer diagnoses in the United States. Each year, nearly five million Americans are treated for skin cancer, with most cases being nonmelanoma skin cancer, typically diagnosed as basal cell carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma. But skin cancer is not the only condition that can affect the skin. From rosacea to eczema to acne to psoriasis, the skin can be affected by numerous conditions, many of which can be both uncomfortable and embarrassing. Keeping skin healthy requires effort, and there are many things men and women can do to protect their skin and reduce their risk for various conditions. · Schedule routine visits to a dermatologist. Dermatologists can treat and help prevent disorders of the skin, and men and women should make annual visits to their dermatologist to ensure their skin is healthy. Dermatologists can diagnose if a mark or a blemish is something benign or serious and provide informa-

tion on various courses of treatment. As with any specialist, dermatologists may be well versed on new and innovative care. If anything on your skin seems suspect, visit a dermatologist right away. · Protect yourself from the sun. The single best thing you can do for your skin is to protect it from the sun. Not only can a lifetime of sun exposure cause wrinkles and age spots, it can lead to cancer. Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. · Be gentle to the skin. Use mild cleansers and limit showers and baths to warm water. Moisturize dry skin if it is problematic. Pat skin dry after washing and do not tug or rub skin excessively. · Inspect skin regularly. Routinely check your skin for any changes and share any concerns with your doctor. Schedule annual skin checks as part of yearly physical examinations. Taking these steps can help you maintain healthy skin and prevent ailments in the years to come.

HENRY HERALD • CLAYTON NEWS • JACKSON PROGRESS-ARGUS • PHYSICIANS GUIDE • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2019 • 7


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Don’t miss a beat regarding women’s heart health

H

eart disease might be seen as something that predominantly affects men, but women are not immune to this potentially deadly condition. In fact, doctors and healthcare professionals advise women to take serious heed of heart disease, which claims more female lives than breast cancer, other cancers, respiratory disease, and Alzheimer’s disease combined. The American Heart Association indicates that more women are now aware that heart disease is the leading cause of death among females than they were 20 years ago. While just 30 percent of women recognized that in 1997, that figure had risen to 56 percent by 2012. However, the AHA reports that only 42 percent of women aged 35 and older are concerned about heart disease. Initiatives like Go Red for Women in February help shed light on the threat posed by heart disease.

are not like the stereotypical clutching of the chest that men experience. Heart disease symptoms in women can include upper back pain, chest discomfort, heartburn, extreme fatigue, nausea, and shortness of breath. • Even fit women can be affected by heart disease. Inherent risk factors, such as high cholesterol, can counteract healthy habits.

Women are urged to take various steps to reduce their risk of heart disease: • Lose weight • Engage in regular physical activity

Here are some facts to consider.

• Quit smoking

• Roughly one female death per minute is attributed to heart disease.

• Keep alcohol consumption to a minimum

• Heart disease affects women of all ages. In fact, the AHA says that the combination of smoking and birth control pills can increase heart disease risk in younger women by 20 percent.

• Get cholesterol and blood pressure checked regularly

• Mercy Health System says about 5.8 percent of all white women, 7.6 percent of black women, and 5.6 percent of Mexican American women have coronary heart disease.

• Control diabetes

• According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, almost two-thirds of women who die suddenly of coronary heart disease have no previous symptoms. • When symptoms are present in women, they

• Make healthy food choices • Lower stress levels

Taking charge of factors they can control can help women improve their overall health and lower their risk for heart disease. Women also should speak with their doctors about heart disease. Learn more at www.goredforwomen.org.

8 • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2019 • PHYSICIANS GUIDE • HENRY HERALD • CLAYTON NEWS • JACKSON PROGRESS-ARGUS


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FAMILY PRACTICE

The importance of annual health exams A

nnual health exams are a key component of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. A person may not see the need to visit the doctor if he or she is feeling well, but not every disease or condition manifests itself in a way that men and women can detect. According the Unity Point Clinic, nearly one-third of the 133 million Americans living with a chronic disease are unaware of the presence of their conditions. Routine physical exams can detect serious illnesses before they do much damage. No two physical exams will be exactly alike, but many will share some general features. Health history A crucial element of a physical exam will include a thorough health history if the physician doesnÕt already have one on file. The doctor will take time to ask questions about family history of illness, health habits, any vices (smoking, drinking alcohol, etc.), exercise schedule, and diet. If there is a possible hereditary health condition running through your family, the doctor may suggest certain testing and make note of potential signs to look for in the future. Current ailments After discussing a patientÕs history, the doctor may ask if they are having any problems they cannot explain. These can

include changes in eating or sleeping patterns; aches and pains; lumps or bumps and other abnormalities. Again, the presence of symptoms may be indicative of illness or physical changes, but not all diseases produce obvious symptoms. Vital signs A doctor will check a patientÕs vital signs during the physical. Areas the doctor will look at include but are not limited to: • Heart rate: This measures the speed at which the heart is pumping. Normal resting heart rate values range from 60 to 100 beats per minute. • Blood pressure: A blood pressure cuff (sphygmomanometer) will measure systolic and diastolic pressure. Systolic pressure measures the force with which the blood is pushing through the arteries. The diastolic blood pressure is the pressure in the arteries between beats, when the heart rests. The systolic (top number) should be below 120, while the bottom should be less than 80, according to the Mayo Clinic. • Respiration rate: The doctor will measure the number of breaths taken in a minute. WebMD says between 12 and 16 breaths per minute is normal for a healthy adult. Breathing more than 20 times per minute can suggest heart or lung problems.

A family practice that cares for you!

JACKSON MEDICAL BUILDING Jorge Moreno Jr., MD AND

Seema Moreno, Occupational Therapy

• Pulse oximetry: Johns Hopkins School of Medicine says pulse oximetry is a test used to measure the oxygen level (oxygen saturation) of the blood. It is a measure of how well oxygen is being sent to the parts of your body furthest from your heart. Normal pulse oximeter readings usually range from 95 to 100 percent. Values under 90 percent are considered low. Physical exam The examination will also include physical components. The doctor will perform a visual inspection of the skin and body for any abnormalities, such as the presence of skin cancer. The physician may feel the abdomen to check that internal organs are not distended. FemalesÕ physical examinations may include breast and pelvic exams. Comprehensive testing In addition to the exam at the office, the physical may include an electrocardiogram, or EKG, to check electrical activity of the heart; blood count and cholesterol checks through bloodwork; body mass index testing; X-rays or MRIs and bonedensity tests. Physical exams remain an important part of staying healthy. Consult with a doctor for more preventative maintenance tips.

Dr. Jorge Moreno, MD specializes in Family Practice in Jackson and has over 21 years of experience in the field of family medicine. He graduated from Medical College Of Georgia with his medical degree in 1997. He is affiliated with numerous hospitals, including Wellstar Spalding Regional Hospital, Sylvan Grove Hospital and more. Dr. Moreno is accepting new patients at his medical office and center location and available for appointments, sports physicals, preventative care, medical care as well as ongoing patient care.

Hours: Monday-Friday 8:30a.m. - 5:30p.m. 375 McDonough Rd. Jackson, GA 770.775.4622

HENRY HERALD • CLAYTON NEWS • JACKSON PROGRESS-ARGUS • PHYSICIANS GUIDE • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2019 • 9


Why Kids Under 21 Should See a Pediatric Orthopedic Specialist When your child’s arm takes the brunt of a fall off a bike or a knee twists pretzel-like in a tumble on the soccer field, a doctor’s visit is probably in your near future. When it comes to kids’ musculoskeletal system—the bones, joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments or nerves—where you take them matters. There are important reasons why you should choose a pediatric orthopedic specialist for their care.

Pediatric orthopedic specialists only treat kids and teens

Pediatric orthopedic specialists work closely with other specialists

Pediatric orthopedic specialists are just what their name implies: doctors who have specialized-training in treating kids for orthopedic conditions. The pediatric team at Children’s only treats and cares for babies, adolescents and teens, so they know kids’ bodies inside and out.

Many orthopedic conditions kids deal with will affect other parts of the body, and vice versa. Pediatric orthopedic specialists collaborate with other pediatric specialists, sharing their expertise about treatments and the long-term impact on growing bones.

Michael Schmitz, MD, Chief of Orthopedics at Children’s says, “We treat tens of thousands of patients a year, so we’ve seen a lot of conditions, both common and rare, and understand how to treat their orthopedic issues for the best results now and as that patient grows and matures.”

Pediatric orthopedic specialists understand growing bones Kids and teens aren’t just small adults. Their bones are still growing even as teenagers and pose different challenges than adult bones. Sometimes what may look like a problem in a child may actually be something they naturally outgrow. Dr. Schmitz explains, “It takes a specialist to know how an injury and treatment today will affect your child’s body when it’s finished growing. The pediatric specialists at Children’s know what to look for, can anticipate problems and work to prevent them or address them for the best outcome.” It’s not just about treating injuries, either. Children’s pediatric orthopedic specialists also help educate parents on ways to help keep kids’ bones healthy.

Pediatric orthopedic specialists provide kid-focused care

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When it comes to your kids and teens getting the care they need, you want care that’s kid focused from beginning to end. When you choose a pediatric orthopedic specialist, you’re choosing someone who understands and treats kids’ unique needs—both physical and emotional. That means things like kid-sized and kid-friendly casts, braces, waiting areas, rooms and communication.

Our orthopedic doctors and surgeons are part of one of more than 70 specialties and programs. They lead many of the programs and help guide kids’ entire journey of care.

We’re here to help At Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, we know how to care for growing kids and teens. Children’s is the only nationally ranked pediatric orthopedics program in Georgia. And, we’re right in your neighborhood. Children’s Physician Group – Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine 1500 Hudson Bridge Road Stockbridge, GA 30281 404-255-1933 Our physicians at this location: • Ashley Brouillette, MD is a pediatric sports medicine primary care physician who specializes in sports medicine and musculoskeletal and overuse injuries. • Joshua Murphy, MD is a pediatric orthopedic surgeon who specializes in spinal care, limb deformity, bone health, and foot deformity. • Dana Olszewski, MD, MPH is a pediatric orthopedic surgeon who specializes in limb deformity and lengthening, complex hip, and foot and ankle (club foot).

Visit choa.org/cpgortho to learn more.

*Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS), 2017. This content is general information and not specific medical advice. Always consult with a doctor or healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns about the health of a child. In case of an urgent concern or emergency, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency department right away.

10 • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2019 • PHYSICIANS GUIDE • HENRY HERALD • CLAYTON NEWS • JACKSON PROGRESS-ARGUS


We don’t treat teens like adults, because physically, they’re not where you take them matters Unlike adults, teens have growth plates where bone growth happens. So when kids or teens get a fracture, it’s important to have them treated by a pediatric specialist. Our team of orthopedic experts understands how to properly diagnose and treat growth plate injuries. Because when it comes to growing bones, where you take them matters.

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CHILDREN’S AT HUDSON BRIDGE

1500 HUDSON BRIDGE ROAD, STOCKBRIDGE

©2019 Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Inc. All rights reserved.

choa.org/cpgortho

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GASTROENTEROLOGY

Pain-free Treatment Available for Hemorrhoids

Thanks to a non-surgical procedure called the CRHO’Regan Disposable Hemorrhoid Banding System, patients do not need to suffer in silence from hemorrhoids. This safe and effective technique enables patients to be treated quickly, return to work the same day and resume normal activity with very little discomfort. Hemorrhoids are very common in both men and women – especially pregnant women – and about half the population will get them by age 50. Hemorrhoids are actually swollen veins in the lower rectum and anus and can be extremely uncomfortable. For most women, hemorrhoids caused by pregnancy are a temporary problem resulting from the pressure of the fetus on the abdomen, hormonal changes and

pressure on the blood vessels during childbirth. For both men and women, they can be caused by constipation, diarrhea, obesity, heavy lifting, or long periods of sitting. Most patients only decide to see a gastroenterologist when the bleeding, pain, burning or itching becomes unbearable. When symptoms do become a problem, the physicians at Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates (AGA) have been trained and certified in the CRH-O’Regan Disposable Hemorrhoid Banding System to offer patients relief. In the past, surgery was frequently recommended to treat internal hemorrhoids. But this method uses a small rubber band to strangulate the base of the swollen vein and cut off the blood supply to the hemorrhoid.  Some

patients may need more than one treatment, but they can be spread out a couple of weeks apart. The procedure itself is minimally invasive and is over 90% effective. Plus, it does not require anesthesia, lasts less than five minutes and is typically performed in the office. Many patients go back to work after their appointment and resume normal activity. With this procedure, patients can finally end their discomfort for good. The physicians at Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates see patients throughout Atlanta’s south metro area – including offices in Fayetteville, Locust Grove, Riverdale, and Stockbridge. To make an appointment, call 1.866.GO.TO.AGA [468.6242], or visit www.atlantagastro.com.

Advantages of the O’Regan Banding Technique • Highly effective treatment for hemorrhoids • Minimal pain or discomfort • Patients can quickly resume normal activity and return to work • No anesthesia needed • Very quick procedure lasting about 5 minutes • Performed in office or endoscopy suite 529866-2

Knotted up inside?

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Relax. Call your digestive healthcare experts. We can help.

Locust Grove | 678.432.8246 Pediatrics | 404.843.6320 Riverdale | 678.904.0094 Stockbridge | 770.507.0909 www.atlantagastro.com

Expert GI Care for the Whole Family AGA, LLC and its affiliates are participating providers for Medicare, Medicaid, and most healthcare plans offered in Georgia.

12 • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2019 • PHYSICIANS GUIDE • HENRY HERALD • CLAYTON NEWS • JACKSON PROGRESS-ARGUS


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REHABILITATION Westbury Medical Care and Rehab Continues to Excel in Rehabilitation Success In 1959, and several years before Interstate 75 was completed between the Atlanta-Macon corridor, Westbury Nursing Home opened with 32 beds. The original building was converted from a school building in Jenkinsburg, Georgia. At the time of its opening in April 1959, Westbury Nursing Home was the only nursing between Atlanta and Macon. For over 57 years Westbury has been family owned and operated and has been dedicated to providing a full range of the highest quality resident-centered care and services. Westbury’s working community has served and cared for those who spent their lives building the nation we live in and cherish. Westbury’s residents have been the farmers, plant and factory workers, textile workers, construction workers, railroad workers, teachers, and homemakers who filled homes with love for every member. They served the nation in armed services and in wars to win, protect, and preserve the freedom that we enjoy. They embraced the qualities of duty and discipline imbedded in our American heritage. With an understanding of the importance of delivering care to those who need it within the context of community and a secure, supportive environment, Westbury Medical Care and Rehab strives to preserve and nurture relationships and connections with residents’ families, friends, and the encouraging environments within the community. With an emphasis on short term care and rehabilitation, last year Westbury returned 48% of its admitted residents either to back at home, assisted living, or personal care home settings. Westbury Medical Care and Rehab continues to earn the reputation of becoming a top rate facility that offers aggressive rehabilitation services to address the needs of those who need to recover from an acute illness, a fall resulting injuries, or a recent surgery who goal is to regain and recover strength and independence. In short, whether its residents need short term rebab or long term nursing care, Westbury is committed to promoting and preserving individual dignity, respect, independence, privacy, choice, and eternal significance. 582141-1

WELCOME TO WESTBURY MEDICAL CARE AND REHAB OF JACKSON Come to Westbury Medical Care and Rehab of Jackson and experience:

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• Short term rehabilitation services. • A full range of rehabilitative and restorative services that improves quality of life and enhances optimum independence. • Nutritional services under the care of our full time Registered Dietician. • Dental and ophthalmological services. • Recreational services directed by a certified Therapeutic Recreational Specialist. • Spacious, protected and beautifully maintained outdoor areas. • The comfort of knowing your loved one is living next door to a hospital. • A large chapel providing onsite opportunities for worship. • The convenience of billing through private pay, Medicare, Medicaid and most insurance plans. • Long term skilled nursing services.

For more information, please call (770) 775-7832 922 McDonough Road, Jackson, Georgia 30233 HENRY HERALD • CLAYTON NEWS • JACKSON PROGRESS-ARGUS • PHYSICIANS GUIDE • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2019 • 13


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FINANCES

GEL Health Advisors GEL Health Advisors is the Health Insurance and Benefits Division of GEL Financial Services, LLC located at 817 Pavilion Court in McDonough, GA. We are “Agents with a Servant’s Heart” – we put our clients needs first. Our dedicated team of licensed and certified agents specialize in tailoring coverage and benefits to meet each unique client’s need. Working with physician groups, community organizations, etc, we bring value to our clients through educational seminars, workshops and one-on-one assessments. Our agents go more than the extra mile to assist clients with lowering the cost

of prescription, applying for Limited Income Subsidy and Medicaid when possible. In addition, we partner with clinical groups to provide Prescription and Cancer screening. GEL provides insurance and related services such as Health Insurance, Life Insurance, Medicare, Dental, Vision, Long term Care, Hospital Cash, Disability, Critical Illness, Accident, DME – we even have Guaranteed issued products such as Life, Disability, Critical Illness and Cancer. GEL can insure 99.9% of everyone. Gale Edwards Lawrence, Manager 678-480-1500. www. GELHealthAdvisors.com

Cyngeiear Grimes

Jannet Cervantes

Gale Lawrence

June Allen

(770) 808-7075

(678) 902-7828

(678 480-1500

(678) 697-2319

Patricia Parker

FerRell Malone Sr.

Deborah Stokelin

Peggie Rhodes

(678) 557-6501

(912) 816-5817

(678)482-4913

(770) 330-0324

Debbie Kight

Veronica Jackson

(404) 452-0869

(678) 593-6476

Andre & Joan Shiver (601) 506-2817

14 • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2019 • PHYSICIANS GUIDE • HENRY HERALD • CLAYTON NEWS • JACKSON PROGRESS-ARGUS


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OPHTHALMOLOGY Is your child ready for contact lenses?

Eye conditions that can affect children

Learning about certain conditions and how to recognize their accompanying symptoms can help parents ensure kids get the treatment they need. Amblyopia Often referred to as "lazy eye," amblyopia may be characterized by reduced vision in an eye that has not received adequate use during early childhood. Amblyopia may result from misalignment of a child's eyes or from one eye focusing better than the other. If left untreated, the weaker eye can continue to weaken until it is rendered useless. Sight in the affected eye can be restored if treatment is begun early, says Prevent Blindness America. Glasses, eye exercises or surgery may be prescribed to help fix the underlying causes of the condition. Astigmatism Astigmatism is a condition wherein objects viewed at both a distance and close up can appear blurry. Experts say it occurs from the uneven curvature of the cornea or lens, which prevents rays of light from entering the eye and focusing

on a single point on the retina, otherwise known as a refractive error. Prescription eyeglasses often fix astigmatism. All About Vision also says that refractive surgery may correct astigmatism. Color blindness (color vision deficiency)

According to a study titled "Children & Contact Lenses" conducted by the American Optometric Association Research and Information Center in conjunction with the Sports Vision Section and Contact Lens and Cornea Section of AOA, with support from VISTAKON®, a division of Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Inc., more than half (51 percent) of optometrists feel it is appropriate to introduce children to soft contact lenses between the ages of 10 and 12 years old, while nearly one in four (23 percent) feel

The main symptom of color blindness is difficulty distinguishing between colors or making mistakes when identifying colors, particularly those shaded red and green. Typically by age five, children with normal color vision will be able to identify groups of colors, so if a school-aged child is having difficulty or showing disinterest in coloring, he or she may benefit from a colorblindness test. The National Eye Institute says color blindness is much more common in males than in females.

Age alone may not be a reference for the appropriateness of contact lenses. Parents and eye doctors may take maturity into consideration as well. Contact lenses require a greater level of care than glasses, and parents should factor in that maintenance when deciding if their children should try contact lenses or stick with traditional eyeglasses. Younger children also may not be as dexterous as older contact lens wearers, making it challenging for them to insert and remove contacts safely and properly. While there are no firm rules regarding the right age to begin wearing contact lenses, parents can consider their children's maturity levels and their eye doctor's recommendations before making a final decision. More information is available at www.aoa.org.

1075 Bandy Parkway Suite 110, Locust Grove GA 30248

Pediatric glaucoma This rare condition, also known as congenital glaucoma, occurs in infants and young children. The Glaucoma Research Foundation says incorrect development of the eye's drainage system before birth leads to increased intraocular pressure, which can damage the optic nerve. Enlarged eyes, corneal cloudiness and sensitivity to light can be symptoms. Medication and surgery are required in most cases. Pink eye (conjunctivitis), diabetesrelated eye problems and other refractive errors also can occur in children. Routine eye examinations can identify problems and get children the treatment they need.

13 to 14 years old is a suitable age for a child to begin wearing contact lenses. The younger the child is, the lower the percentage of eye doctors who feel it is appropriate to introduce lenses.

Stay home in Henry for your eye care needs

Corner of Strong Rock Parkway and Bandy Parkway

• PROVIDING ROUTINE EYE CARE FOR THE FITTING OF GLASSES OR CONTACTS A FULL SERVICE OPTICAL DISPENSARY • OFFERING EXAMS AND TREATMENT FOR CATARACTS, GLAUCOMA, MACULAR DEGENERATION, DIABETIC EYE DISEASE AND COSMETIC/RECONSTRUCTIVE EYELID DISORDERS.

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hile a loss of visual acuity is often associated with senior citizens, various diseases and conditions of the eye can affect children. The American Academy of Opthalmology says many conditions and diseases can impact a child's vision. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical to improving a youngster's eye health and helping him or her see and feel better.

Contact lenses are a viable option for many people who require vision correction. Some find them more convenient than eyeglasses, and people who wear contact lenses are less likely to lose them or leave them behind than they are with traditional eyeglasses. Others feel contacts are more comfortable to wear and reduce the propensity for any blind spots in peripheral vision. While contacts are appropriate for many people, there are some limitations depending on the particular vision problem and age.

770-228-3836 8:00AM – 5:00PM Monday through Friday

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ASSISTED ASSISTED LIVINGLIVINGSenior

S

living options abound

enior living communities often present an affordable and comfortable option for adults over the age of 55. Filled with like-minded and similarly aged residents, these communities can be the right fit for individuals no longer interested in or capable of taking care of a larger home. Senior communities are located all across the country. Finding one that meets your needs takes only a little research. Although they are often moderately priced and offer a variety of amenities, senior living communities sometimes suffer from a bad reputation. But such communities are not the “old age homes” that some people purport them to be. Rather, they’re entire living neighborhoods that cater to the needs of an active resident base. These communities can range from independent living private homes or condos to managed care facilities. Residents may be able to enjoy organized outings, recreation, shopping, and socialization without having to venture far from property grounds. Some communities offer food services or an on-site restaurant. Fifty-five and older communities offer conveniences that many find irresistible. They’re frequently located close to shopping, dining and healthcare providers. Taxes, insurance, utilities, and maintenance expenses may be covered in one fee. Clubhouses, golf courses, lakes, card rooms,

Senior Care Communities The Farm — The Woods

and many other offerings are designed to appeal to residents of many ages. Now that baby boomers have reached the age where retirement communities are a consideration, there has been an influx of interest. Those considering a move to one of these communities should research some information before purchasing a unit. • Determine the fees associated with a community. Can Medicaid or long-term care insurance pay for all or a portion of the fees? Which types of services does the monthly fee cover? • Who is eligible to live in the community? Some restrict all residents to a particular age, while others do not. Rules may be in effect that include an age cut-off limit. • Is this the type of community where you can age in place? Meaning, are there separate accommodations if you eventually need assisted living care? Some communities offer living options that vary depending on residents’ ages. • Be sure there are activities or amenities that appeal to you. You eventually want to find your niche and get together with a group of friends who share the same interests. Following these guidelines can mean discovering a community where anyone can feel comfortable for years to come.

Enriching the Lives of those we Serve

Our Services

• 24 hour overnight care by our dedicated and experienced staff • Medication management • Assistance with activities of daily living • Three home cooked meals & 2 snacks served daily • Private rooms & companion suites us to • Laundry & housekeeping Please contact our of ur to a set up • Recreational & cultural activities in us jo d an ity un Comm • And much more! for a free lunch. ase)

CONTACT CONTACT INFO INFO

(24hr notice ple

DreamCatcher Catcher Senior Care Communities Dream Senior Care Communities 286 Four Points, Rd., Jackson, GA 30233

286 Four Points, Rd.,Phone Jackson, GA775-2794 30233 | Phone (770) | Fax(770) (770) 775-2794 775-4767 | Fax (770) 775-4767

16 • WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2019 • PHYSICIANS GUIDE • HENRY HERALD • CLAYTON NEWS • JACKSON PROGRESS-ARGUS

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Specialized and Personalized Services When and Where You Need Them REHABILITATION is our specialty – Our rehabilitation service focuses on occupational, physical, and speech therapy, designed for recovery regarding: joint replacement and various surgeries, stroke, cardiac occurrences, and resistant wounds that cannot be treated through outpatient means.

Not only does WellStar Sylvan Grove provide a healing touch, we also offer: - Emergency Department services - Placement for post-acute, extended care - Personalized nursing care and treatment from dedicated professionals - Adult and pediatric therapy programs

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Sylvan Grove is located in quiet and serene setting convenient to Butts, Henry, Rockdale, Newton and Spalding counties.

WELLSTAR SYLVAN GROVE HOSPITAL | 1050 McDonough Rd | 770.775.7861 x 267 wellstar.org

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How to make your favorite foods healthier

A

fter the whirlwind of the holiday season, the season of resolutions takes over. Many people to resolve to live healthier, and they may not have to give up their favorite foods to do so. Research from the National Institutes of Health suggests American adults between the ages of 18 and 49 gain an average of one to two pounds every year. Grazing and overeating tends to increase when the weather cools down. A 2005 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that, in the fall, people tend to consume more calories, total fat and saturated fat. In the spring, people seem to prefer more carbohydrates. In addition, less powerful sunshine in winter coupled with people bundling up translates into less vitamin D being absorbed by the body. Some researchers believe there is a link between vitamin D deficiency and weight gain as well.

• Fry with care. Use healthy oils like olive or coconut sparingly.

To ensure that certain foods do not sabotage healthy eating plans, people can employ some easy modifications and make healthier versions of the foods they like to eat.

• Replace meat with leaner forms of protein. Lean chicken,

• Choose crunchy foods. Those who are prone to snacking can reach for noisy foods. These include crunchy items like apples, carrots and pretzels. Scientists say that when people listen to what they are chewing — called the “crunch effect” — they eat less of that item.

• Tone down the cream. Delicious dishes like fettuccine alfredo typically are made with lots of butter and cream. Replace cream sauces with a healthier base made of low-fat milk thickened with flour. Increase the flavor with favorite spices.

Many foods that are traditionally fried also can be lightly coated with cooking spray and baked for a crunchy texture.

• Choose sodium-free seasonings. The USCA recommends limiting sodium to less than 1 teaspoon of salt per day. Try options like fresh herbs or lemon juice to add some sodium-free flavor.

• Increase fiber content. Fiber helps one feel fuller longer and can also be helpful for digestion and heart health. Choose the “brown” varieties of rice, pasta and breads.

turkey and pork can replace red meats in many recipes. Some traditional meat dishes, such as burgers, also can be modified using vegetables or seafood. Lean meats dry out quickly, so keep foods moist by watching cooking times.

• Stock up on yogurt. Greek and other varieties of yogurt can replace sour cream and mayonnaise in many dishes. Resolving to eat healthier can be easy by making some simple swaps when preparing your favorite foods.

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