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L E T ' S E AT THE LOCAL ISSUE MAY 2014 ISSUE NO. 12

C O R AZ ON SAR SA PI N O BR EAK FAST & PI ES

S PE AKE AS Y


MAY 201 4

WHAT'S INSIDE

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CORAZON

SARSA

BREAKFAST & PIES

PINO

SPEAKEASY

ISSUE N O . 12

As alik


The laTesT dining hoTspoT down souTh

Aside from being an exciting addition to the retail scene south of the Metro, the new SM BF also makes it much easier for its clients – young and old alike, to enjoy a more satisfying dining experience without having to go too far through its lineup of new restaurants.

Aside from offering the best baked treats in the Metro, My Little Buttercup is a non-intimidating family restaurant/café, which also serves a variety of hot dishes to satisfy every craving. The owners take pride in offering a delicious selection of comfort food favorites and desserts at more accessible price points. Must-tries include the French Hot Chocolate, all-day breakfast selection, which includes Tapsilog and Buttermilk Pancakes with Egg and Bacon, Adobo Baby Back Ribs, burgers, and it’s very popular lineup of cupcakes. Bestsellers include the Red Velvet, Speculoos Cookie Butter, and Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup.

When it comes to shabu-shabu, no one does it better than Thousand Cranes. Having developed a solid following throughout the years, this well-loved Asian-themed restaurant is happy to have set up shop down South. This is to cater to their clients who usually have to go all the way

My LittLe Buttercup 2nd Floor Hallway 478-4013

Thousand Cranes prides itself for offering not just great value for ingredients to be served – from US Kobe Gold Ribeye, seafood, vegetables and more. Not just limited to shabu-shabu it also offers oher “Asian favorites” like rice toppings, sushi and sashimi.

With a name, which means “bread from heaven”, Manna is an inspired bakery and restaurant that became popular for its appetizing lineup of artisanal breads. Born out of the owner’s passion for good bring pleasure to its diners.

Thousand Cranes

Manna

2nd Floor Hallway 808-6504

2nd Floor Hallway 556-6512

For inquiries, call 808-6306 loc. 15

smbfmarketing@gmail.com

From wheat bread, walnut bread, and it’s very popular sugarfree breads, Manna also provides guests with other kitchen staples such as a selection of salad dressings, spreads, and jams. Must-tries include the Clam Chowder, Grilled Cheese Sandwich, Corned Beef Reuben, and Cherry Tomato Mozzarella.

www.facebook.com/SMCityBF

@smcitybf


L E T ' S E AT TH E L OCA L ISSU E

E DITOR 'S LE TTE R

FERNANDO MIGUEL BELMONTE Publisher

ON T H E COV E R

DON JAUCIAN Since we began working on Let’s Eat, I’ve always wanted to do an issue on Filipino food. It has been the primed as the new culinary thing, hailed by magazines like New York and Esquire UK as the likely successor to the Asian food frenzy. Beloved by celebrity chefs such as Anthony Bourdain and food show hosts like Andrew Zimmern of Bizarre Foods (who proclaimed our local cuisine as “the next big thing”), Filipino food has often found itself in the spotlight, but not in the world’s culinary stage, unlike our other Asian brethren such as the Thai, Japanese, and Chinese in terms of taking over food trends and hotspots. So for the Let’s Eat team, it’s about time we devote a full issue on our beloved homegrown food. We showcase the best restaurants that deliver local flavors that are both innovative but still grounded by the taste of good home cooking that we’ve come to love. Places like Sarsa, Pino, and Corazon all fit our criteria for a restaurant that successfully infuses modern sensibility to classic Filipino cuisine—and taking them on a different spin. And as usual, we cap off our issue with a dessert and a drinking place, Breakfast and Pies and Speakeasy, respectively. Our new haunts after a long day of eating. Kain na! Connect with us on Facebook (LetsEatPhilStar) and on Instagram (@lets_eat_magazine). We are also available on the digital newsstand, Buqo which you can download on the iTunes Store and Google Play.

Managing Editor

THYSZ ESTRADA Editorial Associate

PATRICK DIOKNO Art Director

SPANKY HIZON ENRIQUEZ Writer

GABBY CANTERO Photographer

LUCIEN DY TIOCO

ANNALYN DELGADO

Paella Mariscos, Paella Negra, and Paella Valenciana from Corazon Photo by GABBY CANTERO

Golden Letter Publishing, 1497 E. Rodriguez Ave., Quezon City For inquiries, call 5277901 local 132 or email letseat062013@gmail.com Facebook: facebook.com/LetsEatPhilStar Instagram: lets_eat_magazine

ERRATUM In the April 2014 issue of Let’s Eat, we failed to acknowledge the dish on the cover—the Rack of Lamb and Pulled Shoulder of Lamb from The Black Pig. We apologize for this oversight.

Head of Sales & Marketing Editorial Assistant


LET'S EAT — May 2014

THE HEART OF LIFE BY SPANKY HIZON ENRIQUEZ PHOTOS BY GABBY CANTERO

Chef Florabel Co-Yatco takes Filipino-Hispano cuisine on a hearty level

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LET'S EAT — May 2014

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orazon” is a name dear to my heart. Growing up, I was lucky to have a second mother in our household, my dad’s sister, my Ninang Cora, who was one of the most kind-hearted people I’ve ever met. I cherish her memory and always remember how she influenced my life, especially during the month of May, as she was born on the 12th many years ago. She was a professor at the University of the East, and she spent a few summers teaching me how to type fast with discipline. It’s a skill that I use everyday, to this day, as a writer. She taught me the value of exercise, as she was a very active lady, and I still remember the whirring of the wheels of her stationary bicycle as she pedaled her way to good health. She gave me my first Bible, and she gave me many through the years, the last, just a few months before she passed away five years ago. She was a Christian but not a Catholic, and she made me understand that the essence of religion is not worship, but faith.   She truly loved to cook and bake, and my childhood was made complete by the wonderful aromas that would waft out of her beloved oven. The butter-glazed cashew bars she called “yummies”, her oldfashioned heart-shaped chocolate cakes with condensada frosting, her creamy chicken a la king in wedges of crisp toast, her irresistibly rich chicken macaroni casseroles. When I started working, it became a tradition for me to treat her on her birthday, as she never married and didn’t have children of her own. I’m sure that she would have been tickled at the thought of having a party in a restaurant that shared her name, a restaurant as vibrant, as welcoming, and as generous as she was.  In the busiest areas of the most crowded levels of the new East Wing of the Shangri-La Plaza Mall, one can get dazed

and confused from the many tempting dining destinations, but there are two things about this restaurant that act like beacons for foodies of all ages: Corazon’s “Candy Chairs”, bright red and white, striped like peppermint canes and shaped like those old school rattan party chairs; and the restaurant’s colorful “Dirty ice cream” cart, parked in front, a playful and wistful throwback to everyone’s favorite kiddie chill out treat. Perhaps that’s why this restaurant is so popular—it has a way of making us all feel like giddy children again. The giddiness, the anticipation of a happy meal shared with family and friends, is fulfilled by the quality of the food. “Filipino Hispano” it’s called, and the Spanish influence is certainly apparent, but the voluminous menu, developed under the keen supervision of Chef Patron Florabel Co-Yatco, is very much Pinoy in execution. Nothing too formal or too intimidating in the recipes or ingredients, everything familiar but elevated to a higher level of preparation. Flavors are exaggerated: sweet is sweet and savory is savory. Every dish is extremely tasty. It seems subtlety is not in this restaurant’s vocabulary. And that is a very good thing for the Pinoy palate, something guaranteed to please everyone. Oh, and the complimentary spicy cornik appetizers is genius.

1 Paella Mariscos 2 3 Chorizo Fillipino 4 Magellan 5 Pulpo

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LET'S EAT — May 2014

RECOMMENDED DISHES

My FAvORITE ITEM In THE vAsT MEnu Is THE pAELLA nEgRA. IT’s gOOd FOR THREE And A sTEAL AT LEss THAn FIvE HundREd pEsOs FOR A HEFTy pAELLERA bRIMMIng wITH squId And FILLETs OF FIsH, And LAsHEd wITH gARLIC AIOLI.

Pulpo Seville

Paella Mariscos

Paella Negra Paella Valenciana

TIPS

alcohol.

PRIC E R A N G E * *selected APPETIZERS manchego cheese) PAELLA (Paella Valenciana) ENTREES P5500 (Whole Lechon De Mora) VEGETABLES SOUP P595 (Sinigang na Pompano) Corazon Filipino Hispano Cuisine

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My favorite item in the vast menu is the paella negra. It’s good for three and a steal at less than five hundred pesos for a hefty paellera brimming with squid and fillets of fish, and lashed with garlic aioli. The ebony rice on top is so delectable, the socarrat at the bottom so crisp, that no additional garnishing is necessary. And for dessert? It’s a no brainer for me. The homemade sorbetes from the cariton, please! Ube macapuno and keso langka. The beloved street food frozen delights of my childhood days, the flavors, authentically recreated with obvious affection. A fine dining experience need not be formal. A memorable meal doesn’t have to be fancy. What matters most to us Filipinos is hearty food enjoyed with heartier laughter in the company of the ones closest to our heart. That’s exactly what Corazon offers, and that’s why I know my ninang would have loved it too.


LET'S EAT — May 2014

H OM E T Own gLOR y BY SPANKY HIZON ENRIQUEZ PHOTOS BY GABBY CANTERO

Chef JP Anglo recalls the pleasures of a great home-cooked meal in Sarsa

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LET'S EAT — May 2014 02

THE HOusE spECIAL, THE kAnsI, THE nEgREnsE vERsIOn OF buLALO, Is sERvEd s I z z L I n g , w I T H A d A n g E R O u s Ly s E x y , quIvERIng MOund OF bOnE MARROw pERCHEd A b O v E I M p O s s I b Ly T E n d E R b I T E - s I z E d CHunks OF pREMIuM bEEF.

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P Anglo wears many hats. He’s a passionate surfer, often flying off to La Union to ride the northern waves. He’s a glamorous celebrity, one of the mentors in the toprating local version of Junior Master Chef. He’s a loyal son of Bacolod, an articulate ambassador tirelessly promoting Negrense cuisine. He’s a respected restaurateur: his Mu Shu in his hometown has become a must-visit spot for tourists and locals alike, and his half-year young Sarsa in Bonifacio Global City is one of the most successful new restaurants that have opened anywhere in the country in the past year. He’s a very creative chef, having learned his Le Cordon Bleu lessons well, honing his kitchen skills for five years in Sydney, where he began his career. He’s many things to many people, with a growing fan base among foodies all over the Philippines. But what most of the chef ’s fans don’t know is that he’s a beloved baby brother to his older sisters Tracy and Anne, who have been his biggest fans since their childhood days. They were also the first to enjoy the future culinary superstar’s cooking. Imagine this: a seven-year-old Jayps, precariously balanced atop a stool, frying up some Vienna sausages. That’s a fond shared memory among the siblings, a scene from the brief period when their family was based

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in New Jersey. Apparently, that’s when the very independent and determined bunso first tried his hand at cooking, and discovered his natural aptitude for it. I wish I could write that it was all smooth sailing from that shaky first day decades ago to his solid present day fame, but it wasn’t. Like many creative people, he was a quintessential “bad boy” during his teens, encountering many rough patches trying to find his footing, going through many schools and many courses before settling down in CCA in 1999. That’s where he rediscovered the path back to his true destiny, one that seemed predetermined from the time he was a very young boy. Flash forward fifteen years later, and thanks to a lot of hard work and endless hours honing his craft, he’s at the top of his game, a man in full control, on the crest of a wave of well-deserved success. Success in the culinary world is often measured by the number of covers, or guests who patronize a restaurant. By that metric, Sarsa is a roaring success. There seems to be a permanent queue outside its doors, as long now as it was when the restaurant first opened in October of 2013. It doesn’t hurt that, unlike other restaurants owned by “celebrity chefs” who just lend their name to the marquee and hardly make an

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LET'S EAT — May 2014 appearance, Jayps is almost always inside his kitchen—prepping, cooking, expediting, checking, tasting— ensuring that his dishes are always up to his own exacting standards. The people line up, many of them returning for the third or fourth time, because the food is just so damn good. Classics revolutionized and rebooted: a deliriously decadent inasal sisig. Bacolod batchoy made artisanal, accorded with the same care and respect as the Japanese do with their ramen. Degrees of difficulty made exponential for seemingly simple specials. A traditional kadios bean soup, but served with a thick slab of bacon belly to round off the flavors. Perfectly marinated barbecue sticks of isol, chicken tails, masterfully grilled over blazing red charcoal. And the house special, the kansi—the Negrense version of bulalo—is served sizzling, with a dangerously sexy, quivering mound of bone marrow perched above impossibly tender bitesized chunks of premium beef. I’ve always thought that Bacolod’s best offerings were its sugar-laden desserts, but Sarsa is proof positive that the region’s savories can challenge the proud Capampangan heritage specialties for the title of the Philippines’ most highly regarded provincial cuisine. Thanks to JP’s unique spin on his region’s traditional favorites, Negrense cooking is now the next big wave.

RECOMMENDED DISHES

Inasal Sisig

TIPS

PRICE RANG E * selected GRILLED STICKS P195 (Liempo-Q) PANCIT NOODLES, ATBP. P170 (Arroz

BEEF CHICKEN PORK SEAFOOD

Sarsa Kitchen and Bar

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LET'S EAT — May 2014

E AT L E T ' SE E T S W S

EAsy A s pIE BY SPANKY HIZON ENRIQUEZ PHOTOS BY GABBY CANTERO

Even Momfuku took notice of Breakfast and Pie’s delectable deserts

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or the longest time, I’ve been dreaming of a place that sells nothing but pies— crumbly buttery crusts, fresh fruit fillings, over the top chocolate and candy infusions—but somehow, no one’s thought to open one until now, which is why, to the bakers of Pi, I am infinitely grateful. I love the pun of the store’s name, and I adore the wit behind π: by its mystical mathematical definition, it relates to the circle, the shape of the house specialty. Most of all, I worship Pi’s pies in all their forms and functions, from K Lime to Butterfinger and Apple Gruyere to Chocolate Raspberry. But I want S’more. And yes, that flavor’s available too.

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LET'S EAT — May 2014

ROLLING IN DOUGH

bars. clockwise from top)

Pi Breakfast and Pies is located at 39 Malingap, Teachers Vill QC; (02) 2121212 for delivery and (02) for reservations and pickups. Facebook: breakfastnpies Twitter: breakfastnpies 13


LET'S EAT — May 2014

REFI nEd TAs TEs BY SPANKY HIZON ENRIQUEZ PHOTOS BY GABBY CANTERO

Pino has come a long way from a mere drinking place to a landmark Filipino restaurant 01 14


LET'S EAT — May 2014

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ne of the most exciting dining scenes in Metro Manila is in Quezon City, but not in the more visible districts where most would expect to find the hottest new restaurants. Not In Tomas Morato or along the Scout Streets nearby or even in Eastwood. Although those areas have their fair share of legendary establishments and new go-to favorites, the most thrilling, the quirkiest, and many agree, the restaurants with the most character are lined up in Teacher’s Village—on all those alliterated streets whose names begin with the letter “M”: Matimtiman, Masunurin, Maginhawa. One quirky joint after another, almost all located in converted apartments and cozy houses. There are Wicked Kitchens and Cebuano Pizzas. Korean sam gyeup sal cheek by jowl with Persian shawarma. The restaurants may be small in size, but all are big on flavor. It would take at least two days to discover all of them via a moveable feast, but if time is limited, the starting point should be one of the first ones that opened, the one that paved the way: Pino on Malingap St. Why “Pino”? Ask Ed Bugia, the genial chef who conceptualized the restaurant, and with a mischievous twinkle in his eyes, he’ll probably say Pino, because of his interesting interpretations of Filipino food. Or “pino”, a translation of the English “fine”, for fine dining. But better yet, squeeze the anecdote about Pinocchio out of him; that’s the naughtiest origin story by far. There may be different versions of the etymology of the restaurant’s name, but there’s definitely agreement when it comes to the date when it all began: August 8, 2008. A day that’s proven to be most fortunate to the former culinary instructor; the day Pino first opened its doors as an inuman, of all things. In the beginning, that’s all that Chef Ed envisioned. A drinking place with great chow. He wanted to serve whatever he felt

like cooking; no pressure. At one point, grilled cheese sandwiches were on the menu. But the natural talent and innate creativity of the young man couldn’t be contained—after all, his mentor is none other than Chef Him Uy de Baron, who took him under his wing a decade ago in Rustan’s Makati’s East Cafe, that hidden gem of Asian cuisine in the middle of the country’s premiere department store. The two established an excellent working relationship and remain close friends to this day. Both also now have very popular restaurants: Nomama for Him, and the growing Pino chain for Ed. Another celebrated chef is part of the Pino success story. Reggie Aspiras discovered the bar with excellent dishes very early on, and was the first to write about it. She famously asked, “Why not offer lunch?” Prior to that, Pino’s regulars were thirsty residents of the village and the faculty and students from neighboring U.P. Diliman. After the article was published on the first day of 2009, foodies from all points

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LET'S EAT — May 2014

MARkET FORCEs sOOn dEMAndEd THAT Ed TRAnsITIOn HIs gIn JOInT TO A FuLLsERvICE FuLL-MEnu REsTAuRAnT, And HIs pInO sIgnATuREs HAvE sInCE bECOME sTAndARds, OFT COpIEd, buT nEvER EquALEd 03

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RECOMMENDED DISHES

TIPS

04 of the compass were soon driving around Teacher’s, in search of the tiny restaurant that could. Market forces soon demanded that Ed transition his gin joint to a full-service fullmenu restaurant, and his Pino signatures have since become standards, oft copied, but never equaled, such as the mini sisig acos, portobello mushroom inasal, sinigang na salmon sa miso’t bayabas. The refreshing and warming broth of his buko juice binakol. And the bestseller, the crunchyfatty-nutty-creamy kare-kareng bagnet. Six years on, Pino’s given birth to Pipino, which offers healthy vegetarian cuisine, and Pi Breakfast and Pies. But the mother restaurant is still as sexy as ever, seducing its clientele with its exciting evershifting specials, its surprisingly affordable prices, and its second, more accessible branch on Jupiter St. in Makati. And one thing hasn’t changed from the very beginning. Pino still is a kick-ass beer and booze destination with its line of flavored beers (watermelon, strawberry, honeymansi, lychee) and the most magnificent Margaritas in the city.

PRICE RANG E APPETIZER MAIN COURSE PASTA Sisig Carbonara) Pino Resto Bar


LET'S EAT — May 2014

' S E AT L E TTREATS

' S E AT L E TTREATS

Free Frozen Brazo with minimum purchase of P2000

Free Tsokolate Banana Turon for every P1,000 single receipt order

' S E AT L E TTREATS

' S E AT L E TTREATS

Buy One Take One Rice Meals for P250* from 11 A.M. to 4 P.M.

Get the coffee and dessert combo for only P199

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LET'S EAT — May 2014

L E T ' S E AT

L E T ' S E AT

Coupon is valid from 30 May to 30 June 2014. Only one (01) coupon can be redeemed per transaction. Use with other discount or promotion is not allowed. Not replaceable when lost and non transferable to cash. Only the coupon from Let’s Eat print edition will be entertained.

Coupon is valid from 30 May to 30 June 2014. Only redeemable at the EDSA Shangri-La Plaza Mall branch. Only one (01) coupon can be redeemed per transaction. Use with other discount or promotion is not allowed. Not replaceable when lost and non transferable to cash. Only the coupon from Let’s Eat print edition will be entertained.

L E T ' S E AT

L E T ' S E AT

Coupon is valid from 30 May to 30 June 2014. Only one (01) coupon can be redeemed per transaction. Use with other discount or promotion is not allowed. Not replaceable when lost and non transferable to cash. Both Speakeasy coupons cannot be used at once, only one of the coupons can be used per visit. Only the coupon from Let’s Eat print edition will be entertained. 

Coupon is valid from 30 May to 30 June 2014. Only one (01) coupon can be redeemed per transaction. Use with other discount or promotion is not allowed. Not replaceable when lost and non transferable to cash. Both Speakeasy coupons cannot be used at once, only one of the coupons can be used per visit. Only the coupon from Let’s Eat print edition will be entertained.

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LET'S EAT — May 2014

L E T 'SK D R IN

THE E nd OF pROHI b ITIOn BY SPANKY HIZON ENRIQUEZ PHOTOS BY GABBY CANTERO

Speakeasy puts a great spin on the classic drinks of comfort and inebriation Speakeasies are those incognito bars that sold illegal liquor in America during the Prohibition era in the 1920s. Almost a century later, a bar called Speakeasy has opened here in our city, but it’s got nothing to hide. This new millennium version cockily offers bespoke cocktails shaken and stirred by Alyona, a ravishing Russian mixologist. Her bar boasts of a vast array of premium brands, great neat, but even better in a mix with a modern twist. The establishment also proudly offers a line-up of classic comfort food by Mike Santos, the affable chef who ensures that all his patrons leave his establishment with full stomachs, satisfied cravings, and most importantly, high spirits.

Speakeasy is located at G/F Alphaland Makati Place, Ayala Ave. cor. Malugay St., Makati; 0917 499 3279. Facebook: SpeakeasyMakati 19


LET'S EAT — May 2014

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Let's Eat May Issue  

Since we began working on Let’s Eat, I’ve always wanted to do an issue on Filipino food. It has been the primed as the new culinary thing, h...

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