Page 1

March 2017 | Vol. 3 Iss. 03

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RESIDENTS PROVIDE INPUT to improve life on State Street By Kelly Cannon | kelly@mycityjournals.com

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Nearly 200 residents who live or work on State Street turned out to give their opinion on what should be done to improve the corridor. (Kelly Cannon/City Journals)

experience, how do we do that, how do we improve the visual and aesthetic experience for everyone moving along State Street, those crossing State Street, and what is happening on the private property side,” Robinson said. There are seven goals to Life on State Street: improve safety and security, improve identity of place, expand connectivity, optimize mobility, drive economic prosperity, support equitable living opportunities and encourage healthy and sustainable design. After participants registered and walked into the work shop, they were given small stickers to place on panels next to the goal they believed was their largest priority. Most of the stickers were placed next to improve safety and security, improve identity of place and encourage healthy and sustainable design. Robinson agreed there are a lot of safety and security issues along this particular section of State Street. “We’ve talked to members of the public about this already. There’s criminal activity. There’s vehicular crashes and other issues in terms of crossing and safety for cyclist and pedestrians,” Robinson said. “Transit is a big challenge on State Street. How can State Street become a couplet to the TRAX system? That’s something that we’ll be looking at.” The workshop itself was divided into two parts. The first hour was dedicated to having participants provide feedback on

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early 200 residents participated in an interactive workshop to help solve the problems plaguing State Street. Held Feb. 9 at Salt Lake Community College, Life on State Street provided a platform for people who live and/or work on State Street from North Temple to 3300 South to voice their concerns and opinions on what should be done on that section of the street. “We want to make major changes to State Street as the heart of our urban neighborhood in both Salt Lake and South Salt Lake,” said Sharen Hauri, the urban design director for South Salt Lake. “We believe that if we make changes to the road itself, it will be a big improvement by making things friendlier for bikers, walkers, adding things like street trees and lighting. Local businesses succeed with facade improvements and parking, we’re looking at anything that we can do and doing whatever it takes to make those transformations.” The initial idea for the project was developed in 2010 for the entirety of State Street, starting at the capitol and ending in Draper. The effort is a joint project between Salt Lake City, South Salt Lake, the Wasatch Regional Council, Salt Lake County, the Utah Department of Transportation and the Utah Transit Authority. The goal of the Life on State Street workshop was to get into the next level of detail. “Ultimately with this project, we’ll be identifying three demonstration sites with detailed design drawings of what should happen to the roadway and ultimately getting some cost estimates and seeking funding for hopefully implementing those demonstration projects, with the ultimate idea that we can grow it for the length of State Street,” said Molly Robinson, the urban designer in the planning division for Salt Lake City. The three demonstration sites and their locations have yet to be determined and will be developed after gathering the input provided by residents. The section of State Street from North Temple to 3300 South was selected because Salt Lake City and South Salt Lake have very similar issues. “We’re both urbanizing and adding a lot right now in housing and business and jobs. They’re very similar as we have transit with TRAX and bus lines and major businesses and institutions,” Hauri said. “We chose a section that was very similar in what happens there and the trends with who lives there and what they do. It’s very similar neighborhood. And it’s all relatively blighted.” Robinson said the idea is to figure out what is an ideal model for an urban arterial in Utah that is unique and can serve as a model for the whole state. “This project is looking at both the roadway itself, what’s happening between property lines, can we improve the pedestrian

priorities and experiences on State Street by using an individual electronic voting device. The questions were presented by Alex Joyce, a consultant with Fregonese Associates hired to help with the workshops. Questions delved deeper into the goals of the workshop, asking participants what was their top priority when it came to mobility or identity. In between the first and second half of the workshops, South Salt Lake Mayor Cherie Wood thanked residents for coming out to give their opinion and provide feedback on State Street. “Seven years ago when I ran for mayor, I ran on ‘Safe, Clean and Beautiful City,’” Wood said. “I’m super excited because we’re going to work together to make State Street a safe, clean and beautiful State Street. Thanks for participating tonight.” The second part of the workshop had participants gather around tables that had one of two projects on it. The first project had a print out of an aerial view of the section of State Street in question. Using markers, stickers and notecards, participants identified areas of State Street they felt were of concern, areas they felt could be better utilized and sections they felt already demonstrated an ideal part of the street. The second project had print outs that symbolied a cross section of a street. Using cut-outs of cars, trees, bicycles, dividers, etc. participants glued the cut outs to the page in order continued on page 5…

Bowl with a cop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 SSL firefighter receives recognition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Souper Bowl of Caring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 CHS boys basketball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

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LOCAL LIFE

Page 2 | March 2017

S outh Salt Lake City Journal

Burmese refugee makes most of opportunity to shine in tech sector By Brian Shaw | brian.shaw@mycityjournals.com The South Salt Lake City Journal is a monthly publication distributed directly to residents via the USPS as well as locations throughout South Salt Lake. For information about distribution please email circulation@mycityjournals. com or call our offices. Rack locations are also available on our website. For subscriptions please contact: circulation@mycityjournals.com The views and opinions expressed in display advertisements do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions held by Loyal Perch Media or the City Journals. This publication may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written consent of the owner.

The South Salt Lake Team CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Bryan Scott bryan@mycityjournals.com EDITOR: Travis Barton travis@mycityjournals.com ADVERTISING: 801-254-5974 DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING: Ryan Casper ryan.casper@mycityjournals.com 801-671-2034 SALES ASSOCIATES: Melissa Worthen melissa@mycityjournals.com 801-897-5231 Steve Hession steve@mycityjournals.com 801-433-8051 Josh Ragsdale Josh.R@MyCityJournals.com 801-824-9854 CIRCULATION COORDINATOR: Brad Casper circulation@mycityjournals.com EDITORIAL & AD DESIGN: Tina Falk Ty Gorton South Salt Lake City Journal 9500 South 500 West, Suite 205 Sandy, UT 84070 Phone: 801 254 5974

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he We Are Makers program is changing lives. None perhaps more so than the life of Garroe Wah, a refugee from Burma.

Wah’s only offense in his native land was that he was Karen—a religious ethnic group that has been persecuted since the 1950s and that, according to Wah, had the Burmese government in 1995 issue a statement calling for their ethnic cleansing. After running from village to village through eastern Burma from 1995 to 1999 to avoid losing his life to the Burmese soldiers who were chasing him and his fellow countrymen, United Nations Human Crisis Relief (UNHCR) officials were finally able to stage an escape route for Wah and many fellow Karen (kuh-REN), allowing them to make it safely to a refugee camp along the Thailand border. Danger still surrounded him. Leaving the refugee camp meant you could be arrested by Thai police and sent back to Burma—Wah worked his way around the danger by seeing a bigger picture entirely. “Since I was young I’ve really been crazy about computers,” said Wah, who, along with other area refugees has now been in the coding training program for We Are Makers for five months. His dreams are big like any refugee wanting to make the most of their American experience. In his case, he wants to be a computer programmer. Even when Wah arrived in Utah in June 2008, the computer he bought at a Deseret Industries sat and collected dust because he didn’t know how to use it. It wasn’t until an LDS missionary helped him some eight months later that it came out of that box. When he was at a refugee camp years earlier, he said he and his fellow Karen often wondered aloud what using one would be like. “Back at the camp, we’d heard about it but we’d never used one. Was it a box? A bowl?” he said, laughing at the thought now. “I was told [by a relief worker] I’d be able to look at something like a TV screen.” Even in the camp where Wah stayed in Thailand as a young man in his 20s, he made the best of a tough situation. He took high school classes even though no governing body recognized he was receiving an education. Wah’s love of learning there resulted in his eventually being accepted to a private school in a small city 300 miles away from the camp, taught solely by a Japanese teacher whose mother financed the entire venture—from books to housing to food and clothing—and who taught these refugees more than they ever thought possible. “I owe so much to this teacher, he was so amazing,” said Wah, who added that he’d one day like to return to help and teach others. But even as he was in school 300 miles away from that refugee camp, Wah never forgot about his own people. Even then, he took the English lessons he learned from that Japanese teacher and became an interpreter at the camp where he had stayed because he felt it was the right thing to do. “There’s a big need for it. They [the Karen] need to know important information such as personal hygiene and education [upon arriving at a refugee camp],” said Wah, who was very proud of what he was able to do for his fellow countrymen and someday hopes to return to the camp to teach them more about life.

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Garroe Wah hard at work during a coding class at We Are Makers. (Michael Pekarske)

After spending those eight years in Thailand, Wah finally found his way to America. Along the way, he received an opportunity to further his education and develop English-speaking skills, which would come in handy in Utah. With his wife six months pregnant, they de-boarded the airplane in Salt Lake City. After settling in and having a short meeting with refugee officials, he was placed in an apartment and asked to help with interpretation—the same skill he put to use at the refugee camp—at a local company called backcountry.com. It was tough, he said, because the Burmese community in Salt Lake City—numbering about 2,000 people at the time, he added— struggled to understand their new surroundings. “Later on, about four months later,” he recalled, “I got a call from the refugee office to join their team and was hired on a seven-month contract helping refugees connect with resources and providing case management.” After that, Wah applied for and got another interpreting job on a fourmonth contract. Four months later came his big break: a job at the Department of Workforce Services helping people receive Medicaid. Wah worked in that position for five years. He currently works at the Refugee Education and Training Center and because he’s always looking forward, he’s already put in his notice that he’ll be stepping down in May to become a computer programmer. “I’ve been in the class [at We Are Makers] for five months and I really enjoy it,” he explained. “It’s really hard because [coding] it’s a second language. Because of that I go to the library on Fridays to learn it. Taking Fridays away from my family is very difficult but I know it is something I have to do.” As time goes on though, he’s proven to himself that he’s capable of overcoming many challenges. “I know that there are barriers,” he said, “but I’m going to work as hard as I can.” For more about the We Are Makers program, please go to http://www. wearemakers.io/ l


March 2017 | Page 3

M yCityJournal.Com

ict r t s Di l o cho ation tters S ite Educ ma n a Gr d of ut on r You Boar r inp ou y s nt wa

C A L E N D A R TUESDAY, MARCH 14 Town Hall Meeting Kearns High School THURSDAY, MARCH 23 PTA Battle of the Bands Olympus High School 6:30 p.m.

U O GY

N I N

R E C

N O C

. S E X A T R

Brief explanatory video on website:

gsdfuture.org

THURSDAY, MARCH 23 through FRIDAY, MARCH 31 Spring Recess No School TUESDAY, APRIL 25 Town Hall Meeting Cyprus High School FRIDAY, MAY 26 Last Day of School High School Graduation

C O N T A C T

School Buildings in Need Despite maintaining a fiscally responsible budget, a tax rate well below the state average, and some of the lowest administrative costs in the country, our current model for financing capital projects is not enough to meet the needs of our school buildings.

□ □

GRANITE SCHOOL DISTRICT 2500 S. State Street Salt Lake City, UT 84115

385-646-5000

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NEARLY HALF of all Granite schools are more than 50 years old. NEARLY HALF of all Granite schools require updates, remodels and repairs to more than 75% of the building. Along with structural needs, security and seismic upgrades are needed for most schools in the district. Current funding for school renovations and rebuilds is well below what’s required to keep pace with needs.

$1 Billion in Capital Needs.

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The Board of Education has hosted several community meetings to discuss long-term capital planning. If you haven’t attended a meeting, please follow the link (above) to watch the video.

Annual funding allows the district to save $2 million for school rebuilds. That pace means our schools have to last 150-200 years before being rebuilt.


LOCAL LIFE

Page 4 | March 2017

S outh Salt Lake City Journal

Bowling with a cop program begins at Bonwood Bowl By Brian Shaw | brian.shaw@mycityjournals.com

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or years, Bonwood Bowl played second fiddle to its larger neighbor, Ritz Classic Bowl. But now that the Ritz has permanently closed, Bonwood has taken over as the No. 1 bowling destination in South Salt Lake. Leagues are thriving more than ever before and it’s a familyoriented place that is busy every day of the week. So bringing in the South Salt Lake Police Department to oversee their new “Bowling With A Cop” event is just another way to usher in new people who may not have been introduced to the sport. Once a month starting on Feb. 16, area youth ages 8-18 get the chance to bowl for free with the police officers who patrol South Salt Lake streets and neighborhoods. From the police department’s perspective, there’s also a community tie-in. Across the country, police departments are having trouble communicating their wants and needs to a public saturated with what many perceive is misinformation. The South Salt Lake Police Department is trying to change that misconception. “The main purpose is to reach out to the youth in our community,” said Sgt. Bill Hogan of the South Salt Lake Police Department. “We police officers are human. You can trust us because we enjoy having a good time as well.” Hogan added that the secondary aim is to establish friendships with kids ages 8-18 whom the department may not yet have had the privilege to come into contact with.

“In doing this, we hope to build relationships with our youth and make them productive members of our society,” added Hogan. “We will run into each other at some point, and hopefully that contact is positive, but now you can put a face with an officer and build some trust with us.” In Hogan’s opinion, it is absolutely critical with all of the problems taking place around the country in inner cities to reach out to those who may feel marginalized and disenfranchised. “Any kind of relationship that we can foster is good,” said Hogan. “We want our children to know they’re important members of our community.” The children that the department has targeted for this particular program—although it’s open to all South Salt Lake residents between the ages of 8-18—are those who haven’t come into contact with the Police Athletic League, either because the kids show no interest in sports like boxing or basketball—or because they are new to the area. According to Hogan, Bonwood has been instrumental and critical in making this event happen. “I would consider them our partner is this,” said Hogan, who is restarting a program that the department last had in place about 15 years ago—and that he himself attended. “They’re giving us a very good discount on this. We’re paying for the lanes and shoes. We hope that it grows and we get sponsors and grants.” For more info, contact Bonwood Bowl at 801-487-7758. l

“We want our children to know they’re important members of our community.”

An outside look at Bonwood Bowl in South Salt Lake. (Nate Grigg)


GOVERNMENT

M yCityJournal.Com

South Salt Lake firefighter receives recognition

Residents provide input to improve life on State Street …continued from front cover

to design what they felt would be an ideal layout of the street. Halfway through the second hour, the participants switched tables so everyone had a chance to do both activities. Erica Dickson first worked on a cross section of the road, designing what she believed would be ideal. Dickson said she lives and works on North Temple and State Street. “We go up and down State Street two or three times a day,” Dickson said. “It’d be nice to see it change and get better and grow.” Dickson’s main priority was both safety and the look of the area. “There’s so many really cool, neat buildings and businesses in this region that I don’t think people go to enough because of the safety,” she said. Jade Sarver worked on the aerial layout of State Street during the first half of the workshop. Sarver said he works on State Street and lives in downtown Salt Lake City. “I’m very passionate about the North Temple project. I wanted to come out and see what they’re going along State Street and what we can learn what’s working well on this project for enhancing the street life along here to bring to our neighborhood,” Sarver said. “I live downtown, I work downtown. I shop on State Street. I think anyone who lives on State Street should be here.”

Sarver said his top request for State Street was economic development. He believed by bringing more businesses to the area, it would increase commercial traffic, thereby increasing shopping and walkability. The next step in the Life on State Street process is to gather the information provided by the public and create a presentation based off the information. That presentation will be given to the public to show what was designed and the what direction the project will take. The final plan will be finished at the end of the year and fundraising for the improvements will begin. To learn more about the Life on State Street project, as well as how to provide feedback, visit lifeonstate.com. l

Participants used an aerial print out of State Street between North Temple and 3300 South to identify troubled areas and highlight areas for potential development. (Kelly Cannon/City Journals)

March 2017 | Page 5

By Kelly Cannon | kelly@mycityjournals.com

S

outh Salt Lake firefighter David Larsen was honored at the South Salt Lake City Council meeting on Feb. 8 for his achievement of earning a certificate of supervising fire officer. Larsen was recognized by Fire Chief Ron Morris and other members of the South Salt Lake Fire Department. “Firefighter David Larsen has achieved a rather significant event in his career,” Morris said. “There have been 12 to 18 people in the state who have achieved this so it’s a big deal.” The certificate was presented by David Owens, the program manager of the Utah Fire and Rescue Academy, which is the governing body of the certificate earned by Larsen. “I find it a great honor to come to do this. Not only do I find it an honor, I find it comforting. I think you should too. Chief Morris and I have been friends for a very long time and we’ve been in the fire service. It’s our craft,” Owens said. “We both take it very seriously and try to do as much as we can. When you have that craft, that passion for what you do, you want to make sure the upcoming generation has that same passion.” Owens explained Larsen had to put forth a great amount of effort to achieve this certification, including creating a portfolio containing all of Larsen’s education experience

Program Manager of the Utah Fire and Rescue and Rescue Academy David Owens praises David Larsen for earning a certificate of supervising fire officer. (Kelly Cannon/City Journals)

and certifications. “It goes way over and above what he needs to do to just do this job,” Owens said. “That being said, I’d really like to thank him for carrying on and keeping the craft and the everchanging science of firefighting alive and doing the best he can.” Councilwoman Sharla Beverly, who was conducting the council meeting, praised Larsen for his hard work and congratulated him on his achievement. “We have great fire and police officers in our city and they do bring us comfort,” Beverly said. l

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GOVERNMENT

Page 6 | March 2017

S outh Salt Lake City Journal

Council appoints Johnny McConnell as new councilman

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he South Salt Lake City Council has a new member. Johnny McConnell was appointed as the newest member of the council on Jan. 25 after several interviews. McConnell replaced Debbie Snow, who had to resign from her position after she moved out of the area. The council had interested parties answer questions via email prior to the meeting. The council selected nine candidates who were then interviewed during an open work meeting. McConnell was voted in 5-1, with Councilwoman Sharla Beverly voting for Ryan Gold. Members of the council thanked all the candidates before taking a vote for the new member. “I want to thank the candidates that came out tonight. I think we have a tough decision. We have some good, qualified people,” said Councilwoman Portia Mila after the interviews were concluded. “I really appreciate everyone’s willingness to serve.” Councilman Kevin Rapp said he was encouraged by the number of people who wanted to serve the community. “This is not an easy job and it’s very controversial and it’s something that you have to step out of your comfort zone to do,” Rapp said. “But I’m glad to see that because there have been too many times in South Salt Lake where there has been an election where there was only one person who signed up to run.”

The newest councilmember Johnny McConnell sits between Councilmen Mark Kindred and Ben Pender in his first council meeting. McConnell was appointed by the council to replace Councilwoman Debbie Snow. (Kelly Cannon/ City Journals)

your desire. But it takes a lot to go out there to bang the doors and do this. That was a huge factor in my mind.” During his interview, Beverly asked McConnell what kind of edge running a campaign gave him over the other candidates. McConnell said it gave him a chance to get to know his community. “I got to get out and spend a lot of time visiting with people and I got a chance to find out what my community is like,” McConnell said. “I got to meet people and got a chance to see what their concerns were. When I knocked

that’s an issue.” McConnell also said he is concerned about the high number of rental units in South Salt Lake. “From what I understand, we have less than 100 homes that are worth $250,000,” McConnell said. “I’d like to see some houses. I’d also like to see some retail.” Councilman Mark Kindred asked McConnell what he would like to see on State Street. McConnell explained as you drive up and down State Street, each city has a different feel to it but South Salt Lake seems to be more of a “hodge-podge” of different communities. “I think there needs to be some kind of an identify,” he said. “I think the idea of us having a downtown, I would like to see that spread to the point where South Salt Lake looks like an inviting community.” McConnell stressed that concept of identity during his final remarks when he talked about how when he and his wife moved to South Salt Lake, they decided they wanted to get involved in the community. “My big thing is I would really, truly like to see South Salt Lake gain an identity, that we’re a proud community,” McConnell said. “And we’re a place to come, a place to buy things, a place to live, we’re a place to grow our kids. That’s what I’m looking to do.” l

“My big thing is I would really, truly like to see South Salt Lake gain an identity, that we’re a proud community.” McConnell had previously ran for a spot on the council but had lost to Mila. Councilman Shane Siwik said the reason he voted for McConnell was because McConnell had run for the city council before. “They have invested a lot of blood, sweat, tears and money. I think for them to have knocked the doors and have gotten to know the pulse of this community like they have, I think for me was worth further consideration,” Siwik said. “Not that those of you who didn’t shouldn’t be commended for your interest and

on doors, I got a chance to visit with who they were. That was really big.” McConnell works as a teacher in the Murray City School District. He cited education as one of the important issues facing the South Salt Lake Community. “That’s one of the things I’d like to do as a councilman, to kind of find out what we can do to educate our kids,” McConnell said. “Our kids are important and I know a lot of our people who live close to the schools are not sending their kids to South Salt Lake Schools. I think

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EDUCATION

M yCityJournal.Com

March 2017 | Page 7

Pettit sees brilliance in students’ web creations By Aspen Perry | a.perry@mycityjournals.com

Your Career Begins

with Us!

William Pettit assists students during web design lesson. (Allie Nannini/City Journals).

A

fter 10 years of teaching technology to teens at Granite Park Junior High, William Pettit still loves watching the pride of his students when they see what they are capable of creating. “I like helping kids create things they can be proud of. I like when the parents come in and are genuinely astounded by the accomplishments of their child,” said Pettit. One of the courses taught as part of the college and career awareness class is web design, which Pettit has taught for eight years. This puts him ahead of the curve considering Utah has yet to create a plan for K-12 computer science curriculum, according to the Code.org Utah state fact sheet. During Pettit’s Thursday morning class in February, students sit in front of Macs to learn the fundamentals of web design, including HTML coding, photo selection and typography. Impressive skills many students are not exposed to until high school or college, and an aspect of teaching this subject that Pettit enjoys. “I like teaching kids things they would have never known otherwise, and then listen to them talk about those things together. I like being surprised by their brilliance,” Pettit said. Pettit always knew he wanted to teach and help kids reach their potential. He recognizes students need tools and resources to succeed, and he reflected on one of his former teachers once telling his parents with the right tools he too would be able to do anything. It is no secret the education budget in Utah can make it difficult for teachers to obtain those proper tools and resources, but for Pettit being able to play the role of the one who provides the tools is a way for him to help students accomplish anything. The same way his parents and former teachers helped him. In addition to teaching web design, Pettit has run the Granite Park film and announcement class for seven years, and oversees the daily production of the Granite Park YouTube channel. The Granite Park YouTube channel is produced by a film group called A-Staff, students who wish to be involved with A-Staff are

required to have straight A’s. “This is a great incentive that helps them master their other classes as well,” said Pettit. Many students and faculty agree the video productions have an incredibly professional look and feel, while providing important school information for students, as well as highlighting school happenings. The students that participate in the Granite Park YouTube Channel participate in a film class, taught by Pettit, which involves self-critique and a commitment to excellence, as well as experience in collaborative skills. “Students learn to manage schedules, check details, think outside the box, and work with a lot of different kinds of kids. They learn leadership. They are expected to be great, and they rise to the challenge,” Pettit said. When asked the biggest challenge Pettit faces, time and meeting the demand of individual student needs are the things that come to mind. Pettit attributes planning as a key element in meeting the challenge of time. This includes ensuring lessons are well planned out, given how much his students have to learn in a short amount of time. In addition to well thought-out lesson plans, last year Granite Park was able to hire four students to stay after school and work on the videos. This helps Pettit with time, while also providing the students with a fantastic first job and a unique skill for their resumes. The other key to managing time for Pettit means long days spent at school. As Pettit said, “I go early and I stay late. But that’s just being a teacher. I’m certainly not the only one that does that.” All this allows for students at Granite Park the ability to excel, and their efforts do not go unnoticed. This brings a sense of pride and appreciation for both the students and Pettit, as he stated, “Our school’s administration, and even our district, have noticed our efforts and provided us fabulous resources to use. I’m grateful for the support we have received.” l

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EDUCATION

Page 8 | March 2017

S outh Salt Lake City Journal

Granite Technical Institute wows at Career and Technology Education open house By Aspen Perry | a.perry@mycityjournals.com

One of the entrances to the GTI CTE open house. (Aspen Perry/City Journal)

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n the evening of Feb. 2, students and parents packed the halls of the Granite Technical Institute (GTI), eager to see all the Career and Technology Education (CTE) open house had to offer with educators ready to demonstrate and discuss career path possibilities. The mission of CTE is, “to help students discover educational purpose, personal potential, and a pathway to their future with courses and training aimed to help ninththrough 12th- grade students academic and career growth.” The vast amount of career pathway courses through the CTE includes: health science and technology, computer science and robotics, engineering, information technology, biotechnology, culinary arts, aviation, agriculture, cosmetology, and home building to name a few. During the open house, there were live demonstrations with students able to get hands-on experience. On the fourth floor, students interested in the Medical Anatomy program observed current students dissect a cow’s eyeball. For students with plants to move on to medical school, courses in the health sciences program would serve as a foundation. As Carma Varas-Dental, faculty member in the health science department, explained, “It would provide a foundation for the classes they have to take… medical anatomy and physiology would help them with the human physiology they’re required to take (in a premed program)… it’s a good core to give them a leg up on courses they would be taking.”

Biotechnology first-year students showed off the lab and discussed how biotechnology will help them in their career. One student described his plan to try out for an internship with a local biotech company, in the hopes of turning that into a career. In contrast to his peer, the second male student explained how the course helped him weigh the options biotech offers, “I’m looking at careers and pathways in medical, but I enjoy the skills I learn in this class and also the discernment of whether I want to work in a lab.” College credit programs are available to students of Granite School District, in addition to offering a clear career path, certification, or college credit are given for little cost. Generally, cost includes a one-time $40 enrollment fee to Salt Lake Community College (SLCC), $50-75 for book rental, and a $25 course fee. Through CTE, obtaining 3 college credits in finance or accounting would cost under $100 with books included in the fees. In contrast to taking the same course and earning the same credit hours at SLCC which would cost $494.50 plus books, in accordance with the SLCC tuition and fee rate of 2016-2017 academic year. CTE offers programs that can be taken either at GTI campus or junior high and high school campuses throughout the Granite School District. Students at Granger who wish to enroll in the Academy of Finance have three potential location options: Cottonwood High, Skyline High, or GTI.

Three biotech students excited to showcase the biotech program through CTE. (Aspen Perry/City Journal)

The GTI campus holds more course options, and many courses offer bus accommodations to and from the GTI campus. During the open house students and parents were impressed with the GTI campus. Complete with four floors, each has labs and classroom space designed to fit the model of what students would find in that career field. In addition to receiving college credit or certifications based on the subject students decide on, in programs where applicable, paid internships are also available. For college bound students, CTE strives

to assist students in receiving scholarships or financial awards by working with the Utah State Board of Education, in partnership with Utah College of Applied Technology (UCAT) and Utah System of Higher Education (USHE). According to the CTE scholarship webpage, last year almost one of every two applicants received an award. For more information on CTE programs and registration visit CTE homepage on GraniteSchools.org. l

“It would provide a foundation for the classes they have to take…it’s a good core to give them a leg up on courses they would be taking.”

Prospective student receiving hands on guidance in Intro to Welding. (Aspen Perry/City Journal)

Farm to table, current medical anatomy student dissects cow eyeball at CTE open house. (Aspen Perry/City Journal)


SPORTS

M yCityJournal.Com

March 2017 | Page 9 SALT LAKE TRIBUNE

WELCOME TO THE 2017 SALT LAKE TRIBUNE HOME+GARDEN SHOW! @slchomeshow

+GARDEN

www.facebook.com/SaltLakeHomeShow

BROOKE PARKS: SHOW MANAGER

As winter makes its way out, transitioning into warmer spring days, the Salt Lake Tribune Home and Garden Show is preparing for a season of the hottest home design and landscaping trends. As always, our team has one goal in mind—to provide the highest quality products and services to help you turn your house into the home of your dreams. We are excited to provide valuable ideas and creative inspiration for every room in your home! This spring, we’re pleased to welcome special guests to the Salt Lake Tribune Home and Garden Show. Jason Cameron of DIY Network’s Desperate Landscapes, Man Caves, and Sledgehammer joins us this weekend to discuss the home renovation process and projects any homeowner can get involved with. Also, Sara Bendrick of DIY Network’s I Hate My Yard shares expert landscaping tips to help you prep your yard for the warmer months ahead. For a more personalized experience, check out our Ask a Designer feature by Thomasville, and don’t forget to browse the 25,000 square feet of lush landscapes and edible gardens to gather inspiration for the season to come. Plan to take home your own floral arrangement by participating in the Blooming Hope Flower Auction and benefit Primary Children’s Hospital Foundation at the same time. And, don’t forget to cast your vote for the best kids’ cupcake when visiting our kitchen stage. Thank you for welcoming the Salt Lake Tribune Home and Garden Show team into your home. For your convenience and as a special bonus, we’re adding valet parking for home show attendees. For details, visit SaltLakeTribuneHomeShow.com. Remember, your thoughts are very important to us, so join the conversation on Facebook! See you at the Home Show, Brooke Parks and Team www.SaltLakeTribuneHomeShow.com

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Page 10 | March 2017

S outh Salt Lake City Journal

CITY NEWSLETTER COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT EDITION

March 2017 Cherie Wood, Mayor 801-464-6757 mayor@sslc.com

Ready, Set, Build!

South Salt Lake City Council Members Ben B. Pender, District 1 801- 580-0339 bpender@sslc.com Kevin Rapp, District 2 801-485-5817 kdrapp@sslc.com Sharla Beverly, District 3 801-803-4127 sbeverly@sslc.com Portia Mila, District 4 801-792-0912 pmila@sslc.com L. Shane Siwik, District 5 801-548-7953 ssiwik@sslc.com

Mayor Cherie Wood

The weather is warming up, and this construction season is heating up! South Salt Lake is in a construction boom, and I am so happy that not only are we a development hot spot, we are leading the way with innovative plans and beautiful designs. I am always fighting for a more safe, clean, and beautiful South Salt Lake, and we are proving that we can attract the best projects to our community. My thanks go to the Community and Economic Development employees who have been writing new master plans and attracting the best developers to our community. I also give credit to the many engaged community members who share your insights and support for the changes we are making. There are so many great stories to tell, as you will find in this newsletter, so let me just share the highlights and let you explore more. Visit our city website for more photos and information.

• There are 6 construction cranes up in SSL.

Mark C. Kindred, At-Large 801-214-8415 mkindred@sslc.com

• At this moment, there are $80 million in development projects in SSL and $80 million more to come in 2017.

Johnny McConnell, At-Large 801-712-4837 jmcconnell@sslc.com

• In the last two years, SSL has added 230 businesses. That is 10% growth in 2 years.

City Offices Mon-Fri 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. 801-483-6000 220 East Morris Ave SSL, UT 84115 Animal Service 801-483-6024 Building Permits 801-483-6005 Business Licensing 801-483-6063 Code Enforcement 801-464-6712 Fire Administration 801-483-6043 Justice Court 801-483-6072 Police Administration 801-412-3606 Promise 801-483-6057 Public Works 801-483-6045 Recreation 801-412-3217 Utility Billing 801-483-6074 Emergencies 911 Police/Fire Dispatch 801-840-4000

• The new Winco grocery store at 2200 S. Main St. is breaking ground this month and will be complete by the end of 2017. • South Salt Lake’s population will grow by 10% in the next couple years as 1,000 new housing units hit the market.

From Idea to Construction...Community Development in Action What does it take to get something built around here? A lot of work, good partners and public input. At each step of the way, the Planning Commission, City Council, residents and developers have a chance to weigh in. City staff writes the new policies (the zoning and master plan) and the city adopts them as ordinances. Then it is the property owner and developer’s turn to propose projects, go through the approval process and get to work building something that meets the community’s needs and vision.


March 2017 | Page 11

On The Move

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SSL City Council Meetings 220 E. Morris Ave., 2nd Floor Wednesday, March 8, 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 22, 7 p.m.

SSL City Planning Commission Meetings 220 E. Morris Ave., 2nd Floor

Development Update Rite Aid – 3250 S. 700 E.

The City is excited to see construction begin for the new Rite Aid on the northwest corner of 3300 S. 700 E. Rite Aid will be relocating from their current location inside the strip mall to a stand-alone building on the same site. Site prep work is currently being performed and vertical construction will begin in the next month. The new building will be one of Rite-Aid’s largest buildings that they construct at just over 17,000 square feet.

Thursday, March 2, 7 p.m. Thursday, March 16, 7 p.m.

Columbus Senior Center Highlights 2531 South 400 East South Salt Lake, Utah 84115 385-468-3340

Free Lunch

Monday thru Friday at noon *A lunch donation of $3.00 goes directly back into the meal program

Weight Management Class

Tuesday, March 7 at 11:00 a.m. Presenter from St. Mark’s Hospital

Medicare Presentation Wednesday, March 8 at 11:00 a.m. Learn about screenings that are covered by Medicare, and how to pay for treatments for expensive diseases [such as cancer].

Sharon Gardens

Sharon Gardens is a 58-unit five-story senior housing development located at 3354 S. Sue Street. Development is well under way with this project and the fifth story is currently being framed. The development is expected to be completed at the end of 2017.

Riverfront

The Riverfront Development is located at approximately 3700 S. 700 W. This is a mixed use development consisting of 58 single-family homes, 100,000-square-feet of commercial industrial buildings, townhomes, and space for a new elementary school. Construction is nearly complete on all of the single family homes. Three of the apartment buildings are being leased with the others framed and to be finished by the end of this summer. One commercial building is occupied with another under construction. Due to the success in sales of the single family homes, the developer will be adding another 76 single-family homes that should begin construction in early summer.

Transportation (UDOT), the intersection of I-15 and 3300 South will be enhanced with landscaping, lighting, signage and artwork. This is a welcome improvement that businesses along this corridor have been looking forward to. This coincides with a project to build the first section of the Mill Creek Trail, from the TRAX station to the Jordan River. The sidewalk on the north side of 3300 South will be widened to 10 feet to allow safer travel for walkers and bikers. This section of trail is funded by UDOT. Construction of both projects starts in February 2017 and will be completed by June 2017.

Imagining State Street as a Place for People

Close to 200 people joined forces on February 9th to talk about what could make State Street a better place for everyone who lives, works, shops, or moves along it. The workshop was the kickoff for the Life on State project, which is a plan for improving transportation, business, housing, and the character of this historically important street.

Via Apartments Phase 2

The Via Apartments are located at 3808 S. West Temple. Due to the success of phase 1 directly to the north, phase 2 is now under construction and being framed. Phase 2 consists of 58 units. Construction is expected to be completed at the end of 2017.

Harley Davidson

Harley Davidson of Salt Lake is currently expanding their showroom and shop space for their location at 2928 S. State. This 5,200-squarefoot addition will add much needed space for Harley Davidson to expand and remain a successful South Salt Lake business.

The Pie Pizzeria

Huntsman Cancer Presentation

Monday, March 20 at 11:00 a.m. How to reduce your risk for cancer; good sources for cancer information; Medical Scams; New Developments in cancer research; and Time for answering questions. **For more Senior Events stop by the Columbus Senior Center!

Construction is almost finished on the Pie Pizzeria on the southeast corner of 3300 South and 200 East. Contractors are working on the interior kitchen and dining area. Over the next couple months, the exterior will be finished, and the site will be landscaped. The Pie will be ready to serve and deliver hot pizzas to South Salt Lake residents by early May 2017.

New Gateway Sign under Construction

Travelers along 3300 South will soon have a beautiful welcome when they enter South Salt Lake. With funding from Utah Department of

Many people today often think of State Street as a place that isn’t safe or inviting to visit. Cars and trucks travel fast and often don’t stop for people who are trying to cross the street. There are many vacant lots, parking lots, or empty storefronts. Yet, the neighborhood is one of the last affordable places to live or do business in the valley. Many people pointed out ways to give it a boost to make it more of a neighborhood. Residents, business owners, and community leaders spent time at the workshop drawing on maps and designing an ideal street that would be more friendly to walkers, bikers, and shoppers while still keeping the cars moving. State Street was once the main highway through Utah. Major institutions, attractions and small businesses set up on State Street to be visible and add to its character. There is a renewed interest in putting people and businesses on State Street as our Utah population continues to boom. City planners are seeking a better path forward, and looking to regain State Street’s reputation as a “great street.” You are invited to join the conversation and share your ideas. Get involved and take the survey at www.lifeonstate.com.


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S outh Salt Lake City Journal

March 2017 Westminster College’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service

South Salt Lake has 14 neighborhood centers serving our community:

Promise South Salt Lake Neighborhood Center Spotlight: Granite Park Junior High This month at Granite Park Junior High, students formed a new partnership with the American Chemical Society through the University of Utah College of Science. They have been trying to incorporate more STEM activities into the program and this has been a great way to do so. This month, the kids have been learning about energy through experiments, hands on activities, and discussions with the college students. They did activities with friction, made windmills to harvest wind energy, and did a chemical reaction involving hundreds of ping-pong balls shooting up into the air.

Hser Ner Moo Community and Welcome Center 479 East 2250 South South Salt Lake, UT 84115 801-828-7245 Roosevelt Community School 3225 South 800 East Salt Lake City, UT 84106 801-828-8219 Historic Scott School and Arts & Community Center 3238 South 540 East South Salt Lake, UT 84106 801-803-3632

Promise South Salt Lake at Moss Elementary participated in Westminster College’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service. They made first-aid kits for the homeless, wrote letters to our Armed Forces abroad, worked together to make slime in the chemistry lab, and wrote about their own dreams for the future. For their favorite project, each student was given a paper hand and asked to draw or write about their dreams for the future. They then placed their hands together to make a tree, symbolizing all of them growing together towards their future goals, and that they all are a part of something bigger: their community. This tree hangs in the halls of James E. Moss elementary as a constant reminder of their bonding experience as well as their day of service.

Lincoln Community School 450 East 3700 South South Salt Lake, UT 84115 801-657-0416 Utah International Charter School 350 East Baird Circle South Salt Lake, UT 84115 801-520-7175 Central Park Community Center and PAL Boxing Program 2797 South 200 East South Salt Lake, UT 84115 801-466-3143 Columbus Center 2531 South 400 East South Salt Lake, UT 84115 801-412-3217 Woodrow Wilson Community School 2567 South Main Street South Salt Lake, UT 84115 801-386-0589

The Granite Park creed, “Inspiring students to dream of college and beyond” shows how much emphasis the school puts on college. The volunteers from the ACS not only inspire kids to learn more about chemistry, but also serve as positive role models for the students and encourage them to attend college. The kids have been really engaged, learning about STEM while also asking questions about the university and what it is like to be a college student.

Granite Park Jr. High 3031 South 200 East South Salt Lake, UT 84115 801-440-4499 Meadowbrook STEM & Community Center (SLCC Campus) 250 West 3900 South South Salt Lake, UT 84107 801-518-5502

Friendly

Cottonwood High Promise 5715 South 1300 East Murray, UT 84121 385-630-9748

Definition: favorably disposed; inclined to approve, help, or support

Kearns Saint Ann Promise 430 East 2100 South Salt Lake City, UT 84115 385-630-9754

Walking with a friend in the dark is better than walking alone in the light.

Commonwealth Performing Arts & Youth Entrepreneurial Center

- Helen Keller

Moss Elementary 4399 South 500 East Salt Lake City, UT 84107 385-258-6360

2530 So. 500 East (@ Columbus Center) South Salt Lake, UT 84115 385-630-9753

Ida and Laurie


March 2017 | Page 13

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Designate Emergency Contacts Careful consideration should be taken when choosing emergency contacts. An emergency contact can be local or outside of your geographic location so be aware that it may be easier to call a long distance contact in the event of a localized/regional disaster. After confirming that you have a willing emergency contact, be sure to share the contact’s phone number with everyone in your family. During an emergency, you should call your contact that can then share with other family members where you are, how you are doing, and how to get in contact with you.

www.sslchamber.com

Coffee With A Cop Coffee with a Cop is part of a national initiative to create a place for community members and police officers to come together. There are no agendas or speeches; just the opportunity to ask questions, voice concerns, and the chance to get to know the officers in their local neighborhoods. The South Salt Lake Chamber supports the program to help businesses increase their involvement in the community’s safety. The event takes place on the first Wednesday of each month from 9-10 a.m. at Village Inn, 2929 S. State St. The next session is Wednesday, March 1.

On The Move Wasatch Renal Medical Center Site work for a new 52,000-square-foot medical facility at 3702 South State Street has recently begun. Most of the structure will be one story in height, but there will be a two-story portion along State Street. The structure will house six tenants: a hemodialysis treatment center, a vascular medical practice, a medical practice, an urgent care facility, a medical imaging center, and a pharmacy. The new medical facility is planned to open in January 2018.

S-Line Townhomes The S-Line Townhomes are South Salt Lake’s newest townhome development. The project consists of 32 owner-occupied townhomes that take advantage of being located along the S-Line Streetcar. The project is located at 2255 South 400 East. The project will be separated into four rectangular buildings each containing eight individual townhome units. Two drive aisles will provide access to the buildings from 400 East. The buildings will have units oriented toward the S-Line Streetcar corridor, 400 East and to internal corridors. The project includes a plaza along the S-Line Greenway and landscaped open space for the residents along the S-Line Greenway. The town homes are expected to be available in the Spring of 2017.

Zellerbach The Zellerbach warehouse was demolished in the Fall of 2016 and currently is under construction to be replaced as a new 292-unit transit-oriented multi-family development. The project is located at 2255 South 300 East. The building will be four stories tall and will feature two large open-air atriums providing amenities and open space to residents. 34 units will have street-level private entrances along 300 East, 400 East, the S-line or a private lane on the south side of the project. Zellerbach development includes two plazas and an improved path along the south side of the S-Line Greenway. The project is expected to be completed in the Spring of 2018.


Page 14 | March 2017

S outh Salt Lake City Journal

March 2017 Rock Star – Lyn Creswell City attorney Lyn Creswell has a bold vision, a giant personality, a winning smile, and most of all passion. He makes fast friends with everyone he meets and treats them like they are themselves rock stars. Everyone who meets Lyn Creswell feels special, which makes him an incredible asset to our team. Lyn came to South Salt Lake after a full and decorated career as a military attorney and as a city attorney and manager for SSL. Lyn will eagerly ell you which branch of the military he served in. They train the best, and Lyn is no exception. He is ready for the crusade to make South Salt Lake the best city it can be. He believes in our vision and has made it his duty to bring everyone along to achieve the mission. Lyn is an amazing professional in the way he handles the legal matters we deal with. He takes each of our concerns and jobs seriously and becomes an instant advocate for doing the right thing. Our City and staff members face an unbelievable range of legal issues and challenges; Lyn finds a way to address all of them with great knowledge and care, and of course speed. Lyn is passionate about his work and many consider him a friend and a mentor. He approaches each day with a smile and positive attitude. His keen advice and experience have made him a leader amongst our staff and amongst our Mayor’s Cabinet staff often say that literally their department cannot survive without his support. They have nominated him as their rock star amongst all the department heads. Lyn you are ROCK STAR through and through! We all say THANK YOU!

Arts Council Featured Artist: Cheree Garn March’s featured artist, Cheree Garn, is one of the talented artists at SSL’s Poor Yorick Studios. We love her beautiful paintings that inspire our imagination to reflect on images of life. Check out more of her work at chereegarn.com and @ chenicoleart on Instagram or at www.sslarts.org under the “People” tab.

Meet Council Member Johnny McConnell When my wife and I first moved here, we drove up and said, “We have to get involved in this community!” So when the city council seat for my district was up for election in 2015, and I noticed that the current council member was running unopposed, I thought that someone should, so I signed up. I made it through the primaries and ran against Portia Mila for the seat. When I didn’t win, I was both disappointed and relieved, and was still looking for ways to get involved. When my neighbor, Debbie Snow, decided to move and leave her at-large City Council position in 2016, she suggested I apply. I was excited to get another chance to serve and was pleased to be selected to be on council for the next year. I think it is a great opportunity to get to know the city and take a look around at all the different ways I can get involved – as a city council member or in other capacities. I live in the Lincoln Park neighborhood at 3700 South 300 East, I am an 8th-grade science teacher at Murray High, and I love bicycling. I look forward to serving you.

There will be a Business Watch meeting on: Monday, March 27, 2017 at 5:00 p.m. Location, TBA.

Remembering Prendy Schneider We remember our friend Prendy Schneider, a crossing guard for South Salt Lake, who passed away in her home January 19, 2017. She was a lively part of the morning walk to school for the kids and families in our community. She was passionate about the kids, her friends, and her job keeping everyone safe and in good spirits. She knew every child’s name, not only so she could greet them each day, but also so she could call out to them if they were in danger or not paying attention. She is missed by her friends, family and our community.

SSL Arts Council Update: As part of their efforts to support and grow the arts and cultural communities of South Salt Lake, they are focusing on the creative assets we already have in our city. One of these is the SSL Water Tower, located at 2500 S. West Temple. The water tower, constructed in 1949, was originally called Horton Tank, cost $50,530, and can hold 300,000 gallons of water. Although the tower has not held water since 1991, it still stands as an icon in our city. The Arts Council feels the water tower should be part of the creative place making efforts in our city and envisions it as a community-gathering site someday. To start the conversation, we asked 200 youth at the Promise SSL Arts Fair in February to help us by creating art for the tower, as if they were the artist hired to paint it. Each of them designed a panel and then had a chance to "try it on" our water tower model. The youth created designs ranging from mountain peaks to flowers to flags from different countries representing the wonderful diversity in our city. The Arts Council will continue to organize different activities around the water tower and welcomes any input from the community on their vision for the tower.

The following Neighborhood Watch Meetings will take place in March: March 9th, CPZ 1 & 2, Columbus Community Center room #101, 7:00pm March 14th, CPZ 3 & 4, Columbus Community Center room #101, 7:00pm March 28th, CPZ 5 & 6/Plymouth/ Waverly/Huntly Manor Townhome Communities, Club house @ Waverly Townhomes, 7:00pm. A recording with updated information on Neighborhood Watch Meetings can he heard by calling 801-412-3668.

Avoiding Retail/ATM Fraud, remember: • Review receipts before you sign • Monitor your statements/accounts often • Sign up for email/text “transaction alerts” from your bank • Keep copies of ATM and sales receipts for your records • Be aware of your surroundings • Guard your PIN from fraudsters “shoulder surfing” For more information go to: www. consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0060-10things-you-can-do-avoid-fraud


March 2017 | Page 15

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On The Move

New Resident

INFORMATION

The City of South Salt Lake Recreation Department Tee-Ball

Planning Commission

COST:

The varying roles that South Salt Lake City residents take in our local government are essential to the City’s success. One of these roles is The Planning Commission, which is comprised of seven full-time commissioners, and two alternates who are city residents and were appointed by Mayor Cherie Wood with the advice and consent of the City Council. The current Planning Commissioners are: Jeremy Carter (chair), Holly Carson, Brandon Dalton, Susan Dickstein, Jonathan Meakin, Laura Vernon, Leslie Jones (alternate), Spencer Walker (alternate) and one open position. The Planning Commission conducts public meetings and hearings every first and third Thursday of the month at 7:00 p.m. in South Salt Lake City Hall.

WHO:

$25 for 1 st Child, $20 for 2 nd , $15 for 3 rd *Additional $5 non-resident fee for participants living outside of South Salt Lake

Boys & Girls 4 yrs – 6 yrs

WHEN: Tuesday & Thursday Evenings Starting April 18th WHERE: Central Park Baseball Field, 2797 S. 200 E.

Practices starting the week of April 17th Coaches will call to inform players of 1st practice date prior to April 14th *Please note that all Dates and Locations are subject to change

Deadline:

SPACE IS LIMITED, SO SIGNUP TODAY!

March 30th SIGN UP FOR Tee-Ball & GET:

SCHOLARSHIPS A VAI LABL E

PRACTICES, GAMES, A TEAM SHIRT, PICTURES, AND A PARTICIPATION AWARD!

to those who qualify ($10 W/FREE/REDUCED LUNCH LETTER)

REGISTER ANYTIME MON-FRI 8:30AM-5PM 5PM AT: SOUTH SALT LAKE RECREATION DEPARTMENT Columbus Center 2531 S. 400 E. SOUTH SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84115 801-412-3217 OR 801-412-3209

The City of South Salt Lake Recreation Department Youth Baseball League COST:

South Salt Lake Recreation Department 3 on 3 Basketball Tournament When: Saturday, April 1st 10:30 AM - 4:00PM

$25 for South Salt Lake Residents $30 for Non-Residents

**Scholarships available to those who qualify ($10 w/free/reduced lunch letter)

During these meetings the Commission is the Land Use Authority for Conditional Use Permits, subdivision, and design review approvals. They are also the recommending body to the City Council for adoption or modification of a Land Use Ordinance, Land Use Map, General Plan, or Future Land Use Map. They also are the recommending body for all Planned Unit Developments. This group of South Salt Lake residents offers insight and advice that has a tremendous impact on the current and future success of South Salt Lake City. Their work is continually respected and appreciated throughout the City. If you are interested in serving on the planning commission please contact the Mayor’s Office for more information.

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REGISTER ANYTIME MON-FRI 8:30AM-5PM AT: SOUTH SALT LAKE RECREATION DEPARTMENT Columbus Center 2531 S. 400 E. SOUTH SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84115 801-412-3217 OR 801-412-3209


EDUCATION

Page 16 | March 2017

S outh Salt Lake City Journal

Historic Scott School rich in history and community programs By Aspen Perry | a.perry@mycityjournals.com

I

n 1847, a two-room log cabin was built on the corner of 3300 S. 500 E., with the intent to be used as a church, school, and community recreation center. Fast-forward almost 170 years and the Historic Scott School continues to serve the surrounding community. In 1890, what was once a small log cabin became a larger building made of brick and named Scott School, after pioneer John Scott. In 1950, Granite School District entered an agreement with the Pioneer Craft House and Salt Lake County Recreation to serve the community and the Scott School was remodeled. In 2007, South Salt Lake City applied to purchase the site from Granite School District with the intent to update the campus and continue to serve the South Salt Lake community. After the first round of updates were completed the community center re-opened as the Historic Scott School (HSS), with many partnerships forged to offer community members of all ages a special experience. Complete with after-school programs, community arts programs, a writing center and community education classes, HSS is the oldest operational school in Utah. There is an after-school program for first to sixth graders, as well as an after-school program for teens, both with homework help available. HSS afterschool program for elementary age kids provides arts-based learning, field trips

to museums or activities at schools. In February, HSS went to Lincoln Elementary science day. Other activities include visits from groups like BBoys who visited the campus in February to teach kids how to breakdance and DJ. HSS awards tickets for good behavior; they can then spend in the store on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Sixth-grade students generally help run the store, which gives them a sense of accomplishment while fostering entrepreneurial skills. The program for teens includes basketball games with other after-school programs on Thursdays, and cooking classes on Fridays. On Feb. 10 students took turns learning to make pancakes, complete with a table of fix-ins to dress up their pancake creations. All students are from various educational backgrounds making HSS unique in comparison to other after-school programs that funnel from one campus. “There is a very interesting mix of kids here, we have homeschooled kids, kids from charter schools,” said Elizabeth Bunker, former HSS Center coordinator. In mid-February, Utah International Charter School where Bunker taught art part-time, asked her to teach full-time, a move slightly bittersweet, as Bunker has loved being an integral part of HSS. “I love HSS because it’s like a family. We are smaller… so we really get to build a rapport with

Kara Barnette leads a philosophy class discussion. (Aspen Perry/City Journal).

our youth and their families,” Bunker said. Taylor Kirch became the new HSS Center coordinator, having graduated from the University of Utah in Performing Art. She is looking forward to being part of an arts-based program. “I consider myself very blessed to be able to continue to be passionate about my work in afterschool, while now being able to have more of an artistic focal point,” said Kirch. In addition to building youth opportunities, HSS teamed up with Westminster College to offer college credit courses in the humanities through the Venture Program. Five humanities subjects are taught within Venture by a professor or instructor of the specified

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subject: art history, writing, literature, US history, and philosophy. During the Thursday evening philosophy class, Kara Barnette, assistant professor in philosophy with Westminster College, led the class in a discussion on different branches of philosophy: epistemic, skeptic, and empiricism. “It really is an incredible program for people who have always wanted to go to college, but haven’t had the opportunity,” said Liz Rogers, Venture director of Westminster College. From a tiny log cabin to a campus on the verge of another renovation upgrade, HSS continues to serve the community of South Salt Lake. l

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EDUCATION

M yCityJournal.Com

March 2017 | Page 17

Granite students score big during Souper Bowl of Caring By Aspen Perry | a.perry@mycityjournals.com

D

uring the first week of February schools throughout the Granite District rallied to raise funds and food for the Souper Bowl of Caring, a nationwide fundraiser to fight hunger, empower youth, and unite communities. “We are encouraged by the efforts of the community and schools within the district to help fight hunger,” said JeAnna Jenkins Ellis, with Granite Education Foundation. According to the Granite Education Foundation (GEF), Granite School District currently faces a hunger epidemic. In December 2016, Granite School District reported having 1,100 homeless students. In addition to homeless students, Granite District reports having over 44,000 students living at or well below poverty level, often missing meals. Participating in the nationwide Souper Bowl of Caring seemed to be a great way to serve GEF’s commitment to ensure students do not go hungry, and GEF is not alone. The concept of the Souper Bowl of Caring began with the simple prayer, which said, “As we enjoy the Super Bowl football game, help us be mindful of those who are without a bowl of soup to eat.” From that simple prayer in 1990, people from around the nation have generated over $100 million for various soup kitchens and food banks to communities in need, with GEF at the helm of the efforts to help students in communities along the Wasatch Front. In 2014, during the first year of Souper Bowl fund raising event, GEF collected $8,813 for programs in need. In 2016, with

Cottonwood Elementary lip-sync performance part of reward assembly to celebrate students hard work. (Aspen Perry/City Journal)

“We are encouraged by the efforts of the community and schools within the district to help fight hunger.” more school and community involvement GEF was able to collect $27,222. As of February 13, through the fundraising efforts of schools, businesses, and community groups throughout the Granite School District, GEF raised an astonishing $422,100 in funds and over 35,900 food items with many schools pledging to continue to collect food and funding.

In addition to raising funds for a good cause, many schools had fun activities to encourage participation and make for an overall positive takeaway for students involved. Evergreen Jr. High tied fund-raising efforts in with spirit week, which included encouraging students to dress up for Tacky Tourist Tuesday, Throwback Thursday, and

more, a strategy that resulted in raising $903 and 376 items. Cottonwood Elementary in Holladay, treated their students to a fun assembly complete with faculty and staff taking on wacky tasks, such as a lip-sync performances, a cupcake eating contest, skateboarding across the auditorium stage, letting students spray their teachers with silly string and more to reward students for their hard work in raising $2,500 and 960 food items. With a student population of 570, Taylorsville Elementary was able to collect $263.28 along with 300 lb. of food. Howard R. Driggs Elementary exceeded their goal of having each student bring a can, which would have given them a total of 640. But the students collected 867 food items and promised to continue raising more throughout the remaining school year. Not too far from Holladay, schools in Murray also scored big, with Cottonwood High School reporting an astounding $11,300 donated in funds and 4,500 food items. Across town schools in West Valley rallied, with Whittier Elementary raising $1,700 in funds and Academy Park Elementary bringing in 1,800 food items. Local businesses joined in the effort as well, with Granite Credit Union bringing in $50,000, and an organization called Friends of GEF donating $251,500. Churches also participated including the Episcopal Diocese raising $15,000 and St. James Episcopal Church collecting $2,600 in funds and 231 food items. Whether donations were large or small, all the schools, businesses, and community groups throughout Granite made for an incredible collection year, sure to make a real difference in the fight against hunger. To stay in the loop on the fund-raising efforts visit, Granite Education Foundation on SouperBowl.org. For information on other programs GEF holds throughout the year to help educators visit GraniteKids.org/ educators. According to SouperBowl.org, as of February 13, 2017, across the nation 4,061 groups participated in the annual nationwide fundraiser with a total of $6,868,726 raised in cash and food items, with more donations tallied by the minute. It all proves that when it comes to the Souper Bowl of Caring there are only winners. l

Students from Howard R. Driggs Elementary pose next to the school’s donated food items. (Aspen Perry/City Journal)


SPORTS

Page 18 | March 2017

S outh Salt Lake City Journal

Cottonwood girls basketball begin to turn around its season

GET CONNECTED,

By Brian Shaw | brian.shaw@mycityjournals.com

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to our new and renewing members!

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Head coach Janae Hirschi (standing left) with her Cottonwood High girls basketball team. (Janae Hirschi/Cottonwood girls basketball)

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or the Cottonwood Colts girls basketball team, maybe losing a few games was what they needed to turn the program around. While the Colts are not quite where they wanted to be at this point in the season, and not in a position to make a postseason spot, that’s OK according to head coach Janae Hirschi. “I’ve even coached teams that have made it to the state tournament and I played in college myself, but coaching teams like these girls is just as rewarding in my opinion,” said Hirschi. For this Cottonwood team, nearing the end of their season hasn’t spelled doom in any way. Rather, it’s galvanized a team whose record might not be as good as they hoped. Instead of gathering wins they’re building life skills and transforming girls into women. “The growth has been tremendous. Usually at the end of the season our kids were like, ‘“We’re out of here,’” she added. But, the players have actually asked to hold extra practices on Saturdays to learn more about the game. And while the back half of the season started just as badly for the Colts—losing 53-13 to Bingham on Jan. 12—they never quit, added Hirschi. Every game things got a little better in every aspect, which is standard for a team which, according to Hirschi, is not like other teams in her region. “I’ll be the first to admit that our kids have been kind of hot and cold throughout part of the season. Most of them have never played on any competitive teams. We have to teach them fundamentals and game situations, so even though the win-loss record doesn’t validate it, and it may sound cliché, the growth has been tremendous,” said Hirschi. In a game Hirschi termed as winnable at West Jordan Jan. 19, the Jaguars held tough down the stretch to hold off the Colts 40-27, keeping the Colts winless in region play. She credits the Jaguars for executing their game plan a little better than her team. But a funny thing happened in the next three January games. Cottonwood started scoring with

more regularity according to their coach, and that growth has translated into more competitive games. Taylorsville 53, Colts 29 After scoring just 13 points against Bingham and 27 to West Jordan, the Colts opened play against Taylorsville leading the first quarter 14-11. At that point in the game, everything looked possible for the Colts. But a scoreless second quarter doomed Cottonwood, who were outscored 15-0 going into halftime. The quartet of Colts veterans did what they could to stem the tide but Taylorsville was too much for the Colts, who stayed winless in region play with the loss. Brighton 64, Colts 36 Cottonwood continued to improve on offense and open up their scoring prowess against the Bengals on the road. But Brighton simply had too much firepower for the Colts, who trailed in every quarter except for the final stanza. In that pivotal fourth quarter though, the Colts turned a corner. Getting 14 points from senior guard Isamar Guzman, Cottonwood showed it had plenty of fight left despite remaining winless up to that point in region play. Colts 50, Jordan 47 The girls got their turn on Jan. 31 in front of their home crowd. “When my kids show up and play consistently for four quarters at the level they’re capable of, and I know there are tough teams in this region, they can do it even if it might only happen one of 10 times,” Hirschi said. Riding a five-point lead into the half, the Colts finally put together two solid halves en route to an impressive victory. In the game, the Colts were again led by Guzman, who poured in 25 points and splashed three shots from behind the arc. Center Katie Haglund chipped in 11 for the Colts, who won its first region game. The Colts wrapped up their season with a 43-41 victory over West Jordan. l


SPORTS

M yCityJournal.Com

Rhyan White leads Cottonwood swimmers into state, finishes with four medals By Brian Shaw | brian.shaw@mycityjournals.com

Colts 200 IM state champions Rhyan White and Blayze Kimble. (Ron Lockwood/Cottonwood High swim team)

F

The Cottonwood Colts ladies pose with their team 2nd place trophy they earned at the 2017 5A State Swimming Championships. (Ron Lockwood/Cottonwood High swim team)

or Rhyan White, winning two events in last year’s Utah 5A State Swimming Championships wasn’t enough. Now the junior from Cottonwood High wants more. Lots more. On Feb. 9-10 at the Richards Building Natatorium at BYU, winning more championships represented more than just an opportunity to hang more gold around her neck. At this state meet, competing gave her a chance to do something for her teammates as well as herself. Already the owner of two state records, White didn’t settle for just the 200-yard individual medley title and a runner-up finish in the 200-yard freestyle the first day at state Feb. 9. “She’s great. I don’t know how much more I could ask for from her,” said Cottonwood head coach Ron Lockwood. How unselfish is White as a swimmer and a person and how determined was she to eclipse her previous medal haul? Despite being in what Lockwood said was “a different mindset” going into this state tournament —in that White’s in the midst of preparing for a serious run at the upcoming regional and national meets and is still getting into tip-top physical condition—she still did what she needed to get the team scoring points. Despite needing an extra arm’s length to overcome a significant length advantage from Brighton’s Rachel Butler, White still won the 200-yard individual medley Feb. 9 by two-hundredths of a second. It was her first state title in the event, according to Lockwood. White also jumped back into the pool and led her team to silver in the 200yard freestyle relay, finishing just .70 of a second behind their region nemesis Brighton. The next day White defended her 100-yard backstroke crown, beating her nearest competitor by almost four seconds with a time of 53.79—not far off her state record time of 53.45 that she set last year. Then White still had enough in the tank to help her teammates win a silver medal in the 400-yard freestyle relay to wrap up another successful state run. “She raced like hell and put us in a place to win those and work together toward a team goal,” said Lockwood, who also happens to coach her and many of her teammates on a club team. “We had to make a little sacrifice, but she was great about it. And it set us up nicely for those (regional and national) meets later this spring.” All told, of the four races White entered, she came home with

at least a silver medal in each. Her total medal haul in Provo was two individual golds to go with two team silvers. Other girls swimmers standing out for the Colts were freshman sensation Emma Walker, who collected three silvers, one each in the 500-yard freestyle, the 100-yard breaststroke and the 400-yard freestyle relay, as well as junior Katelyn Price, who had a silver and bronze apiece. As for the boys swimmers, they weren’t chopped liver at the state tournament, either. Living up to his name, sophomore Blayze Kimble torched the field for gold in the 200-yard individual medley. His record time of 1:55.48 put him nearly two seconds ahead of his nearest competitor. Kimble then tacked on a silver and bronze on the second day. Lockwood said the sky is the limit for Kimble, whose mother swam at Kearns years ago. “With all that raw talent, in a couple years he could be something very special,” Lockwood said. Originally from Indiana, some family issues brought Kimble and his mom back to Utah. “He’s still really young and still a little immature to the sport and he’s still learning how to train, but you can see he’s got limitless potential,” Lockwood said. Not to be outdone by his teammates, however, junior Christian Simon played “Simon Says” with a star-studded field in the 50-yard freestyle, touching the line first in 21.45 to win gold. Simon’s story was a nice come-from-behind one as well, because as Lockwood said, his talent also runs in the family. “His older brother won the 200 IM and 100 breast here as a senior, and after a few tough swims last year Christian got himself refocused, so it’s been really fun to see him grow,” Lockwood said. “He’s always knee deep in his books and I have a ton of respect for him and his life.” On the second day, Simon went on to grab another gold medal in the 100-yard freestyle—then won silver and bronze medals along with his teammates in the relays. It was a crazy yet wonderful state tournament for the Colts, who with all this young talent has a bright future ahead of it. “This year we thought we had an outside shot,” said Lockwood. “Obviously, we came up a little short this year. But we’re excited. We’ve laid the groundwork to have a great year next year.” l

March 2017 | Page 19

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SPORTS

Page 20 | March 2017

S outh Salt Lake City Journal

Slow starts lead to tough losses in January for Cottonwood boys hoops By Brian Shaw | brian.shaw@mycityjournals.com

A

ccording to Cottonwood head coach Lance Gummersall, the boys basketball team may have a win or two up their sleeves yet. Despite losing some games early on, the Colts have managed to stay in some games. They just haven’t found a way to win yet. West Jordan 67, Colts 54 Back at home after getting pummeled by nearly 50 points at Copper Hills, the Colts finished up the second of two against West Jordan-area schools by hosting West Jordan on Jan. 20. The Jaguars are a longtime region power—having had several players go on to play Division I college basketball under legendary head coach Scott Briggs. The Colts started off rather sluggish against the Jaguars trailing 20-11 after one quarter. But in the second quarter the defense stiffened and each team scored 10 points in the second quarter. Down 10 points, the Colts managed to claw back into the game on the strength of 18 points from senior Andrew Lujan. But the Jaguars depth was just too much for the Colts, who despite the loss still shot a respectable 18-of-23 from the field. West Jordan had four players score in double figures to drop the Colts who also got 13 points from senior Malik Johnson and 10 from Britton Jensen. Taylorsville 72, Colts 70 After showing such promise against West Jordan, the Colts really upped the ante against the Warriors. As was the case against West Jordan though, the Colts started slow in the first

quarter. Trailing 11-6 after one though, the Colts slowly climbed back into it thanks in part to a balanced scoring effort from four players scoring in double figures. Some players are bound to have off nights and that was the case for Lujan in this Jan. 24 contest on the road. But, Spence McDonald worked the nets for 20 points nailing three, three-point shots from behind the arc for Cottonwood, who went into the break trailing by double digits. By the end of the third quarter, the game looked out of reach. Then the Colts stormed back, outscoring the Warriors 3720 in a frenzied final stanza that only was out of reach for Cottonwood. Other than that, it seemed like the Colts were on a roll and about to turn the corner. But the Colts were about to take on a perennial state power. Brighton 69, Colts 45 In Brighton on Jan. 27 the Colts got a tough test from a young Bengals team featuring two Krystkowiaks. For those unfamiliar with the sons of Utah Utes basketball coach Larry Krystkowiak, he has two kids playing for the Bengals and they appear to be pretty good, too. Cam, a 6-foot-8-inches junior and his oldest, came as good as advertised scoring 21 points for the Bengals, who roared out to an 11-point lead at halftime. The Bengals would pull away in the third, extending their lead to 23 points after three quarters. The Colts actually only missed three shots in the game—going 9-for-12 from the field. But the Bengals, who got 7 points and 10 rebounds

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from Luc, the other younger Krystkowiak, took twice as many shots and made about 70 percent of them en route to the easy win. For the Colts, Spence McDonald had 11 points. To round out the month of January going into February, the Colts lost 86-64 to a Jordan team they beat to open region play. Since that point in the season, the Colts haven’t won, losing in blowout fashion to Copper Hills (98-40)—but they did come close in those earlier games against West Jordan and Taylorsville, two teams they’ll meet again to close out the season so hopes are high to get a W or two. l

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M yCityJournal.Com

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Page 22 | March 2017

S outh Salt Lake City Journal

Jump into Spring Organization – Is there an App for That?

A

by

JOANI TAYLOR

common question I’m often asked is, “how do you get so much done in a day?” After all, in addition to running a busy Coupons4Utah.com, I also own a travel blog, 50Roads.com and contribute to a grocery website Crazy4Smiths. com. I have a segment on KUTV, write this article monthly and still find the time to hang out with my out-of-state grandkids. Initially, this tough question left me struggling for an answer. After a little thought I realized my most productive days come down to one handy tool. No, it’s not mood-altering drugs (good guess though). The answer is my phone. Now, if you’re like me in the 50-something age range, I know what you’re thinking, “Get a grip, we don’t need no stinkin’ phones!” And admittedly, I did just write an article about the importance of writing down your goals. So, let me be clear, I ALWAYS put my phone away during meals and it NEVER goes to bed with me (two habits I highly recommend for everyone). I’m of the mentality that I own my phone, it doesn’t own me. And while some days it proves to be more of a distraction, this one tool can keep me productive all day. Here are a few apps I use that you could find useful too.

sync my calendar to all my devices and put everything on. I even use it to block out times to take a moment and breath, to go to the gym, read a book, and even plan a vacation. Keeping to a schedule is my No. 1 tip for staying organized. If you’re an iPhone user check out Awesome Note 2 app. It brings together to-do lists, notes and your calendar. These are just a few ideas that will help you organize your time. You can find more apps we’ve shared on Coupons4Utah.com/get-app. The next time you feel overwhelmed with a task, you might just look to see if there’s an app for that. And remember to always check the privacy terms before registering. l

Grocery: ListEase is a free grocery app for your phone and even works with an Apple Watch. After a brief learning curve and initial set up, I found it easy to use for not only groceries, but for to-do lists to. There’s even links to coupons. If you’re a Smith’s or Macey’s shopper they both have great grocery list apps with coupons too. Photos and Kids’ Art: Keepy is a new free app that allows you to organize kids’ artwork and allows the user the ability to share it with family members who live far away. The app also allows you to record voice-over stories about your photos. Google Photos: There are tons of apps out there with cloud storage, but my personal favorite is Google Photos. It’s easy to use, free and offers editing options. Calendar: Yes folks, if you aren’t already, you need to learn to use your calendar. I

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March 2017 | Page 23

M yCityJournal.Com

Life

Laughter AND

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fter God created Adam and Eve, he plunked them down in the middle of a garden and told them to start naming dinosaurs. Adam dove headfirst into the task and went to work giving names to the millions of creatures walking around his backyard. They lived together in ignorance and innocence, walking around naked and coming up with funny names like “chicken turtle” and “spiny lumpsucker.” After a time, Eve thought there had to be more to life than mind-numbing sameness every. single. day. She’d walk to the forbidden Tree of Knowledge and stare into its branches, wondering how bad knowledge could be. Then along came a snake and blah, blah, blah—knowledge entered the Garden of Eden. Adam came home from work that afternoon to find Eve wearing fashionable fig leaves. Before he could comment, Eve enthusiastically told him all the amazing things she had learned. Knowledge was awesome!! Adam was furious. He didn’t need no smart woman telling him what to do. He turned to reprimand Eve, but she was writing poetry, doing math and creating crafts to put on her Pinterest board. Not to be upstaged by a lowly rib-woman, Adam stormed off through the jungle, getting his

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nether-regions caught on brambles, until he came to the Tree of Knowledge. And the rest is history. Or is it? Fast forward to 2017 and male/female relationships haven’t improved much. It wasn’t until the last 100 years that women decided things had to change. They ate from their own trees of knowledge and became proactive in voicing opinions. What was the overall reaction from men? “These women are crazy. To the institutions!” “Why can’t women just be happy?” “Don’t they know they have inferior minds?” “Where’s my dinner?!?!” Nevertheless, we persisted. Our mothers and grandmothers and greatgrandmothers fought against the stereotypical bra burning, hairy armpitted, unsmiling, Birkenstockwearing feminists. They tussled with men who found them shrill, incompetent and wholly ungrateful; men who were possibly afraid of what a smart woman could do. We’ve quietly listened to blonde jokes, put up with mansplaining bosses and held our tongues for hundreds of sexist and/or patronizing comments. But maybe we can find common ground. I’m sure many young men feel the pressure to become muscular like Thor, brave like a Navy Seal and wealthy like that Monopoly guy. I’m sure men battle with confidence issues, body image concerns and are always trying to look smarter than the

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women in the room. So, see! Common ground. Feminism is the promotion of women’s rights based on equality, meaning anyone who believes women are (at least) equal to men is a feminist. And, come on, really? We’re at least equal to men. Here’s my vision for the next 100 years (assuming we survive the next four). • Women take an equal role in leadership, possibly creating an effective education system. • Men embrace a woman’s ability to communicate with emotion and passion as a strength, not a weakness. • Girls around the world are educated, respected and live in peace. • Someone creates a gluten-free cinnamon roll recipe that doesn’t taste like cinnamonflavored concrete. (Okay, that last one has nothing to do with equal rights. But still. Get on that, Pillsbury.) Smart women shouldn’t be scary to men. We still do the majority of child-rearing and you don’t want a stupid person raising the next generation. Maybe in 200 years, this could be a headline: “Is America Prepared for a Male President?” Maybe, like Adam and Eve, we can work together to create a new world. l

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South Salt Lake Journal March 2017  
South Salt Lake Journal March 2017  
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