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MATTHEW WIEBER design portfolio


COVER IMAGE | Project: FARMING FAITH Carved Plaster Model

MATTHEW WIEBER mjwieber19@gmail.com www.mjwieber.com 443.974.1171


“There is a secret bond between slowness and memory, between speed and forgetting.� - Milan Kundera


Bio Matthew Joseph Wieber (b. 1994) is a recent graduate from the Marywood University School of Architecture, graduating Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Architecture degree. He served as the Vice President and Co-founder of the schools Sketching Club, Student Teacher for the Architecture in Schools Program (AIS) and undergraduate researcher. He currently works as an Intern Architect at Gaudreau, Inc in Baltimore, Maryland. He is the winner of the 2017 AIA COTE Top Ten Student Design Competition and has earned the 2016 AIA Pennsylvania Student Design Award, 2013 Merit Award for Architecture, and Eagle Scout.

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SELECTED WORKS 01

NURTURE Lehigh Living Cultural Center on Sand Island

02

FARMING FAITH Urban Farming + Interfaith Space in SOHO, NY

03

PALLET P.A.D. Design Build Disaster Relief Shelter in Scranton, PA

04

TRACES of the IMMATERIAL Sanctuary of Peace in Thingvellir, Iceland

05

CONSCIOUSNESS Observatory for Teaching + Science on Mt. Lemmon, AZ

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VISIBILITY of INEVITABILITY Death Research + Burial in Lower Manhattan & Gov. Island

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PERCEIVING SENSATION Louis Kahn Foundation on Rittenhouse Square

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ADDITIONAL WORK Detail + Teaching

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PROFESSIONAL WORK Graphic Design | Construction Documents | Master Planning

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SKETCH Italy + Postcards From + Freelance

SELECTED WORKS

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NURTURE Lehigh Living Cultural Center | Bethlehem, PA

AIA COTE Top Ten Competition Winning Project AIA Baltimore Unbuilt Award / Excellence in Sustainable + Resilient Design AIA San Antonio Citation Award - Unbuilt 5 th year Fall 2016

13 weeks

with Kurt Kimsey

Prioritizing people as the most sustainable solution. This project seeks to nurture its future citizens into a green lifestyle, ultimately facilitating a positive growth for the future of Bethlehem. The site houses a “new foundation” dedicated to supporting and nurturing the people of Bethlehem. Offering a range of educational, art and community outreach opportunities paired with recreation, the project integrates the people into the natural landscape. The raised pathway connects visitors through programs, creating a narrative of an individuals experience. The transparency and flexibility of the building allows for a range of cultural uses, and manages long term potential and flexible use. The restoration of Bethlehem’s identity will be cultivated first hand through its citizens.

01 NURTURE

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L e h ig h

Canal

il D + L Tra

Water Access Point: Bike / Kayak Rental

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S cu lp tu re

G ar de n


rk in ng Pa E x is ti ) d (s h a re

do Out

av or P

ilion

g

s

Boat t in g E x is O f f D ro p

Lehigh River Site Plan - Sand Island

Region Map

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PATH narrating connection

RAISE 4’ above flood plain

FRAME view to river and landscape

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PROGRAM interior derived from path

DESCEND toward landscape

INTEGRATE interior + exterior programs

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First Floor Plan

Merging Landscapes The pathway bifurcates at the intersection of the building offering a path back towards the landscape and eventually connecting back to the existing bike trail. The path and building circulation run parallel to one another, striving to merge the interior and exterior conditions bringing the sense of nature inside.

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Approach from Water Access

Sectional Model

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Concourse (model)

Visibly Flexible, Socially Sustainable

PATH

CONCOURSE

Raised above the flood plain on site, the path operates as an “artery� providing access to various programs on-site

Functioning as a flexible gallery space and concourse, holding social gatherings and events.

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Suspended Walkway

CLASSROOMS / WORKSHOPS Students get involved on site and within the community of Bethlehem through volunteer and outreach programs.

ART STUDIOS / GALLERIES

SCULPTURE GARDEN

Open studio space encourages social interaction. The visibility to the outside promotes the biophilic art created within.

Operates as a buffer to the students working inside, as well as a public display for their work.

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RAINWATER COLLECTION

DAYLIGHTING + SHADING

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SOLAR THERMAL

VENTILATION

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Framed views of the Landscape

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FARMING FAITH Urban Farming + Interfaith Space | SOHO District, NY 2 nd Year

Spring 2014

6 weeks

The project focused on the duality of serenity and disturbance. Sited in the SOHO District of New York City, the building operated as a small scale urban farm and tea shop. At the core of the building, unobtainable from the interior lies an interfaith space. The project provides a calming moment within the city, subtly pulling pedestrians off the street slowly into darkness and finally providing a place of repose. The combination of homogeneity and the continuity of the raw concrete surface creates an internal belly within the building, while at the same time being exposed to the outside. Sitting in the middle of the urban farm, the faith space remains still and silent within the urban context.

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Longitudinal Section

Transverse Section

Carving Light Through the action of carving plaster models, the internal void of the building (what was carved away) developed into the interfaith space. The negative and voided space of the building defines the program and organizes the remainder of the spaces inside. The action of carving away symbolizes the power of light filling a space of emptiness, and in return giving breath and life.

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PALLET P.A.D. Pallets Providing Aid for Disaster | Scranton, PA Design Build Disaster Relief Shelter 3 year Spring 2015 rd

with Design Studio VI

12 weeks

Our goal was to design a temporary relief shelter for a large disaster preparation strategy in the North Eastern Pennsylvania Region. The project is designed as a modular structure with cost efficient, renewable and abundant materials. The biggest proponent for the project is that it is easily produced through the prefabrication and kit of parts. The temporary shelter will be deployed in a large indoor space such as a gymnasium, but could still withstand outdoor elements. The ability for small groups and ordinary people to assemble the shelter was an important factor in our design.

As one of the project leaders, my responsibilities included leading all design phases of the project, coordinating and producing the assembly booklet and drawings, logo design and graphic visualizations and assisting with the construction of the project.

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Assembly Book: Kit of Parts The assembly booklet provides directions that are easily understood and visualized by victims of a disaster. In a disaster scenario, the kit of prefab parts and assembly booklet will be sent to the site and assembled by the victims and volunteers. The booklet contains a material and supply list and a 36 step process to assemble the shelter.

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Materials

Shelter

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ADA Accessible Entry

Bunk Beds & Desk

View from beds

Seating + Porch Entry

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TRACES of the IMMATERIAL Sanctuary of Peace | Thingvellir, Iceland 117th John Stewardson Competition Postgraduate

Spring 2018

10 Days

We strive as humans to leave our “marks� on the world. Whether through action, fame or failure, these material indications we leave behind, inspire and invoke curiosity and pursuit toward greater endeavors throughout our world. The increased tourism and industry within Iceland has lain waste to the fragile landscape. The polarity between man and nature is accelerated by the material scars left by visitors each year, resulting in a careless appreciation for nature and culture. The architecture becomes a mechanism to exhibit the transitory nature of landscape on the visitors. The climatic, cultural and historic traces bring awareness to the growing change of the region. The slow revelations of the immaterial are contrasted by the material scars of the architecture left by time. The immaterial qualities evoked through the sequence of space and light leave traces on visitors, eliciting an awareness and reminder of a greater divinity.

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RIVER / WETLANDS

SITE

GORGE / ROCKY TERRAIN

TRAILS

HISTORIC STRUCTURES

REGION MAP

Region Map

Admin.

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Sanctuary

Entry Promenade

N


8 1

4

7

6

6 1

8 4

2

5 5

3

9

1

1

entry

2

sanctuary

1

3 altar of peace 4 offices 5 support / storage 6 meditation rm. 7 mech rm. 8 viewing deck 9 courtyard

Sanctuary

Entry

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Sanctuary

Approach from Trail

Origins of the Landscape The site is placed at a tension point between the river, gorge and historic boundaries, attempting to reorient and attune visitors back to the origins of the site. The position and form of the building mimics the vast Icelandic terrain. Existing paths extend from the ground plane framing views of the landscape and organizing the sanctuary at the heart of the building.

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CONSCIOUSNESS Observatory for Teaching & Science | Tuscon, AZ Honorable Mention - Finalist 116th John Stewardson Memorial Fellowship in Architecture 5 th Year

Spring 2017

10 Days

This project seeks to aid visitors in focusing their attention on certain objects in space. Through a high contrast between light and shadow, a spatial sequence is created within the building, concentrating on specific natural and celestial elements. The procession through the building evokes reflection and observation within the occupant, creating a tension towards oneself and the object being reached. The attention toward specific elements within space will increase our ability to perceive change. Our consciousness of the unknown will encourage us to continue exploring, discovering and questioning our world, our being and our perception of what lies beyond.

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5’

10’

20’

N

First Floor Plan

Perceiving the Unknown The building focuses on natural and celestial occurrences in space. Highlighting the sunset, sunrise, north star and landscape, the mechanism of light and shadow is used to represent the changing state of the occurrences. The visitor will become more aware of these aspects through observation and in turn direct their perception towards greater things that go unnoticed.

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GREENROOF ROOF GREEN

OBSERVATORY OBSERVATORY

RETAINING WALLS RETAINING WALLS

ENTRY SEQUENCE/ ENTRY SEQUENCE / VIEWING PLATFORMS VIEWING PLATFORMS

VIEWING DECK / / VIEWING DECK CLASSROOMS CLASSROOMS

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EMBED The building’s form sits into the mountainside, lifting visitors out over the landscape

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IMITATE Concrete walls mimic the surrounding mountainous terrain


LONGITUDINAL SECTION

FOCUS Opening’s focus the visitors attention toward key natural and celestial objects

PANORAMA The building’s lower deck offers uninterrupted views of the land and beyond

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VISIBILITY OF INEVITABILITY Death Research & Crematorium | Lower Manhattan + Gov. Island, NYC Comprehensive Studio 4 year Spring 2016 th

12 weeks

with Carly Bonsignore

Our architecture strives to enhance the awareness and perception of death. To bring to the conscious mind and to keep in the conscious mind the element of death. To provide a potential comfort through exposure and familiarity. By making visible the consciousness of death, its integration and cohesion with life can be fortified. Architecture can provide the visibility of inevitability so that our culture can live more comfortably with the reality and beauty of death.

The project is derived through a procession between two sites. One located in lower Manhattan and the other on Governors Island. Both sites constitute two processions of the body: living and dead. The urban site houses a morgue, death research facility, funeral home and chapel. The body leaves the urban site and heads across the Hudson on a ferry to Governor’s Island.

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Programming Death The building is partitioned by large concrete walls organizing the programmatic functions while concealing the mechanical equipment. The right side of the building holds more private programs and contains the body freight elevator. The left holds a more public environment where the labs and classrooms reside. The center performs as a overflow space to manage the flow of people and bodies between programs.

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Viewing Rooms | 10th - 11th Floor

Chapel | 12th Floor

Research Labs | 3rd - 5th Floor

Lecture Hall - Comp. Lab | 7th Floor

Admin - Body Drop-off | Ground Floor

Morgue - ID Lab | 2nd Floor

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Verticality

Opaque

Translucent

Division of Program

Viewing Rooms

Morgue

Lecture Hall

Research Labs

Funeral Prep Room

Material Configuration The visibility of the spaces increase through a systematic implementation of materiality. The variance of transparent, translucent and opaque provide a gradient of visibility through each level. Fiber cement panels, channel glass with translucent film and glazing are configured to emphasize the thinness and verticality of the facade, orienting views to above.

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Site Model

Chapel

Ascension to Above The dead body’s visibility to the living (public) increases as it ascends up through the building, as its maximum visibility is reached in the viewing spaces and finally the chapel space. The occupants perception of death is challenged through the exposure of the body and its process, giving them the opportunity to become familiar and comfortable with what has been visually and mentally ingrained.

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Procession of the Dead Within both sites there is a transition from a public front into a tranquil environment. The body processes from the memorial hall back into the public realm and onto the ferry. The ferry arrives at Governor’s Island as the body is prepped for the crematorium and/or other burial options on the site. This progression of the body parallels the exposure and visibility of death symbolized at both sites. The exposure and visibility of death are increased as you ascend through the site.

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Transverse Section A

Transverse Section B

Transverse Section C

15 foot Wall Constant throughout Site

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Site Plan - Governor’s Island

Programmed Walls determine terraforming

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View from Cemetery

Mausoleum

A Growing Exposure Expanding on West 8’s master plan of Governor’s Island, the site’s design integrates visitors with the landscape. The pathways and organization of the programmed walls are derived from existing paths and correspond with the future develop of the island. Death is represented on site through walls weaving through the terrain offering places for pause, reflection and activity.

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1 Ferry Landing

2 Crematorium / Visitor Center

3 Columbarium

4 Mausoleum

5 Burial Grounds (Cemetery)

6 Parking

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PERCEIVING SENSATION Louis Kahn Foundation | Philadelphia, PA Capstone Project: Perception + Shadow 5 th year

Spring 2017

13 weeks

Our ability to perceive is deeply rooted in our capacity to interpret our surroundings and relate them to a specific human sensory or mental complex. We perceive objects not only through a visual construct but also in a tactile and auditory manner. Our brains monitor our perceptions, conscious, memories and emotions. As we perceive things we are at the same time creating them; perception is directly linked to imagination. Architecture can become a mental extension of our capacity to perceive. By focusing the attention on specific elements in space the viewer can become aware of an unknown relationship in space. Material and spatial configurations heightened by light and shadow will narrow our attention and create an internal focus. As Kahn succeeded in mastering the sensation of space, so to his foundation offers the opportunity to become curious and uncover a unique perception of our sensitized environments.

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Street Analysis + Precedents

Walnut Street

Montreal Museum of Fine Arts

Boundary: lack of ambiguity along the

Depress: focal point of depressed fenestration is contrasted with a subtle protrusion

street front

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Sitting Silent The foundation sits quietly on the corner of Rittenhouse Square. The extrusion and depression of the facade punctuates the streetscape adding to the spatial depth and

definition perceived

from the street, eliciting further haptic and visual sensations. The dematerialization of the buildings corner on Rittenhouse reveals

glimpses and

moments of the interior galleries creating an internal focus, drawing visitors in.

Site Plan - Rittenhouse Square

Rosenthal Center

Kahn Foundation

Relief: variety of reliefs add tones of shadow and light, giving off a haptic sensation

Compress: the compression of the two masses emphasizes focus from the exterior

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De-materialization of Corner

Formal Parti

STAC K

E X T RU D E

program: galleries + educa ti on

ga lleries toward street, pushing entry underneath

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OUTER

ACTIVE

PROCESSION

ACTIVE

OUTER

G EO M ET R IC HI

The atrium | light void experince of the Kahn expands towards the c pinching towards the e slow the procession, off and reflection.

S PAT IA L R HY T H

The sequence between light-well alternate from to silent ones. The gall space to wander contr focused atrium.

Indentations reflect areas of public transparency

M AT ER IA L | IM

The contrast between circumstances is accen of light and darkness. arrangements of the ga highlighted by the imm intermittal spaces, whe and discovery is heigh

COMPR ES S

PEEL

public + repose a rea s bet ween programs

gallery opening to project views out, and peak curiousity within

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View up through Lightwell

Peaking Curiosity The dim entry into the building is contrasted by the light trickling down the lightwell. Passing underneath, your curiosity is triggered by the staircase tying the atrium together. The procession down through each gallery is offset by intermittal spaces located between each level, offering a space for pause and reflection. The dimness of the interior creates a focus on specific objects inside.

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Transverse Section

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View from Gallery over Rittenhouse

Model - Aerial over Rittenhouse

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Model - View down Walnut Street


Sixth Floor - Gallery

Fourth Floor - Concourse

Ground Floor - Entry

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A Romantic Touch The heavy concrete guardrails add security to the visitors movement down through the high atrium. The railing is embedded into the guardrail resembling a hand guiding you through each level, adding to a sense of comfort and intimacy. From below the stair sheds light between the subtle gap left between the guardrail and treads.

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1

2 1/4” PreFab Conc. Tread w/ Steel Reinfor.

2

1/2” Cont. Steel Riser w/ Angles

3

1/4” Silicon Spacer Pad

4

1/4” Silicon Insert Strips

5

1/2” Steel Sheet welded to Riser

6

7” Steel C Channel

7

5” Pre Fab Conc. Guardrail

8

8” Reinforced Conc. Landing

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DETAIL + LIGHT Menil Collection | Houston, TX Art + Craft of Building 5 year Fall th

with Kurt Kimsey, Ben Dealy & Jake Amendola

Upon the Menil’s request, Piano designed the museum for the art to be viewed under natural light. He used the ceiling and louvers as a mechanism for light and shade, referring to them as a “roof of leaves”. The ferro-cement louvers control the daylight and direct light into the gallery as well as protecting the interior from heat gain. The organic shape of the louver is accentuated by the shadow and light, allowing the louvers and ceiling to appear as floating and weightless.

The elegant design and shape of the louvers gives the impression that they are moving and harnessing daylight. Since the louvers are fixed, the slightest belief in the movement of the louvers activates the space creating a connection between the viewer and the space.

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Stud Wall - Mock Up

Modeling - Tectonic + Space

Programming the City


ARCHITECTURE IN SCHOOLS Students and Homes in Education | Wilkes-Barre, PA Teaching + Hands on Learning 5 year Spring with Ben Dealy & Andrew Mitchell th

Over the course of 8 weeks, we planned activities and exercises to test, challenge and inspire middle school students about the field of architecture and design. Our lessons incorporated a variety of architectural tasks including mocking up a stud wall, exercises in urban design and planning, and even getting a little messy mixing and casting concrete. Our exercises were developed to challenge the kids to think critically about how and why we design. By understanding material qualities and spatial hierarchies and organization, the students were able to relate our exercises to there own experiences and see the impact that design and architecture have on a multitude of scales.

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4’ x 8’ Graphic for Lobby

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PROFESSIONAL Gaudreau, Inc. Architects | Planners | Baltimore, MD

Wake Forest Innovation Quarter Book & Lobby Graphics Graphic Design

9800 Medical Center Drive - Building t Parking Garage Design Development (50%) - Construction Documents

West Street Master Plan - Annapolis MD, Master Planning

Note: All work & images belong to Gaudreau, Inc Architects | Planners

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Wake Forest Innovation Quarter Book / Lobby Graphics Individual Project I was given the task to design a promotional book highlighting a series of 4 award winning projects completed in the Wake Forest Innovation Quarter. I also designed an 4’ x 8’ collage of the project, printed on 24”x24” boards and mounted down the lobby staircase. Both tasks were integral toward updating our branding and marketing of the firm.

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09 PROFESSIONAL

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C

CL

CL 12' - 0"

1 1/2"

11' - 9" 5' - 6"

1 1/2"

3"

5' - 6"

3"

1 1/2"

P6 522' - 6"

3"

3"

ALUM. FRAME

D4 A501

A4 A501

D4 A501

9"

POST INSTALLED CONNECTION BY MTL PNL SCREEN CONTRACTOR

4"

ALUM. FRAME BEYOND

O.H.

COLUMN BEYOND

11' - 0"

10' - 9"

C

ALUM. FRAME BEYOND 9"

4"

3"

P5 511' - 6"

3"

22' - 0"

ALUM. FRAME

COLUMN BEYOND

PERFORATED METAL SCREEN P1B 466' - 6"

C 11' - 0"

10' - 6"

B4 A501

PERFORATED METAL SCREEN ALUM. FRAME

A1

FIN. GRADE

POST INSTALLED CONNECTION BY MTL PNL SCREEN CONTRACTOR

5"

5"

1' - 2"

6"

3"

P4 500' - 6"

CONCRETE FOOTING SEE STRUC. FOUN.

1 1/2"

3"

COLUMN BEYOND

Perforated Metal Panel - Panel Type D1

P1A 460' - 0"

9800 Medical Center Drive - Building G Parking Garage with LPA, Inc.

Team: Chris Taylor, RA, Euiguem Ko, RA, LEED AP BD+C

The project was a joint effort between Gaudreau and LPA. The design of the garage optimizes parking on site for the National Institutes of Health in Rockville, MD. My responsibilities for the project was working through CD’s and assisting with the development and design of the perforated metal screen.

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Rendering by LPA, Inc.

A3 A311

A

B1 A301

A2 A202

0.A

PARAPET 538' - 6"

11' - 0" 5' - 0"

B

11' - 0" 12' - 0"

P2 478' - 6" P1B 466' - 6" P1A 460' - 0"

6' - 6"

PRECAST CONC. PANEL CLAD WITH THIN BRICK

11' - 0"

P3 489' - 6"

PRECAST CONCRETE, TYP.

CUSTOM ARCH SIGNAGE

P4 500' - 6"

11' - 0"

PERFORATED METAL SCREEN, TYP.

11' - 0"

B.O. ROOF SLAB 533' - 6" VISION GLAZING, TYP. P6 522' - 6" EXTRUDED ALUM. TUBE FRAME P5 511' - 6"

78' - 6"

C

North Elevation

A1 A301

1

0.1 A1 A202

B.O. ELEVATOR ROOF SLAB

VISION GLAZING, TYP. EXTRUDED ALUM. TUBE FRAME PERFORATED METAL SCREEN, TYP.

PRECAST CONCRETE, TYP. PRECAST CONC. PANEL CLAD WITH THIN BRICK

PARAPET 538' - 6"

B.O. ELEV ROOF SLAB 536' - 4" B.O. ROOF SLAB 533' - 6"

PRECAST CONC. PANEL CLAD WITH THIN BRICK

P6 522' - 6" P5 511' - 6" P4 500' - 6" P3 489' - 6" P2 478' - 6" P1B 466' - 6" P1A 460' - 0"

11' - 0" 5' - 0"

1.1

11' - 0"

2

11' - 0"

3

78' - 6"

4

11' - 0"

5

5' - 0"

6

11' - 0"

7

12' - 0"

7.4 A3 A301

6' - 6"

8

East Elevation

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Existing Big Box Store + Parking Lot

Existing Auto Dealership Lot

West Street Master Plan Annapolis, MD

Team: Esra Martin, AIA, LEED AP

This project strives to extend the walkable, social atmosphere found in downtown Annapolis along the West Street corridor. Isolating 11 areas along the corridor, the design will implement green infrastructure and strategically placed program to encourage walkability and connectivity. Existing impervious areas and failing business will make way for new residential and commercial programs, increasing density within the corridor.

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Existing Conditions Along West Street - Annapolis, MD

Existing Impervious Lots (abandoned, auto dealerships) to be developed on.

Implement new program around existing mixed-use development.

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Proposed: Sports Complex + Retail

Existing: Impervious Pavement + Parking Lots

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Proposed Development Along West Street - Annapolis, MD

Proposed: Multifamily Residential / Commercial

Existing: Impervious Pavement + Auto Dealers

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St. Pauls Church - Scranton, PA

SKETCH A collection of sketches and observations. Italy | Postcards From... | Personal Travels

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Windsor Chair - Scranton, PA


Fireplace Detail - Scranton, PA

Lighthouse - Bass Harbor, ME

Villa Rotunda - Vicenza, ITA

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Capturing Motion Sketches - First Friday Coffee House


The Acceleration of Slowness I believe in the precision and sensitivity of architecture’s response to people, place and material. There is a slowness to which we design that is often times balanced by our reveries and desire for timelessness. Our slowness is accelerated by our endless heuristic efforts to craft and compose an architecture that resonates with its people and is rooted in its place. It is through this careful chaos that we find the beauty of architecture and of place, woven together by our thoughts, experiences and memories. It is only when we begin to slow down and become more attuned to our environments, our people and our thoughts that we will discover the harmony of all.


M

M

ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN + WRITING

MATTHEW WIEBER mjwieber19@gmail.com www.mjwieber.com 443.974.1171

M

MATTHEW

IEBER

Matthew Wieber | Architecture + Design Portfolio 2018  

A collection of academic, personal and professional work.

Matthew Wieber | Architecture + Design Portfolio 2018  

A collection of academic, personal and professional work.

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