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Collegian The Newsletter of The New England College Council

Spring 2012

New England College Council President Dr. Lucille Jordan President Nashua Community College 505 Amherst St. Nashua, NH 03063 Tel: (603) 882-6923 www.nashuacc.edu Vice-President Dr. Terrence Gomes President Roxbury Community College 1234 Columbus Avenue Roxbury Crossing, MA 02120 Tel: (617) 541-5301 www.rcc.mass.edu Treasurer Dr. Daniel M. Asquino President Mount Wachusett Community College 444 Green St. Gardner, MA 01440 www.mwcc.edu Secretary Dr. Barbara Douglass President Northwestern Connecticut Community College Park Place East Winsted, CT 06098 www.nwcc.commnet.edu Executive Director Robert Ross (617) 426-1920 The Collegian edited by Robert Ross The Collegian newsletter design by Dana Armstrong The Collegian is available online at:

This Collegian highlights the indomitable spirit of the students, faculty and staff at New England’s associate degree granting colleges. During a year when financial resources were being stretched to the breaking point and student demand was rising, the colleges of the New England College Council demonstrated their creativity, leadership and responsiveness. In the articles and news stories presented in this Collegian you will read of hopes and dreams being fulfilled. You will see our member colleges growing to meet new challenges. You will read about individuals who make a difference in the lives of others and the future of their communities.

“During a year when This year the New England College Council has set forth financial resources were to provide members with new being stretched to the opportunities to gather and address significant issues breaking point and facing our institutions, our communities and the nation. student demand was The Annual Best Practices rising, the colleges of the Conference, offered in partnership with the College New England College Board, continues to grow in Council demonstrated attendance and the substance of presentations. Our new their creativity, leadership Presidents Roundtable and responsiveness.” meetings provided a vital opportunity for the exchange of information and views on shared issues facing colleges across New England. Our membership is increasing, participation is growing and our annual scholarship program received a record number of submissions. I invite you to take the time to enjoy the successes and innovations of your colleagues from across the region. Reflect upon the enormous watershed of talent and experience available to learn from and to share. As each of you contributes the whole region becomes stronger. Thank you for your support and active involvement in the New England College Council.

www.newenglandcollegecouncil.org

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The Newsletter of The New England College Council

Spring 2012

Serving Those Who Serve Us

Military to Management: Offering New Beginnings for Service Members By Dr. Thomas M. McGovern, President of Fisher College and Veteran of the Army of the United States Nearly 2 million service members have been deployed since 2001. These service members are now returning from active duty in search of homes, jobs, and an education. As a result, colleges and universities are working harder than ever to help service men and women pursue new beginnings through higher education. Maximizing Post-9/11 GI Bill Benefits For many military students, the Post-9/11 GI Bill is the main reason for beginning or continuing their education. Some of the numerous benefits offered under the Post-9/11 GI Bill include up to 100% tuition and fee coverage, a monthly living (housing) stipend, up to $1,000 a year for books and supplies, a one-time relocation allowance, and the option to transfer benefits to family members. To receive the maximum benefits from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, veteran and active service members should select a college that understands the challenges presented by the Bill and has the expertise to manage the benefits it offers. For example, a qualified college will help military students understand and take advantage of programs like the Yellow Ribbon Program. This program is a provision of the Post-9/11 GI Bill that is designed to help students avoid up to 100% of the out-ofpocket tuition and fees that may exceed GI Bill tuition benefits. A military-friendly college will help veteran and active service members receive additional funds through this provision without additional charges to the student’s entitlement. By helping military students navigate processes and utilize benefits like the Yellow Ribbon Program, colleges can streamline the administrative aspects of degree programs for these students. Military-Friendly Colleges Offer Supplemental Programs In addition to assisting military students with understanding and leveraging the Post-9/11 GI Bill and its provisions, colleges should provide additional accommodations for veteran and active service members. Military-friendly colleges will accept College Level Examination Programs (CLEP) and/or DANTES Subject Standardized Test (DSST) exams for credit, and many will accept military training and experience for credit through the American Council on Education (ACE). Colleges may also offer military students benefits such as tuition discounts; in-state tuition without residency requirements; fee-waived applications; flexible schedules through evening, weekend, and online courses; and reenrollment without penalty for military students who are called to active duty. Furthermore, military-friendly colleges are often part of the Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC) Degree Network System, an organization that works to provide educational opportunities to military students who, because of frequent relocation, have difficulty completing their college degrees (according to soc.aascu.org). These colleges may also participate in the Military Spouse Career Advancement Accounts (MyCAA), a program that provides up to $4,000 (over 2 years) of financial assistance for military spouses pursuing degree programs, licenses or credentials that lead to employment in portable career fields (according to Military.com). On-campus or cross-town programs can make Reserve Officers’ Training Corp (ROTC) available as well. The provision of these benefits clearly demonstrates a college or university’s commitment to military students. Relevant Degree Options and Career Placement Support Relevant degree options are increasingly important to veteran and active service members. Therefore, colleges looking to cater 2


The Newsletter of The New England College Council

Spring 2012

Continued from page 2 to these individuals should offer two- and four-year degree options in areas that inherently draw from military skills and knowledge, such as management, leadership, and public administration. Additionally, these degree options should be made available on a flexible schedule through day, night, and online courses. Career placement is also one of the most important aspects of a military student’s education. The transition from academic to civilian life is as critical to military students as the transition from military to student life. Colleges must acknowledge this process and provide the necessary support through internship opportunities, access to career counselors, and a network of military-friendly employers. Colleges should also have experienced veteran advisors and counselors on staff who can help liaise with local VET REPS for career placement. By leveraging their business and community connections, military-friendly colleges can effectively make the transition for military students into the workforce as seamless as possible. Fisher College: Offering New Beginnings to Military Students Fisher College’s Division of Continuing Education was established in 1975 to serve Vietnam-era veterans returning from active duty. Many of Fisher College’s senior staff members, including college President Dr. Thomas McGovern, are veterans and earned degrees with the help of a GI Bill. Continuing this tradition through Fisher’s innovative “Military to Management” initiative, the Fisher faculty and staff are eager and equipped to assist military students to build upon the leadership training they received in the military and achieve their educational goals. Fisher’s “Military to Management” initiative provides highly-customized online degree programs for veteran and active service members in the areas of Leadership and Public Administration. These degrees are priced to meet the cost per credit offered by the Tuition Assistance component of the Post-9/11 GI Bill. In addition, Fisher College offers flexible scheduling to veterans and active military students with evening, weekend, and online classes. Students are given access to the right tools and resources, like live sessions and tutoring via webcam, to keep them connected and help ensure their success. Military students also work directly with veteran military faculty through the “Military to Management” initiative, ensuring they receive guidance from individuals who can relate to their experiences first-hand and ease the transition from military life to student and civilian life. Fisher College is recognized as a military-friendly institution, and G.I. Jobs named Fisher College as a Top Military-Friendly School in 2011 and 2012. Fisher offers a variety of benefits to help military students transition into new beginnings, including but not limited to those mentioned in this article, as part of their “Military to Management” initiative. For more information on Fisher’s Military to Management program, visit http://www.fisher.edu/military. Dr. Thomas M. McGovern, President of Fisher College and Veteran of the Army of the United States, 1968-1971, may be reached at (617) 236-8800 or tmcgovern@Fisher.edu.

Support for Veterans at Massasoit Massasoit Community College in Brockton, MA recently opened a new Veterans Center to serve its military veteran students. This center is designed to meet the growing needs of military members, veterans, and their families. Centrally located in the Student Center it is a place where military students can go to for assistance with educational benefits, college related issues, and a comfortable place relax , study, and socialize with other military students. There are computer workstations for class assignments and research, a lounge, and a multimedia conference table for laptops and studying. “We are very pleased to be able to provide this opportunity to those who have served; it has been an initiative in the planning for several years and the entire college community is excited to see it come to fruition,” said Dr. Charles Wall, President of Massasoit Community College. The new Veterans Counselor, Michael Siegel has eighteen years of military experience, including a year in Afghanistan. Michael has served in the Connecticut and Massachusetts Army National Guard and was the veteran’s coordinator at Norwalk

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Continued from page 3 Community College in Connecticut before coming to Massasoit. As a veteran himself, he is familiar with the military culture that affects this particular student population. “Having served myself, it is my honor to support military students and to be able to take this role to give back and assist my fellow service members,” Michael said. “I was deployed while in college so I understand the difficulties and the unique hardships of proudly serving my country while pursuing my educational goals,” he added. The mission of the Veterans Center at Massasoit Community College is to support students who are military members, veterans and their family members by providing academic advising, educational benefits eligibility and processing, and a dedicated staff and environment for professional and personal development so they may achieve life-long success. This expanded comprehensive and caring college experience will help service members to reach their educational goals as well as their personal and professional goals. Michael is excited about his new position, “I want to provide services and connections that will have Massasoit Community College leading the way in campus veteran services. This center should transcend this room and spread throughout the college community to create a military friendly culture. It is not just this Veterans Center that will attract military students; it will be the College becoming known as a school that enthusiastically and wholly supports their military students and their families.”

New Directions and Innovations

Capital Community College and Theatre’s “One Play” Collaboration Thriving Hartford, CT - The Tony award-winning theatre, Hartford Stage, and the city’s only public undergraduate college, Capital Community College, are more than neighbors – they are partners. The two institutions across the street from one another have joined forces to expose students to the world of theatre through a new collaboration dubbed One Play. One Play, which began in 2011, focuses the attention of the entire college each semester on a single play offered by Hartford Stage. The program includes special events related to each play, such as lectures, panel discussions with actors, and professional development opportunities for faculty. Many instructors also include the play in their courses. Capital Community College nights at Hartford Stage offer students, staff and faculty discounted tickets and include a pre-play pizza reception at the college. Last semester more than 400 from Capital Community College, over 300 of whom were students, attended the first One Play, which was Water by the Spoonful, by Quiara Alegria Hudes, about a Latino family in contemporary America. This semester’s One Play attendance for The Whipping Man, by Matthew Lopez, exceeded the first, with more than 500 from the college viewing the play and participating in associated programs. The play was about a Jewish Confederate soldier and two former slaves who were raised as Jews in his household in the aftermath of the Civil War. One Play grew out of an NEH grant, spearheaded by Capital’s Chair of Humanities, Dr. Jeffrey Partridge. The grant is providing the college’s Humanities faculty with the opportunity to study Hartford’s history, literature, communities and culture by interacting with scholars at area institutions to stimulate course content that will engage students. “The goal is to make Hartford an extension of our classrooms,” said Partridge. “By

Pulitzer prize-winning playwright Quiara Alegria Hudes, (in white shirt) with Dr. Jeffrey Partridge, Capital’s Chair of Humanities, and students from Partridge’s American Literature class.

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Continued from page 4 connecting our students with the cultural institutions at our doorstep – by engaging them with Hartford’s rich mix of arts and culture – we hope to see our students get excited about the place they call home.” Capital is the only public undergraduate college in Hartford, and the only college in Connecticut designated as a Hispanic Serving Institution by the federal government. Many Capital students have lived in Hartford their entire lives, and most remain here after graduation and further education. Despite this, many are unfamiliar with Hartford’s history. By bringing students face-to-face with the city’s remarkable past, it is anticipated they will become active participants in Hartford’s present and future. “This is an outstanding initiative that is already impacting student learning, the college, and Hartford,” said Dr. Wilfredo Nieves, Capital’s president. “We are fortunate to be surrounded by numerous diverse cultural institutions, and we are establishing relationships that are enhancing the college’s courses, our humanities curriculum, and the lives of our students.”

Tunxis Provides Connecticut TSA Employees with Path to Degree Tunxis Community College was recently selected by the U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to offer a certificate in homeland security for its employees that can be applied toward an associate’s degree at Tunxis. “We are pleased to partner with the Transportation Security Administration in offering this opportunity to Connecticut TSA employees, who are so vital in supporting security efforts statewide and nationally within our airports and transportation systems,” said Tunxis President Cathryn L. Addy, Ph.D. Tunxis is the only college in Connecticut, and one of about 50 community colleges from across the country participating in the training program, which encourages TSA employees to further their post-secondary education and attain credentials to advance in their careers. The three-course certificate helps TSA employees fulfill their homeland security mission, and introduces concepts such as intelligence analysis, border security, and security management. “This is a great program for security officers who want to advance their education and improve their career advancement opportunities while continuing to work for TSA,” said David Bassett, TSA federal security director at Bradley International Airport. “Our people are our greatest asset and this program gives the workforce new skills and information that they can apply not only to their important work at TSA, but also to an associate’s degree if they so choose.” Once employees finish the program, they receive a certificate from TSA and can apply their credits toward an associate degree in criminal justice or other programs at Tunxis. The College is developing a certificate in homeland security based on the curriculum, which Tunxis anticipates will be available to all students in the near future. TSA employees enrolled in “Intro to Homeland Security,” taught in fall 2011 by a 22-year veteran of law enforcement. “Intelligence Analysis & Security Management” and “Transportation and Border Security” are also included in the course sequence. The three courses have been developed and funded by TSA and will be delivered at the Connecticut Fire Academy, about four miles from Bradley International Airport. The TSA training program started in spring 2010 as a pilot for 11 airports and has since grown to all 50 states and over 75 airports within the United States. Over 3,500 TSA employees are expected to enroll nationally by this fall. From business, health, and technology to liberal arts & sciences programs, Tunxis offers over 60 associate’s degrees and certificates, providing critical thinking and problem-solving skills that prepare students for transfer to bachelor’s degree programs and employment in areas with industry need. Tunxis is located at the junction of Routes 6 and 177 in Farmington. For more information on programs at Tunxis, call 860.255.3500, or visit tunxis.commnet.edu. 5


The Newsletter of The New England College Council

Spring 2012

New College Scorecard Brings Data to Life at the Community College of Vermont In 2009 the Community College of Vermont (CCV) created a comprehensive ten year strategic plan, CCV 2020. That same year CCV joined Achieving the Dream (ATD), a national initiative that helps community colleges improve student success and graduation rates, two goals also identified as priorities for the College. The ATD emphasis on metrics-driven planning has led to new procedures for collecting and analyzing data to note patterns of student success, and to identify areas for improvement. A new challenge has been to organize this growing database and to bring these findings to the college community. “Ideally, this information starts conversations,” said Director of Institutional Research David Buchdahl. “We needed to find a way to make all this data accessible and understandable. And we needed a way to communicate meaningfully with faculty and staff about progress on strategic priorities and key objectives.” This spring Buchdahl has been visiting each of CCV’s 12 academic centers throughout Vermont to launch the new College Scorecard. This new tool (available on the College portal) displays key indicator data for outcomes linked to five priorities outlined in the strategic plan. The scorecard offers a “one-stop data center” that shows how initiatives, activities, and individual programs relate to the College’s overall goals and objectives. “It makes the strategic plan a living document,” said Buchdahl.

The first page of CCV’s interactive institutional scorecard features five strategic priorities with clickable outcome links. These links lead to a variety of data points showing progress on the measured outcomes 6


The Newsletter of The New England College Council

Spring 2012

New Beginnings in Manufacturing at Connecticut’s Naugatuck Valley Naugatuck Valley Community College is one of three state colleges that will split $17.8 million to expand manufacturing and training programs. The money comes from bonding authorization included in a state jobs bill that passed last October. The NVCC Advanced Manufacturing Technology Center is a new beginning for both the college and the community. “This is a tremendous recognition of the work being done by the college and the needs of our area,” NVCC President Daisy Cocco De Filippis said following the announcement. In conjunction with this award, the President and leaders at the College have joined forces with leaders from the manufacturing industry to form the Manufacturing Advisory Council for both curriculum and fundraising initiatives. The community outreach and alliances with local industry are a new beginning for local manufacturing. The revamped Manufacturing Program will include internships at local industries, through the efforts of NVCC’s new Job Placement Center and the Northwest Regional Workforce Investment Board. This expansion of the Manufacturing Program through training and education at NVCC is an exciting new opportunity for students and local industry. “The number one reason manufacturing companies stay or move to the state of Connecticut is the skilled workforce,” said Joe Vrabley, Jr., President of Atlantic Steel & Processing and co-chair of the fundraising campaign for the new Advanced Manufacturing Technology Center. George A. La Capra, Jr. and Joseph J. Vrabely, Jr. both entrepreneurs in manufacturing and members of the NVCC Foundation Board, are leading the drive to raise awareness and support for the Center. Fundraising for the new Advanced Manufacturing Technology Center is the catalyst for new relationships with manufacturing. The campaign offers businesses the opportunity to adopt a student, strengthening the ties between the College, the students and industry. This is the beginning of a new era in local manufacturing and NVCC is proud to be a part of it. The Center will feature manufacturing and technical education encompassing diverse coursework such as: Additive Manufacturing, Automation and PLC Controls, Benchwork, Blueprint Reading, CAD/CAM, Classical Machine Tool Operation, CNC Technology, Design for Manufacturing, Drill Press and Saw, Electronics Repair, Grinding, Industrial Safety, Lathe, Lean Manufacturing, Manufacturing Mathematics, Materials Processing/Metallurgy, Metrology, Milling, and Quality Control. George A. La Capra, Jr. & Joseph J. Vrabely, Jr.

Students in the Manufacturing Program will be assigned a manufacturing machining technology advisor who will assist in coursework scheduling and job placement upon graduation. These students will be prepared to meet the needs of local industry. Submitted by Sydney Voghel-Ochs Director of Community Engagement

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Second Phase of Tunxis Campus Expansion Under Way Tunxis Community College is officially in the second of a multi-phase campus expansion project, with completion of Phase II expected in summer 2013. The completed project will expand the campus to 292,000 square feet. Phase II includes construction of a 56,000-square-foot three-story classroom building which will add approximately 19 classrooms to campus. As site work continues, footings and walls are currently being poured for the foundation. The estimated cost for Phase II construction is approximately $12.6 million, which was approved by the Connecticut State Bond Commission at its meeting on July 29, 2011. The public is invited to view ongoing campus expansion updates—containing information, images and video—which are posted on the College’s website at tunxis.commnet.edu. Questions or comments can be emailed to JLodovico@txcc.commnet.edu.

Architectural rendering by DuBose Associates Architects of the new building, which will extend from the College’s 600 Building completed in 2008.

Tunxis is located at the junction of Routes 6 and 177 in Farmington. Call Tunxis at 860.255.3500.

Tunxis Early Childhood Associate Degree Program Receives NAEYC Accreditation Tunxis Community College’s Early Childhood associate degree program has been awarded accreditation through 2019 by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). The accreditation signifies that the College demonstrates it adheres to national professional standards for early childhood teacher education. Tunxis is one of only five early childhood programs in Connecticut and 105 throughout the country that has received the accreditation. “NAEYC has always been the leading authority for best practices in early childhood education, and this accreditation attests to our program’s high quality standards in helping students prepare to become competent early childhood educators,” said Jackie Coyne, Tunxis Early Childhood Education program coordinator, who led the accreditation process, which included a comprehensive self-study and on-site evaluation by a NAEYC peer review team. The Early Childhood Education program at Tunxis Community College prepares students to work effectively with children and their families in the field of professional childcare and education. The curriculum provides students with opportunities to complete observations, assignments and student teaching experiences utilizing the College’s on-campus, NAEYC accredited Early Childhood Education Center for preschool children. Tunxis also offers an associate degree in Pathway to Teaching Careers and certificate programs in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Administration, as well as 56 other degree and certificate programs. For more on Tunxis programs, please call 860.255.3500, or visit the Tunxis website at tunxis.commnet.edu. Tunxis is located in Farmington, at the junction of Routes 6 and 177. 8


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Spring 2012

Quinsigamond Community College Comes to Marlborough It is an exhilarating time in Central Massachusetts as QCC focuses on the future and paves the way for a brighter, greener tomorrow. Through a partnership with Assabet Valley Regional Technical High School in Marlborough, QCC opened a new door this fall for many students seeking to continue their education or enter new professions. The new location, QCC Marlborough, is designed to keep pace with innovation and will answer the community’s need for quality education in emerging green industries. In addition to a general education curriculum, QCC students now have access to a one-year certificate program in heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) services as well as a non-credit program focusing on photovoltaic (PV) and solar studies. PV is an exciting development in the green industry that uses solar panels and semi-conductors to convert solar radiation into direct current electricity. QCC has invested $70,000 into equipment, training and materials for the new PV program which will prepare students for the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP) certification exam. The NABCEP certification provides a set of national standards by which PV installers with skills and experience can distinguish themselves from their competition. The courses, which began in September, are designed with afternoon and evening schedules to accommodate working professionals and traditional college-aged students alike. “Our mission is to bring education to those who need it,” says Director of Institutional Communications Josh Martin. “One of our President’s primary objectives is to shorten the distance, and we’ve partnered with communities and local businesses to find other opportunities and bring education to the masses.” Assabet is well-known for the ESL programming, which enticed QCC to the amplified partnership concept. The new QCC site in Marlborough is an exciting opportunity to extend QCC’s reach beyond Worcester, while making higher education more accessible. The school will also offer business studies in conjunction with Dudley-based Nichols College. This unique program allows students to earn a baccalaureate degree by attending Nichols College in their fourth year. QCC’s Vice President for Community Engagement, Dale Allen says that the college is also working with local high schools to provide college-level courses for credit prior to high school graduation. “We’ve been exploring the viability of bringing services out to other regions of our service territory with little to no state or public funding.” QCC held a news conference in October of 2010 announcing plans to search for a satellite location in Marlborough. A much-needed boost for the local area drew influential pillars of the community, eager to become involved. Included among over 100 people in attendance were Congressman James McGovern, State Labor and Workforce Development Secretary Joanne Goldstein, and State Representatives Danielle Gregoire and Jim O’Day. QCC’s impressive turnout also included a number of elected officials, business leaders, and the Marlborough Regional Chamber of Commerce, which was instrumental in their support for the new location. “One of the roles of the Chamber is to attract more and better jobs,” Chamber President Susanne Morreale-Leeber said. “For 2010, one of the goals for our board was to bring higher education to the city.” With that goal in mind, the Chamber of Commerce and QCC worked QCC President Dr. Gail Carberry together to survey local businesses, schools and residents last spring, gathering data that helped identify a distinct need for classes in the area. A leadership team consisting of Marlborough Chamber of Commerce business members, Assabet Valley Technical High School administrators and QCC administrators then met monthly to develop the curriculum and determine facility requirements for the program. Mr. Allen says that Marlborough is perfect for a satellite location and if the demand proves great enough, QCC hopes to increase its course 9


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Continued from page 9 offerings as participation swells. “It will be a matter of measuring the interest as we go based on enrollment gains and hopefully we can expand the services even more,” says QCC President Dr. Gail Carberry. Assabet Valley Superintendent Mary Jo Nawrocki has praised QCC for its resiliency in tough economic times and acknowledged that the adaptation of technical programs to the current market has been invaluable. “We know the toughest jobs to fill right now are in the engineering fields, so our nationally certified Project Lead the Way program is sending students off to WPI, Wentworth and Rochester Institute of Technology with college credits and a passion for engineering... We want them to be able to stay in the area and have productive jobs,” she explained. After working closely with Ms. Morreale-Leeber and Jack Cutone at the Chamber of Commerce, she is happy to have wooed QCC to their facility. Another exciting partnership has been forged with Burncoat High School. Replacing the previous, long running arrangement with Blackstone Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School in Upton, this joint venture enables QCC to offer an automotive program through access to Burncoat’s classrooms, automotive shop, parking and storage space. This mutually beneficial arrangement means that QCC will give back to the community by providing upgraded equipment and tools for the school. Upon graduation, a newly signed articulation agreement allows automotive students automatic acceptance to the Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology bachelor’s program. Three QCC seats are also provided to Burncoat graduates on an annual basis. Part of QCC’s vision as a higher education establishment is to ensure that the needs of the community are not just met but exceeded; Dr. Gail Carberry is working diligently to roll out programs that will have meaning_ful impacts and allow room for growth in new industries such as QCC’s plan to offer additional job-specific training as the green industry evolves and matures. With unemployment in the Greater Worcester area remaining around 8%, it is more important than ever to keep in touch with the region’s employers and modify curricula to meet their needs; as the job market changes, so must higher education offerings. QCC’s efforts with the Marlborough Chamber of Commerce have strengthened ties with the community and provided valuable insight on the future of Central Massachusetts’ economic stability.

MCC Offers Free Job Skills Training for Unemployed MANCHESTER, N.H. – Manchester Community College is one of four pilot sites for a new job skills training program for the unemployed and underemployed, administered through the Community College System of NH. The program was developed after hearing directly from business leaders through NH Governor John Lynch’s series of Jobs Cabinet Roundtables held across the state. WorkReadyNH provides free assessment, instruction and credentialing in key skill areas, identified by employers as essential to workplace success. The program: 1. Assesses job-seekers’ basic workplace skills in Applied Mathematics, Reading for Information, and Locating Information 2. Helps job-seekers improve in these skill areas to earn a National Career Readiness Certificate at the bronze, silver, gold or platinum level (through the self-paced and fully online KeyTrainTM learning modules) 3. Provides classroom instruction in “soft-skill” practices identified by employers as key to workplace success 4. Provides a nationally recognized credential (upon completion) that signals to employers that the WorkReadyNH participant has mastered key work-related skills and is ready to become a valuable employee. WorkReadyNH is an initiative of the Community College System of New Hampshire, the Office of Governor John Lynch, the NH Department of Resources and Economic Development, and the NH Department of Employment Security. At a recent visit to the MCC WorkReady NH site, Governor Lynch said “The stories I heard today were quite compelling. These people were eager to get back in the workplace and WorkReady is helping them by highlighting their strengths and identifying which areas they need to improve upon, By earning certification through WorkReadyNH, these workers will able to demonstrate to potential employers they have the skills needed in the workplace.” 10


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Continued from page 10 Unemployed workers who choose to participate in WorkReady take a test assessing their skills, and then participate in remedial training in basic areas where necessary. Upon completion of the program, workers receive a nationally recognized certification to take to potential employers, giving business owners confidence that new hires will have the necessary skills they are looking for. A key component of the WorkReadyNH program is the classroom-based Soft Skills Training, which places participants in simulated workplace-related settings and covers areas that include job interviews, general workplace expectations, communication, team-building and conflict resolution, problem-solving, and customer service. After six months, MCC’s WorkReadyNH program has helped more than 100 clients from 19 to 70 years old, from different ethnic cultures and careers, and who have ranged from the newly unemployed to up to three years unemployed. “Despite all these differences, there are some recurring themes that we have seen for the majority of our clients who have gone through the program,” says MCC WorkReadyNH Director Regina Kelleher. “They have a renewed sense of hope and confidence, and they feel productive and valued again.”

MCC, FPU and Elliot Health System Form Partnership for Bachelor Degree Nursing Education MANCHESTER, N.H. – A new partnership between Manchester Community College (MCC) and Franklin Pierce University (FPU) will allow students to earn a Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing from FPU in one year after earning their Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) from MCC. Students in the Pathway for NH’s Future Nurses program will not have to apply separately to FPU after earning their ADN because they will have been accepted to both colleges as freshmen. By spending most of their first three years at MCC, students will save thousands of dollars in tuition over the cost of attending a traditional four-year college for their BS in Nursing. Elliot Health System (EHS) in Manchester is a key partner in the new program. Students in the Pathway for NH’s Future Nurses program will do a 192-hour preceptorship in their third year, working alongside an Elliot RN, an experience not available in a traditional associate degree program. Students accepted into the Pathway program will take courses that meet the requirements of both colleges during their first three years at MCC, receive their ADN, and be eligible to take the RN state board exam (NCLEX-RN). They will then complete their bachelor degree in nursing at FPU during the fourth year. “This new agreement offers real advantages to nursing students who want to achieve their bachelor degree in nursing within four years of beginning their college careers,” says MCC President Dr. Susan Huard. “Students in this new program will earn their ADN and be ready to take the RN exam while they’re still working towards their bachelor degree. And they’re assured from the first day on MCC’s campus that they have a place at FPU to finish their bachelor degree!” “FPU has a strong RN-to-BSN program in place,” says Associate Dean John Ragsdale of FPU, “and the graduates of MCC’s ADN program consistently show the highest pass rates on the state nursing exams, so they’re well-positioned to succeed in our program. Students in the new program will transition seamlessly from MCC to FPU and benefit from the high quality of both programs. It’s a win-win-win for the students, for MCC and for FPU.” “And it’s a win for EHS as well,” says Joni Spring, RN, Vice President of Patient Care Services and Chief Nursing Officer at Elliot Health System. “We have a strong relationship with MCC, and have served as a clinical site for their nursing students for many years. We encourage our RNs with associate degrees to continue their education, so this new partnership will help us assure a strong nursing staff throughout our system.”

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Spring 2012

Student Profiles of Persistence and Success

Asnuntuck Community College Grad Inspires Others to Follow Their Dreams Annette Ramsdell was a familiar face to many who attend or work at Asnuntuck. Every weekday she could be found setting up her “office” outside of the Learning Resource Center. A layoff is what brought her back to Asnuntuck but it is reinventing herself, looking to further her education and ultimately working in a field helping others, that kept her here. She earned her Associates Degree last year and was accepted at Bay Path College in nearby Longmeadow, MA. She was also awarded scholarship funds which will help her continue on her journey. Ramsdell has experienced what many may have thought to be roadblocks but she treats them as just bumps on her road to an education. She has been working on her degree for a long time. It was a bike ride to Asnuntuck, when she was just 15 years old, that kicked off her postsecondary experience. Her curiosity about the college got the best of her and she went to the college, with babysitting money in hand and registered for a class. Once the Dean was made aware of her age he met with her and agreed to work on a payment plan so she could pay for the class (she earned a B). Her parents had encouraged her to pursue a career in hairdressing, something her mother had done before she moved from Great Britain to the United States, despite the fact Ramsdell had her eyes set on nursing. She graduated from hairdressing school but never pursued it as a career. Life went on. She has been married for 28 years and raised three children. “They are my greatest gifts and accomplishments.” She keeps a positive attitude and recognizes that there are lessons to be learned with everything that happens in life, which for her has included a bout with uterine cancer, two heart attacks, a sick child and a variety of jobs. She says it has always come back to appreciating all of the blessings she feels her family has received. Her story inspires and in some cases mirrors the lives of many who study and work in this building. She has worked hard and is reaching her goals. She says, “It has always been a dream for me to get a degree from Asnuntuck-the school I have always loved.”

MassBay Student Goldwater Science Scholarship MassBay Community College is proud to honor Goldwater Scholar Kenny Moreno. Kenny is pursuing his Associate Degree in Biotechnology at MassBay and plans to continue his research at either a university or in the private sector. Established by the U.S. Congress in 1996, colleges and universities across the country are allowed to submit four names to the Barry M. Goldwater scholarship program and only 300 are chosen. These students, who receive scholarships up to $15,000, are chosen based on their intention to make a difference in science, math and technology. Kenny describes his submission to the program thusly: “I focused in on a gene we all have in our body, in which higher incidents of cancer are found. I tried to decrease its expression to see if the tumor can get treated more effectively or not.” Kenny, 25, says he liked science in high school and he did well in the subject, but he “didn’t have the drive” to consider it a career. So he started out as a business major at Framingham State University. Finding it to be less than satisfying, Kenny took a different path and joined the United States Marines. He served as an infantryman from 2004 – 2009, including two tours in Iraq, and is now a Corporal in the Reserves. “The entire MassBay community is extremely proud of the accomplishment of Corporal Moreno in earning this prestigious scholarship,” said MassBay President Dr. John O’Donnell. “That we can proudly recognize our 18th Goldwater Award winner also reinforces the national prominence of the biotechnology program that Dr. Bruce Jackson and his colleagues have built here.” 12


The Newsletter of The New England College Council

Spring 2012

Continued from page 12 Among the approximately 300 Goldwater scholarships awarded this year, Kenny is the only winner from a two-year college and received the highest score from Goldwater reviewers of any honoree from Massachusetts, outscoring competition from MIT and Harvard. “This is a big honor,” says Kenny. “Dr. J. (Bruce A. Jackson, a professor of biotechnology and forensic DNA science, and chairman of the Biotechnology Department) says it’s the highest science award. Since I received this award for the research I’ve done, I’m more motivated now to continue to build on what I’ve started. It gives me a greater sense of responsibility.” When he arrived on campus in January 2010, he had heard from a few friends that it was a good school and a good atmosphere. When he found the biotech program, “I knew what I wanted to do.” “I’ve learned so much here,” says Kenny. “Faculty and staff have been great – anytime I’ve needed help they’ve been there. Marie Hahs and the Veterans services here are good too. It’s been nice to know my peers are around.” For his scholarly studies and his service to America, the MassBay community echoes the sentiments of Kenny’s mom, who tells him she’s “Very happy. Very proud.” Corporal Kenneth Moreno earned a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship for science, becoming the 18th winner from MassBay. A reserve Corporal in the United State Marines, Kenny is on schedule to graduate in May 2012 with an Associate Degree in Biotechnology and plans to pursue a bachelor degree in molecular biology or biochemistry.

SAVE THE DATE The Annual New England Associate Degree Granting Colleges Best Practices Conference October 19, 2012 Nashua Community College

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2012 Collegian  
2012 Collegian  

Collegian, the newsletter for the New England College Council, is published twice annually to give members an opportunity to keep up to date...

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