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November 19, 2010 News | Candidly Patriotic Personal photos of Moraine Valley’s veterans. Page 9

Sports | Lady Cyclones to Nationals Women’s volleyball team advances to nationals. Page 15

Volume 43, Issue 7 Features | A Soldier’s Story A Marine gives a first-hand account of a hostile situation. F&E Page 2

Graphic by Amanda Panicucci and Laura Joy


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November 19, 2010

News

Moraine Valley Glacier

Nancy Pearson passes away By Rob Siebert

News Editor

  Many in the Moraine Valley community were saddened this week to hear of the death of Nancy Pearson on Tuesday.   Pearson passed away due to complications related to leukemia.   Until recently, Pearson was Mo-

raine Valley’s International Student Housing Specialist. In 20 years she hosted 25 students from as far as Saudia Arabia, Japan, Hong Kong, Korea, among other countries.   Pearson’s memorial service will be Dec. 4 from 10:30 to noon at Hickory Hills Presbyterian Church, at 8426 West 95th St. The church can be reached at (708) 598-3100.

Student Trustee Corner | Julius Allen

The above graphic illustrates the number of students who have been enrolled at Moraine Valley, as well as another college over the last five years.

Panel speaks on terrorism and what Americans can do By Rob Siebert

News Editor

  The word “terrorism” has arguably never been a bigger part of everyday American rhetoric than it is now.   In post-9/11 America, with the country’s presence in the Middle East conflict ever present, the threat of an attack on American soil still hangs over the over 300 million people that live in this country.   On Nov. 10, Moraine Valley’s Global Diversity Education program brought together a panel of four to the D Building for a dialogue on terrorism.   The group consisted of three faculty members: Dr. Richard Wolf, a philosophy and humanities professor who used to work overseas as a federal agent, as well as history professors Jim McIntyre and Josh Fulton. Joining them was Matt Berry of Argonne National Laboratory.   One of the major themes in the discussion was the comparison between the Cold War and the war on terror. McIntyre said that, during the Cold War, the entire conflict could in essence be boiled down to the United States vs. the Soviet Union. With the War On Terror, it’s not that simple.   “You can come up with names of certain groups, but you can’t necessarily pin that down somewhere,” McIntyre said.   McIntyre said ideally America would like to fight a war on its own terms, and force the conflict “into a box we like.” But ultimately, the country needs to adapt.  Having worked in the Middle East himself, Wolf provided a more handson perspective. He said that in essence, the rules of war have changed. While in the Cold War, there seemed to be an unwritten pact that neither the United States

nor the Soviet Union would actually use weapons of mass destruction, no such pact exists now.   The mindset of our enemies has also changed. It used to be that a hostile individual always cared about his safety. When it comes to suicide bombers, that’s obviously not the case anymore.   “Now you’ve got a guy who doesn’t care if he blows himself up,” Wolf said. “How do you negotiate with that?”   When a student brought up the idea of tightening security measures around America’s borders, McIntyre said he couldn’t think of a successful instance of a country actually doing such a thing. But in the end, Berry said it wouldn’t matter.   “Terrorism is largely driven by ideas,” Berry said. “A wall isn’t going to stop the ideas.”   Though some have questioned the need to have troops in the Middle East because the battle is against terrorists, not an army, Wolf said soldiers play a pivotal role in the war on terror.   “Somebody can take a picture and tell us where the bombs are, but at some point we’re going to have to have boots on the ground so we can go get them,” Wolf said.   In terms of what regular Americans can do to stifle terrorism, Berry said that, whether they meant it this way or not, President George W. Bush’s administration made it seem like America was at war with the Islamic faith, when that wasn’t the case. Berry said it’s important for Americans to know who their real enemies are. “Our rhetoric matters,” Berry said. “The way we frame things matters.” Rob Siebert can be contacted at siebertr3@student.morainevalley. edu

November has to be my secopen mind. ond favorite month of the year I’ve spoken with many students next to April. I’m not exactly sure who are undecided on a major or what it is but I’m always filled direction of study. It’s not uncomwith a certain type of energy or mon to feel this way because stumotivation. It makes me want to dents deal with that issue all the get up and do something differtime. This is true especially for inent like switching from Colgate coming freshman who come right toothpaste to Aquafresh out of high school. The or taking a certain risk. main difference from colspeaking   Seriously lege and high school is though, it’s natural for that college isn’t mandapeople to stick to the tory. You don’t have to be same routine but differhere so a different type ent doesn’t mean deof motivation is required. ficient. It’s ok to take a I tip my hat to whoever different route because implemented extracurdoing so might lead us ricular activities because to where we should’ve they’re definitely a key been all along. I personelement to defining ally believe that students how a student’s life can are true risk takers and shape out. Thanksgiving Julius Allen living proof of what it is right around the cormeans to be different. Even if the ner and families from all over will direction you want to go in seems be gathering together. I trust that tough or out of reach, don’t walk many of you will eat well and be away because having your heart in good company over the holiday. in it makes the difference. I ask that you all take time to give   Many people can learn from thanks to the ones who helped you us because there is no limit to get to where you are today as well. what we can achieve. We’re only Giving back is what it’s all about limited by the ones we place on so be safe over the holiday and be ourselves so be sure to keep an sure to save some leftovers.


News

Moraine Valley Glacier

November 19, 2010

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International students speak on American stereotypes

By Rob Siebert

News Editor

  For many of Moraine Valley’s international students, perception is not reality.   Seven students from around the world opened up about that concept, among other things at a panel discussion hosted by the school Nov. 10. The event was put on by Moraine’s Global Diversity Education program.   Among them was Julia Mueller, an international student from Germany who discussed her discomfort at the way some Americans associate Germans with the Nazis and World War II.   “Sometimes I think people think

we’re all Nazis,” Mueller said. “There is barely anyone that thinks like that anymore.”   Mueller also spent part of her grammar school career in America, and recalled feeling very uncomfortable in how a history teacher portrayed Germans, as well as the Japanese. A Japanese foreign exchange student also in that class became fearful of even entering the classroom.   Mueller emphasized that the era of Nazi Germany is long gone. She said today’s German educational system spends a tremendous amount of time on World War II, and the lessons that need to be learned from it.   “It’s important to learn from the

Photo by Rob Siebert

Maria Radnaeva and Satoe Ogawa speak to fellow students Wednesday.

past,” Mueller said, “But that wasn’t us. That’s not who we are.”   Saitoti Sena, who hails from Kenya, also experiences certain stereotypes, but not to such an emotional extreme.   “Some people think Africans live in trees and pet lions,” Sena said, jokingly adding, “Sometimes I wish I could live like that.”   Oddly enough, Russian student Maria Radnaeva said some Americans think Russians live without basic luxuries.   “Sometimes people ask me if people in Russa have cars, if people have electricity,” Radnaeva said.   Radnaeva, a Russian of asian descent, also said it irritates her when people stereotype Russians as Caucasians, and in certain instances, don’t believe her when she says she’s Russian.   South Korean student Hyunjung Chun said it used to irritate her when people would mistake her as being Chinese or Japanese. She’s gotten over it.   “I don’t care anymore,” Chun said. “Those people don’t know who I am.”   The event was hardly a complaint session, however. Students spent much of the time comparing and contrasting their own countries and cultures to America’s.   As one might assume, international students live with American host families. Originally from Swe-

den, Danni Haile was surprised tp see how important family values are to some Americans.   “You can see that the families, on the weekends especially, really try to do things with the kids,” Haile said.   Sena noted the difference between the testing systems in America and Kenya, and that most Kenyan tests aren’t multiple choice.   “Most of our tests are more written, like paragraphs or short answers,” Sena said.   Chun said downtown Chicago was a stark contrast to the suburban America she pictured before arriving here.   Andrew Duran, Moraine Valley’s vice president of Administrative Services, was on hand to ask students why they chose to come to America for part of their education.    Danni Haile, originally from Sweden, said she came to develop her English skills.   “I know English is the business language,” Haile said.   Radnaeva added that being educated in America will give her an added advantage when it comes to her job search in Russia.   “If you speak English, and you have a Russian education and an American education, you’ll be in high demand.” Rob Siebert can be contacted at siebertr3@student.morainevalley. edu.

Library subs food for fines

By Stacey Reichard Online Editor

  How much is curing hunger worth?   From November 1 - 19 the Moraine Valley Library accepted food in lieu of library fines. Students and staff that did not have fines were encouraged to bring food items that would then be donated to the Zone 32 food pantry in Chicago. Zone 32 donates two days worth of food to families that require it.   Moraine’s library has participated in this drive for about 20 years.   Food items had to be non-expired and non-perishable. In an effort to stay healthy, the library did not accept junk food.   Only simple fines were waived, such as moderate overdue fees. This did not apply to reserved or lost items, or any items that had been sent to collections (including

textbooks).   Some surrounding local public libraries also presented this drive to their patrons. The participating libraries included Chicago Ridge, Palos Heights, and Palos Park. Each library is trying to help their patrons, as well as those in need, this holiday season.   Students are encouraged to pay off their library debts while this opportunity is available to them. Outstanding fines can stand in the way of graduation.   Obviously, the holiday season is not the only time people are in need of non-perishable food items. January through December, hunger is everywhere. For additional food pantries, visit chicagosfoodbank.org. Stacey Reichard can be contacted at reichards2@student.morainevalley.edu.

Photo by Stacey Reichard


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November 19, 2010

News

Moraine Valley Glacier

Your mind and your pain: the power of mind-body syndrome By Rob Siebert

News Editor

  How much power does a person truly have over their pain?   Dr. John Stacks of the Northwestern Memorial Physicians Group Center for Integrative Medicine spoke to students in the Dorothy Menker Theater Nov. 17, hoping to answer that very question.   Stacks spoke about mind-body syndrome, a condition in which a person mentally, yet unconsciously creates or prolongs pain in their body. Stacks said one of his mentors is Dr. Howard Schubiner, author of The Mind Body Prescription: Healing the Body, Healing the Pain.   He emphasized that MBS patients are not imagining the pain.   “What I’m saying is the cause of the pain is emotional,” Stacks said.   Often, patients feel it due to a need to release emotions that have built up after a trigger event, which can either be physical or mental.   “All emotions in the body need an outlet on some level,” Stacks said.   As an example, Stacks spoke of a patient who had migraines every day, but could not figure out why. Upon further investigation, he learned she had a very stressful career, was feeling the pressure of going to graduate school, and also had a borderline abusive childhood. 

  One evening she finally broke down crying in front of her boyfriend.   “She said when she started crying, the headache was gone, and it didn’t come back,” Stacks said.   Stacks said people sometimes unconsciously use pain as a valve to loosen the emotional tension

ed less pain than the group that wasn’t allowed to swear.    Stacks also spoke of a patient who was learning to be midwife, who would have severe pain in her wrist. Because of the anxiety and pressure she felt, and her obvious need to use her hands as a midwife, the pain manifested itself in

Treating Mind-Body Syndrome: 1. Recoge the disorder. 2. Read about mind-body syndrome 3. Writing exercises 4. Reflection exercises 5. Reprogram your mind 6. Rebuild your life - Dr. Howard Schubiner’s Mind Body Program they feel. This can obviously hinder a person’s ability to live their life.   “What I try to do is get people to create a second emotional valve, and call it what it is,” he said.   In a more humorous example, Stacks cited a popular study in which a group of patients that were exposed to pain and discomfort were allowed to swear, and report-

her wrist.   “I find that when I do have pain it is during times that I am either anxious or extremely tired,” Stacks quoted the patient. “But once I acknowledge the pain and remind myself there is no pathology present, the pain subsides.   Stacks noted that sometimes doctors themselves can play a

role in the severity of their patients MBS. By nature, many are afraid of seeing their doctor by nature. When their doctor is giving them bad news, that fear grows.   “We make patients afraid,” Stacks said. “We make patients worry. And by doing that, we may actually be making the pain worse.”   Stacks said recognition of any possible trauma or triggers in one’s life is the key to treating MBS. Obviously, physical pain from an accident or illness can be a trigger. Such mental triggers can include a stressful time in one’s life, the death of a loved on, or a difficult relationship.    After recognizing the problem, Stacks recommended reading about MBS, and then performing writing and reflection exercises, such as writing a letter to someone, and then not delivering it. He emphasized the importance of accepting and understanding the events that create such stress and pain, and affirming one’s self worth.   From there, an individual can reprogram their mind and rebuild their life.   “I don’t think people are truly cured until they get rid of their pain, and  the fear of the pain coming back,” Stacks said.   Rob Siebert can be contacted at siebertr3@student.morainevalley. edu.


Moraine Valley Glacier

News

November 19, 2010

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November 19, 2010

News

Moraine Valley Glacier

Moraine students victorious in CSSIA security competition

By Tim Leavy

Staff Writer

  Moraine Valley’s Center For Systems Security and Information Assurance (CSSIA) has a lot to smile about these days.   On Nov. 6, seven Moraine students took first place in CSSIA’s Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition. The competition tests how well students are learning to defend information on the internet against cyber attacks.   Thomas Costello of Bridgeview, Nick Gallichio of Oak Lawn, Ryan

Haley of Burbank, John Hanson of Tinley Park, Jonathan Kral of Hickory Hills, Nick Melchiori of Orland Park and David Valaukas of Orland Park competed with seven other teams. Teams competed remotely from as far as California and Washington.   Competitors are given a network of information. In the next room, a group of professionals try and hack the system to get the information the competitors are protecting. The team gets points based on how well they protect the system. These are the real day-to-day operations that

students will be experiencing in real life applications of the skills learned.   Events such as these make use of recently installed technology such as virtual labs. In the future, CSSIA Principle Investigator Erich Spengler hopes to hold events such as these year-round. Competing remotely will only make that easier.   “Our new remote system is a fabulous improvement in how we offer cyber competitions,” David Durkee, CSSIA’s director of competition’s said. “Instead of teams traveling to a host school, student teams are now able to compete directly from

their own school by connecting to our new system. Managing the competitions is likewise easier so that students will be given the opportunity to compete.”   Since June, the CSSIA has been transitioning into a national resource center thanks to a four-year $1.7 million grant from the National Security Agency.   “We are thrilled,” Long said. “It truly is a huge deal and we worked very hard to get to where we are.” Tim Leavy can be contacted at TL60445@yahoo.com.


News

Moraine Valley Glacier

Veterans Advising Sessions

Future Healthcare Professionals. All are welcome.

  In order to register for the spring 2011 semester, all students using the G.I. bill will need to attend a mandatory two-hour veterans advising session.   Jeremy Kingery, academic advisor, will discuss the rules and regulations as described in the bill related to college major planning and course selection   Upcoming sessions will be held Nov. 18, Nov. 20, Dec. 2, Dec. 4, Dec. 7 and Dec. 10. For more information, contact Sonja Blades at (708) 974-5277 or at blades@ morainevalley.edu.

ASU Coat Drive

Nurse Panel Discussion   An open question and answer session will be held with a pediatric oncology nurse and a nurse practitioner Nov. 22 from 7 to 8 p.m in room D245.   The event is hosted by

  The Arab Student Union is hosting a winter coat drive until Dec. 1.   Any jacket in good condition will be accepted   Donation boxes are in the Multicultural Student Affairs office, the library, U203, the first floor of the S building, the college bookstore, the fitness center and the C building.   For more information, contact asu@morainevalley.edu. MSA Pot Luck   Moraine Valley’s Muslim Student Association is hosting a pot luck event in honor of Eid Al-Adha (Festival of Sacrifice) Dec. 1. The event will be held in the student union at noon. Admission is free.   Both Muslims and nonMuslims are also invited

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to Friday Prayer from 1 to 1:30 p.m. in U209.   For more information, contact Demetrius Robinson at (708) 974-5353. Financial Aid Assistance Until Nov. 23, students can receive detailed financial aid assistance by appointment only through the financial aid department. Financial aid assistants can answer general questions, accept completed documents and provide required forms. Students with more detailed questions must make an appointment with a financial aid expeditor. For more information, or to make an appointment, call (708) 974-5726. Information is also available online at morainevalley.edu/ financialaid. Upcoming shops

JRC

Work-

  The college’s Job Re-

source Center continues to host workshops to help students take their career skills to the next level.   The JRC will host a workshop on resumes Dec. 8 in B264.   Students can develop their interviewing strategies on Nov. 10 from 12 to 1 p.m., and Dec. 7 from 4 to 5 p.m. Both events are in S223.   “How to Pursue an Internship” will be held Nov. 8 from 4 to 5 p.m. and Dec. 6 from 4 to 5 p.m. Both events are in S223.   For more information, contact the Job Resource Center at (708) 974-5737 or visit S202. Sharpen Skills

Your

Writing

  The college’s Writing Center is a resource for students too explore their creativity, and maximize their potential for both curricular and personal writing.   Instead of focusing on commas and semi-colons, the Center encourages students to overcome their fears and become more confident in their work.   The Writing Center is located in room L242, and can be reached by phone

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at (708) 608-4216. Need Tutoring?   Moraine Valley’s Academic Skills Center offers its students free tutoring in math, English, chemistry, physics, biology, accounting, reading, medical transcription and more.   The center is open from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Two computer labs are available, one for classes and one for walk-ins.   The center is located in room B284-A and B284-B. For more information, call (708) 974-5430. GED/ESL fered

Tutoring

Of-

  Students interested in working on their GED, English as a Second Language or reading skills are encouraged to seek out tutoring on campus Tuesdays and Wednesdays.   Tuesday night tutoring is held from 5 to 7 p.m. in room A184. Wednesday tutoring is in B182 at the same time.   For more information, contact Joann at (708) 608-4151.


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News

November 19, 2010

Moraine Valley Glacier

Moraine Valley celebrates Veterans Day in Student Union By Amanda Panicucci

Staff Writer

  In honor of Veterans Day Nov. 11, the Combat to College student veterans organization held a celebration not only for themselves, but for the students, staff, and the community.   Combat to College is an organization with a mission is to inform all Moraine Valley Community College veterans of all their education benefits, and to lead to the development of lifelong friendships. This organization is open to all family members of veterans and Depart-

ment of Defense, State Department employees and all who support the student veterans’ organization’s mission.   The celebration began with CTC President Mike Sullivan introducing the Great Lakes Naval Band, who marched in with the Navy and American flags while the Pledge of Allegiance and National Anthem were performed. Students then had a moment of silence as a bugler played. Sullivan spoke about the celebration and the Warrior’s Fair and the different tables around the U-Building.   “It was awesome that our school

Student Ryan Brazel mans the “Know “Yer Knot” exhibit in the Student Union.

Four young veterans partake in the Veterans Day ceremony Nov. 11.

did this,” student Jessica Burns said. “I have friends in the military and I was happy to see everyone stop what they were doing to participate.”   The Prisoner of War/Missing in Action flag was marched up the union stairs for display. The Air Force, Coast Guard, Navy, Marine Corps and Army flags were all marched up as well.   “All of these flags will stay up day in and day out,” Mike Sullivan.   The Warrior’s Fair then began. Patrons had a push up contest, and could see where they ranked in either the Air Force or the Navy.   “I thought it was a good way to see how I stacked up,” student Bill

Barker said.   Patrons could also sample a Meal Ready to Eat (MRE), and visit a “Know Yer Knot” board.   Veterans Day started as Armistice Day, and was originally set as a U.S. legal holiday to honor the end of World War I, which occurred on Nov. 11, 1918.   “Veteran’s Day gives me such a feeling of pride to be an American,” Student Life program assistant Dawn Fry said. “My heart was overwhelmed today with gratitude towards all the veterans that serve for our country.” Amanda Panicucci can be contacted at panda091790@aol.com


Moraine Valley Glacier

News

November 19, 2010

Graphic by Amanda Panicucci and Laura Joy

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Views

November 19, 2010

Moraine Valley Glacier

Is readily available oral contraception a worldwide blessing or a health disaster?

It’s the 21st century ladies and gentlemen. Can we please start acting like it?

By Rob Siebert

News Editor

Is it healthy to be able to sleep with anyone without considering the physical and mental applications of such an act?

By Wendy Grupka

Veiws Editor

Our friends down in Washington DC may soon be considering whether the birth control pill should be offered freely to all women, as part of President Obama’s health care legislation. The pill would fall under the category of “preventative medicine.” This, of course, has set the blogosphere ablaze with those outraged that such a thing would even be considered, and those wondering why such a mandate wasn’t passed years ago. I’ve never claimed to know everything there is to know, but I know at least two things for sure: 1. Some people like to have sex. 2. Some people want to wait until a certain point in their lives to have sex. It’s a choice you have to make about your life and your body, and it’s not a choice that should be made lightly. Personally, I don’t have anything bad to say about the people who are waiting. In fact, good for them! It takes a lot of discipline and self-control to be able to do it. But that doesn’t make them morally superior to the people who choose not to wait. If the government is considering allowing the public easier access to safe sex precautions, such as the pill, the waiters should simply let the nonwaiters live their lives on their own terms, and not gripe that it’s not in sync with their life style. The birth control pill has a 92 percent success rate, which rises to 99 percent if the pill is taken regularly or at the same time every day, according to WebMD.com. If the man in the equation happens to be wearing a condom as well, there’s a pretty good chance that woman won’t be having a baby shower any time soon. Granted, there is no 100 percent effective method of birth control, but if you can reduce the probability to the point where you have to use a decimal, you’re being responsible. But to try and block simple access to such resources is irresponsible. For some, birth control isn’t an option because of the chemicals involved, and the hormonal effect it has on the body. To that I say: You have to know your body, and the effect certain chemicals may have on it. If a visit to your doctor is in order, then go to your doctor. Some will argue legislation such as this opens the door for teenagers to have sex more often. I would argue many of those people are kidding themselves. USA Today reports 7 percent of teen girls got pregnant in 2006, which amounts to roughly 71.5 pregnancies per 1,000 teens. Teenagers are having sex, and they’re going to continue to do so whether we all like it or not. Inevitably, some teenagers, and some people in general, are going to be irresponsible about it. But why should we punish the people who are responsible about it? It’s the 21st century, ladies and gentlemen. Can we please start acting like it?

  Parameters for the Obama-care preventative health program are suggesting the issuing of nationwide free birth control. The question is if the general public benefits largely from introducing copious amounts of synthetic hormones to any fertile female that wants it, does it outweigh the negative effects on the individual? Is the government willing to trade off the health of some for that of the U.S. population? The side effects of oral contraceptives on the mind and body, as well as the readible availability’s effect on U.S. culture are something that should be considered and weighed appropriately.   Contraceptives have a bit of a mythic quality to them as little is done to properly educate the public, especially among America’s youth. The government stands by promoting abstinence and very little resources are available for sexual education programs in high schools. If lessons on sexual and reproductive health became a widely accepted priority in schools, and if the average person really understood his or her sexuality then maybe this preventative health program would be an all right idea. But as it stands, the general public will not benefit from a free supply of contraceptives.   According to an article in Reproductive Health, most forms of oral contraception contain an estrogen and a progestin, which are types of hormones. Side effects, such as nausea, bleeding, and more seriously, a rise in blood pressure may occur after two or three cycles of the drug. This is also the amount of time it takes for protection from pregnancy to actually become reliable.   More importantly, the use of oral contraceptives provide no protection from sexually transmitted diseases and could lead to an increase and spread of infections. The free status of birth control will allow more people to control when they decide to reproGraphic by Laura Joy duce, however, the moral consequences have not been fully examined. Is it healthy to be able to sleep with anyone without considering the physical and mental applications of such an act?   With the little chance of a pregnancy occurring it is safe to assume the trust between two partners will fall as well. Research conducted by the University of New Mexico reveals that birth control alters the way a female perceives the smell of her mate. Facial symmetry is considered a sign of genetic superiority. Women were asked to rank the smell of men with symmetrical features versus asymmetrical features. The fertile females preferred the scent of the symmetrical men.   Although free birth control has its advantages such as lowering teen pregnancy rates, slowing the growth rate of our rapidly expanding population and giving females more sexual freedom does have many unforeseen repercussions.

Rob Siebert can be contacted at siebertr3@student.morainevalley.edu

Wendy Grupka can be contacted at wgrupka@yahoo.com

Student Opinions

“Teenage pregnancy rates will plummet.”

William Parker

“It might be a moral issue for some people, and in a way, destroys the meaning behind sex.”

“Nothing is truly free. The money came from somewhere, most likely taxpayers.”

“It’s a good idea because some people don’t take birth control because it’s expensive.”

Kevin Newberry

Nikki McKeating

Amanda Vargas

“It will be more easily accessible and commonplace, which will encourage proper use.”

Alexis Molina

“I think it’s neccessary because most people are idiots.”

Laura Joy


Views

Moraine Valley Glacier

  Tis the season of Thanksgiving. Many people these days, however, express thanksgiving’s opposite: resentment. Understandably, the current economic downturn is bound to leave people uneasy, frustrated and understandably fearful. Thus a fair amount of grumbling is to be expected. But resentment runs deeper.   Too many people nowadays go about claiming that they are unfairly deprived of something they merit from hard work. The object of their resentment is often immigrants, a minority group or the president. They object to people who are given entitlements, believing that they are entitled to something that is being taken away.   While this stream of resentment finds a home

in the Tea Party, the two should not be equated. The Tea Party is attractive to people with a range of interests, including fair-minded criticisms of President Barack Obama, concerns about immigration policy, failures in the finance industry and more.   Rather, the troubling resentment of the day represents a lack of faith; specifically, a failure to believe in a gracious God who bestows everything a person has. Resentment does not acknowledge that everything, including life itself, is an undeserved blessing. Resentment is ingratitude.   There are always resentful people who poison the home, the neighborhood and the workplace. Periodically resentment clusters into a cultural movement.

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It appears here and there, writes Gail Collins of the New York Times, as “undifferentiated anger, which creates nothing but a feeling of moral superiority.”   The current resentment is different from sporadic, condition-specific protests or discontents. Henry Olsen of the American Enterprise Institute in a National Affairs essay describes two types of protest movements.   The first is constructive populism that strives to balance and rejuvenate our democracy. It uses language about self-determination, avoiding portraying its sympathizers as victims. In addition to fiery rhetoric at protest rallies, this populism “proposes alternatives that offer a real change of direction.”   The second type is the “politics of resentment.” It casts opponents as enemies and easily succumbs to leadership by a demagogue. Historically this type often advocates the confiscation of property.   There are no pure examples because, as with the Tea Party, movements by nature attract a diverse crowd. But Olsen says the first type includes the early 1800s movement associated with Andrew Jackson

and the more recent movement associated with Ronald Reagan. The resentment type had greater sway in the William Jennings Bryan movement of the 1890s and the Barry Goldwater movement of 1964.   Another way to spot a resentment movement is to not see in it the virtue of compromise. Ordinary healthy protest, no matter how loud the shouting, is ultimately willing to cut a deal.   A resentful person or group cannot articulate what they might settle for through negotiation. In other words, they are not really interested in reform or even in institutions. Their bitterness comes from disillusionment and is not open to trying things this way or that.   At the Thanksgiving table this year a prayer of gratitude is, of course, appropriate. But on that day and in the days ahead pray too for an increase in our own faith and hope; and secondly for a restoration of faith and hope in the embittered. Contact Bill Droel at droelb@morainevalley.edu. Visit his blog, hosted on www.chicagocatholicnews. com.

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The Plague of

Materialism

By Joe Salah

News Editor

  Materialism is a plague that has corrupted a large majority of today’s pop culture. To stop a plague, you must cut it off at the source right? True, but it’s impossible to destroy this particular source because in this case, it’s the media that’s the problem.   Shows like “Jersey Shore” show people spending copious amounts of money that they haven’t earned on alcohol, parties and clothes.   Most people are influenced by this sort of behavior, and a large majority attempt to reenact it. Many women have become plastic, and men have become fist-pumping meatheads.   Hopefully people wisen up and realize that there’s alot more to life than brand names, swinging, and fake looks. People have forgotten how beautiful they already are. Joe Salah can be contacted at jsalah22@gmail.com

Wintertime weather got you feeling S.A.D.? By Ashley Tarasiewicz

  It’s a burden many of us in the Midwest face: winter.     It can have positive or negative effects on us. For those affected negatively, there’s an answer to your troubles. Do you ever notice that when it starts to get darker earlier, when it’s more grey and cloudy, and when the temperature drops, your mood changes? You’re not as happy as you were, you don’t partake in the same activities you once loved, and your appetite changes. Let’s face it, you’re S.A.D.   Seasonal affective disorder, or S.A.D., is a form of depression that affects a person during the season each year. For example, if you get depressed in the winter and don’t feel like yourself but feel much better in spring and/or summer, you may have S.A.D. Anyone can have S.A.D., but it is more common in people

who live in areas where, during winter, days are very short or there are large changes in the amount of daylight in different seasons like here in Chicago. Women are also at a higher risk, as are people between the ages of 15 and 55, (the risk of getting S.A.D. decreases as you age) and if you have a close relative with S.A.D. your chances are increased.   Experts are not sure what causes S.A.D, but they think it may be caused by a lack of sunlight. The lack of light may disrupt your sleep-wake cycle and other circadian rhythms. And it may cause problems with a brain chemical called serotonin that affects your mood.   Symptoms for S.A.D. include feeling sad, grumpy, moody, or anxious, loss of interest in your usual activities, eating more and craving carbohydrates, such as bread and pasta, weight gain, and feeling drowsy during the daytime. For most,

9000 West College Parkway Palos Hills, IL 60465-0937 Office: Room U 207 Telephone: (708) 608-4177 Fax: (708) 974-0790 glacier@morainevalley.edu

  The Glacier is published biweekly during the fall and spring semesters by the students of Moraine Valley Community College. All submissions should be typed and letters to the editor must include the author’s name and phone number. All material submitted to the Glacier is subject to editing. Submissions must be 450 words or less.   All contents copyrighted 2010 Glacier. Editorial Policy:  The opinions expressed in the Glacier do not necessarily represent the views of the faculty, staff, or administration of Moraine Valley. All content decisions for the Moraine Valley Glacier are under the authority of student editors. Material does not have to be submitted to college administration for advance approval.

Staff Writer

symptoms start in September or October and end in April or May.   It is hard to tell the difference between non-seasonal depression and S.A.D., because they are so alike.   Treatment for S.A.D. includes two types of light therapy, bright light treatment and dawn simulation. For Bright light treatment, you sit in front of a “light box” for half an hour or longer, usually in the morning is recommended. Dawn simulation is the use of a dim light that goes on in the morning while you sleep, and it gets brighter over time, just like a sunrise. Light therapy has shown to work well for most people with S.A.D., and it is fairly easy to use. You may start to feel better within a week or so after you start light therapy. The catch is you need to stick with it and use it every day until the season changes. If you don’t, your depression will most likely return.   Other treatments include

antidepressants and counseling. The most helpful way to treat S.A.D. is to get regular exercise. Staying active during the daytime, especially after you first wake up, may help you have more energy and feel more like

yourself.   My recommendation: relocate to a warmer climate. Ashley Tarasiewicz can be contacted at ashley.tarasiewicz@yahoo.com

Graphic by Laura Joy

For more coverage, check out www.mvccglacier.com Editor in Chief Frank Florez

News Editor Rob Siebert

Distribution Manager Mike Stocks

Online Copy Editor Ryan Kiefer

Copy Editor Liz Richardson

Features Editor Anthony Rojas

Sports Editor Connor Reynolds

Classifieds Manager Priscilla Carroll

Graphics Editor Laura Joy

Entertainment Editor Amel Saleh

Editorial Assistant Joe Salah

Photo Editor Dana Lenckus

Views Editor Wendy Grupka

Online Editor Stacey Reichard

Staff Alexandra Dean Amanda Panicucci Dan Rhode Matt Congreve

Matt Mireles Contributers Bill Droel Julius Allen Corporal   Christopher   J. Santiago Advisor Ted Powers


12

Moraine Valley Glacier

November 19, 2010

Classified ads are accepted at the Glacier office (U207) at the rate of 10 cents per word for students and Moraine employees, 20 cents per word for everybody else. Ads are subject to editing and must be in by noon seven days prior to issue release. The Fall 2010 issues will be on the stands December 10.

For Sale Tired of Getting Ripped Off? I am in the automobile program at Moraine and will do tune-ups, oil changes, starters, alternators, brakes and all minor auto repairs. I will make you an offer that you cannot resist. Call Andrew (708) 289-5046. For Sale! Single family home for sale, quiet location, near transportation, 3 bedroom, 1 bath, Chicago Ridge, IL $173,000 call Leonard or Pam (708) 422-1289, pre-approved buyers only. For Sale! Home for sale near schools on 2448 Orchard, Blue Island. 4 Bedroom, 3 Bath with finished basement. Has new roof, windows, hot water heater and carpeting. Call (708) 396-1512.

For Sale /For Rent Services For Sale! Rainforest themed bouncer, playpen, bassinet, mobile and high chair for sale. In good condition, has been in storage. $150 OBO. About 3 years old, only used by one child. Willing to sell separately. Call Priscilla (708) 469-8829. Property For Sale! Two adjacent lots for sale in Worth, near 111th and Harlem. Three bedroom home. Take advantage of the tax credits! Buy now! Build later! Asking $300,000. Call (708) 267-3421. Furnished Room For Rent! Close to school and transportation, kitchen previledges, smoke free. Sitting room and access to internet, cable-net ready. $500 a month. Call (708) 941-4086.

For Sale! Ford 1996 F-250 XLT. Get ready for the snow! 4 wheel drive, extended cab, cab bed, detachable snow plow hook-up, $6500. Call (773) 343-2810.

Room For Rent! Shared Condo. $350.00/a month. Near 111th & Oak Park.All rooms are accessible. Close to Moraine & Metra. Cable and internet ready. Pets okay. Open Parking. Call Becky (708) 513-7025.

transmission, excellent condition, G re y m e t a l l i c e x t e r i o r, a i r conditioning, am/fm radio, cruise, rear window defrost. $3995. Call (708) 724-6448 or steve.neil.by0h@statefarm.com

Apartment For Rent! Orland Park, two bedroom, one bath, heated, 2nd floor. Quiet building, near train. No pets, no smoking. Call (708)460-2937.

For Sale! Whirlpool washer and dryer, just Apartment For Rent! a little over a year old. $500 OBO Justice: 8045 West 83rd St. one Call Lori (312) 671-6915. bedroom apartment, first floor, balcony. All utilities included. For Sale! Buick 1990 LeSabre custom Available Now! 28,000 miles, 4 door, automatic Call (708)256-7668.

Gymnastic Instructor! Join a growing companybased in Addison. Part time or Full time. Travel required. Starting pay $10 - $12 per hour. Gymnastic background is helpful but not required. Call (630) 458-9211. Room For Rent! Bridgeview Area - Furnished room, cable ready, kitchen p re v i l e g e s , $ 4 0 0 / m o . $ 1 0 0 security deposit. Call (708) 598-4892. Apartment For Rent! 5 minutes from Moraine. 1 Bedroom for $725 a month. 2 Bedrooms for $825 a month. Laundry on site, storage units, secured entry building, newer appliances, newer carpet, freshly painted with assigned off street parking. Great location! Very clean! Sorry, no pets. Call today. (708) 285-3070. Avon! Buy online with free shipping or start selling. (708) 388-5533 www.youravon.com/lsolis

Sell Your Stuff! To place an ad in Moraine’s Classified Section call the Glacier at (708) 608-4177 Or come to room U207.

Wanted! Resource Data Services! Palos Hills inside sales office is looking to hire a few motivated, hard working individuals. No experience necessary. Hours are Monday - Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Pay is $8.25 per hour VS. high commision plus bonus. Call for more information at (708) 974-2738. Or apply in person at 10717 S. Roberts Rd. Calling All Bands! Do you need a practice spot? Check out the new Rock Spot located close to Orange Line by Midway Airport. Spacious rooms at unbeatable prices. High speed Internet Access. Safe and Secure rooms with 24 hour access. Call, text, or e-mail to schedule your appointment before the rooms are gone! John (708) 277-5759 or e-mail therockspot4500@yahoo.com Need Graphic or Web Design! Call Michael (708) 357-7135 or email at: sastudios@sbcglobal.net


Moraine Valley Glacier F&E

November 19, 2010

13

JRC wants you to “Work Outside the Box” By Katie Baxter

Editorial Assistant   “Work outside the box” is the central message the Job Resource Center is trying to get students.   Work outside the box is for students who go against stereotypes and pursue jobs that consist of less then 25 percent of their gender. A majority of students stick with the stereotypes of girls being in childcare and guys being in IT. What if students wanted something different? For example, a male student was interested in childcare or a female student wanted to do welding or automotive? The JRC calls it “Non-traditional Careers” because it’s for students whose career major is more taken up by the opposite gender.   Growing up, we were all told we could be whatever we want to be when we got older. However, the time and society we live in, sort of chooses our role for us. For instance, high school counselors urge females to become nurses more so then men and urge men to do more of the “manly” jobs like IT or construction. We even had seen it as a comedic role in “Meet the Parents”. Where daughter is dating a man, who is a male nurse and the father of the female thinks of his job as a joke because he is

and choices do not have to dictate what the statistics show, but that with their passion, skills and support from others, they can succeed in any career field,” stated Laura Kockler, Job Resource Specialist.   If you’re not sure that a non-traditional career is for you or you’re having trouble choosing which one to go through with, student can make an appointment with our Counseling and Career Development Center which is located in room S202. Or students can also make an appointment with the Academic Advising Center in room S201. The advisors will be able to help students one on one with Photo by Dana Lenckus help determining which classes the student will need for the degree or Many students choose to study in non-traditional fields, such as a man in the field of nursing. certificate program of your choice. Tomorrow Fund. male.   For more information you can   However, the joke is on the fa-   Moraine Valley also offers work- visit the website at www.morainether in the story. Non-traditional shops for those interested in “Work valley.edu/jrc or you can contact careers can offer an opportunity outside the Box” careers. The next Job Resource Specialists Laura for higher wages more so then workshop will be held on Wednes- Kockler at kocklerl@morainevalfor those in a traditional career. day December 1 from 4p.m-5p.m ley.edu and Tamima Farooqui at Also, not only are students who in room S225. Students can reg- FarooquiT@morainevalley.edu. are majoring in less stereotypi- ister for this workshop through Students can also make an apCollege Central Network. This is pointment for a one on one meetcal jobs eventually get higher pay a great workshop to attend if stu- ing. Appointments can be set up but students can also get grants dents really have a passion for a through e-mail or a phone call at if your gender is a minority in the non-traditional career or for any (708) 974-5313. career field. There are grants student interested in learning more anywhere from 1,000 to 10,000 about non-traditional careers. “It is Katie Baxer can be contacted at dollars.Some include, Women in important that men and women baxterk@student.morainevalley. Federal Law Enforcement, The realize that their career interests edu Spa Foundation and Avon-Hello


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November 19, 2010

Sports

Moraine Valley Glacier

Athletes of the Issue By Connor Reynolds

Photo by Dana Lenckus

Photo by Dana Lenckus

First-year guard Morris Woods drives to the lane in a game against Harper College.

Basketball / From Sports Front Page in their next game. First-year guard Darius Parker led the team to a 7664 home victory with a whopping eight three-pointers on his way to a team-high 28 points.   Moraine Valley would continue this trend over the next three games by alternating wins and losses. The Cyclones would lose by nine to Triton College in their first road contest this year and then follow that up with a six-point victory over Danville Area Community College in their second road game of the season.   In the most recent matchup of the year the Cyclones suffered a tough home loss to Harper College, losing 76-90. The team gave up the most points they have all season. The team is now 1-2 in home matchups, but is going to have to do a better job of protecting their own turf if they want to have a successful season.   In off-the-court news, first-year Cyclone Morris Woods did something

that has never happened during Coach Shannon’s time with Moraine Valley. Morris signed a National Letter of Intent with Eastern Illinois University on November 11 and became the first student-athlete to sign with a university before finishing his first year of play. Morris is a 6’3’’ guard/ forward out of Argo High School.   Next the Cyclones will take on the Olivet Nazarene University junior varsity team in their third road contest of season on Friday, November 19 at 7 p.m. The Tigers have yet to earn a victory this season so the Cyclones need to stay sharp if they want to avoid giving them their first victory.   Moraine Valley’s next home game will take place on December 7 at 7 p.m. and will be against Kankakee Community College Frank Florez can be contacted at florezf@student.morainevalley.edu

Photo by Dana Lenckus

Darius Parker Shooting Guard Men’s Basketball

Ashley Shares Team Captain Women’s Cross Country

  Darius Parker is a first year player on the men’s basketball team.   In just his second college game, he was the key player in the team’s 76-64 victory in a tough matchup with St. Xavier.   Taking full advantage of his role as a sharpshooter, Parker drained 8 three-pointers and scored a total of 28 points.   Having a deadly long-range weapon like Parker lurking around the three-point line clearly has its benefits as it allows the Cyclones to better spread the floor and create driving oppurtunites for fellow standouts Morris Woods and Marquel Pierce.   Hopefully Parker can keep up his hot shooting and help the Cyclones to more victories.

  Ashley Shares is the captain of the Women’s Cross Country team and has been, without question, the top perfomer all season.   She was named to the AllRegion team following her finish as the runner-up in the Region IV meet. Her performance was key in the team’s second place finish, which qualified the whole team for the national meet in South Carolina.   One week prior she took home the individual title at the Illinois Skyway Conference meet leading the Cyclones to their third conference championship, and first since 2006.   At the NJCAA national meet in Spartanburg, South Carolina she finished 76 out of 286 while running an impressive 20:05.


Moraine Valley Glacier

Sports

November 19, 2010

15

Lady Cyclones off to a hot start in 2010 By Joe Salah Editorial Assistant

  When it comes to basketball, teamwork is everything. Regardless of how naturally skilled players might be, they are nothing without the cooperation of the rest of their team.   Want a prime example of strategy at its finest? Take a look at Moraine Valley’s very own women’s basketball team. This year, the team returns with 17 players dedicated to owning the competition on every level. This vicious group is led by their coach Delwyn Jones.This year’s team includes four returning sophomores: Ashley Teresiak, Kristy Scialabba, Nicole Mazor, and Allison Dahleen.   Do not let the term “freshmen” fool you though; the new additions to the team this year are a force to be reckoned with. A large majority of these new team members are the best at what they do, and they don’t take no for an answer. Though skill can only go so far before relying on cooperation, it certainly helps.   The Cyclones have emerged victorious in the past four conference championships and aim to do the

same this season.   The opening game of the season took place at home on November 4 and, as anticipated, the Cyclones dominated Daley College 74-34.   An opening home game victory sparks motivation, momentum, and confidence in a team. These feelings are beneficial, but the competitive edge can’t be allowed to fade.   Unfortunately, the women’s next game demonstrated that no competition can be taken lightly. Their November 10 home game against Kennedy King College was played sloppily, and the Cyclones were defeated 58-48.   Thriving on the motivation to perform professionally and shrug off the loss, they charged into their next game heads held high and completely dominated Triton College 50-23.   The record for the season sits at 4 wins and 2 losses. The Cyclones and Coach Jones are confident in their abilities to dominate their competition, and make this season and all that follow successful. Joe Salah can be contacted at Jsalah22@gmail.com

Volleyball / From Sports Front Page

Photo by Dana Lenckus

Jasmine Harris muscles her way into the lane to position herself for a rebound.

Coughlin.   The national tournament will take place November 17-19. The Cyclones are seeded 14th and are faced with a very tough first round

match against third seeded Cowley County. Connor Reynolds can be contacted at illinifreak708@gmail.com


Sports

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9000 West College Parkway, Palos Hills, IL 60465

November 19, 2010

G L A C I E R

Volume 43, Issue 7

Volleyball in the hunt for NJCAA championship

Photo courtesy ofby Public Photo DanaRelations Lenckus

The women’s volleyball team’s tremendous season has been a complete team effort, led by several players who have been honored for both their offense and defense.

By Connor Reynolds Sports Editor   For the first time in Coach Gloria Coughlin’s long tenure, the women’s volleyball team has advanced to the NJCAA National Tournament after winning the Region IV tournament.   A grueling four-set victory against a Kankakee in the championship match was the final step towards a berth in the National Tournament.   The Cyclones were able to manage a 18-25, 25-18, 25-22, and 30-28 victory. Rachael Levitt was a key part of the victory with 18 kills and 16 digs, her 14th double-

double, as well as three aces and three blocks. She also came through in the clutch to notch the final service point in the tight fourth set. Katie Yacko had 49 assists and 11 digs, and Kelly Stack had 27 digs and three aces. Both Levitt and Stack’s performances helped to earn them All-Tournament and AllRegion honors. Yacko and Carli Immordino were also honored as All-Region.   The Cyclones earned their place in the championship match after dispatching a tough Lake County team. As in their championship performance, the team lost their first set, but was able

to storm back for a four-set win. Donna Killeen was vital to the come-from-behind win, turning in one her best performances of the season with a team-high 16 kills. Levitt had 14 kills, 14 digs, and two aces. Stack had 54 digs, and Yacko had 51 assists and 15 digs.   The players were not the only ones to receive recognition; Coach Coughlin was honored as Region IV Coach of the Year. “We are all very excited to participate in the national tournament, and we all look forward to more battles on the courts,” said

Volleyball / Page 15

Young Cyclones squad looking get on a win streak

Frank Florez Editor In Chief

players on the roster.   Through five games this year, the Cyclones have Basketball is back at Mo- been trading wins and lossraine Valley as the Cyclones’ es, but with so many young season has finally gotten un- players some kind of adjustderway. ment period is to be expected. Head Coach Dedrick Shan-   In the season opener, the non returns for his seventh Cyclones suffered a twoyear with the Cyclones. With point loss at the hands of only three second-year play- St. John’s Military Academy. ers, Shannon hopes this Shannon cited the team as young team can win some “one of the toughest teams games and improve upon we’ll face all year.” last years 16-17 record. For-   The Cyclones bounced ward/center Louis Green, back quickly when they took guard Patrick McCarthy and on Saint Xavier University forward Dwayne McGhee are the only second-year Basketball / Page 14

Photo by Dana Lenckus


F &E eatures

ntertainment

9000 West College Parkway, Palos Hills, IL 60465 March November April 2010 19, 2010 12,2,2010

Volume 42 43, Issue13 7 12

The story of a soldier By Corporal Christopher J. Santiago

Contributor

  The rumbling noise of Humvees and other armored vehicles can be heard for miles as our large convoy plows down the road. A vast sea of blue sky surrounds us as far as the eye can see, not a cloud in sight.   The sun bares down on us, scorching everyone and everything below. It must be over 115 degrees Fahrenheit; that, coupled with all the weight of this armor, weapons and long sleeve uniforms, makes for a very uncomfortable heat. Surrounding the road on either side are low sloping fields filled with farmers, crops and herds of animals.   CRACK! The peace and quiet shatter instantly. More sharp cracks follow the initial one and we realize after a short moment that we’re under fire.   My Staff Sergeant immediately commands, “Lock and load everyone! Santiago, go to condition 1!” I trace my hand up the metal gray frame of my massive ‘medium-size’ machine gun and rack the huge bolt back. A 7.62mm round feeds into the cold steel chamber. The power to kill is now, literally, at my fingertips.   As our large crew of Marines scrambles to figure out the direction of the incoming fire, the sounds of rifles being fired at us is growing in number and frequency. I do my best

Photo by Ashlee Small Corporal Christopher J. Santiago tells the story of his fight for Uncle Sam and the United States Marine Corps.

to decipher the different sounds within the cacophony pounding at my ears.   Over the shouts and radio squelch, the sound of  thousands of firecrackers exploding in the distance stands out and is the most unnerving.

As AK-47 rifle rounds begin to barrage and slam into my truck, a sudden heavy feeling of dread and fear sinks into me as though I swallowed a rock and it weighed heavily in my stomach. I may not live through this.

  And that thought instantly spawns a multitude of others like blood rushing through an artery only to spread and branch out into capillaries. What Soldier / Page 2

Banning “Blackout in a can” By Amel Saleh

Entertainment Editor   Four Lokos: a drink that a Facebook group classifies as “blackout in a can and the end of your morals” is now being banned by the FDA.   Four Lokos is an alcoholic energy drink that has gained infamous attention. The drink has been around for a while, so why is it being banned now? Because people have suffered from alcohol poisoning and even died. Inside the 23oz is a heck of a lot of booze, 12% alcohol to be exact, and when combined with caffeine, blacking out is your result. One can is equivalent to about six cans of beer, five glasses of wine, and two pots of coffee.   People who consume the beverage might not notice fatigue and loss of coordination. Within 30 minutes, some can start show signs of being drunk. According to dailyrecordnews. com, Ken Briggs, chairman of Central Washington University’s physical education department and school of public health, said “when you reach a certain point you can actually drop like a box of rocks because what is

happening, is the caffeine and ... all these other substances are messing up with the gradual and normal brain function depression that are signals that it’s time to shut it down.”   The consumption would of course hit more severely to women than men. Sadly, a 21-year-old from Maryland, Courtney Spurry, fell victim to the effects when she drank two cans of Four Lokos and then drove her car into a tree. Friends and family claim that after she drank the beverage, she wasn’t the same. They blame the drink for “making her lose her mind.”   Four Lokos is already banned on college campuses across the country and is not permitted for sale in Washington State, Utah and Michigan.   More states are expected to ban the drink in coming weeks - on Friday, Arkansas and Indiana became the latest states that said they’re investigating a ban on caffeine-alcohol combos.   The ban for Illinois was suppose to take effect last Thursday but the Chicago-based company that produces Four Lokos (Phusion Products) said they would remove the caffeine from manufactured single-selling cans. However, if people still wanted to feel

Photo courtesy of Google.com A can of Four Loko is equivalent to a six pack of beer and as much caffeine as coffee.

the effects of what Four Lokos used to be, they could combine it with any other caffeinated drink.   I must close with one final statement. It was a tragedy that people have suffered from poisoning and died, but if you choose to engage in consuming this beverage, please

drink in moderation. Blatantly speaking, be smart about it. Your life is much more precious than adventurous drinking with your friends on a Saturday night. Amel Saleh can be contacted at saleha38@student. morainevalley.edu


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November 19, 2010

Features

crawl as my senses heighten in response to the adrenaline. I go against if I get hurt? What if one of my fellow my survival instinct and stand up fully Marines gets hurt? What if I never to sight in on the hostiles. My eye see my girlfriend again? I don’t want protection goggles fog as my sweatto die. ing intensifies, forcing me to take a   Within the very same second that moment to remove them to allow me these thoughts arise I force myself to to see down the sights of my solid shake them out of my head, and focus metal, 26 lbs, belt-fed killing machine. on the task at hand. I am in combat   Looking through the tiny circular and must face the enemy. reticle, I see a man standing in be  Adrenaline pumps through my veins, tween the breaks in the berm. I see inciting a rush no drug addict will ever the small flashes coming from the know. My killer instinct, instilled in me barrel of a man’s weapon and I hear by years of training and experience, the cracking of the bullets being fired compel me at me. Any to act. It’s my question of life or their’s. this man be  I raise ing an innomyself up cent civilian slightly, getis destroyed. ting into a   I have squat posiachieved tion on the positive rotating turidentificaret platform. tion of a I allow myhostile and self to prothere’s only trude slightly one thing left above the to do. Only safety of a second the vehicle’s has passed armor that since rePhoto courtesy of Combat to College I might see moving my and yet not Corporal Santiago tells his true story. eye protecexpose mytion yet it felt self. My S. Sgt points out the direction as though I’ve been watching this of the incoming fire. I wrench the large man for an entire minute or so; and clunky armor clad turret to face that every second thereafter felt equally as direction. long. I center the front sight-post on   Approximately 300 meters north of my target, take a deep breath, brace the road, beyond the fields of crops myself and squeeze the trigger. and farmers, lies a large sand berm   I watch in slow motion as the that stretches as far as the eye can rounds scream out of the barrel of my see on either side with randomly machine gun and barrage the man’s placed breaks in it. My eyes quickly position. Plumes of sand kick up all track movement. around him like miniature explosions   Several farmers are fleeing from until one of the slew of American slugs the violence with their wives; part finds its mark. of their herds closely in tow while   I witness a spray of pink mist emathe rest flee chaotically in different nate from the man’s body followed by directions. a seemingly delayed reaction as his   My eyes leave them and con- body falls limp to the ground. I release tinue to dart from side to side fran- the trigger and stand dumbfounded. tically searching for the source of   An abundance of emotions flood the small arms fire. I see noth- my head. I have never before taken ing but sand, crops and blue sky. a life. But before I can revel in this   Calmly, a few of the Marines riding moment of respite, a sharp crack is in the rear passenger seats of the heard and I feel the heat of a round truck direct my eyes onto several slice past my right side. targets. I see at least half a dozen   That forces me to duck my head small ant sized men popping out from down as there are obviously more behind the sand berm, only to retreat hostiles to be dealt with. back behind it.   The next minute or so passes as Corporal Santiago can be contacted though it was ten. Time begins to at santiagointl@yahoo.com Soldier/ From F&E Front Page

Moraine Valley Glacier F&E

Leadership...and tacos? By Branden Zavala

Staff Writer

  A business is like a taco: a series of ingredients are put into a shell and have to work together to make a perfect taste.   On November 16, Moraine’s Student Life organized a Leadership Workshop so that they could teach students how to be successful tacos.   Donna McCauley, professor and coordinator of recreation therapy at Moraine Valley said of success: “The number one reason why graduates are not successful in their careers is because they cannot relate to their coworkers and supervisors.”   She goes on to say, “How we relate to others varies every time we meet them, even if it is the same person or group, everyday is different.”   Non-verbal communication makes up about 85 percent of how we interact with each other and, with this in mind, everyone at the workshop was assigned an ingredient, then had to find other ingredients to make a taco, all without speaking.   Within seconds, small groups formed and each tried to sort themselves out. After a few minutes, one group came close to completion, but needed one more ingredient.   One group member stole a student from another group to help his group finish. The stolen student said it was ultimately his decision to change groups so that he could complete

the project. McCauley added that while loyalty to a group is important, we have to decide what is best for ourselves to get ahead.   As the session went on, different games were played. A particularly frustrating game had the students put character names on their backs and they were meant to find out who the character was.   One participant could not figure out that he was Superman, but others encouraged him to keep going, that he was close to figuring it out. The lesson learned? How much can we learn without asking questions?   This particular session even seemed to show results, as participant Peter Pisarczyk said, “It was a fun experience; I learned to ask questions more.”   The session finished off with “Lessons from Geese.” According to the workshop, several things can be learned from migrating geese, such as: people who share a common direction go father and easier than they would if they were doing it alone; honking is positive to encourage others; and we should stand by our colleagues in good times and bad.   Participant Mike Urbas adds, “It was very insightful, I’ve found that if we put in the effort, we can overcome obstacles.” Branden Zavala can be contacted at zavalab4@student.morainevalley. edu


Moraine Valley Glacier F&E

Features

November 19, 2010

3

Forensics showcases talent By Joe Salah

Editorial Assistant   Have you ever been forced to give a speech to a room full of people that you’ve never met before? As nerve-racking as it may seem, the members of Moraine Valley’s forensic team let no such emotion stop them.   On Thursday November 18, Coach John Nash and the members of the forensics team organized a presentation for all of those that were interested.   This particular presentation consisted of performances that the audience members weren’t quite accustomed to.   Nash began the event by thanking the students that paid the admission feen to attend, and for funding the team’s trips to compete. Soon after, Mike Olson and Ahmad Hajhassan were introduced and the first presentation was underway.   Rather than a skit, in which the dialogue is held between two or more participants, the conversation was held between the two presenters, but directed at the audience, as though they were a part of it.   The scene: two characters are stuck in an airport together when their planes are delayed. Mike Olson portrayed a seasoned marine, while Hajhassan played a Princeton student. Both speakers did an excellent job of discussing the similarities and differences between the two positions, and reacted very realistically to their simulated conversation.

  On the topic of military members and college students, Olson’s character said, “you’re all trying to stay up all night, and we’re all just trying to sleep.”   The deeper idea behind the dialogue emerged about halfway through when they bantered over the slaughter of innocents, and whether or not the “terrorists” are actually people. At the end, both characters parted ways with a deeper understanding of each other’s morals and values.   Tommy Lucio followed Olson and Hajhassan’s presentation with an eight-minute speech on the depiction of Mickey Mouse, and what he represents. He also covered the similarities between characters representing their particular television program, and their channel in general.   The peculiar thing about this presentation that distinguished it from others is that Lucio had no flash cards, notes, or any type of line assistance. The entire speech was memorized perfectly.   Every presentation had a deep meaning that came out at some point, and was easily interpreted and related to by the audience.   Veronica Popp was up next, and did a multiple role act on the degradation of women, and how they deserve just as much respect as the opposite gender.   Following Popp was the very funny Eric Sequeira, who gave an entertaining speech on the properties, origin, and functions of Facebook. His humor was appreciated by everyone in the audience as he opened

Photo by Dana Lenckus

Eric Sequeira entertains the audience with his serious Forensic skills.

up his portion by informing them that the hottest girl in his school recently friend requested him.   The comedic genius was a tough act to follow, but Kyle Whitehead did a great job of doing so with his Slam poetry piece. Whitehead started off in a comedic manner, speaking of monkeys’ similarities to humans and Michael Jackson impersonations, but progressed into a more serious depiction of how quickly people are to judge.   “I like to pretend I’m Michael Jackson so that people don’t think I’m going to steal,” Whitehead says. “I like to pretend that couples don’t hold each other closer when I walk by. I like to pretend that I get an equal amount of respect from everyone that I meet.”   The final act of the night called upon Eric Sequeira once again, who tried his hand at some slam poetry

and, of course, succeeded. This member of the team is extremely creative, and narrated self-written poetry describing his love for a woman using math terms. He discussed the different types of women, and why the intelligent, independent woman is exponentially more attractive than the typical ditzy sleaze. Needless to say, he did a more-than-adequate job of doing so.   The forensics team has only competed once this semester, but went home with second place at state. Their next competition is this weekend at Elgin College, and John Nash encourages students to attend. If the presentations at Elgin are half as entertaining as the ones at Moraine were, anyone planning on attending the competition is in for a treat. Joe Salah can be contacted at Jsalah22@gmail.com


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November 19, 2010

Features

Moraine Valley Glacier F&E

Black Friday: eleven tips to keep you alive By Liz Richardson

Copy Editor

Half-price toys, $3 appliances, and DVDs under $2 will be some of the big draws during this year’s Black Friday shop-a-thon. The event, in which stores slash prices to encourage holiday shopping, will be on November 26. Here is a rundown of the things you need to know to find bargains and stay sane. The early bird gets the worm; this couldn’t be any truer for Black Friday. Go early or go home. Target and Wal-Mart open at 3 a.m., Kohl’s opens at 4 a.m., and many other stores open at 5 a.m.

Above all else, remember to be polite. Being in a good mood will make the day pass much faster.

Research is key. For example, Target’s $3 appliances and Wal-Mart’s $2 DVDs were featured in ads “leaked” on the Internet. However, don’t get your hopes up; these ads could be legitimate or they could be faked. Don’t trust the sales until the ad pages are on your doorstep, normally in a Sunday newspaper.

Some great gift items are always on sale during Black Friday: blanket sets (Kmart, $7.99); Pajama sets (Target, $10.00); memory cards (Office Max, $7.99 for a 4GB card) ; and As Seen on TV products (CVS, $8.88 for a Snuggie.).

Have a plan. Know where you’re going, when you’re going there, and what you’re buying. It’s a good plan to start at the stores that open earliest; the longer a store is open, the more deals could be taken by other buyers.

For those who aren’t adventurous enough for Black Friday or who are stuck working retail (bless you), there are still options for savings.

Be aware of what you’re getting into. This is not an event for the weakwilled, impatient, or antisocial. You will get into block-long lines with irritable strangers all vying for the same products. But you also have a chance to get some great bargains, so be ready to suffer anyone.

Go for Cyber Monday. The online price cuts, made on November 29 this year, are the Internet’s answer to Black Friday. Many sites of popular stores will be holding sales. Be aware that supplies are limited and lots of people will be after the same easy deals.

Black Friday is like an amusement park. Bring water, snacks, and extra money. Having to stand in line half an hour for a drink will be terrible, as will getting great deals and having to drop them at the register because you forgot your wallet!

Pre-Black Friday sales have become popular this year. Some stores, like Kohl’s and Wal-Mart, have been cutting prices since the beginning of November and will continue their periodic sales until Black Friday.

Bring a friend or be ready to make them. Those long lines will get lonely, and it pays to chat with the people around you. They might even clue you in on deals at other stores.

Plan your shopping and find leaked Black Friday ads and more advice at http://www.black-friday.net/ and http://www.BlackFriday2010.com.


Moraine Valley Glacier F&E

Features

November 19, 2010

Another space oddity By Dan Rhode

versity’s “Big Ear” radio telescope.   The powerful signal, which lasted 72 seconds, failed to reappear on subsequent sweeps. No signal of that strength had ever been received before. Unfortunately, the strong energy wave did not repeat and could not be verified by other radio telescopes. It has been classified as anomalous and remains controversial to this day.

contains a section entitled “ImplicaStaff Writer tions of a Discovery of Extraterrestrial Life.” This section discusses   Is it possible that we can contact the possibility that mankind would extra-terrestrial lifeforms? not be able to handle the prospect   If you’ve taken an earth science of extraterrestrial contact. class here at Moraine, you have   The report states, “Societies sure probably spent time on the G. Jack of their own place have disintegrated Bradley Observation Deck. The rewhen confronted by a superior somarkable reflecting telescope in the ciety.” observatory provides a breathtaking   Dr. Seth Shostak, senior asview of the moon and tronomer for the S.E.T.I. other planets. The view Institute, said in a phone makes one wonder if interview, “If we received there is other intelligent another ‘Wow Signal,’ life in the universe. As we would spend weeks it turns out, radio aschecking it out through tronomy is investigating other observatories.” He just that possibility. added, “By then, the   The S.E.T.I. (Search media would be made for Extra-Terrestrial Inaware.” Shostak also telligence) Institute in said we currently have Mountain View, Californo equipment in place to nia has been using radio return a signal. It would telescopes to listen for probably require an intersignals from other civinational effort to decide lizations. The theory is what message we would Photo by Dana Lenckus send. that any civilization at least as advanced as Is it possible that something lies beyond a calm night sky?   Not to worry; if we reours would likely have ceive a signal from one developed radio as a means of com-   Some people believe S.E.T.I. hundred thousand years away, it munication. Using a high-frequency would not reveal the truth if they would take one hundred thousand burst of radio waves, they could did receive a verifiable signal. This years for them to get our reply. By send a message into deep space. is due in no small part to a study then, they’ll probably have forgotten   In 1977 S.E.T.I. believed they had known as the Brookings Report, the question. received such a message. Now fa- which was prepared for N.A.S.A. mously known as the “Wow Signal,” in 1960 by the Brookings Research Dan Rhode can be contacted at rhoit was received by Ohio State Uni- Institute in Washington. The report ded2@student.morainevalley.edu

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Compiled by Student Life 24 Karats: For information, contact Adrienne Stewart at (708) 974-5678. ABLE: Opposite of Disabled: For information, contact Demetrius Robinson at (708) 974-5353. Action, Social and Political Empowerment Club: For information, contact Dr. Shaheen Sayeed at (708) 974-5618. ALAS (Alliance of Latin American Students): For infomation, contact Ronny Anderson at (708) 608-5487. Art Club: For information, contact Tyler Hewitt at (708) 974-5219. Christian Fellowship: For more information contact Michael Shannon. Meets at 4pm, Mondays in D-126. College Bowl: Practice Tue/Thur, 3:00, A164. (708) 608-4177. Combat to College: For infomation, contact Debbie Wills at (708) 974-5759. Creative Writing Club: For information, contact Mary Berwer at brewerm@student.morainevalley. edu. Club Meets 2 to 4PM most Mondays in D122. Culinary Arts & Hospitality Club: For information, contact Michale O’Shea at (708) 974-5597. DILE (Dance Inspired by Latino Experience): For more information contact Ryan Budds. Meets Mondays and Wednesdays at 3pm, Location TBA. Earth Club: For information, contact Janet Kotash at (708) 974-5246. Film Authority: For more information contact Dan Pal. Meets Wednesdays at 6:30pm, in M-202. Filmmakers Club: For information, contact Dan Pal at (630) 942-2800. Finance Club: For information, contact Larry Odelson at (708) 974-5264. Forensics team: For information, contact John Nash at (708) 974-5550 or Michael Shannon at (708) 608-4047 Gay, Lesbian Or Whoever (GLOW): For information, contact Demetrius Robinson at (708) 974-5353. Glacier: For information, contact Ted Powers at (708) 608-4177. Monday at 1:30 p.m. U207 International Women’s Club: For information, contact Dr. Shaheen Sayeed at (708) 974-5618. Martial Arts: For more information contact Courtney Reese at L-287. Meets Thursdays at 3:15pm in U-111. Mastodon: For information, contact Ted Powers at (708) 608-4177. First and third Monday of month at 3:00pm U207 MVCC Animation Club: For information, contact Richard Lapidus at (708) 974-5629. MVCC Christian Fellowship: For information, contact Samuel Chen at (708) 974-5636. MVCC Meeting Planning Club: For information, contact Mary Beth Walsh at (708) 974-5569. MVCC Music Club: For information, contact Tammi Carlson at (708) 974-5636. Music Club: For information, contact Tammi Carlson at (708) 974-5636. Muslim Student Association: For information, contact Demetrius Robinson at (708) 974-5353. Network Security Club: For information, contact John Sands at (708) 974-5426. Phi Theta Kappa: For information, contact Demetrius Robinson at (708) 974-5353. Psychology Club: For information, contact Mitchell Baker at (708) 608-4058. Service Club: For information, contact Cara Williams at (708) 974-5489. Ski Club: For information, contact Michael Wade at (708) 974-5594. Student Ambassador Program: For information, contact Alicea Toso for (708) 974-5356. Student Government Association: For information, contact Demetrius Robinson at (708) 974-5353. Women Empowerment: For information, contact Dawn Fry at (708) 974-5717. Xclusive: For information, contact Demetrius Robinson at (708)-974-5567.


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November 19, 2010

Features

Moraine Valley Glacier F&E

World War I: Veterans’ Memories Featured Veterans James Russell Coffey (9/1/1898 – 12/20/2007), U.S. Army Lloyd Brown (10/6/1901 – 3/29/2007), U.S. Navy Robley Rex (5/2/01), U.S. Army Henry W. Allingham (6/6/1896 – 7/18/2009), Royal Naval Air Service Frank W. Buckles (2/1/1901), U.S. Army Harry Richard Landis (12/12/1899 – 2/4/2008), U.S. Army John Henry Foster Babcock (7/23/1900), Canadian Expeditionary Forces Charlotte L. Winters (11/10/1897 – 3/27/2007), U.S. Navy Howard Verne Ramsey (4/2/1898 – 2/22/2007), U.S. Army Antonio Pierro (2/22/1896 – 2/8/2007), U.S. Army Henry “Harry” J. Patch (6/17/1898), British Army William Stone (9/23/1900 – 1/10/2009), Royal Navy Photo by Dana Lenckus

By Amanda Panicucci

Staff Writer

Ever wanted to take a step back in time? An exhibit ran at MVCC in the F Building from November 3 until 12, spotlighting World War I and the last 13 survivors of that war in the Ormeus Theater. Joshua Fulton put it together along with David DeJonge.   The exhibit’s walls were covered with stories from veterans, along with display cases containing a uniform and old military helmets, as well as articles and pictures. On November 10, Suzanna Buckles, granddaughter of the last surviving WWI veteran, spoke to students, staff, and people from the community on her father’s behalf.     She commented not only on her experiences, but the role her father has played throughout history and his role as the last U.S. Veteran of World War I.   The last survivors of this congregation shared their stories, which hung along with their pictures on the walls of the exhibit. Students, staff, and people from the community were able to take a look into the veterans’ lives and how they viewed them.   These stories and photographs wouldn’t have been possible without David DeJonge, who has made it his mission to help remember WWI and what took place there. He also aims to help get the WWI monument in Washington DC fixed. The stories and photos DeJonge had hanging in the exhibit featured the lives of the brave soldiers listed in this page’s sidebar.   All of these individuals were interviewed about their service when they were between 105-112 years old. Each survivor had a different view and different memories that ranged

from being the first woman in the Navy, to being a citizen of both the United States and Canada, or even remembering the infamous trenches.   This memorial was up to honor all veterans, not just U.S. veterans. DeJonge and Buckles made that a point during their presentation that not only should the U.S. veterans be remembered but all who fought should be remembered.   “I thought the presentation did an excellent job at bringing to life some of the stories from the veterans who served during the first major conflict of the 20th Century,” commented Jason Krausz, a Shepard High School football coach who attended the presentation along with other students, staff, and citizens from nearby communities.   His reflections on the power of the exhibit were echoed by Lynn Chamberlain, a Moraine Valley student, who remarked, “I learned more about World War I at this event then in all my years in school.”   Veterans Day was established to honor all fallen and present soldiers from every war, but WWI had a particularly enormous death toll, bringing immeasurable heartache to families. If you were a veteran, wouldn’t you like to go and visit a monument put up to honor the sacrifices yourself and your unit made?   Unfortunately, the current WWI monument is currently falling to pieces. Now as a student, staff member, or maybe just a reader of this article, do you want to help fix this issue? For more information on how you can help visit one of these websites: www. wwimemorial.org, www.frankbuckles. org, or www.survivorquest.org. Amanda Panicucci can be contacted at panda091790@aol.com

William Steegers (10/24/1900 – 7/10/2007), German Army


Moraine Valley Glacier F&E

Features

November 19, 2010

7

Winter fashion heats up

By Liz Richardson Copy Editor

  It’s chilly, dreary, and boring.   This is a great way to describe the upcoming Chicago winter, but hopefully it’s not applicable to your wardrobe.   Trends for Winter 2010 range from the fashionable (neutral blazers) to the downright confusing (puffy fur vests), but mostly, this season is all about adding a spark to an otherwise dull time of year.   Fashion For a Cause showcased the best of Fall/Winter fashion at their runway show on November 16.   Though it was met with U Building’s usual disinterest with anything unrelated to food, the event had pounding music and great clothing that attracted a crowd.   As seen on the U Building runway, this winter’s fashion is all about making a statement, at least when it comes to the ladies.   They showed this by using menswear, such as blazers and tailored pants, and giving them a feminine upgrade with ruffles and splashes of color. Jewel-toned shirts and sweater dresses lit up the catwalk.   However, the emphasis this season is all on the accessories. Photo by Zandro Zafra Sky-high boots and scarves added pizzazz to every outfit; a good plaid scarf can make anything interesting. Members of Fashion For a Cause model the latest fashions to the U Building.

  Leggings have been the mainstay of the new millennium, and this year you can make a statement by finding novelty leg wear; for example, leggings made of lace or cutouts could bring your dress to the next level.   For the men, the fashion is (thankfully) all about being manly. TShirts were the base of nearly every outfit on the Moraine runway, and you probably already own them; dig out those vintage band tees, because they’re back.   Layers are the key here. Add a snazzy blazer, an unbuttoned dress shirt and a scarf and you’ll be the most fashionable guy on campus. Neutral plaid flannel flatters every man, as does a good pair of jeans.    Some fashions, however, are still questionable. Fur anything should have gone out of style in the 80’s or stayed on the ski slope. Like it or not, though, fur is back, and it should be handled with caution.   Ladies, leggings are still not pants—wear your dresses short if you must, but please cover your derriere for the rest of the world’s sake.   This season is going to be a cold one, but with the right selection your wardrobe can warm things up. Liz Richardson can be contacted at liz.richardson212@yahoo.com


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November 19, 2010

Entertainment

5.0 gets a 3.5

By Frank Florez

Editor In Chief  

Photo courtesy Rottentomato.com

Megamind, a mega hit By Alexandra Dean Staff Writer

  Dreamworks has done it again; Megamind, conveys a powerful message to humanity through an outcast genius character with a giant blue head.   It sounds ridiculous, but the film is very humanizing in its down-to-earth and simple exploration of very complex and philosophical themes.   Great for children and adults alike, the film explores very unoriginal concepts and questions such as, “what makes evil, evil?” and, “what does it take to be a hero anyhow?” through well thought-out plot twists and a protagonist who is relatable to everyday people in his struggles of accomplishments and love.   In fact, it explores these age-old concepts so well that it almost makes them fresh. Watching Megamind struggle with its own self-concept is both enchanting and inspiring; it is

Moraine Valley Glacier F&E

difficult at first to take this movie seriously, but after the almost two hours, viewers will both love and admire the strange alien character, emphasize with him entirely, and find themselves enjoying his every plight.   Said events will remain unsaid to avoid spoilers, but the movie takes very original turns in what seemed a predictable set-up in the end. Megamind grows up competing against his nemesis in everything (yes, on first impression this is cliché, but trust me, the movie takes some original turns with this plotline).   I can’t stress this enough—this movie should be taken seriously, despite its first impression of seeming so childish. Hilarious, true to humanity, not to mention filled with great animation, Megamind is well worth the money, great for all ages, and will leave audience members smiling. Alexandra Dean can be contacted at teelakatana@gmail.com

  Released on November 12, Nelly’s new album features a star-studded line-up of today’s hottest performer, but can the product live up to the names behind it?   N e l l y ’s 5 . 0 , which is actually his sixth studio album, features the likes of T.I., Chris Brown, Diddy, T-Pain, Keri Hilson, Akon and more. There’s a lot of talent featured in this album, but surprisingly the best tracks on this album are the ones without a featured artist. “Just A Dream,” “Making Movies,” “Don’t It Feel Good,” and “Nothing Without Her” are easily the best songs on this album and none of them feature another artist.   The odd phenomenon about this album as that the featured artists tend to overshadow Nelly in his own songs. Instead of adding a new element to Nelly’s style, it sounds more like he’s being featured on their tracks. For example, “She’s So Fly” featuring T.I., doesn’t sound at all like

something Nelly would record and instead it sounds like a T.I. song with a guest appearance by Nelly. This doesn’t mean these songs are bad, but it’s odd to see an artist overshadowed on his own album.   Some of the songs using collaboration are great, for example, “Gone” featuring Kelly Rowland. The trend here is that Nelly shines the best when he sticks to what he knows. Another song to look out for is “1000 Stacks” featuring Diddy. This hip-hop track has great mixing and the styles of Nelly and Diddy blend well together.   Nelly doesn’t do a bad job of mixing styles like southern hip-hop or the auto-tuned styling of T-Pain, but his natural talent shines brightest when he sticks to his traditional R&B style. This isn’t the best album Nelly’s produced but it’s above par, and for an artist of Nelly’s caliber it’s definitely worth the listen. Frank Florez can be contacted at florezf@student.morainevalley.edu


Moraine Valley Glacier F&E

Entertainment

November 19, 2010

9

Dead walk onto the small screen By Matt Mireles

Staff Writer

    In the past decade or so, there have been generally three different types of television shows: the medical-themed drama; the law enforcement-themed drama; and the occasional sitcom here and there.   Now it’s 2010 and AMC has broke ground once again following their success of Mad Men by airing a new series called The Walking Dead. Zombies have never been a focus of a series until this past Halloween when the pilot episode first aired.    The series is developed, written, produced, and directed by Frank Darabont, an Academy Award-nominated filmmaker whose works include The Shawshank Redemption and The Green Mile. He has done a spectacular job of adapting the original graphic novel to the silver screen. The premiere episode, which he directed himself, was of the quality of a feature film along with the great pacing and a steady balance of action and drama. A reported 5.3 million viewers tuned to the initial broadcast, which turned out to be AMC’s all-time best turnout.   The story centers on Rick Grimes, an Atlanta police officer that’s having family issues. When on a high-speed chase, he becomes severely injured and becomes comatose. About a month has passed since the incident

Photo courtesy Rottentomato.com The Walking Dead has gained the most viewers sinced it’s aired, ratings report an estimated 5.3 million viewers tuned in.

and he wakes up to a world of desolation. He eventually meets up with other survivors in downtown Atlanta on a mission to find his family and fend off the never-ending horde of the dead until some form of rescue arrives.   Recently, it has been announced that the series has been awarded a 13 episode second season to begin production in February. Their cravings

will be satisfied every Sunday at 9 on the American Movie Classic channel.

The rating system for the Glacier is based on each writer’s individual opinion about a particular piece of entertainment.

Matt Mireles can be contacted at mattyd177@yahoo.com 

Rating System

Epic

Great

Good Mediocre Waste of Time


10

November 19, 2010

Entertainment

Skyline fails to soar, crashes and burns By Michael Stocks

Distribution Manager

Photo courtesy Rottentomatoes.com

Due Date is lightweight Robert Downey Jr. and Zach Galifianakis go through many amusing struggles.

By Alexandra Dean

Staff Writer

Moraine Valley Glacier F&E

captivating performance, it does, at the very least, remains accessible to viewers, so long as they are willing to buy into what is happening to the characters despite the zany, almost dream-like happenstances.   Highman can’t stand Tremblay, but through the miles of riding across the United States, busting out of a border control camp, drinking coffee made out of Tremblay’s deceased father’s ashes, and dealing with Tremblay’s rather inappropriate but amusing pit bull, several cars are destroyed and a friendship is formed.   Albeit the fact that “Due Date” isn’t very original, for those who enjoy vulgar humor and who can temporarily suspend their view of reality, it may be enjoyable.   Much like “The Hangover,” it is worth the money if viewers have little else in mind and are up for a ridiculous and amusing struggle of stupidity, vulgarity, and the lighter side of the human condition.

  Due Date is like a woman with facial hair. In other words, it either fazes you or it doesn’t. Coated with a sense of humor both weird and random, this movie is not for everyone. However, I found it enjoyable.   Serious and dry Peter Highman (played by Robert Downey Jr.) is soon to be a father but ends up placed on the no-fly list due to an aspiring actor, Ethan Tremblay, (played by Zach Galifianakis) mentioning threats of bombs and terrorism.   This is a man that will make viewers wonder how he has survived to live past childhood. Though Tremblay was joking, the duo is sent on a race to get home to Highman’s expectant wife. They face unlikely problems, including dealing with their polarized personalities, such as Highman’s lack of cash and Tremblay’s spending on the “legal” drugs needed for his “glaucoma.”   The movie borders on believable, Alexandra Dean can be contacted and somehow, through the actors’ at teelakatana@gmail.com

  Skyline is a movie that builds and builds and yet never goes anywhere really.   It has body snatching aliens, a bunch of television actors, a flat and uninspired script and an overreliance on special effects.The movie’s “stars” (and that’s stretching it) includes Donald Faison (Turk from Scrubs), Eric Balfour, and David Zayas (Angel Batista in Dexter).   One of the big problems with the movie is the acting and the material they’ve been given. The actors try really hard as they run, scream, and shout but they are mostly television actors whose skills aren’t up to par with what would be required to make the characters seem defined.   The plot is this: aliens have come to earth and are harvesting human brains while the military is having difficulties fighting them. So basically, just take the plot from War of the Worlds and make it modern with freeways, sky rises, condos, and montages set to 30 Seconds To Mars and you have this movie.   The movie just feels really dry and uninspired. The story really doesn’t drag people in like it should.   A movie about people being a trapped by an extraterrestrial force should invoke a sense of fear and

claustrophobia, but the movie is dull and flaunts the “been they’re done that” vibe. Skyline is a movie that takes awhile to get where it’s going, but when it gets there the audience is left wondering why and if there was ever even a point because even the explosions and special effects feel uninspired.   The ending of the movie is purposely left as a cliffhanger. Thus, when the inevitable sequel comes out it will finish a story in which people have been jerked around so much that they probably won’t care. Many movies attempt to use this strategy to build suspense, but as skyline shows, some completely fail.   Some of the more glaring questions left unanswered by the movie include: where did the aliens come from? What where the characters back stories aside from the three sentences they mutter about them? The movie doesn’t answer any of these, so people are left looking at their watches to see when the movie will end.   The movie is fairly a large cluster of why people are turned off by science fiction movies nowadays, but if anyone wants a good alien/monster attack movie just wait for either Battle: Los Angeles or Monsters. Michael Stocks can be contacted at mstocks19@hotmail.com 


Moraine Valley Glacier F&E

Entertainment

November 19, 2010

11

P!nk and her greatest hits By Erin Kenny

Staff Writer

  Topping the charts for years, P!NK has released her milestone album Greatest Hits… So Far!!!   While commemorating her successful years in the business, the album also gives us a look at what we can expect from P!NK in the future.   Greatest Hits… So Far!!! is jampacked with fourteen of P!NK’s biggest hits from the past decade. Listening to all the past hits like, “There You Go,” from her 2000 album Can’t Take Me Home, or “Get The Party Started,” from her 2001 album Missundaztood, lets us see and hear P!NK’s transformation from her party-girl pink hair to the empowering rebel she continues to be.   Along with the old, P!NK also includes four new tracks. Her recent single, “Raise Your Glass,” is a catchy party track that has become quite successful in the few weeks it has been released.   It has made charts and is also one of the most purchased songs on iTunes. Her other single “F***in’ Perfect,” that was just released, is already receiving positive feedback.   Another new, but not so new, song that is included is P!NK’s version of “Whattya Want From Me.” The song is currently sung by Adam Lambert from American Idol.   However, P!NK originally co-

wrote this song with producer Max Martin and is now putting it on this album after they had cut it from her 2008 album Funhouse.   Some of the older hits chose consist of some of her darker songs such as, “Just Like A Pill,” “Don’t Let Me Get Me,” and “Family Portrait,” all from her 2001 album.   Others are upbeat tracks like, “U + Ur Hand,” “So What,” and “Who Knew.” Along with those, she includes some of her more serious hits, “Dear Mr. President,” “Sober,” “Please Don’t Leave Me,” and “I Don’t Believe You” but leaves us to have some fun with ‘”Funhouse” and “Trouble.”   The standard version of the album offers 16 tracks where the deluxe version offers 18 including “Whataya Want From Me” and another new song, “Heartbreak Down.”   Over the past decade, P!NK has been an empowering and inspirational singer and songwriter with her throaty vocals and her likable lyrics. She has done great things with her music and is ready to do even more.     Her album, though a greatest hits album, is still rocking and letting people relive the past decade with her. It is worth reliving and seeing what P!NK has in store for us for the future. Erin Kenny can be contacted at kennye23@student.morainevalley.edu

Photo courtesy Google.com Pink puts on a show for her fans in Europe.



The Glacier - Volume 43, Issue 7