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CELEBRATING 40 YEARS

THE MU WRITING CENTER 2016-17 annual report 2


TABLE OF CONTENTS LETTERS FROM OUR DIRECTORS...........................................4 LETTER FROM THE WC ASSISTANT........................................6 THE WRITING CENTER CELEBRATES 40!...............................6 OUR MISSION STATEMENT.....................................................8 WRITING CENTER YEAR AT A GLANCE.................................9 GROWTH OVER THE YEARS.......................................................10

USAGE OVER THE YEARS...........................................................11 USAGE BY SEMESTER.................................................................12 USAGE BY LOCATION.................................................................13 USAGE BY SCHOOL AND PROGRAM........................................14 USAGE BY STUDENTS.................................................................15

WRITING TUTORING LOCATIONS........................................16

GRADUATE WRITING SUPPORT PROGRAM...............................20

ORGANIZATIONAL CHART....................................................21 WRITING CENTER RECOGNITION.......................................23 BONNIE ZELENAK EXCELLENCE IN TUTORING.......................24 WC AWARD FOR TEACHING COMPOSITION...........................25 WRITING CENTER SPOTLIGHT...................................................26 APPENDIX..............................................................................28 SELECTED STUDENT FEEDBACK...............................................29 2015H COURSE SYLLABUS..........................................................31 COURSE EVALUATIONS: SCORES..............................................35

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COURSE EVALUATIONS: COMMENTS.......................................37 TUTORING WORKSHOP TRAINING............................................39 WRITING CENTER TRAVELS........................................................40 WRITING CENTER PRESENTATIONS..........................................41 CONGRATULATIONS ARE IN ORDER!........................................42 TUTOR LISTS................................................................................43 CONTACT INFORMATION..........................................................46


LETTER FROM OUR DIRECTOR If you’ve done the math, you already know that 2017 marks the 40th anniversary of the Writing Center on MU’s campus. We are delighted to still be here and #changinglives! While much of the discussion on campus and in the local news has been about declining enrollments and budget shortfalls, we can’t help but also acknowledge how far the Writing Center has come over the last forty years! Established in 1977 by Prof. Doug Hunt, the Writing Center (called the “Writing Lab” in those days) was first located at 304 Watson Place, a brick house roughly on the corner of Hitt and Locust, where Turner Avenue parking garage stands today. According to Dr. Mary Bixby, the lab was only open in the evenings, and it was staffed, at most, with three part-time writing tutors: Julie Bondeson, Elaine Hocks (who would go on to direct the Writing Lab from 1987-2007) and, of course, Mary Bixby (who worked as a learning specialist for the Learning Center for thirty-seven years before her retirement this past spring). Watson Place was eventually torn Dr. Rachel Harper at five years old down, and the Writing Lab moved around a bit—from Strickland Hall (formerly GCB) c. 1977 when the Writing Center to A&S—before finally settling in its current home in the Student Success Center in was founded 2001. Naturally, the Writing Center grew a lot in the intervening years, increasing its staff from three tutors to almost 100; expanding to six different locations on campus; and adding writing support for students enrolled in Writing Intensive courses, for student athletes and even for graduate students. And, of course, in 1994, we launched the Online Writery, which has been providing ever-increasing, asynchronous, web-based writing support 24/7, 365 for the last 23 years. In fact, the Online Writery is the only application of its kind in the SEC, and we’re pretty proud of it. Next year, we will be launching a robust online scheduling and record-keeping platform built “from scratch” by the amazing staff at MU’s Applications Development Network. We’ve had a lot to celebrate over the course of 2017—our best year ever. The Writing Center provided a record-number of 15,412 face-to-face and online appointments to 4,778 individual students, a 13.7% increase over last year’s numbers. We are especially proud of these numbers because we expected Writing Center traffic to be down this year in proportion to MU’s enrollment decline. We were happy to be disappointed in those expectations. As you will see in the upcoming pages, we’ve continued to work with a variety of programs on campus, including Residential Life, Ellis Library, the Total Person Program, Graduate Studies, the Honors College, the Campus Writing Program, the English Department, Academic Retention Services, the Sinclair School of Nursing, the College of Education, the Master’s in Public Health Program, and Mizzou Online. With each partnership, we sought to provide quality writing support to MU undergraduates and graduates at any stage of the writing process and for any writing project the students might have, from academic essays to personal statements, scholarship applications, literature reviews, creative projects, annotated bibliographies, and even lab reports. We offered both face-to-face and electronic assistance in six different locations on campus, and we employed 80 undergraduate or hourly tutors, 18 Grad Fellows and one Writing Center Assistant. Like many others who run and work in Writing Centers, we believe in the fundamental importance of collaboration, and so this spring we met with local Writing Center directors and administrators at Stephens College, Moberly Area Community College, and Columbia College. It was a full day of tours, overdue conversations, and even a little bit of barbecue. A big thank you to the following folks for showing us around and spending some time talking about the work we all do: Sady Mayer Strand (Stephens College); Jill Gosseen and Stacy Donald (MACC), & Kate Denehy and Tom Stearns (Columbia College). Thanks to everyone who helped make this year—and the previous 39 years—so successful!

Rachel 4


LETTER FROM OUR OTHER DIRECTOR Welcome back! I can only assume you’re here because you’ve read Rachel’s letter and turned the page. In late 1977, my parents were probably pretty concerned, as they were experiencing something decidedly unexpected: surprise baby number 3, AKA me! Meanwhile, a couple hours away in Columbia, Missouri, faculty members were getting together because of their concerns about writing support on our campus. While the Writing Center’s birth pre-dates my arrival the following July, I like to think we were made for each other, as our conceptions occurred in such close proximity. But back to “concerns”: as Rachel notes in her letter, we tried very hard this past year to anticipate what our student body (and by extension our student usage) would look like during the ’16-’17 academic year. We were happily wrong. Even with fewer students on campus, we provided a record-number of 15,412 face-to-face and online appointments to 4,778 individual students, a 13.7% increase over last year’s numbers. It probably comes as no surprise to folks in higher education that our percentages continue to shift toward online usage as well. 9,896 of our tutoring hours were conducted via TONY (which you’ll remember is the name of our Online Writery) this past year, a 30% increase from the ’15-’16 year. Part of our predicting incorrectly meant that during the Fall semester, we were overrun by the amount of online submissions. I witnessed many days and nights of harried tutors working more than they were scheduled in order to keep up with our unanticipated demand and we still only achieved an 80% on-time response rate. For the Spring, we responded accordingly, hiring tutors and scheduling more shifts. Our tutors looked a whole lot happier and our students received their responses by their requested dates a fantastic 93% of the time. Lessons were learned; accomplishments were accomplished. As we press on into a new academic year, I feel like we’ve been prepared by our last one. We’re looking forward to finishing our collaboration with the Applications Development Network, as they finish work on our Online Writery upgrade. We’re also planning on continuing our networking efforts with our local centers, and expanding that network a little further this year. And, as Rachel and I tend to write in all of our evaluations, we’re planning on doing all the great things we did this year, again! See you next year! And may you never write alone,

Aaron

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LETTER FROM THE WRITING CENTER ASSISTANT My name is Tracy Anne Travis, and I recently completed my MA in Literature with a concentration in Folklore at the University of Missouri. After working as a writing tutor beginning in August 2015, I was awarded the Writing Center Fellowship for the 2016-2017 academic year. In this capacity, I contributed to various day-to-day functions of the Writing Center, such as answering tutor questions and organizing outreach presentations for the campus community. Less frequently, I represented the Writing Center as guest presenter for large lecture classes, educating students about Academic Integrity and Plagiarism. One of my favorite aspects of this position was serving as Teaching Assistant for the Writing Intensive Honors Course on the Theory and Practice of Writing Tutoring, taught by the directors of the Writing Center. As TA for the course, each week I helped guide future writing tutors as they learned the ropes of tutoring. I met often with students to discuss their progress, and watched as the course assignments prompted them to expand their capacity for analysis, effective writing, and thoughtful interaction with their peers and future tutees. While my TA responsibilities included grading papers, exams, and weekly assignments, and meeting with students when they missed class, this position also gave me the chance to see and help manage an extensive and successful employee training process−twice−from beginning to end. Another central duty of the Writing Center Assistant is observing both new and seasoned tutors and delivering criticism and feedback about their performance. After observing face-to-face tutoring appointments, I offered constructive criticism and provided a space for tutors to reflect on their work with students, and voice any concerns or questions about their work at the Writing Center. I also organized and led peer-review style refresher sessions so that tutors could take time to reflect on and improve their tutoring techniques for the Online Writery. Finally, as part of my Fellowship, the directors of the Writing Center met frequently with me throughout the year for a “crash course” on writing center administration. With their help, I cultivated a new understanding of the various facets of running a writing center, and also an awareness of how the MU Writing Center connects to broader University organizational structures. From funding sources, collaboration across departments and offices, training and hiring employees, and managing data, I’ve gained some invaluable knowledge that will be useful in any academic context that I may find myself in. Looking back on my past two years at the Writing Center, both as a tutor for undergraduate and graduate students in all academic disciplines, and in my post as Writing Center Fellow, I’ve often repeated the metaphor that I came up with my first week on the job: tutoring writing is like being on the front lines of the University. I’m grateful for the chance to understand the weaknesses, strengths, and quirks of the University from the perspective afforded me at the Writing Center.

Tracy Anne

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THE WRITING CENTER CELEBRATES 40 YEARS!

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OUR MISSION STATEMENT OUR MISSION STATEMENT Adapted from former Online Writery Director Dr. Greg Foster’s “The Razor & The Compass” As writing tutors, we should have not only an expert command of the craft of writing, but also an ability to use both the compass and the razor. That may sound like a strange metaphor to use in tutoring writing, but it means that effective tutors must be able to see a paper from both the writer’s and the reader’s perspective. Our job is not to “ x” student essays according to our own sense of what constitutes good writing, but to help the writers determine what they want to say and recognize the array of writing choices available to them. The critical razor is the editor’s tool, but the best tutors know how to survey others’ writing with the compass oriented toward the student’s own north and south. And so, we approach each student draft as if it was a foreign country or town we have never visited. What sort of place is this? Who lives here? Which ways are their north and south, their mountains and rivers, their post of ce and town commons? What are their languages? Their customs? Their values? We explore, and orient ourselves like mapmakers—applying the compass. Only then, when we feel we know something about the place from the inside, do we consider sitting down to discuss ideas for further landscaping. Translated into practical terms, in a writing tutorial, this comes down to a humble and genuine respect on the tutor’s part for even the least accomplished draft. Every piece of writing has its own topography, its own values, which the tutor needs to understand before undertaking to help the writer x it. No draft is ever intended as a prototype of the nished piece the tutor could imagine. That doesn’t mean, of course, that we advocate for completely abandoning the razor. But we use it alongside the compass. Indeed, none of us can hope to be really useful to the writers we work with if we limit ourselves to one or the other. The razor is forged from our practical skill in the craft—a crucial part of our credentials; we need its mental sharpness when we think about another writer’s work. But every good tutor values the compass just as highly, knowing that successful tutorials demand a good deal more than technical expertise. At the MU Writing Center, the razor and the compass are part of what we mean when we insist that all of the people we work with are writers as truly as we are ourselves: like us, they are worthy of both.

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the writing center YEAR AT A GLANCE 9


GROWTH OVER THE YEARS The Writing Center continues to experience significant growth in student usage. This past year, despite falling enrollments, our contact hours rose over 13% compared to the ‘15-‘16 academic year. The following pages detail specific demographic percentages for the past year.

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USAGE OVER THE YEAR Academic year total contacts: 15,412 Our largest demographic areas are broken down here. The following pages detail semester usages in those same categories.

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USAGE BY SEMESTER SUMMER 2016

TOTAL CONTACTS: 1,280

FALL 2016

TOTAL CONTACTS: 7,433

SPRING 2017

TOTAL CONTACTS: 6,699

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USAGE BY LOCATION ACADEMIC YEAR, 2016-2017

FALL 2016

13

SPRING 2017


USAGE BY SCHOOL & PROGRAM COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & PROGRAMS

PERCENTAGE OF USAGE

School of Accountancy

0.3%

College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

2.6%

College of Arts and Science

36.1%

Trulaske College of Business

0.9%

College of Education

4.5%

College of Engineering

1.8%

School of Health Professions

6.2%

Honors College

3.1%

College of Human Environmental Sciences

9.1%

School of Journalism

4.0%

School of Music

0.1%

School of Natural Resources

0.6%

Sinclair School of Nursing

3.9%

Applications

12.0%

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INTERNATIONAL STUDENT USAGE USAGE DATA BY ACADEMIC LEVEL 254

USAGE DATA BY ETHNIC GROUP

15

1,225

975


writing tutoring LOCATIONS 16


WRITING TUTORING LOCATIONS STUDENT SUCCESS CENTER

ELLIS LIBRARY

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WRITING TUTORING LOCATIONS

MARK TWAIN HALL

CENTER HALL

BINGHAM COMMONS

RESIDENCE HALLS

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WRITING TUTORING LOCATIONS MU ATHLETICS’ MIZZOU MADE TUTORING FACILITY

ONLINE WRITERY

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GRADUATE WRITING SUPPORT PROGRAM This year we made further progress with our GWS Program: partnering with the Department of Education and the Masters in Public Health for the third year, and the Sinclair School of Nursing (via Mizzou Online) for the thirteenth year. This program allowed us to provide tutoring services to graduate students in both face-to-face and online formats, the latter available even when classes were not in session.

1,752

3,191

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ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

The Learni

The Writin

Ellis Library

Provide 40 hours per week of walk-in tutoring in Ellis

Mizzou Online

Provide Online Writery to online Nursing graduate program

Honors College

Teach General Honors 2014H (WI) every Fall and Spring

Provide 12 hours per week of athletics writing lab tutoring Train tutors hired by TPP for athletics writing lab

College of Education

Provide GWS for CoE grads

Sinclair School of Nursing (Grad)

Hire primarily Honors undergraduates

Provide GWS for Nursing grads

Serve on Scholarship Committee

Masters in Public Health

MedOpp Collaboration 21

Total Person Program

Provide GWS for MPH grads

Graduate School

Provide assistantships for graduate fellows Applications Development Network (ADN/IT) Collaborate on the development of webbased applications

MU Connect

Serve on implementation team

Res Life

Provide 27 hours per week of res hall writing tutoring


ing Center

ng Center

Career Center

English Department

Requested presentations

Make referrals for students with resumes

Serve on Composition staff

Graduate Nursing Program

Field referrals for students with cover letters and personal statements

Mentor/supervise MA tutors on fellowship

RN-BSN Program

Teach English 2015H (WI) every Fall and Spring

FIG sections

Coordinate Writing Intensive tutoring

Present panels and workshops

Business Administration 4500

Present workshops to WI faculty

Present WC Teaching Award to first-year Composition instructor

Graduate Education Program

Campus Writing Program

Serve on Campus Writing Program board

CELL Program

ESL training presentation

Academic Retention Services

Serve on Advisory Board Coordinate tutoring for Summer Transition Program 22


writing center RECOGNITION 23


2016-17 BONNIE ZELENAK EXCELLENCE IN TUTORING At the Tutor Appreciation Banquet on May 5, we celebrated tutors who are moving on. We also celebrated the 40th anniversary of the Writing Center via several cultural references and bad puns: In the Fall of 1977, Rachel was five. Aaron was being conceived. The top song on the Billboard chart was Rod Stewart’s “Tonight’s the Night.” Star Wars, Episode IV (wish we could have said this on May the 4th) was the top grossing film. Ford was president. Apple Computers incorporated. And the Writing Center was born at the University of Missouri’s Columbia campus. So, as we celebrated our 40th anniversary with all the Tampico punch you could drink, it was our pleasure to give these two awards.

connor crouch

Our first writing tutoring award went to a graduating senior. During the past semester, Aaron also had the pleasure to write multiple recommendation letters for him. And since Connor appropriately opted out of being able to read those letters, he had to cover his ears while Aaron quoted himself at the banquet: “Connor’s work always carries the hallmark of great tutors (and people): he cares about each individual’s progress and wants to do his best work with each one, for their benefit. He also looks for the best in everyone and seeks to bring that out. He is one of over a dozen of our tutors who we ask to mentor tutors-in-training each semester, and while all of our mentors make it a point to give good feedback on their mentees, he has, on multiple occasions, remarked that the not-yet-hired tutor taught him something that will make him better at his job.” For his dedication to our students and his ability to bring out the best in each of them, we were supremely pleased to give this award to Connor Crouch.

stephanie kimmey

Writing about our second award winner was like writing the Declaration of Independence. They both had 1776 in common. That was a terrible line that Aaron wrote. Please ignore it—we can’t all be Lin-Manuel Miranda. “What do you say when you want to say all the things?! Our second award winner is finishing her fifth year as a Writing Intensive tutor with us, and frankly, had this award in the bag since she showed up for training. Since that fateful day, she has changed 1,776 student lives. It’s fair to say that she has, over her time here, tutored more students than any of our other tutors. But as you math tutors know, quantity isn’t everything. This tutor truly loves working with students at every stage of the writing process. She knows instinctively that her job is not to “fix” student essays according to her own sense of what constitutes good writing, but to help the writers determine what they want to say and recognize the array of writing choices available to them. In other words, she empowers the students she works with in the best of ways. We have been very lucky to have had Stephanie Kimmey work for us these last five years and if we could conscionably sabotage the ongoing success that is about to take her away from us, we’d consider it: she is that good.” 24


2016-17 WC AWARD FOR TEACHING COMPOSITION bailey boyd This year’s winner was Bailey Boyd. We started offering this award three years ago as a (literal?) payoff to complement the (figurative?) payoff that MA students in English get by teaching after they’ve spent a year tutoring in the Writing Center. Their goal of course: to translate all the super-awesome stuff they learned as tutors into classroom teaching strategies. This year’s awardee described this translation better than we could have put it. (It’s almost as if we planned it): She wrote, “The Writing Center helped me to be an empathetic and approachable instructor; I think these are now my strengths. My time tutoring also helped me to realize the power of clear instructions, individual revision, and opportunities for students to ask questions. Perhaps more importantly, however, being a tutor in the Writing Center helped me to understand the undergraduate student perspective a little better. I hope that by my working with my students, they feel supported and more willing to ask for help. And that is, after all, what I am there for: to help them to communicate more effectively.” Her students noticed too. Here are a few nuggets from her evaluations: She… …was a great teacher who always was organized and had a plan for the day, but also fostered class discussions. She created a safe and easy working environment through her personality and knowledge. …was very knowledgeable and not only used class time appropriately but was able to explain topics well and answer students’ add-on questions. …was very interested in student success and learning and would commonly help students who were struggling with a concept. And then there are were two favorite comments: First, “I normally hate English, but I loved this class. I actually enjoyed the essays.” Second, and the most concise comment we saw: “No problems here.” These comments highlighted what we thought was the best-of-all-possible transitions from tutoring to teaching: that instructors have a thoughtful plan for their teaching, at both the semester and daily levels, but that they’re also willing to go where the students take them, improvising when needed. We were delighted to offer this year’s Tutoring to Teaching award to Ms. Bailey Boyd!

Congrats, Bailey! We wish we had even more money to give you. :-) --R & A 25


WRITING CENTER SPOTLIGHT Sarah Marcum was featured on the MU Undergraduate Studies website, where she talked about combining her passions for writing and science through her work at the Writing Center.

writing science by Kelsie Schrader

Most kids have idols—people they look up to or aspire to be. For junior Sarah Marcum, that was astronomer and author Carl Sagan. Marcum grew up watching all of Sagan’s PBS series on astronomy, enchanted with the scientific concepts and visuals. When the series ended, she took to Sagan’s books. “I read everything he wrote,” Marcum says. “He was my first introduction into any type of science writing.” The two somewhat incompatible passions of science and writing have carried through to Marcum’s college years at MU, where she combines them in her daily studies of physics, biology and math, her English minor and job as a tutor at the MU Writing Center, which is located in the Student Success Center. Originally a biology major, Marcum chose Mizzou after being accepted into BIOME, a biology intensive orientation experience that allowed her to come to school a week early and participate in specialized pre-class training with biology professors. She enjoyed biology, but after a few semesters of classes, her confidence in her math skills had increased. Having grown up with a particular affinity for astrophysics, Marcum decided to return to those childhood passions and changed her major to physics. In the fall semester of her sophomore year, Marcum enrolled in a class called the Theory and Practice of Tutoring Writing. Science and writing do not naturally seem to go together, Marcum says, but the two do intertwine. Science relates to all people, so it is necessary to be able to explain it to all people, she says. “The skill of being able to explain something to someone else is really important in science,” she says. She attributes her enduring interests in science writing to Sagan. “I was fascinated with how he presented concepts in science in an understandable, beautiful way,” Marcum says. Given these long-held interests, she figured the Theory of Practice and Tutoring Writing—a required class to become a tutor at MU’s Writing Center—was a good opportunity to learn writing and teaching strategies. She did not actually expect an offer to become a tutor, as only so many are available each year. When she got the tutoring job, she was excited to take her passions for reading and writing to a new level. Marcum particularly enjoys the challenge of helping students brainstorm and relate their interests into a cohesive, academic paper. “I have students who come in and are very interested in incorporating their majors into every paper they write,” she says, “so it’s a good challenge to find connections between art and history and to integrate other interests in writing.” After graduation, Marcum plans to continue using her passions of science and writing by attending graduate school and conducting physics research. She is interested in working in a science communication field after school. Until then, Marcum will continue indulging her interests through her job at the Writing Center and by enroll in more writing classes, which she calls her “fun” classes. 26


WRITING CENTER SPOTLIGHT Tutor James Bohnett was featured in the “Scholar & Athlete” section of the MU Student Affairs website, where he talks about balancing his time on between the Mizzou wheelchair basketball team and academics.

MU senior excels on the court and in the classroom by Sarah Sabatke

James Bohnett can often be seen racing around campus from various classes to the MizzouRec Complex. As a member of Mizzou’s wheelchair basketball team, he balances early morning practices with a heavy academic load. “You try to plan around sleep,” he says. “You try your best.” Players are allowed five years of collegiate eligibility. Bohnett plans to play out his eligibility at MU and complete bachelors degrees in political science and economics (and maybe statistics, if he has time). A California native, Bohnett began playing adaptive sports at the age of 7. He enjoyed wheelchair basketball the most and soon joined a junior team in Berkeley, California. “I wasn’t really good at it, but they were more than happy to have me tag along and try to play the sport,” Bohnett says. “I haven’t stopped since.” After attending high school basketball camps at MU, Bohnett eventually decided to make Missouri his home. “I got attached to the players that were here and some of the teammates that moved over to here, and it just became the school for me,” he says. While his studies and athletics keep him extremely busy, Bohnett says they have opened many doors. He was selected for the MU Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy scholars program during the summer of 2015 and worked in Washington, D.C., with California Senator Barbara Boxer. He currently volunteers with the Starlight Reading Program in Columbia, where MU student-athletes visit area elementary schools to read to and interact with the students. “It’s partly an opportunity for us to be involved with the Missouri community, but it’s also an opportunity for us to introduce adaptive sports to young individuals,” Bohnett says, “and to also introduce them to disability in general in a better light.” This story was originally published in the division annual report, 2016 Student Affairs Highlights.

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appendix

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SELECTED STUDENT FEEDBACK As part of our tutoring session evaluation, students are also given the option to provide written feedback on the following questions:

1

Would you recommend the Writing Center to a friend? Why or why not?

2

Please describe one aspect of your tutoring sesion that was especially helpful.

3

Additional comments or thanks to a particular tutor?

• I am a PhD student in Mizzou and wanted to thank the MU Online Writing Center for giving instruction for one of my works. I am excited to say that after making all the suggested corrections, my work got finally published in an International journal. It would not have been possible without the advice and corrections that I received from the Writing Center. My tutor was Thomas, and I would like to thank him personally. Thank you all for helping out graduate students whose native language is not English, you should know you make an impact in their academic careers. • I truly appreciate all your input. It means a lot to me that you took the time to read every sentence with detailed feedback. If there is any survey or recommendation I can do, let me know and I would give you A++ because you are a rockstar! • Your helpful feedback and corrections made my personal statement sound so much better. I appreciate your time and help. Thanks again for this great resource! • I am writing in regards to the help that I received from Katelyn Freund for my PTCAS essay for Graduate School for Physical Therapy. She was such a wonderful tutor to work with and helped me organize my thoughts for the paper in order to answer the specific prompt, helped with the flow of the paper and my word choice throughout. I have nothing but wonderful comments to say about Katelyn and if I need help in the future with essay prompts, I will be sure to use her again! Thanks again for your time and what a wonderful resource the writing center is! • Heather - thank you so much for the constructive review. I implemented your feedback, and the revised essay is much better for it. Thanks again and good luck with the remainder of your Ph.D. program • Thanks so much for your help in revising my piece! It’s a tight two pages so we have to be very direct and concise, so I’m grateful you said I could be more specific in my proposal. I’m glad you pointed out I seem to be proposing two different things, as well, because I definitely want to study the ideologies posed by local media when covering student protests. I can be more consistent with that through-line. Thanks so much for your help, I appreciate it tremendously! 29


SELECTED STUDENT FEEDBACK, CONT. • I just wanted to say thank you for looking at my paper and helping to enhance it! Any future papers I submit to the Writing Center I hope comes across your desk (or computer). Have a great day! • Thank you very much for your help, I did all the changes keeping in mind your notes. I am French and it is my first “summary” and it is hard for me sometimes to find the right words. Thank a lot again. • Thank you very much for your timely response. Your helpful feedback and corrections made my personal statement sound a lot better. I appreciate your time and help. Thanks again for this great resource! • Thank you very much for the help on my paper. I know I will be able to work with the suggestions you had and clean up the middle part of my paper. I will let you know if I run into any more difficulties! • This is my first time using you all, just wanted to say THANK YOU to Andrew for all of his help with my paper! It’s been a while since I have had to write a paper and this was beyond awesome! • I don’t know whether you will find this message but I wanted to thank you for all your relevant feedback on my paper. Most of your advice will serve me as well for future assignments. So, I will keep them all in mind. Thanks again and have a good day. • Papers aren’t my strong suit so I expected there to be a few mistakes! Thank you for your time and I will address these issues right away! • Thank you so much for going over my paper. It is apparent that you spent a large amount of time on it, and I appreciate it. I will make the appropriate changes. I have always had problems regarding the ordering of my thoughts and matching them with the ideas, even though I formed an Outline in advance. Do you have any other suggestions to help this? • I would like to send you my greatest thanks for your helpful comments, corrections, questions and remarks. I am working on applying them on my text. I wish you all the best. • Oh my gosh, thank you so much for your help, Kacy!! I really appreciate your thoroughness in indicating exactly which slides needed some tweaking, as well as reassuring me about the works cited page. Take care and thanks again! • Oh my gosh, thank you so much for your help, Kacy!! I really appreciate your thoroughness in indicating exactly which slides needed some tweaking, as well as reassuring me about the works cited page. Take care and thanks again! • Thank you so much Erin for your help. I truly appreciate all your input. It means a lot to me that you took the time to read every sentence with detailed feedback. If there is any survey or recommendation I can do, let me know and I would give you A++ because you are a rockstar! cited page. Take care and thanks again!

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2015H COURSE SYLLABUS

31


2015H COURSE SYLLABUS, CONT.

32


2015H COURSE SYLLABUS, CONT.

33


2015H COURSE SYLLABUS, CONT.

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COURSE EVALUATIONS SCORES, FALL 2016 The following average numbers show how students enrolled in 2015H during the Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 semesters evaluated their experience taking the course, with 5 being the highest possible score (strongly agree) and 1 being the lowest (strongly disagree): COURSE CONTENT AND STRUCTURE

MEAN SCORE

The syllabus clearly explained the course objectives, requirements, and grading system.

4.80

Course content was relevant and useful (e.g., readings, online media, classwork, assignments).

4.80

Resources (e.g., articles, literature, textbooks, class notes, online resources) were easy to access.

4.80

This course challenged me.

5.00

TEACHING DELIVERY This instructor was consistently well-prepared.

4.80

This instructor was audible and clear.

4.80

This instructor was knowledgeable and enthusiastic about the topic.

5.00

This instructor effectively used examples/illustrations to promote learning.

4.80

This instructor fostered questions and/or class participation.

5.00

This instructor clearly explained important information/ideas/concepts.

4.80

This instructor effectively used teaching methods appropriate to this class (e.g., critiques, discussion, demonstrations, group work).

4.80

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT This instructor responded appropriately to questions and comments.

4.80 4.80

This instructor stimulated student thinking and learning. This instructor promoted an atmosphere of mutual respect regarding diversity in student demographics and viewpoints, such as race, gender, or politics. This instructor was approachable and available for extra help.

5.00

This instructor used class time effectively.

4.80

This instructor helped students to be independent learners, responsible for their own learning.

4.80

5.00

ASSESSMENT I was well-informed about my performance during this course.

4.80

Assignments/projects/exams were graded fairly based on clearly communicated criteria.

4.60

This instructor provided feedback that helped me improve my skills in this subject area.

4.80

TEACHING EFFECTIVENESS This instructor taught effectively considering both the possibilities and limitations of the subject matter and the course (including class size and facilities).

FEEDBACK FOR OTHER STUDENTS Would you recommend this class to other students regarding...? • CLASS CONTENT • CLASS STRUCTURE (E.G. ORGANIZATION, PACING) • POSITIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT • INSTRUCTOR’S TEACHING SKILL/STYLE • FAIRNESS OF GRADING 35

% YES 100 100 100 100 80

4.80

% NO 0 0 0 0 20

% IDK 0 0 0 0 0


COURSE EVALUATIONS SCORES, SPRING 2017 COURSE CONTENT AND STRUCTURE

MEAN SCORE

The syllabus clearly explained the course objectives, requirements, and grading system.

4.56

Course content was relevant and useful (e.g., readings, online media, classwork, assignments).

5.00

Resources (e.g., articles, literature, textbooks, class notes, online resources) were easy to access.

4.78

This course challenged me.

4.78

TEACHING DELIVERY This instructor was consistently well-prepared.

5.00

This instructor was audible and clear.

5.00

This instructor was knowledgeable and enthusiastic about the topic.

5.00

This instructor effectively used examples/illustrations to promote learning.

4.89

This instructor fostered questions and/or class participation.

4.89

This instructor clearly explained important information/ideas/concepts.

4.89

This instructor effectively used teaching methods appropriate to this class (e.g., critiques, discussion, demonstrations, group work).

5.00

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT This instructor responded appropriately to questions and comments.

5.00 5.00

This instructor stimulated student thinking and learning. This instructor promoted an atmosphere of mutual respect regarding diversity in student demographics and viewpoints, such as race, gender, or politics. This instructor was approachable and available for extra help.

5.00

This instructor used class time effectively.

5.00

This instructor helped students to be independent learners, responsible for their own learning.

5.00

5.00

ASSESSMENT I was well-informed about my performance during this course.

4.89

Assignments/projects/exams were graded fairly based on clearly communicated criteria.

4.89

This instructor provided feedback that helped me improve my skills in this subject area.

5.00

TEACHING EFFECTIVENESS This instructor taught effectively considering both the possibilities and limitations of the subject matter and the course (including class size and facilities).

FEEDBACK FOR OTHER STUDENTS Would you recommend this class to other students regarding...? • CLASS CONTENT • CLASS STRUCTURE (E.G. ORGANIZATION, PACING) • POSITIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT • INSTRUCTOR’S TEACHING SKILL/STYLE • FAIRNESS OF GRADING

% YES 100 100 100 100 100

5.00

% NO 0 0 0 0 0

% IDK 0 0 0 0 0

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COURSE EVALUATIONS COMMENTS, FALL 2016 The following selected comments show how students enrolled in 2015H during the Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 semesters evaluated their experience taking the course: • The overall setup of the course was extremely interactive; I found that through my participation I was the most successful. I didn’t have to vigorously write down everything written on the board, but just listen and interpret for the out of class aspects. • The collaboration of the instructors was really great • I enjoyed coming to class. I liked that it was a relaxed environment. It made it fun and easy to participate in discussions. • My favorite assignment was the personal statement, as it was helpful and applicable to writing outside the course. I also enjoyed the overall set up of the class in that the majority of learning came from discussion and interactive activities instead of boring powerpoint and lectures. • Class participation was actually very fun! • I loved all of it. The assignment comparing tutoring to a random thing was my favorite. • Rachel was very good at giving students the knowledge necessary to become an effective writing tutor. • Very helpful and interesting classes that were always engaging. I really enjoyed this class. • I really appreciated Rachel’s creative approaches to teaching and her approachable nature. She made herself available for extra help and I really enjoyed having her as a professor. • This class was very challenging for me, but I also consider it to be the class I learned the most in this semester. Rachel is one of the best teachers I’ve ever had, and when Aaron and Rachel collaborated, the class was so educational and funny. • The instructors were enthusiastic and experienced • I believe this course should respect the fact that not all students taking this class are English or Journalism majors, and could help explain other aspects of Journalism so that the entire class is able to understand.

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COURSE EVALUATIONS COMMENTS, SPRING 2017 • I liked that all of the professors had a more casual and friendly relationship with us, as students. That relationship made each class a lot more fun and inviting to attend. I also appreciated that they were often up to meeting outside of class to go over papers you want to revise if needed. Overall, though, I thought the pacing of this class was great. There was plenty of notice for assignments and we were given ample amount of time to write and revise essays. One of my favorite aspects of the class was the ability to revise essays as much as we wanted because I am very much a perfectionist and I liked the chance to make my papers as good as they could be. • I loved that we weren’t just talked at. We were able to be creative and think about tutoring in an interesting way. I didn’t really know what to expect coming into this class, but I can say that my expectations were well exceeded. • Rachel and Aaron did a great job formulating a course syllabus that thoroughly prepared and trained myself and my fellow students to become writing tutors, while also making the class fun, collaborative and interactive (just like a tutorial should be!). I also really appreciated the opportunity to revise essays and assignments. • I’m not saying that it needs to be changed, but the freedom in some of the papers was confusing and scary. I think it just needs to be stressed more that for some of the free form papers there’s no one right format in which to write them. • I wish we had spent more time on working with ESL students because I think they present a unique challenge to future writing tutors, and I’m not sure I feel entirely prepared. However, I also understand that there are limitations to the class and I think it offered a decent overview. • I think this class prepared me really well to become a Writing Center tutor. Though I think I will constantly be evolving as a tutor the more I actually tutor people, I think this class gave me a great foundation for getting started. • My favorite part of the course is honestly the enthusiasm and happiness that Rachel and Aaron have for every class. I feel like they always really want to be there and have come up with fun and interesting ways for us to learn whatever they want to teach us. I really liked the personal statement because personally I have not had to write a personal statement before, and it challenged me. • I think it’s valuable for the instructors (Rachel and Aaron) to be the people running the Writing Center. They know better than anyone what it takes to be a writing tutor, and having them as resources this early on as we prepare for this is incredibly valuable. The course was pretty demanding, but I do feel like everything we did had a purpose and was valuable. 38


TUTORING WORKSHOP TRAINING In addition to the Online Writery refresher workshops given to tutors through the year, we offered two sets of subject-specific tutoring workshops.

39

In the last week of September, Dr. Darcy Holtgrave, an advisor in the MedOpp office of the Honors College, presented two sessions on tutoring personal statements for students applying to Medical School.

In the last week of October, Mary Browning from the Center for English Language Learning presented two sessions on working with ESL students.

In the second week of February, Rachel and Aaron delivered the oft-used-but-never-equaled “What’s a Nut Graf?” workshop for all tutors who weren’t lucky enough to see it last year.

In the last week of February, Rachel and Aaron presented a brand new workshop to all tutors on two high-enrollment Writing Intensive courses from Rural Sociology and Health Sciences.


WRITING CENTER TRAVELS On a beautiful April Tuesday, we visited three local Writing Centers, met with their directors and toured their tutoring sites: Stephens College, Columbia College, and Moberly Area Community College’s Columbia campus. We also toured Como Smoke & Fire’s fabulous barbeque for lunch.

Stephens College

Columbia College

Moberly Area Community College

CoMo Smoke and Fire

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WRITING CENTER PRESENTATIONS WORKSHOPS AND PRESENTATIONS BY WRITING CENTER STAFF • Art of the Personal Statement, FIG classes and Missouri College Advising Corps • Plagiarism: Guidelines & Context, FIG classes, Business Administration 1500 (850 students); Business Administration 3500 (800 students); Cornell Leadership Program (25 students) • ESL: Writing and International Students, WI Faculty Workshop • WITS: Common Misconceptions, WI Faculty Workshop, WI TA Workshop • Grading & Commenting, TA Workshop for Business Administration 4500

WRITING CENTER OUTREACH PRESENTATIONS • Consultation on Writing Center Programs and Administration for Southern Technical University, Basra, Iraq • Summer Transition Program Opening Day • Sinclair School of Nursing Summer On-Campus Orientation • College of Education, Graduate Student Orientation • Master’s of Public Health Department Meeting • New Faculty Resource Fair • Residential Life Staff Training Fair • 176 total Writing Center outreach presentations (AY ‘16-’17)

NON-WRITING CENTER SERVICE AND PRESENTATIONS • • • • • • • • • • • 41

Led the Honors One Read Book Discussion of Just Mercy (250 students) Gave a lecture on Cervantes’ Don Quixote for the Honors Humanities Sequence Gave a lecture on Melville’s Benito Cereno for the Honors Humanities Sequence Gave a lecture on Garcia Marquez’ Chronicle of a Death Foretold for the Honors Humanities Sequence Served on Honors Learning Community Stakeholder Committee; Campus Writing Board; ESL Advisory Committee Co-Chaired the Honors One Read Program Chaired the Honors Curriculum Committee Chaired both the Honors One Read Essay Contest Committee and the Honors Humanities Scholarship Award Committee Served on the Honors Scholarship Committee Served on the Academic Retention Services Advisory Board Served on the Department of English Composition Staff


CONGRATULATIONS ARE IN ORDER! dr. rachel harper On the warm Tuesday night of April 18, the ladies of Kappa Alpha Theta recognized Rachel as someone who “embodies the Theta motto of being a leading woman.” Many of the sorority members, who have worked for her or taken her class, look up to her as a role model. Her nomination was voted on by the entire chapter. Congratulations, Dr. Harper!

aaron harms On Monday, April 10, Academic Retention Services held their spring semester Salute to Excellence reception for graduating seniors. This year was also the inaugural awarding of the Linda Garth Visionary Award for leadership and creativity. Kind words were said to and about Aaron’s continuing work with ARS and the students they serve.

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WRITING CENTER HOURLY TUTOR LIST TUTOR NAME:

AREA OF STUDY: Journalism Information Tech/Journalism English/Journalism Nursing English/Journalism English/Disability Studies English Political Science English Political Science English/Journalism English German Law/English/Fiction Journalism Veterinary English Journalism/French Science & Ag Journalism Journalism Business Nursing Economics Journalism Journalism Journalism English Journalism Journalism Journalism English Journalism Journalism Economics Journalism Business Administration Journalism English Journalism

Katie Akin Natalia Alamdari Jenna Allen Elena Arnett Marlee Baldridge Andrew Bennett Allie Berger James Bohnett Bailey Boyd Rachel Brinkmann Mallory Brown Zan Cappetta Audrey Case Brett Cottrell Connor Crouch Liz Daugherty Devin Day Jessica Dennis Olivia DeSmit Megan Dollar Ashley Fessler Norma Fisk Katelyn Freund Thomas Friestad Emma Gambaro Lydia Ghuman Grace Gist Alex Gnibus Allie Greenspun Joy Han Kate Harlin Jessica Heim-Brouwer Valerie Hellinghausen Nate Henry Katherine Herrick Nate Hunt Anna Jaoudi Rachel Johnson Sarah Kellogg

KEY:

(colors denote tutoring locations or duties in addition to the Student Success Center)

English MA tutor Total Person Program tutor Ellis Library tutor Writing Intensive tutor 43

Residence hall tutor Nursing Online Writery tutor Education Online Writery tutor Graduate Writing Support Program tutor


WRITING CENTER HOURLY TUTOR LIST, CONT. TUTOR NAME:

AREA OF STUDY:

Amanda Kenney Aleksandra Kinlen Ruth Knezevich Michaela Lamb Derrick Lin Katelyn Lunders Michelle Marchiony Sarah Marcum Thomas Martin Holly Moore Erin Niederberger Maddie Niemann Caitlin Palmer Drew Pilewski Kavita Pillai Sebastian Pope Amanda Rhim Eric Russell Andrew Saeger Mary Salatino Bailey Sampson Jamie Seibert Ruth Serven Lucy Shanker Joe Simpson Brendan Solis Blake Splitter Erika Stark Madison Steely Alaina Strollo Sarah Thompson Morgan Toczek Tracy Anne Travis Abbie Walker Kacy Walz Bonnie Watson Emma Worgul Emily Young Katie Ziegler

History History English Secondary Education Journalism Psychology/Journalism Communication and Science Disorders Biological Sciences English English/History ISLT International Studies/Political Science English Journalism English English Political Science/Psychology English History Journalism Journalism English Journalism Journalism English/Education Interdisciplinary Studies Mathematics Journalism Health Sciences English Textile and Apparel Management Psychology English Food Science & Nutrition English Russian/English Business Business Administration History

KEY:

(colors denote tutoring locations or duties in addition to the Student Success Center)

English MA tutor Total Person Program tutor Ellis Library tutor Writing Intensive tutor

Residence hall tutor Nursing Online Writery tutor Education Online Writery tutor Graduate Writing Support Program tutor 44


WRITING CENTER FELLOWS LIST TUTOR NAME:

AREA OF STUDY:

Rachel Bauer Rona Bern Stephanie Chapman Luke Dietterle Erin Osborne Adam Hirsch Sarah Kellogg Stephanie Kimmey Laura Serwe Maggie Tripp Heather McRae Mike Olson Jen Para Chelsy Richley Takaze Turner Trisha Van Buren Elizabeth Wolfson

Theatre Public Health Art History Public Affairs 19th Century American Lit Soil, Environment and Atmospheric Sciences Journalism Art History Poetry English History History Journalism Atmospheric Science Law Atmospheric Science Art History

KEY:

(colors denote tutoring locations or duties in addition to the Student Success Center)

English MA tutor Total Person Program tutor Ellis Library tutor Writing Intensive tutor 45

Residence hall tutor Nursing Online Writery tutor Education Online Writery tutor Graduate Writing Support Program tutor


contact info The Writing Center University of Missouri 100 Student Success Center Columbia, MO 65211 (573) 882-2496 writingcenter.missouri.edu

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MU Writing Center Annual Report 2016-17  

The Writing Center at the University of Missouri celebrates 40 years and reports on their record-setting 2016-17 academic year.

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