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2007: CBC 11 Chaminade 0

The

Dynasty

John Jost has built Christian Brothers College High School’s hockey team into one of the most dominant in the area. But the By Brian Haenchen

I

ce hockey at Christian Brothers College High School is synonymous with winning. Since John Jost and assistant coaches Randy Staub and Nick Carosello took over the program in 2000, CBC has compiled a record of 474-41-23 and claimed eight Mid-States Titles (active streak of 14 straight appearances). With a rich history that dates back to the league’s inception in 1972, the Icemen continue to draw the area’s top players, many of whom have decided to stay at home and split time between their club and high school teams. “John Jost has set a standard there at CBC,” AAA Blues coach Andy Strickland said. “The best players, they want to go there and they want to be a part of CBC, be a part of the winning tradition, they want to win a Mid-States Championship.” Ask CBC’s head coach what the key to his program’s sustained success is and he will point to the message he delivers to his team prior to each season, one that emphasizes the importance of getting to wear the CBC uniform. “It’s kind of the same formula every year, starting at the beginning and saying every game is important,” he explains as we, along with Randy Staub, sit around a table outside Bartolino’s—the restaurant where the team used to meet the night before the championship game. “We always want to win our division…[and] get that number one seed going into the playoffs. There are little goals and little things that we talk about every year that you have to try and get people to buy into.” Jost’s mantra was something he picked up from his high school coach Rick Kennedy.

blew out the perennial powerhouse of the league… That was a big deal.” The Icemen went on to win three more championships under Kennedy. They won back-

in 1993, CBC won its fourth championship. The team’s captain, senior Nick Carosello, was forced to sit out the entire season due to injury. After graduating, Carosello, who grew up playing with Matt Jost (John’s younger brother), returned to the ice, joining a Junior-A team in Montana before returning to St. Louis to work towards his Bachelor’s degree. Shortly after Carosello returned to St. Louis, Kennedy invited him, along with Jost, to “Rick was still head coach, but John and I were doing everything,” Carosello explained. “We learned more in that one year than we did in previous years when we played for him because he would listen to us and we could bounce ideas off of him. He was just a great resource.” At the end of the season, Kennedy announced that he would be stepping down as head coach.


without rival in this area… It’s going to take some time, obviously, but our goal is to work to make CBC the premier hockey school in the area.” A year later, Randy Staub joined the staff after he was hired to teach upper-level English at CBC. Staub coached the JV team for a season with Jost in 1996-97, but left after one season to coach youth hockey at Affton. “It was one of things like fate sort of stepped in,” he said with a smile. “I was teaching middle school then all of a sudden I got the job at CBC. Obviously [it’s my] dream job, I never thought it would happen. Now I’m back not only teaching at CBC, but also coaching hockey at CBC.” With the staff now fully assembled, Jost began “re-building” the program. “When we took over, we just wanted to do things the right way and get CBC back to where we thought they should have been,” Carosello said. “We were pressured as coaches and we wanted [to win] just as bad as the players.” In 2001, just their second season as a full staff, an element of luck in the MidStates playoffs allowed CBC hockey to

Chaminade had Paul Stastny, Chris Butler and some NHL players. [They] were on the other side of the bracket and got knocked off by Vianney. We just kind of caught a head of steam heading into the playoffs and played Vianney in the championships and beat ‘em.”

time between the varsity and JV year,” Staub explained. “That’s what we do teams as a sophomore before well… Christian Argyos was a senior this year. I can tell you the freshmen look at him with the varsity squad in his junior and what he did for us down the stretch and season, despite still splitting time say, ‘that’s how you do it.’ That started with between hockey and soccer. Joe. That started with Kyle… You get kids to By his senior season, Kraemer act the right way and say, ‘this is how you do was ready to give up soccer (he it’ and kids follow suit if it’s working.” was still playing for a club team) The lofty standard for CBC’s hockey their 7-0 victory over Vianney and focus solely on his hockey career. His hard work on the ice players, the threat of complacency is offset resulted in a career-year for the by expectations from a rabid fan base that senior forward, who registered has come to judge individual players (in was something of a relief, a sign team-highs in goals (36) and large part) by the number of rings they won that the program was, at the very points (62). during their careers. least, back on the right track. More “When I look back, probably “Everyone expects you to win and it’s a importantly, the 2000-01 team set the most fun player and the one lot of pressure on them,” Staub said. “Over the example for future teams and who I’d say did great things for the course of a long season, there are peaks began to put the program back on CBC and CBC did great things for and valleys, but we’ve been fortunate for the map. him is Kyle Kraemer,” Carosello what we’ve been getting.” “We knew we had young talent said. “He started out playing on the that year and we knew our better C-Team and just worked his tail 132-game stretch that is known as “The years were ahead,” Jost explained. off… He turned out to be a great Streak.” “So, it was nice to win that year player, a great adult and a great It began, from what I can surmise, with and all those young guys learned “We knew we had young talent that year and we knew our better years were ahead. So, it was nice to win individual… He eats and how to win and it kind of developed breathes CBC hockey. 2003: CBC 4 Marquette 2 that year. All those young guys learned how to win and it kind of developed from there.” from there.” That’s something we like -John Jost There were three players all to see as coaches. He three coaches pointed to when worked his way up and two would play one-on-one against each realize] he’s one of the hardest working worked to build the program into a perennial asked about those CBC teams from did things the right way… other and they would have so much fun,” guys on the ice,” Kraemer, who grew up championship contender. the early 2000s: the Vitale brothers (Joe and He sort of envisions everything that Staub said. “That’s what I remember about playing with Vitale, said. “I watched him in Charlie) and Kyle Kraemer. Two of those CBC hockey is.” Joe. He loved playing. He cared. Everything high school, through juniors—that kid is the It was big,” Jost recalled. “It was actually players, Joe and Kyle, are now playing Kraemer’s journey and Vitale’s you wanted in a player—he was it, but it all perfect example of determination, hard work almost—I hate to use the word miracle, but professionally—Joe in the NHL as a member work ethic were pivotal to the [and] grinding it out… He wins almost every growth of CBC’s hockey program of the Pittsburgh started because he cared so much.” Vitale came out late for hockey tryouts one of his battles.” 1998: CBC 2 DeSmet 1 OT Penguins and Kyle in under Jost. They, along with their Unlike Vitale, Kraemer had to work his teammates from those teams in the the Central Hockey his freshman year because of scheduling way up to the varsity team. A late arrival to early 2000s, passed down the hardLeague with the newly formed St. Charles arrived, Staub pushed for him to be moved camp his freshman year due to scheduling nosed approach it takes to play from defense to center. Chill. varsity hockey at CBC—a pivotal “That was it,” Jost said. “He was just a started out with the C-team, playing for Rick facet that may be overlooked in Kennedy, who had started the team just a examining the program’s dynastic devotion to the game of natural center.” few years earlier. hockey (in particular run. goals and 91 assists (142 points) over 109 “Rick Kennedy was one of the best hockey at CBC) came “The guys they bring in—the coaches I’ve ever had,” Kraemer said. “I was from his parents, in culture [the coaches created] brings performance during his senior season. He a little bummed out about only making the particular his father, guys in,” Kraemer said. “Guys like graduated from CBC with three rings and a C-Team. I really wasn’t expecting that, but I Sam, who once told myself, Vitale and even before us, Junior-B National Title with the Junior Blues. took it with open arms, I stayed positive and Jost there were three who I don’t even know that well. A little over a year after he graduated high just started working my way up. Just playing things important in They created for us and now we school, Vitale was drafted by the Pittsburgh for Rick was exciting because he started life: God, family and created for kids after us and it just that program…[and] he already had those “[Joe] loved playing. He cared. Everything you “We learned more in that one year than we did...when we played CBC hockey. keeps going from there.” championships and history.” “When his brother “The baseball team made a nice wanted in a player--he was it. But it all started for him because he would listen to us and we could bounce now only, player out of CBC to be drafted With Kennedy’s emphasis on the Charlie was around, run this year and there was a great because he cared so much.” ideas off of him. He was a great resource.” importance of playing for CBC etched in they would get on the into the NHL. -Randy Staub -Nick Carosello ice early and those “He’s a workhorse. He’s one of those him and a commitment to the game itself, on Pittsburgh Penguins forward Joe Vitale on serving as former CBC coach Rick Kennedy’s assistant guys that right away when you see him [you Kraemer began to work his way up, splitting

2005: CBC 5 Oakville 2


a 6-0 victory over Parkway Central during and everything.” the 2002-03 season. The Icemen had fallen The Cadets bounced

2004: CBC 2 DeSmet 1 OT

Hockey Classic in Chicago and returned season with just one other blemish (a tie to the playoffs. Chaminade) and their third Upon their return to St. Louis, CBC consecutive Challenge Cup Championship with a regular season, before cruising through the playoffs, outscoring their opponents by a As the dust settled on second Challenge Cup title in three years (a had a record of 92-0-2 over 4-2 win over Marquette). the past 2-plus seasons. “The further we got overtime to claim its seventh Mid-States into it, I think the pressure championship and extend its undefeated run built,” Carosello said. “I hate to say it, but there were a few times during that streak where, as 60 in a row, I don’t remember, but the game coaches you never say you want to lose, but it might was [Brandon] Bollig and a whole lot of be good for the team. good players.” We were getting a little “Everyone expects you to win. It’s a lot of pressure on them.” -Randy Staub complacent.” native to hoist Lord Stanley’s Cup as a While complacency midway through the second period behind member of the Chicago Blackhawks this a goal from Grant Gorczyca, but Oakville summer, was a top-line forward for Howell refused to fold, responding with the equalizer North that season. just moments later before Michael Wirthlin “I remember when we tied that game, coming into the locker room and guys were “Not only did we lose a huge senior class left in the third period. The Cadets tried to the year before, but Kyle O’Kane had left and recounted. “Nothing wrong with that, it’s that really hurt us, losing some scoring,” Jost some good passion for high school hockey explained. “It was really remarkable that we win the Mid-States title since 1994 and “The got back down Streak” was over at 132 games. there because 2006: CBC 2 Oakville 3 “It was neat while it lasted,” Jost explained. we weren’t “I don’t think it will ever be done again. We sure.” certainly won’t.” “Coming into “We lost the championship that year, so this season, I that took precedent over the streak ending,” told the guys Staub said. “It’s devastating when we lose that as long as down there. So, the streak ending was a we improve, second thought.” we could get “Right, but I will tell you, next year back to the championship Tournament, it was a big relief to start— game,” Oakville okay, we won!” Jost said laughingly. “We coach Ben were like, ‘Alright, this is awesome. Clean Lamperti said. slate.’ We had a pretty good year the next “Once we get year.” into the playoffs, CBC went on to win three consecutive we really came Mid-States championships after the streak together as a came to an end, including a pair of blowout team.” victories over Chaminade in 2007 (11-0) and down there. So, the streak ending was a second thought.” CBC took -Randy Staub a 2-1 lead “I can remember one point, us looking

at each other [during the 2007 game] and saying, ‘I can’t believe this is happening,’” Staub said. “That was just one of those magic moments. The older you get, the more you realize how special games like that were.”

in the stands at [his older brother] Jack, who lost his senior year, and the two of them sort of doing a thing,” Staub recalled with a smile. “That’s a touching moment. That’s one of those moments I’ll never forget.” The moment shared between Jack and

2012: CBC 3 SLUH 1

that team—we had lost seven games before Christmas,” Jost said. “Then we ended up reeling off 20 in a row after Christmas, winning the division and playing them again down at Scottrade and that happening again (CBC blew out Chaminade 9-2). I remember looking at Randy again and going, ‘Can you believe this is happening again?’” The Icemen claimed two more titles what makes high after their back-to-back blowouts of the school hockey so unique and, on a “We weren’t the best team. [SLUH] was better than us... I think one in 2009 and the other, number 12 for more intimate level, the program, came in 2012. It was the 2012 why the tradition of it was really special because we worked really hard during the Challenge Cup, a 4-2 victory over the up- CBC’s program is so year as a staff and a team to get back down there.” and-coming Jr. Billikens that Jost cited as the distinctive. -John Jost one that stood out the most. “It’s an extension “I’ll be very honest with you…we of the CBC thing. You weren’t the best team,” he explained. “They go there because your brother does,” Randy were better than us. They beat us two out explained. “I go back to—I can tell you championship, something his older brother was unable to do in his senior year. of three during the year and I think it was really special because we worked really hard was no doubt I was coming to CBC and I during the year as a staff and as a team to get brought my friends with me. It’s special. for CBC hockey was rivaled only by that of their father, it was playing one-on-one back down there.” That’s part of our success, I think.” The 2012 championship game also “It’s neat to see,” Jost said in agreement. before practice and constantly pushing the reminded Jost and Staub of a special moment “I remember when we played SLUH in an other brother to improve. that occurred at the arena in the aftermath of exhibition game and we dressed Glenn Ryan. His brother Jack was on the team and watching his older brother Mark lead CBC “I can remember when we won against Glenn scored a goal. I remember those two SLUH, Glenn Ryan winning and looking up hugging on the bench. I remember thinking was able to help the team to back-to-back to myself, that’s 2009: CBC 4 SLUH 2 neat. I won a championship with my brother, championship as a coach with his younger I was lucky to brother, Tony, who was in his senior season. And for John Jost, whose last name has do that.” become synonymous with CBC hockey, it The tie shared between was winning a championship with his older sons, brothers John Jr., to three-consecutive titles from and nephews 2007-2009. through “I think it’s a big deal,” Carosello said. CBC’s hockey “We really are a family organization… I program know a lot of my good friends I’ve met has been manifested in a through CBC hockey. Even guys that John variety of ways played with and Randy played with have over the years. become close with everybody because it’s “We really are a family organization... Even guys that John & Randy played that family atmosphere. We’re all pulling with have become close with everyone because of that family atmosphere.” brothers, it for the same goal and that is the continued -Nick Carosello was a moment success of CBC hockey.”


BH: Who were the dominant teams during the early 80s, because the league was still fairly new back then? JJ: Actually, Kirkwood won championships in ’81 and ’82 and had some really good teams. DeSmet, of course, had some really good teams. We started coming on around ’82, ’83. BH: Had you had family at CBC before you? JJ: Well, my father went there, but of course there wasn’t hockey back in the 50s. My brother Jim played in the 70s and my brother Tom and I played together. He graduated in ’83 and I graduated in ’84. So, I was actually the fourth. BH: Did you play four years varsity? remember from it? because it was a really good team. I actually was happy that I was on the third line and played a regular shift and I had the time of my life. BH: Any notable alumni from those teams?

CBC. That was back in the days when, St. Louis kids just didn’t play JJ: I didn’t mention, Brian—and I don’t mean to interrupt—but his brother Mark Staub was the starting goalie that year and he’s actually

bigger than the program. Those were the kids he really went after. BH: When you were in the program, DeSmet was on the rise, right? RS: My freshman and sophomore years, they were the ones to beat. BH: Then you guys knocked them off, right? RS: That was my junior year, correct. It was a great experience. I can

out of St. Louis at that time. JJ: DeSmet had already won a couple of championships when we won BH: Working off of that, did you two meet through [Mark Staub]? Or had you known each other prior to going to CBC? JJ: Our families were really good—I had met Mark back when we out the perennial powerhouse of the league. The tide changed a little were playing squirts and then our families became really good friends. BH: How did you two end up coaching at CBC? RS: But him and Mark were best friends growing up. So, once I started teaching at CBC, that’s when the hockey came. And actually, we JJ:Yeah, maybe so. That was a long time ago. BH: Rick Kennedy—What was he like as a coach? JJ: When Rick Kennedy came to CBC, the program—I’m not going to mince words—it was in turmoil. We were coming off a really rough year, players were really kind of running the program and Rick

BH: Who are the big rivals for the hockey team? be— JJ: They’re going to be really good next year. RS: DeSmet is? just consistently good, Lindbergh too. Next year will be pretty similar to this year in terms of who’s going to be up there. I think DeSmet’s going to be a lot better though. dominate hockey? RS: I can tell you a couple public schools that beat us.You can make that statement with soccer. Who knows why, but it’s not—maybe

who’s our defense coach still, and we did it together for one year by

school or two that is always able to beat us and we don’t just say that. We mean it. There are teams that can beat us. Like you said,

RS: That’s when I started teaching at CBC. It was one of things like

JJ: Remember Howell Central.

happen?

at…

program. The most important thing I got from Rick when he coached BH: Randy, same basic set of questions for you, but the team had a bit more success during your career… RS: My brother was a goalie on that ’83 team and I could tell you anything you wanted to know about that ’83 game. He talked about Brian Bowen. Brian Bowen went to St. Mary’s, which is where I ended

uniform was a big deal, a big game—it was important. RS:Yeah, I agree. I always joked at our banquets that I also learned

players], it’s because they’re not taking it seriously, thinking they’re

years. BH: Could you elaborate on that—fate playing into your ending up at CBC? RS: I graduated with an accounting degree and I was teaching middle teaching at CBC, but also coaching hockey at CBC.

that number one seed going into the playoffs. There are little goals and get people to buy into. RS: I’ll tell you something else, the baseball team made a nice run this year and there was a great article in the paper about how they


the seniors when they were freshmen—that’s what we do well. The freshmen try to emulate who they were—Christian Argyos this year was a senior and I can tell you the freshmen look at him and what he did for us down the stretch and say that’s how you do it. That started

BH: How has the game changed since you were playing? RS: From a players’ standpoint, the players are just better than when we were kids. It hasn’t changed in as much as your best players are

name you a bunch, but it’s just, you get kids to act the right way and say this is how you do it and kids follow suit if it’s working. JJ: That’s a good point. That’s how you do it.

kid really cares about CBC, it usually works out. JJ: I think a lot of the guys that played during the 80s are coming back and coaching. So, the coaching’s better now. We’re facing teams that are well coached. That’s a part of it too. But the players they’re

almost become like a given that CBC will be playing at Scottrade to win the championship. JJ: For Randy and I, what we start with at the beginning of each

talented when we get them. We’re lucky, but at the same time, you can’t fake it, because they know good coaching.

put him at center. That was it. He was just a natural center, but you should see him play defense.

2008: CBC 9 Chaminade 2

to see your former players playing professionally? JJ: On our end, we certainly know what part we play—it’s a small part, but at least we got to coach these guys. along. We know our role, we know they’re going on and playing for bigger on, but it’s neat to watch them play and

hockey? any type of complacency or automatically thinking that we’re going to get back down to Scottrade and again, getting back to thinking that

player to do either because for a kid to miss his senior year, miss his prom, miss his graduation, miss all those things, that’s a big choice he

great. RS: Looking at it from a school

our goal is always to be the number one seed heading into the playing hockey, but as soon as hockey’s to Scottrade and hopefully win it. RS: It’s a lot of pressure on the kids, too.You know how it is around

between them and the parents. There are some kids—Paul Stastny,

hate seeing it, but it’s not our call. to make it nowadays. The year we lost to Francis Howell junior year and he stuck around. He went to Western Michigan—? JJ: Western Michigan and he’s going to the Ducks’ camp this summer with a chance to make it. RS: He stuck around. I think a major part of it was he wanted to stick around and beat us. JJ: And he did. us being an extension of the school. The thought of not being around my senior year, it’s unfathomable. But again, BH: What about Joe Vitale and his decision to stay around? RS: I tell you one thing I remember about him, when his brother Charlie was around, they would get on the ice

“[We] looked at each other and said, ‘I can’t believe this is happening,’ It was a magical

enough head on their shoulders that moment. The older you get, the more you realize how special games like that were... they’re going to be successful. BH: How big has the game of hockey grown in the St. Louis area in terms of -Randy Staub the game itself? on CBC’s back-to-back title-clinching blowouts of Chaminade RS: It’s kind of cyclical. Upswing, downswing, some years it seems like there’s a lot of kids, but the good—best kids in the nation at this point. So, I don’t know that the becoming more prominent. getting better and better. It’s pretty amazing. encountered either for your team or on the opposing team? stepped on the ice, especially when we had last change, without Joe. RS: And, playing for the Blackhawks now, Brendan Bollig played for Howell North, right? JJ:Yeah, he was probably the most physically imposing. For us, Kyle

States championship under your belts?

“The most important thing I got from Rick when he coached was that every single game when you put on that CBC uniform was a big deal, a big game.” -John Jost

or 60 in a row, I don’t remember, but the game was against Francis Howell North, which was Bollig and a whole lot of good players, and I remember when we tied that game, coming into the locker room

but it all started because he cared so much. JJ: And his dad cared. It came from his parents. They were great people. He was staying here four years. His dad told me there were three things important in life and it was “the Lord, family and CBC hockey”—and that’s the truth. On the other side of it, though, the one thing I remember the most—and Randy was really the one who pushed it—was he always played defense. His freshman year when

hate to use the word miracle, but Chaminade had Paul Stastny, Chris

defense]. He played football, came out late and we actually

step back and admire what you were in the midst of?

championships and beat ‘em. It was big because we knew we had young talent that year and we knew our better years were ahead. So, it was nice to win that year and all those young guys learned how to

talked about it, but it was a tremendous amount of pressure on those players and we felt it some times. It was neat while it lasted. I don’t JJ: Unfortunately, it was down at Scottrade Center, but it was kind of a relief. JJ: Right. Not only did we lose a huge senior class the year before, but Kyle O’Kane had left and that really hurt us, losing some scoring. It was really remarkable that we got back down there because we weren’t sure. It was a small senior class, but we ended up winning three in a row after that. BH: When the streak was snapped, did it take some of the burden off knowing you had such an experienced group coming back the next season? streak ending was a second thought. (Laughs) We were like, “Alright, this is awesome. Clean slate.” We had


JJ:Yeah, this year really was different. On the other side of it, X’s especially as we see these teams two or three times. I think that’s changed quite a bit and Randy out at school is able to get

Goaltending is what it is.You can’t make somebody your goalie. You can make somebody your defenseman. RS: We put a lot of emphasis on

really helped out. BH: How awful is that for you, Randy? Having to sit through classes top two guys. Our truly great teams, we had three centers that we would put against anyone on your roster. Those were our truly playoff time we start harping on things. I don’t want to say it’s great teams. more enjoyable than teaching, but it’s teaching hockey, especially when it comes down to crunch time, it’s more exciting than

“It’s an extension of that CBC thing. You go there because your brother does... It’s special. That’s part of our success, I think.” -Randy Staub a pretty good year the next year.

BH: Randy, how different is your relationship with the players since you deal with them on almost a daily basis in class and around school?

style. Watching the NHL, I get so excited watching the Bruins play because they’re so good in their

with them all day. So, I guess to that extent—the kids I see them all day, so I guess I’m a little more ornery than the other guys. JJ: It’s a little good cop, bad cop. I hate to say it, but I always

own end and it goes from there. JJ: I would agree. We don’t do a lot of stretch passing or anything like

see them at practice. So, we do a little good cop, bad cop and unfortunately, he’s usually the bad cop. the play a lot more now. I think our neutral zone play is good. So,

historic win. How big of a relief was it for you guys? Was it surprising RS:Yes. I can remember one point, us looking at each other and magic moments. The older you get, the more you realize how special games like that were. Two years in a row. I was really expecting—I was mentally prepared to lose. to myself, holy smokes. Then we ended up reeling off 20 in a row at Scottrade and that happening again. I remember looking at Randy almost like a here we go again for them. BH: I think it was Chaser who came out the day after the game and

it. I thought he was wrong. In the end, we played the seniors because and we got a couple of late ones. I think he understood after we talked about it that it wasn’t in any way, shape or form—sometimes you get down there and things happen. Kids want to score. The set routine? RS: Well, we kind of changed it up a couple years ago. We used to

JJ: Defense. It’s defense. I mean, starting at the beginning of the year,

“I always say I’m blessed because I...just see them at practice. So, we do a little good cop, bad cop and unfortunately, [Randy] is usually the bad cop.” -John Jost

BH: Have you ever had any thoughts of trying to move up and coaching at another level? things like that. RS: It’s an extension of the CBC thing.You go there because your

looking at is who are our best six D? Who are the six that are going to play down the stretch? And if the six that we’re playing during the regular season aren’t what we think it should be, then we’re going to make changes. If we want to make a forward a defenseman or we’re going to bring someone

2005: CBC 5 Oakville 2

being a hockey coach. I make my life as a teacher. JJ: Same on my end. I’m a purchasing family here. So, it gets mentioned a lot to us because of the success of the program, but it’s

state game. There was no doubt I was coming to CBC and I brought my friends with me. It’s special. That’s part of our success, I think. JJ: It is. It’s neat to see. I remember when we played SLUH in an exhibition game and we dressed Glenn Ryan. His brother Jack was on the team and Glenn scored a goal. Do you remember that? RS:Yeah. JJ: I remember those two hugging on the bench. I remember thinking to myself, that’s neat. I won a championship with my brother, I was lucky to do that— RS: I can remember when we won against SLUH and Glenn winning and Jack lost his senior year and seeing Jack in the crowd and him and Glenn sort of doing a thing. That’s a touching moment. That’s one BH: Any of the state titles that stand out more than the others?

crossed my mind.

done it. We’re going to do what

coaching CBC hockey. When this

changed it up. We said we’re going to take it like any other game. But

we think the six D that we’re dressing way. As often as we’re down there, and I guess it’s a routine, but it still down the stretch is the most critical.

it’s more than a side job, but hockey—I don’t

we would put against anyone on your roster. Those were our truly great teams.” -Randy Staub

certainly not going BH: How important

2012, because we weren’t the best team. RS: The SLUH team? JJ:Yeah and we beat SLUH. They were better than us. They beat us two out of three during the year and I think it was really special because we worked really hard during the year as a staff and as a team to get back down there. They’re all great, to be honest with you. about— JJ: It’s—it’s a lot of great memories.



The Dynasty