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347-8V E N G I N E B U I L D ISSUE 19 $595

FOUND! FORD’S DEALER-BUILT

“BRANDED”


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ISSUE 19 MUSTANG MAGAZINE

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ISSUE 19 MUSTANG MAGAZINE

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ISSUE 19 TABLE OF CONTENTS

16

26

38

BUILD 347 -8V E N G I N E

FOUND!

DEPARTMENTS

FORD’S DEALER-BUILT

8 EDITORIAL

24 ONLINE FINDS

10 YOU GOTTA SEE THIS #1

26 EVENTS

12 YOU GOTTA SEE THIS #2

32 MUSTANG NATION

16 MUSTANG NEWS

36 NEW PARTS FOR CLASSICS

22 AUCTION RESULTS

92 FIX MY MUSTANG

“BRANDED”

ON THE COVER Striking a handsome pose is Fran and Becky Cosentino’s superb Branded ’67 coupe, a virtually extinct dealer creation for stimulating used-car sales back in the day. Photography by Tom Shaw

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$ 95 ISSUE 19 5


COVER STORY 46

BRANDED: FORGOTTEN PROMOTION FROM THE ’60S

Fran and Becky Cosentino’s almost-extinct Branded ’67

54

 EGEND SERIES #19 L 1967 Branded Mustang poster

FEATURES

56

26 C  ARLISLE 2013

The big Ford Nationals 38 S  ECOND LOOK

Johnnie and Rachel Garner turned thumbs-down on this ’64½ convertible. Then they reconsidered 56 T  HE RADICAL

Craig Waltjer loved the ’69 SportsRoof, but factory issue would never do 64 GALVESTON, OH GALVESTON

Messin’ with Texas in a ’66 Shelby clone 90 FROM THE ARCHIVES

Reprinting a seldom-seen salesman’s booklet. Pages 4 and 5

64

96 LAST PAGE CULTURE

The National Council of Mustang Clubs

RESTORATION & MODIFICATION 70 E  IGHT-BARRELS FOR EIGHT BORES

Part 2: Trans Am Racing takes this 347-8V stroker to the dyno 80 D  IAGNOSTIC DETECTIVES

The case of the no-fly-by wire 86 H  OW TO REPLACE YOUR GLOVEBOX LINER

A quick and easy fix for what’s behind the door ISSUE 19 MUSTANG MAGAZINE

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E DITORIAL

I HAVEN’T SEEN IT ALL

by Tom Shaw

T

he world loves the cocky, young hotshot in designer shades, turned up collar and hair gel, walking with a swagger. The world, it is said, will get out of the way for a man who knows where he’s going. Cool as that may be, I admire not how studly a man can be, but how humble. I once watched a drunk get mouthy with a new guy in the area he considered to be a rival and a threat. The drunk, as drunks do, was trying to provoke a showdown. The other guy was bigger, badder, and not intoxicated. He could have mopped the floor with Mr. Pop-Top Mouth. But he kept his cool, let the guy rant, and stayed above getting drawn into a pointless brawl. “You wanna fight?” the drunk challenged. “Fighting’s against my religion,” the new guy parried calmly. The drunk looked him up and down with red eyes, attempted a thought, and asked, “What religion are you from, anyway?” “Texas,” the new guy replied, in what I’ve always thought was some seriously funny dialog. There was no question which guy was insecure, living low, and making a butt out of himself, and which guy was in control of himself and the situation. Ever run across a know-it-all who feels like he’s gotta weigh in on every conversation and give everyone within earshot the benefit of his vast knowledge? I’ve seen too many of these guys over the years, and these days, I refuse to waste time with these blowhards. And although I’ve been around Fords all my life and feel like I a have a pretty good basic understanding, there’s still plenty to learn. At Carlisle, there was a new type of Mustang that I’d never seen or heard of — The Branded. I was fortunate enough to meet owners Fran and Becky Cosentino, and arrange a photo shoot for early the next morning. Fran had done a lot of research on the Branded Mustang program and was happy to share what he knew. Now that’s the kind of story an editor lives for. Carlisle was loaded with great cars, but this one, because it was something new, gets this issue’s cover. The Mustang hobby is mature. We’ve been buying, racing, customizing, fixing, hot-rodding,

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The Branded Mustang. I found it at Carlisle. swapping, repainting, rebuilding, maintaining, refixing, re-rebuilding, restoring, re-restoring, showing, collecting, parting out, finding, and rediscovering these old cars for a lot of years now. And to find something new just doesn’t happen that often. So I feel like I’ve done something good when I’ve found a Mustang that makes even hard-core Mustang veterans stop and look. Once in a while I’ll get a note or an email from a reader who really enjoyed something in Mustang Magazine. That’s what I dig. Curt, our publisher, signs my check, but I’ve always felt like the reader is the boss. He’s the guy I’ve really got to please. If the reader’s happy, most of the rest falls in to place. If the reader isn’t happy, you’re in for some rough seas, no matter what else is “right.” I haven’t seen it all, and I don’t know it all. My Ford books know a lot, and I know a few experts who know a lot. Those are my most trusted sources. But they don’t know it all either. To know it all, or even to know more than the next guy, is not the goal. Knowledge is knowing. Wisdom is

knowing what to do with your knowledge. Wisdom is better than knowledge. I’m wise enough to know that I haven’t seen it all. So I try to use my ears more than my mouth. From what I’ve observed, the operation of the mouth is usually in inverse proportion to the capacity of the brain. Like seeing a falling star, every once in a while I’ll find something new and amazing. It’s kind of like studying the cosmos. Just when you think you’ve got something figured out, you learn about a black hole, or dark matter, or that a solar flare can be 10 to 20 million degrees kelvin, or that at the Big Bang the universe is estimated to have been around 10 billion degrees kelvin. It’s enough to keep yourself humble.


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For those who wish to achieve a higher Concours correct repro is exact in every level of detail with your concours car these way. Each contour, dimension and slot has been precisely recreated. Even the stamped wiper hoses are a must have. These hoses originally had ribbing on the side that is part number is correct where required. distinct when compared to the replacement Finished off with beautiful chrome plating. smooth hose. These kits have been 67 Shelby, early two piece welded style, pair ..... 5255-8A $324.95 reproduced with the correct ribbing. 65-66 ..................... 17543-1B $24.95 67 Shelby, late one piece stamped style, pair ..... 5255-8B $324.95 67-68 ..................... 17543-2B $26.95 69-70 ..................... 17543-3B $21.50 68 Shelby, pipe in pipe style, pair ..................... 5255-9A $374.95 71-73 ..................... 17543-4B $22.50

TIE ROD, 1965-66 260, 289

New reproductions feature correct forgings that utilize a correct style boot with metal ring and a smooth lower cover without a zerk fitting as required for concours judging. Outer, M/S, 2 reqd ... 3A130-4C $118.95 Inner, M/S, 2 reqd .... 3A131-2C $142.95 Outer LH, P/S .......... 3A130-3C $124.95 Outer RH, P/S.......... 3A130-4C $118.95 Inner, LH, P/S .......... 3A131-1C $142.95 Inner RH, P/S .......... 3A131-2C $142.95

Modern gauges mounted to a custom backing plate. “Units are sold without the dash bezel allowing the customer to add the bezel that matches the rest of their interior.” Black face/white numerals, 140 speedo W/o tach ................... 10848-8BA $560.95 w/8,000 rpm tach ...... 10848-8BB $710.95 White face/black numerals, 160 speedo W/o tach ................... 10848-8CA $560.95 W/10,000 rpm tach ... 10848-8CB $710.95 Black face/green numerals, 140 speedo W/o tach ................... 10848-8DA $560.95 W/8,000 rpm tach ..... 10848-8DB $710.95

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Nearly concours correct. This unit is exact in every way to the original except that it is missing the correct Ford logo. 68-73 200, 250, 289, 302, 351, 390, 428............... 12A091-8A $54.95

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ISSUE 19 MUSTANG MAGAZINE

9


YOU GOTTA SEE THIS

HAIRY AND HARRIER Captain M. Andrew “TAC” Tacquard sent us this high-powered pic of his hairy ’66 Mustang coupe alongside a couple of other hot rods, USMC Harrier Jump jets. He bought the Mustang while in high school in 1994 and did the work himself, pausing only for deployments. The extensively updated Mustang runs a 383inch Windsor, A5 manual trans, and 4.30:1 9-inch rearend. Captain Tacquard obviously appreciates the finest flying machines. Photography by Mauricio Campino

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ISSUE 19 MUSTANG MAGAZINE

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YOU GOTTA SEE THIS

UP IN THE AIR Danny Towe launches his ’70 SportsRoof Mustang on three wheels during qualifying at the Nostalgia Muscle Car class at the 2012 NMCA Atlanta event. Danny’s run a best of 11.30 at 117 mph with his Harland Sharp roller rocker–equipped 393 engine, backed by a Performance Automatic PowerGlide. This same Mustang propelled Danny’s wife, Suzanne, to her Fun Ford Weekend Open Comp Championship in 2005. Photography by Keith Keplinger

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ISSUE 19 MUSTANG MAGAZINE

13


DALLAS MUSTANG.COM

MUSTANG PARTS AND ACCESSORIES

1964-2012

PUBLISHER CURT PATTERSON curt@pattersonpublishing.com EDITOR TOM SHAW tom@themustangmagazine.com MANAGING EDITOR BRANDON PATTERSON brandon@pattersonpublishing.com COPY EDITOR LAURA BURKE ART DIRECTOR PHILIP PIETRI

CELEBRATING

GRAPHIC DESIGNER DANIEL BARCELO CIRCULATION DIRECTOR JASON JACOBS jason@pattersonpublishing.com MUSTANG NATION / EVENTS DIRECTOR JASON JACOBS jason@pattersonpublishing.com

CLASSIC PARTS FOXBODY RESTORATION PARTS PERFORMANCE PARTS FULLY STOCKED WAREHOUSE KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES STAFF CUSTOM TUNING SHOP SERVICES

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WEB MARKETING BRANDON PATTERSON brandon@pattersonpublishing.com ADVERTISING SALES TEAM CURT PATTERSON JASON JACOBS BRANDON PATTERSON OFFICE MANAGER DEB PATTERSON ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CHRISTINE WILSON CONTRIBUTORS MICHAEL GARLAND MARK JEFFREY JIM KREUZ JIM SMART PUBLISHED BY PATTERSON PUBLISHING CURT PATTERSON JASON JACOBS BRANDON PATTERSON STEVE BROWN Mustang Magazine is published bimonthly by Patterson Publishing, P.O. Box 41, Lakeland, FL 33802. Subscription Rates (bimonthly frequency): U.S. 6 issues; $20. Canada add $15 per year for postage. All other countries add $25 per year for postage. U.S. Funds only. Allow 4-6 weeks for new subscriptions. Send address change to Mustang Magazine, Customer Service, P.O. Box 41, Lakeland, Florida 33802. Customer Service (877) 279-3010. “Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and lean not on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge Him, and He will direct your paths.” -Proverbs 3:5-6


ISSUE 19 MUSTANG MAGAZINE

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N EWS

MARTI AUTO WORKS SERVICE CENTER MUSEUM GRAND OPENING Talk about a good day at the office. Kevin Marti, columnist for this magazine and the man behind Marti Auto Works, recently unveiled his company’s new Service Center Museum and corporate offices — a replica of a Ford dealership’s Parts and Service Department, 1960s’ style. “The idea for a Ford dealership service and part museum started when I was 17 and collected my first Ford banner,” Kevin says. “Through the years, I have traveled the country collecting Philco-Ford, Rotunda, Autolite, and FoMoCo products, parts, parts counters, equipment, signage, and literature from the 1960-1970 years.” Also featured is a 1960s’ Coke machine that, like all the other equipment, is in working order. For the grand opening, Kevin and Shelli Marti invited guests from all over the country for a tour and luncheon. The Marti Service Center Museum is part of a new home for Marti Auto Works that will eventually house all departments of the company. More info: www.martiauto.com

NEW ITEM! MCA UPDATE John Dettori, New York-based member of the board of the Mustang Club of America, will be providing regular news from the MCA. While many readers are MCA members, many are not, and this regular update will keep us all up to speed on what’s going on with the world’s largest Mustang club. Mustang 50th Celebration: By now you’ve heard that two simultaneous shows, East and West, have been announced for the Mustang’s 50th birthday celebration, scheduled for April 15-20, 2014, and hosted by the Mustang Club of America. All Mustang enthusiasts are welcome and can come to the event of their choice. Here are the facts: • Pony Drives: April 12-15, 2014: Mustang, Oklahoma, to both Concord, North Carolina, and Las Vegas, Nevada • East Show: April 16-20, 2014: Concord, North Carolina, at Charlotte Motor Speedway (vendor setup 4/15) • West Show: April 16-20, 2014: Las Vegas, Nevada, at Las Vegas Motor Speedway (vendor setup 4/15)

SHELBY PROTOTYPE? Is this a long-lost Shelby concept car destined for the Texas market? A combination high-performance two-seater that could also haul a few square bales and a spool of barbed wire would certainly be popular with the ranchers here in Lake Jackson, Texas, where this photo was taken. Factory options might include a gun rack, trailer hitch, spotlight, and heavy-duty bumpers. OK, maybe it isn’t a prototype. But maybe this good-looking Ranchero should have been. — Jim Kreuz

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In addition to a Grand National car show, swap and vendor presence, and performance events, optional crosscountry Mustang Pony Drives are being organized the week before from several areas of the country to meet up in Mustang, Oklahoma, where an event is being organized (details TBD). Mustang, Oklahoma, is equidistant between Charlotte and Las Vegas Motor Speedway, about 1,100 miles to either show. Working with local clubs, Ford dealers, and Mustang related business, the Pony Drives cover 300-400 miles per day, picking up Mustang enthusiasts en route. Check the MCA website (www.mustang.org) for more information as the event draws near. Start making your plans now! — John Dettori More info: www.mustang.org


ISSUE 19 MUSTANG MAGAZINE

17


N EWS CHUCK McARTY’S LUCKY BLUE DOT FIND “I wanted to send you some pictures of my recent find,” writes our friend Chuck McArty from Champaign, Illinois, original owner of the ’65 GT350 on the cover of Issues 8 and 16. “It’s a picture of my original spare Blue Dot tire. I wore out four full sets of Blue Dots racing at Elk Hart Lake, Wisconsin, from 1965 to 1966. I ran out of money and stopped racing after 1966. I parked it in the garage with bald Blue Dots. Then Goodyear stopped making them.” Chuck managed to hang on to his original spare all these years and wanted something suitable in which to display it. “I ended up at our Goodyear store, asking for the manager, the old guy. I told him the story about the spare and that I was looking for a tire stand from the ’60s with the blue face and Goodyear logo. Well, he showed me some of the new plastic ones. Then he got thinking and said, ‘I’m going upstairs.’ Well, he was up there for at least twenty minutes and then came down with his hand behind him. He said, ‘I think I found what you are looking for,’ and handed it to me. I just about fell on the floor. It was a metal ’60s stand. He uncovered it from under a pile of stuff. After I recovered, he said that it was the only one up there. My hand was in my pocket to pay him for it, but he said, ‘Take it. It’s free.’ Prayers answered, thank you God!” Nice score, Chuck. And it couldn’t happen to a nicer guy.

MISSING SHELBYS, ISSUE 16 – COLD CASE SIGHTING From reader Tom Baker: About the ’69 GT500 of Connie Kreski: In the mid-1970s I was a participant in the Pan American Rally. The rally started in the Los Angeles, California, area on a Friday night and ended in Ensenada, Mexico, the next day. After we arrived in Ensenada, a group of us toured the city. One of our stops was Hussong’s Cantina. When we left the Cantina, we continued our tour and one or more of us saw a gray primered ’69 or ’70 Shelby parked at the curb. We thought it odd that such a newer car was painted gray. We looked at the car and did not see any body damage except for a few door dings here and there. However, something struck us as odd — there were specks of pink showing through near the door dings and other places. The only one we knew of that was pink was Connie’s. One of our “tour” group was involved in U.S. law enforcement, and he wrote down the VIN to see if it was stolen. If I remember correctly, the car had Mexico plates on it, which struck us as odd. When we got back the following week, he was able to trace the VIN and found it was listed as stolen from the U.S. He was able to contact Connie, and she told him that her agent or business manager or whoever the person was, took the car as “payment due.” That was the last she saw of it. None of us heard anything further about it as the info was turned over to other agencies to handle.

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AUCTIONS AMERICA ON THE NBC SPORTS NETWORK Auctions America’s California and Auburn Fall auctions were televised live this August and September on the Emmy Award-winning NBC Sports Network, and streamed live via NBC Sports Live Extra, reaching more than 80 million homes with fast-paced, gavel-pounding action. The California sale highlights included a ’64 Shelby 289 Cobra that sold for $825,000.


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Standard round head-like original. Complete with mounting screws and pads. ER-198 USA Made .......$38.95 ea. ER-1981 USA Made with Convex Glass ..$48.95 ea. ER-710 Import ..............$21.95 ea.

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Gas Tanks Rear Leaf Springs

Restore your ride height with new springs. Correct tapered and rounded leafs like original. SU-42 ......................... $119.95 pair

The “real deal”. These are the best ones available. We don’t even handle the cheap ones. It’s not worth it. ER-258 65-68 with Drain ........... $99.95 ER-290 69 with Drain ............. $109.95 ER-565 70 with Drain ............. $109.95 ER-5651 70 without Drain ........ $122.95 ER-549 71-73 .......................... $144.95

Mustang: Fifty Years - Celebrating America’s Only True Pony Car Great new “must-have” hardcover book from long time editor of Mustang Monthly, Donald Farr. LT-172.................... $37.50

American Racing Torq-Thrust D Wheels

Great looking wheels for any Mustang! HB-23 15 x 7 ......$179.95 ea. HB-58 14 x 6 ......$159.95 ea. Chromed & polished versions ISSUE 19along MUSTANG MAGAZINE available with other wheels. 19


N EWS

FORD MUSTANG 50TH ANNIVERSARY (TO BE CELEBRATED APRIL 17, 2014) Bob Fria, author of the excellent book Mustang Genesis, sends along this clarification of the Mustang I’s role in the overall Mustang development.

DREAM PIPES NOT A PIPE DREAM Of all the thousands of parts being created in the aftermarket for vintage cars, why no upgraded exhaust manifolds? We’re left to choose between restrictive OEM cast-iron manifolds or headers, which flow better but look nothing like factory pipes. From the United Kingdom, Alan Faulkner-Stevens has addressed that longrunning deficiency with these beautiful hand-fabricated manifolds, made from T304 stainless steel, which keep the clearances and fit of the originals. Alan is a former Aston Martin engineer, now specializing in concours restoration in the U.K. He’s been developing 427/428 engines and upgrading them, but he ran into a power bottleneck. “The problem with the 427 heads is the exhaust manifold bolt pattern which does not match the Police Interceptor/390GT manifolds,” he says. “Shelby used 427 Fairlane manifolds on his Super Snake, but had to cut the inner steelwork to get clearance. I wanted exhaust manifolds which allowed the use of 427 heads in a standard ’67-’68 engine bay, cleared the Z-bar, and hooked up to a standard exhaust system.” Is this an idea whose time has come, or just more hot air? More info: Alan Faulkner-Stevens Workshop phone: 01908 551131 faulknerstevens@brinternet.com www.dragonwheelsrestorations.co.uk

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In the spring of 1962 a concept two-seat roadster was developed by Ford under the direction of Lee Iacocca to test the waters of public perception. The concept car was named “Mustang” and was unveiled at Watkins Glen Raceway in New York on October 5, 1962, 50 years ago. The two-seater was fully operational and was driven around the track for the press by Dan Gurney. Small in size, the Mustang was shown around the United States and did a tour of Europe. Upon tour completion, it was spirited away to storage by Ford, not to be seen publically again until 1980 when it was displayed at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan, where it currently resides. The concept name “Mustang” was chosen by its designers, symbolizing the American horse. One proposed name, “Mustang,” taken from the P-51 Air Force fighter, was quickly eliminated from consideration and never used on any Ford car in that context. This two-seat concept’s equestrian name, Mustang, was dropped after the completion of the concept showing and was never again used by Ford to name any Ford car. The production four-seat Mustang design had already been approved for build on September 10, 1962, one month before this concept two-seater was ever shown to the public for the first time. We now know this little concept car, which became known as “Mustang I,” was merely a styling and marketing exercise, never considered for production, and had nothing to do with the soonto-be-produced production four-seater, coincidentally also with its own unique, separate, name derivation of Mustang.


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AUCTION RESULTS

GOING ONCE, GOING TWICE… LOT

YEAR

MODEL

ENGINE/TRANS (CODE)

COLOR

HIGH BID

SALE

SN909

1965

Coupe

289 / auto

TH244

1966

Convertible

289 / auto

TH357

1966

Coupe

66

1965

F182 163

FROM

white

13,200

Yes

Russo and Steele

Signal Flare Red

25,850

Yes

Russo and Steele

289-2V / auto

black

18,700

Yes

Russo and Steele

Fastback

289 / auto

Arcadian Blue

25,300

Yes

Barrett-Jackson

1965

Fastback

289 / auto

blue

17,250

Yes

Mecum Auctions

1965

GT350

289-4V / 4-speed

white

170,000

Yes

RM Auctions

131

1965

GT350R

347 / 4-speed

white

730,000

Yes

RM Auctions

33

1966

Coupe

351 / auto

red

14,850

Yes

Barrett-Jackson

F108

1966

Coupe

289 / auto

white

15,500

Yes

Mecum Auctions

42

1966

Coupe

289 / 3-speed

red

19,250

Yes

Barrett-Jackson

735

1967

Convertible

390 / 4-speed

green

51,700

Yes

Barrett-Jackson

455

1967

Fastback

289 / 5-speed

gray

60,500

Yes

Barrett-Jackson

F458

1967

Fastback

289 / auto

green

28,600

Yes

Russo and Steele

762

1968

GT500

428 / auto

Acapulco Blue

330,000

Yes

Barrett-Jackson

736

1969

Fastback

428 / 4-speed (R)

Acapulco Blue

70,400

Yes

Barrett-Jackson

TH352

1969

Mach 1

427 / manual

Candyapple Red

42,900

Yes

Russo and Steele

TH304

1969

Mach 1

351 / 5-speed

red

37,950

Yes

Russo and Steele

771

1970

Boss 429

429 / 4-speed

Grabber Blue

209,000

Yes

Barrett-Jackson

S87

1970

Fastback

428CJ / auto (R)

red

64,000

Yes

Mecum Auctions

722

1970

Mach 1

428CJR / 4-speed

green

66,000

Yes

Barrett-Jackson

T162

1972

Convertible

351C / auto

Bright Red

17,000

Yes

Mecum Auctions

633

1972

Mach 1

351C / 3-speed (H)

Goldenrod Yellow

18,700

Yes

Barrett-Jackson

101

1973

Convertible

351CJ / auto

Tangerine

27,500

Yes

Barrett-Jackson

F212

1973

Mach 1

351C / auto (Q)

silver

18,000

Yes

Mecum Auctions

’72 MACH 1 - SOLD – $18,700

This ’72 Mach 1 has its original 351 Cleveland engine with three-speed manual transmission, power steering and power disc brakes. It also has the optional stripe package and both spoilers. This was the last year for the smaller bumpers. According to the Marti Report, there were only 413 of these cars made with the color combo of Goldenrod Yellow and Ginger interior. Barrett-Jackson – Palm Beach 2013 – Lot 633 photo courtesy of Barrett-Jackson Auction Co. LLC © 2012 Barrett-Jackson

’67 FASTBACK - SOLD – $60,500

Here’s a restored ’67 fastback that’s equipped with a 289 crate engine with small cam, five-speed transmission, roller rockers, ceramic chrome headers, X-pipe, coilover suspension, upgraded sway bars, rebuilt Baer Shelby disc brakes, 17-inch wheels, Cobra dress-up kit, and Pro Scat seats. Barrett-Jackson – Palm Beach 2013 – Lot 455 photo courtesy of Barrett-Jackson Auction Co. LLC © 2012 Barrett-Jackson

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’70 BOSS 429 - SOLD – $209,000 Listed as Kar Kraft #2347, this ’70 Boss 429 has lots of original, hard-to-find parts, including its smog equipment, carburetor, radiator, interior, trunk, and more. It’s equipped with a matching numbers motor, four-speed transmission and rearend. The original BOSS 429 block is included. Documented by two original build sheets and a Marti Report, this car is reported to be one of only 500 factory built for 1970.

Barrett-Jackson – Palm Beach 2013 – Lot 771 photo courtesy of Barrett-Jackson Auction Co. LLC © 2012 Barrett-Jackson

’73 CONVERTIBLE SOLD – $27,500

’66 COUPE SOLD – $15,500

’69 MACH 1 SOLD – $42,900

This ’73 convertible started out as an F-coded 302cid with C4 automatic. It now bears a “Reconstructed” title, which means the car was rebuilt after having prior flood damage. After a complete teardown, the car was updated with a 351-4V Cobra Jet motor, functional Ram Air, C6 transmission, 1,900-rpm torque converter, stainless steel dual exhaust with turbo mufflers, aluminum underdrive pulleys, poly bushings, and stainless steel brake lines and fuel lines. The interior is has been upgraded with new upholstery, and seats from an ’02 Mustang.

Powered by a 289ci engine, this restored ’66 coupe has a C4 automatic transmission, power steering, A/C, Styled Steel wheels, factory-look AM/FM stereo, and new top and interior.

This ’69 Mach 1 has a 427ci stroker engine with a factory rating of 450 hp, manual transmission, rebuilt 9-inch differential with 3.89 gears, limited-slip differential, and rack-and-pinion steering. Stopping is handled by the cross-drilled and slotted four-wheel power disc brakes. The restored interior features a new dashpad, door panels, carpet, seat upholstery, and upgraded gauges.

Mecum Auctions – Kansas City, MO 2013 – Lot F108

Russo and Steele Scottsdale, AZ 2013 – Lot TH352

Barrett-Jackson Palm Beach 2013 – Lot 101 photo courtesy of Barrett-Jackson Auction Co. LLC © 2012 Barrett-Jackson

SOURCES

AUCTIONS AMERICA BARRETT-JACKSON GOODING & CO. MECUM AUCTIONS RM AUCTIONS RUSSO AND STEELE SILVER AUCTIONS

(260) 927-9797 (480) 663-6255 (310) 899-1960 (815) 568-8888 (519) 352-4575 (602) 252-2697 (800) 255-4485

WWW.AUCTIONSAMERICA.COM WWW.BARRETT-JACKSON.COM WWW.GOODINGCO.COM WWW.MECUM.COM WWW.RMAUCTIONS.COM WWW.RUSSOANDSTEELE.COM WWW.SILVERAUCTIONS.COM ISSUE 19 MUSTANG MAGAZINE

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O NLINE FINDS

DEALS FROM THE WEB ’68 COUPE

FOR SALE – ASKING $13,500

This Golden Nugget Special Mustang featured special yellow paint along with the louvered hood and black stripes. This one has the original 200 straight six-cylinder motor with automatic trans, power steering, and manual brakes. The seller has all of the original paperwork and says the car has been garage kept and is in great condition. Asking $13,500 OBO on www.mustangclassifieds.com/mustang-6523.html.

’69 COUPE

FOR SALE – ASKING $12,500

Up for sale is this ’69 light blue coupe with black vinyl top. It’s a 302 automatic with console and power steering. Equipped with all new chrome, tires, rims, and radiator, it does have factory air but needs a new compressor. The seller says the car has won ten trophies. Offered at $12,500 on http://mobile.craigslist.org/cto/3918779670.html.

’72 COUPE

FOR SALE – $6,750 OBO

Powered by a 5.8L 351 Windsor V-8 and four-barrel carb, this ’72 coupe is currently being used as a daily driver (except during the winter). It has newer seats, carpet, and dash. The seller also has some extra parts for the car, including starter, alternator, extra driveshaft, etc., and says the coupe was recently stripped to the metal and primed for body preservation. Asking $6,750 OBO on http://denver.craigslist.org/cto/3957918408.html.

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Prices Prices are subject Prices are subject Prices toarechange subject Prices are to change subject without are to Prices change subject without toare notice. change subject without to notice. change without tonotice. change without notice. without notice. notice.


SHOW COVERAGE & EVENTS

CARLISLE 2013 The big Ford Nationals | story by Michael Garland and Tom Shaw

C

arlisle is a major Ford event anticipated throughout the year. Ford aficionados of every stripe and tribe flock to the fairgrounds in the historic town where George Washington’s troops once assembled. But for 2013 it was power of a more mechanical sort that drew crowds for what Carlisle Events bills as “the biggest and best all Ford-themed event in the world.” Despite a Friday rainout, over 45,000 attendees and 3,000 Ford and Ford-powered cars rolled in to the event grounds for a weekend of special guests, autocross, demo rides, onsite installations, seminars, tons of cars and parts for sale, and the most amazing display of Fords and Mustangs in one place. Once Friday’s weather cleared, Saturday and Sunday ran at a heavy pace. Located just outside the Carlisle fence line, Building G, the “old dealership,” gets special displays that change each year. This year it was packed with Hi-Po cars, including Comets and Fairlanes. Within the Carlisle fence line, Building T was a hotspot, displaying a wide variety of vintage Ford power, including a Shelby Super Snake, various rods — one with 427 Cammer power

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— and even a Ford farm tractor. and even a Ford farm tractor. Saturday, the lines formed early — before 7 a.m. — for admission and the inside action. Formula Drift Champion Vaughn Gittin Jr. signed autographs and delighted crowds with drifting exhibitions. Mustang icon Steve Saleen welcomed enthusiasts for seminars, and elsewhere, the Carlisle beauty contest and burnout competition kept interest levels high. Ford offered test drives and ride-alongs in its Raptor truck to demo its new offerings, and attendees were invited to register for a Raptor lease-giveaway to be held in September. Sunday, Charles Kelly won the drawing for a Ford crate engine as crowds continued to pore over the many goods at the expansive swap meet. Not far away, under cover of roof, those looking to buy a vintage Ford had a lot to choose from at the pavilions. Another great Carlisle event goes into the books as preparations are already underway for next year’s big milestone. Ford Carlisle 2014: June 6-8, Mustang’s 50th Anniversary


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Quality in the Name... Quality in the Products

1969 - 1970 Mustang Throttle Pedal Assembly Shown

Voted Runner Up 2011 SEMA Show Best New Interior Accessory Product Billet Aluminum Tremec Shifter Levers for TKO 500 and TKO 600

1964 - 1970 Mustang Throttle Pedal Assemblies & Pedal Pads - Available in Brushed or Black Finish

® Polished Hi-Tech Throttle Cable Kit

Like us on Facebook! fb.com/lokarinc © 2012 Lokar, Inc.

Quality… Plain & Simple ® 1-877-469-7440 • www.lokar.com ISSUE 19 MUSTANG MAGAZINE

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SHOW COVERAGE & EVENTS

EVENTS SEPTEMBER

10.4 – 10.5 JENKS, OK

10.18 – 10.20 PANAMA CITY BEACH, FL

9.21 BOSSIER CITY, LA

MUSTANG ROUND-UP

Ron Watkins; 918.510.7612 www.greencountryclassicmustangs.com

25TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

20TH ANNUAL MUSTANG STAMPEDE

Thomas Monahan; 318.797.8385 www.rrcmc.com

9.21 TEXARKANA, TX

20TH ANNUAL MUSTANG STAMPEDE Mac McLaughlin; 903.293.1595 www.4statesmustang.com

9.21 ASHLAND, VA

MUSTANG & FORD SHOW

Kathy McWilliams; 804.557.0105 www.centralvamustang.com

9.21 OWENSBORO, KY

MUSTANG ROUND-UP

David; 270.925.1977 www.owensboromustangs.com

9.22 LONG BEACH, CA

MUSTANGS AT THE QUEEN MARY

10.5 GALVESTON, TX

Fred Miller; 850.276.0441 www.baymustangclub.com

FALL OPEN SHOW 2013

10.26 SEFFNER, FL

Ray Coe; 832.264.8466 www.mcoh.org

10.5 MYRTLE BEACH, SC

MUSTANG STAMPEDE & ALL FORD SHOW

Steve Smith; 843.685.4002 www.carolinamustangclub.com

10.5 MEMPHIS, TN

MUSTANG AND FORD SHOW

MUSTANG, SHELBY AND FORD ROUNDUP

Mark Morley; 813.417.2483 www.mustangcluboftampa.com

10.26 SAVANNAH, GA

“WORLD FAMOUS” MUSTANG & CLASSIC FORD SHOW Mark Davis; 912.659.6511 www.savannahmustangclub.com

Mike Cunningham; 901.672.5112 www.mustangsofmemphis.org

10.27 SAN ANTONIO, TX

10. 6 WARWICK, RI

Paul Read; 830.537.3606 www.samustang.com

MUSTANG & FORDS ROUND-UP & SWAP MEET Info Line; 508.674.5462 www.mccne.com

CHARITY OPEN CAR SHOW

10.27 LANCASTER, PA

MCCP COVERED BRIDGE CRUISE Mike Cole; 610.733.8547 http://home.epix.net/~mjcole/ Bridge%20Cruise%20Home.htm

Jon Schultz; 562.498.2262 www.mustangsatthequeenmary.com

10.12 WILMINGTON, NC

9.22 WILMINGTON, DE

Kurt Miller; 910.265.8265 www.sencmc.webs.com

NOVEMBER

10.13 HOT SPRINGS, AR

PONIES UNDER THE PALMS MUSTANG & FORD SHOW

MUSTANG AND FORD SHOW Tim Narvell; 302.545.7934 www.firststatemustangandford.com

9.28 MOUNT JULIET, TN

MUSTANG AND ALL-FORD SHOW Johnny Myers; 615.513.1275 www.musiccitymustangclub.org

9.28 CHARLOTTE, NC

MUSTANG & ALL FORD SHOW Ray Michue; 704.617.3696 www.ponytales.org

9.29 LACEY, WA

PONIES IN THE PARK www.mustangswest.com

OCTOBER 10.3 – 10. 4 PORT ARANSAS, TX

CRUISE TO MUSTANGFEST Island Tom; 210.399.7500 www.mustangfest.org

10.3 – 10.6 BOWLING GREEN, KY

NMRA WORLD FINALS Jeff Taylor; 949.784.9061 www.nmradigital.com

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ALL FORD CAR & TRUCK SHOW

MCA REGIONAL SHOW

Mike Pate; 501.681.7462 www.centralarkansasmustangers.com

11.24 SARASOTA, FL

Elaine Lunkes; 941.704.4474 www.mustangclubofwestcentralflorida.org


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T RAVEL

ANNUAL EVENTS

NATION 1 SHELBY SPRING FLING Nashville, IN May

2 ALL FORD CAR SHOW AND SWAP MEET Des Moines, IA June

3 SHOW AND GO Dearborn, MI June

4 BRANSON MUSTANG RALLY Branson, MO June

5 MUSTANG AND ALL FORD SHOW Grand Rapids, MI June

6 MUSTANG AND FORD SHOW Elyria, OH June

7 NMRA

Milan, MI June

8 MUSTANG AND ALL FORD WEEKEND Sellersburg, IN June

9 RACE TO INDY ALL FORD SHOW AND SWAP Indianapolis, IN June

10 NMRA/NMCA SUPER BOWL OF STREET LEGAL DRAG RACING Joliet, IL July

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Midwest Edition A DIRECTORY FOR MUSTANGERS, BY MUSTANGERS Welcome to Mustang Magazine’s regional directory of the Mustang world, which includes parts vendors, restoration and mechanical shops, shows and events, great diners and restaurants, roadside attractions, races, drive-ins, and just plain old neat things.

11 MUSTANG AND FORD SHOW

21 ALL FORD & MUSTANG CAR SHOW

Elyria, OH July

12 MUSTANG ROUND-UP AND ALL FORD CAR SHOW Alton, IL July

13 MCCI @ MID AMERICA MOTORPLEX Pacific Junction, IA July

14 ALL FORD CAR SHOW Springfield, MO August

15 A DAY IN THE PARK Bourbonnais, IL August

16 MUSTANG & FORD SHOW Elkhart, IN August

17 MUSTANG MEMORIES ALL FORD CAR SHOW AND SWAP Dearborn, MI August

18 MUSTANG & ALL FORD SHOW Springfield, IL August

19 ALL MUSTANG CAR SHOW Akron, OH September

20 MUSTANG & ALL FORD SHOW St. Louis, MO September

Birch Run, MI September

ATTRACTIONS

MUSTANG

22 ABRAHAM LINCOLN PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY & MUSEUM Springfield, IL (217) 558-8844

23 CINCINNATI ZOO & BOTANICAL GARDENS Cincinnati, OH (800) 944-4776

24 FORD MOTOR CO. Dearborn, MI (800) 392-3673

25 FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT HOME AND STUDIO

26 GATEWAY ARCH RIVERFRONT St. Louis, MO (877) 982-1410

27 HENRY FORD MUSEUM Dearborn, MI (313) 982-6001

28 INDIANAPOLIS MOTOR SPEEDWAY Indianapolis, IN (800) 822-4639

29 MALL OF AMERICA Bloomington, MN (952) 883-8800

30 ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM Cleveland, OH (216) 781-7625

Oak Park, IL (708) 848-1976

ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM, Cleveland, OH


44

MINNESOTA

34

45

41

67

40

29

WISCONSIN

72

MICHIGAN 58 39

13

21 5

IOWA 2

50

35

42

69 52

54 7

25 10 38 53

46

49

16

27 24 17 3 66 57 11 6 30

43

15

ILLINOIS

64

59

19 60

22 18 33

48

71

MISSOURI

36 26

65

20

56

28 9

73

INDIANA 12 55 68

1 63

47

51

70 23

OHIO 37

8 62

61

14 32 31 4

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T RAVEL 31 TITANIC MUSEUM

45 TOWN TALK DINER

Branson, MO (800) 381-7670

32 VETERANS MEMORIAL MUSEUM

St. Cloud, MN (230) 257-7900

35 COMET CAFE Milwaukee, WI (414) 273-7677

36 CONNELLY’S GOODY GOODY DINER St. Louis, MO (314) 383-3333

37 JIM DANDY’S FAMILY BBQ Sharonville, OH (513) 771-4888

38 LOU MITCHELL’S Chicago, IL (312) 939-3111

39 MARTIN’S BRANDENBURG

Edwardsville, IL (800) 327-2897

47 AJE RACING

56 MUSTANG MUSCLE

N. Vernon, IN (800) 877-7233

High Ridge, MO (636) 677-9987

48 DANA FORRESTER AUTOMOTIVE FINE ART

57 NATIONAL PARTS DEPOT

Independence, MO (888) 755-8388

49 IDIDIT

Tecumseh, MI (517) 424-0577

50 INLINE TUBE

Shelby Township, MI (586) 582-1338

51 K.A.R. AUTO GROUP Columbus, OH (800) 341-5949

52 KENNY BROWN

Rolling Meadows, IL (855) 847-4477

53 MONEYMAKER RACING La Porte, IN (219) 861-1214

Canton, MI (800) 521-6104

MUSTANG RESTORATION SHOPS

34 CIATTI’S RISTORANTE

55 MUSTANG CORRAL

Cedar Rapids, IA (319) 366-7817

MUSTANG PARTS

RESTAURANTS

Kansas City, MO (816) 231-1123

Plymouth, MI (734) 455-5807

46 VERNON INN

Branson, MO (417) 336-2300

33 ARTHUR BRYANT’S BBQ

54 MRT

Minneapolis, MN (612) 722-1312

58 BOB PERKINS RESTORATIONS Juneau, WI (920) 696-3788

59 BUCKEYE AUTOMOTIVE RESTORATION Berlin Center, OH (330) 997-0090

60 DVS RESTORATIONS Crawfordsville, IN (965) 361-1822

61 ED MEYER HI-PO FORD PARTS & RESTORATION Huntingburg, IN (812) 536-3673

Salem, IL (618) 912-1032

64 McCOART’S AUTO Somerset, IN (765) 981-4342

65 MID AMERICA CLASSIC MUSTANG St .Charles, MO (636) 946-4444

66 MROZ MUSTANG RESTORATION Redford, MI (313) 465-6307

67 MUSCLE CAR RESTORATIONS

Chippewa Falls, WI (715) 834-2223

68 MUSTANG CORRAL Edwardsville, IL (800) 327-2897

69 MUSTANG RESTORATIONS

Cincinnati, OH (513) 791-1087

St. Paul, MN (651) 698-0259

71 R&A MOTORSPORTS

41 OLD POST OFFICE RESTAURANT

Lee’s Summit, MO (816) 246-9094

Ephraim, WI (920) 854-4034

72 SHELBY PARTS & RESTORATION Green Bay, WI (920) 434-3645

42 ROSIE’S DINER Rockford, MI (616) 866-3663

73 TOUCH-N-GO COLLISION AND RESTORATIONS

43 SOUTH SIDE SODA SHOP Goshen, IN (574) 534-3790

Carmel, IN (317) 846-6718

44 SYL’S CAFE

MUSTANGMAGAZINEONLINE.COM

63 MARION COUNTY MUSCLE CARS

70 PAUL’S AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING

40 MICKEY’S DINING CAR

34

Evansville, IN (812) 897-2890

E. Dundee, IL (847) 428-9889

Waverly, IA (319) 352-9170

Ontonagon, MI (906) 884-2522

62 GOEBEL’S PERFORMANCE CORNER

HENRY FORD MUSEUM, Dearborn, MI


Scott Drake Quality Comparison Featured Product: Concours Exhaust Tips

Brand X.

Scott Drake. Painted tubing looks great and helps prevent rust.

Unpainted raw tubing with unsightly seam degrades rear-end appearance and promotes rust. Sloppy welds look ugly and can fail.

Clean, precise ultra-durable welds.

Low-grade stainless steel tip.

Premium-grade polished stainless steel tip.

Improperlyaligned tip and incorrect rear tubing contour create installation problems and often require alterations.

Low-quality louvered baffles are incorrect depth and use non-OE glossy paint.

Large, uneven gap between tip edge and incorrect-shape lip.

Shown: Concours Exhaust Tip Part# C5ZZ-5255-PRO

Correct tip angle and rear tubing contour ensure easy installation and a balanced, symmetrical look.

Lip is OE-look and tightly-fit into tip edge.

High-quality louvered baffles are concours-correct depth and have OE-look matte finish.

“See the Find your Dealer: Difference, 1-800-999-0289 www.scottdrake.com Ask for youtube.com/DrakeAutoGroup Scott Drake� facebook.com/ScottDrakeFans Watch Scott talk about the Drake difference! Scan the mobile code above or visit youtube.com/DrakeAutoGroup

A Division of

ISSUE 19 MUSTANG MAGAZINE

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N EW PARTS CLASSIC FASTBACK SKELETON Thoroughbred International has released the ’65-’66 fastback skeleton. Available as full replacement skeletons or as a Clipster, the skeletons are assembled in the United States and finished in red primer, like the originals. Thoroughbred International www.thoroughbredgt.com (330) 533-0048

SMALL-BLOCK FORD HEADS WITH SHAFTMOUNTED ROCKERS The latest from Jon Kaase Racing Engines are these smallblock Ford Windsor heads with shaft-mounted rockers. They’re designed for oval track, road race, and track-day demands that require high-speed valvetrain stamina and stability. Jon Kaase Racing Engines www.jonkaaseracingengines.com (770) 307-0241

AFTERMARKET CLEVELAND ENGINE McKeown Motorsport Engineering offers an aftermarket Cleveland engine called “Titus.” These are larger-displacement blocks, available in aluminum or cast iron, with deck heights of 9.2 inches or 9.5 inches and with bore sizes ranging from 4.00 inches to 4.20 inches. McKeown Motorsport Engineering www.mmeracing.com (301) 932-9292

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DRIVESHAFT SLIP YOKES Performance Automatic announces one of the latest editions to its Ford Performance Transmission line of parts, this Driveshaft Slip Yoke. Designed to complement the company’s Ford Street Smart System, all of the yokes are made from forged steel and designed to exact OEM specs. Performance Automatic www.performanceautomatic.com (240) 439-4650


LIGHTED DESKTOP DISPLAYS Speedometer Art transforms ’50s and ’60s speedometers into lighted desktop displays. Now available is this early-model Mustang dash display that’ll keep you dreaming about driving your classic Mustang even while you’re at work. Speedometer Art www.speedometerart.com (317) 840-0941

WATER SPOT REMOVER Meguiar’s new Water Spot Remover is an easy-to-use, multisurface formula, designed to help remove water spots. There’s no longer a need to use detailing clays or compounds to clean water spots. Works on paint, hard plastics, chrome, metals, and glass. Meguiar’s www.meguiars.com (800) 347-5700

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SECOND LOOK JOHNNIE AND RACHEL GARNER TURNED THUMBS-DOWN ON THIS ’64½ CONVERTIBLE. THEN THEY RECONSIDERED story and photography by Tom Shaw

L

ooking at it now, it might seem farfetched that anyone wouldn’t fall in love with this spectacular ’64½ convertible Mustang, the essence of pure pony-car joy. But Rachel Garner remembers that when she first saw it in June 1996, it didn’t exactly set her world aflame. “I was involved at the time with a Bible study,” Rachel says, “and I was carpooling with a friend. I saw a car covered up in her garage and asked to see it. It was a ’64½ Mustang convertible sitting up on blocks. She said it belonged to her son-in-law, and he needed to sell it. The inspection sticker was dated 1994, so the car hadn’t been on the road since then.” Distressed merchandise in long-term storage… From a negotiating standpoint this is looking pretty good. There were condition issues, too. “The interior was missing some parts, and the car needed some minor work,” observed Rachel, an experienced Mustanger who knows how to size up a project. “I came home and told Johnnie [husband] about it, but we weren’t planning on buying another car,” she says. So it looked like the deal was off. But the idea had been proposed, and even though it was dismissed out of hand at first, it was now in that all-critical period of “percolation,” the silent reconsideration. You think about the money. You think about garage space. You think about the money. You think about how the car’s equipped. You think about what it would feel like to drive and how you’d look behind the wheel. This is how an idea percolates. Sometimes the process takes

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seconds, sometimes month, or years. In this case, it took days. “A few days passed, and Johnnie decided to get a look at the car,” Rachel says. So when he goes to look at a car he’s already declined, you know the percolating is percolating in the right direction. As Johnnie investigated, he found out that the owner had all of the missing parts, along with five new tires, a battery, and lots of other stuff. If you’re already leaning in that direction, some unexpected good news like discovering a cache of parts is all you need to push the deal over the top. “So,” Rachel says, “he made an offer, and the car was trailered to our home.” Johnnie took a week of vacation from work to wrench on the car and try to get some basic assembly completed. With his strong mechanical skills and prior Mustang experience, the simple ’64½ came together well, and it was quickly running and showing up at local Mustang shows. Johnnie and Rachel were already members of the Carolina Regional

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1

2

3

4

5

6

Mustang Club, and joined the MCA and AACA, but they knew the car would need some spiffing up to be competitive at those shows. So Johnnie rolled up his sleeves and began bringing the workmanship up to spec. Some paint had to be redone. Some overspray had to be scrubbed off of the convertible top. The D-code 289 4V engine was pulled and detailed with factory black paint (blue engines began in 1966), and a new exhaust system was installed. The undercarriage was detailed, too, the goal being to be competitive in MCA’s Concours Driven class. Inside, the interior got new, correct-for-’64½ carpet, upholstery, door panels, and paint on the steering column. That was winter-spring 1996. That March, it was time to take the wraps off their newest addition. At an AACA national show in Venice, Florida, the transformed Mustang won its first Junior award, but it wasn’t done. “On our way home we stopped at a show in Riverview, Florida, and won the Best Interior trophy,” Rachel says. Well, they were off to a good start. From there, the Rangoon Red convertible began hitting the shows and racking up an impressive list of wins, working its way through the Junior, Senior, and Preservation awards in AACA, and Gold classes in MCA. After winning most

A FEW ITEMS UNIQUE TO THE ’64½ 1. Generator, not alternator

7

8

2. Brake light switch on master cylinder 3. Vents stamped into radiator core support 4. Hood edges different 5. Distributor has oiler port 6. Hood bumpers have Philips screw in middle 7. Door lock knobs are different shape, molded in color 8. Spare tire bolt is straight

9

10

9. Hood hinges black, not gray phosphate plated 10. Window crank and door handle are clip-on For a complete list of unique ’64½ features, visit www.early-mustang.com.

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everything there was to win, the car took a breather. “At the Grand National show in Charlotte, North Carolina, Labor Day weekend 2002, we retired the car from competition,” Rachel says. But it wouldn’t stay retired. Rachel says, “In 2006, MCA’s Conservator class was implemented for previously retired cars that have earned twenty points and those cars that have earned a blue grille medallion. This class is judged for cleanliness, condition, and workmanship. After ten shows you receive the Conservator d’Elegance trophy, the highest award MCA can bestow upon one of its members. In 2011, a white grille medallion was implemented to go along with the trophy.” The Garner’s Mustang won the Conservator d’Elegance trophy at Augusta, Georgia, in 2007. Even though this car shines like a new penny, you might be surprised to learn that it’s still driven to the shows, often across long distances. “We enjoy driving our Mustangs and going to shows,” Rachel says. “The ’64½ has been driven over 80,000 miles just to shows since 1997.” Johnnie and Rachel drive together, switching off with each tankful. If their car looks familiar, there’s a good chance you’ve seen it at one or more of the shows, or you may have seen it on the MCA’s official 2012 show shirt. From sitting on blocks in a garage, disassembled under a cover, to racking up more trophies than you could stuff in the trunk, Johnnie and Rachel Garner’s superb ’64½ has been living out the best existence a vintage Mustang could hope for. All because of the power of percolation and that second look. 44

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BRANDED: Fran and Becky Cosentino’s almost-extinct Branded ’67 story and photogra phy by Tom Shaw

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(above) photos by Fran Cosentino

S

o there you are, a used-car manager at a modest dealership in a midsized town in the Midwest. You’ve got a dab-and-a-half of Brylcream in your hair, thick plastic-rimmed glasses for visual acuity, a pair of ballpoint pens and a pack of Tareytons in the pocket of your Sears’ Best white button-down shirt, with matching black Haggar slacks, Ban-Lon socks, and black Oxfords. You, sir, are ready to write contracts, sell the dickens out of cars, and conquer your $84-a-month mortgage payment with money to spare. Down the boulevard a couple of blocks, arch-rival Chevrolet has, after only three years, finally received its first few shipments of GM’s much anticipated pony car to take on Ford’s wildly successful Mustang. You’re used to having the “youth market” to yourself, and it’s not going over well in your office that people are dropping by the Chevy dealership to have a look while your used Mustang inventory remains on the

books for yet another week. You’re the sales manager. You’re supposed to have an answer for this. In fact, you do. Responding to a recent merchandising mailer from Ford, you pick up the phone and dial D for Dearborn, Michigan, and order a six-pack of cardboard tubes, one for each Mustang on your lot that’s overstaying its welcome. Each tube contains a spiffy makeover to jazz up a plain exterior, easily installed by a couple of guys in the garage who could probably use something to do anyway. The kit-in-a-tube contains vinyl-top material in one of several patterns, metal C-pillar moldings for the edge of the vinyl top, a pair of Western-themed “Branded” medallions, and a pair of “Thoroughbred” body side stripes of complementary color. Once installed, the kit transforms a Plain Jane into a looker with a strong new identity, and it works for new cars as well as used.

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THE BRANDED KIT Fran Cosentino is surely the foremost keeper of Branded Mustang knowledge. He says, “I have instructions, Thoroughbred stripe identification charts, order form, invoices from DSI, a copy of an introduction ad in a dealer publication, two Branded Mustang ads, and a copy of an ad in the Washington Post dated July 17, 1968, introducing Shelton Ford’s exclusive ‘California Mod Mustang.’ It’s a Branded kit without the emblems. I also have a pair of promotional Branded cufflinks.” His research shows that the Branded Mustang kit was used by dealers on new and used Mustang coupes. It could also be ordered for ’65-’66 coupes. Fran opened up a Branded Mustang shipping tube to reveal its contents. To convert a Mustang into a Branded Mustang, here’s what you got.

SHIPPING TUBE Standard heavy cardboard, with printed “Branded Mustang” sticker and mailing label. Kits were sent from DSI Corp., Plymouth, Michigan, directly to Ford dealers.

VINYL-TOP MATERIAL

C-PILLAR MEDALLIONS Two C-pillar medallions in either black and gold, or black and silver. They were marked left and right, and there was one for each side — they were not interchangeable. Each had the horse running forward.

It’s precut, hand-sewn vinyl in one of 15 different colors or patterns. Fran says, “The tops are all different and range from ‘pretty cool’ to ‘butt ugly.’”

SIDE STRIPES Called “Thoroughbred” stripes in the installation instructions, these precut stripes, ten to a kit, came in five colors: red, white, black, blue, or gold.

VINYL-TOP C-PILLAR MOLDINGS These were installed at the base of the roof pillar. They carried a Ford part number too, and were attached by three polished sheetmetal screws.

It was a promotion that seemed to quickly disappear from the radar screen — maybe there weren’t many made, maybe they lacked a national sales push, maybe they were usually found on low-end Mustangs that were ignored in favor of bigger V-8s, or maybe they were forgotten because they never showed up on factory window stickers. Whatever the reason, the Branded Mustang had just about slipped into permanent forgottenness for most of us. But at least one guy was on to the mystery and hot in pursuit of its answers. “I’ve always been a lover of oddball cars,” says Fran Cosentino. “Not just rare, but rare and different.” You can tell a lot about a man by the cars he admires. It’s amazing what you can find if you just know what to look for. Fran kept his eyes open for the oddball. “I’m always on the lookout for cars and parts, and once in a while it leads me to one of these specials, and in this case, a Branded Mustang Special,” he says. Such was the case eleven years ago. Fran was buying parts online for a ’68 Cougar XR-7G. A Canadian dealer was helping his grandfather sell a large cache of N.O.S. parts. They’d come up for sale on eBay, but the seller wasn’t really sure what the parts were.

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SCREWS

TWO CANS OF VINYL-TOP MASTIC Two steel pint cans of glue for installing the vinyl top.

For attaching the medallions and lower moldings to the C-pillar.


BRANDED VINYL TO PS WERE “LOUD” AND CAME IN ONE OF 15 COLORS AND PATT ERNS.

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Fran kept checking back to make sure he didn’t miss something good. “One day, while looking through his listings, I came across one for a Branded Mustang kit,” Fran says. “I had to take a look.” Inside, the contents of the kit were something pretty wild. “It was a crazy-looking, black-and-white vinyl top, with white stripes, emblems, and various other pieces in a shipping tube.” Fran was a regular on a website for special-edition Mustangs, so he scoured online sources to see what kind of information was available about a Branded Mustang. “I checked Don Hughmanick’s  website for special-edition Mustangs,  www.limited600mustang.net, and did quite a bit of searching on the Internet,” he says. “I found bits and pieces of info, but no cars.” Intrigued, Fran bought the kit anyway, though he wasn’t sure what to do with it. Continuing to scour the Web for info, he found a few more kits, and then decided he wanted to find the right car on which to install one. It would’ve been easy and completely proper to buy any plain Mustang and kit it, but Fran aimed higher. “I decided to see if I could find an original Branded Mustang,” he says. “After years of searching, I finally found one in Texas. It had been sitting

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out in the Texas sun, and the occasional hailstorm, for years. It was all there, but it was a bit ‘crispy,’ so to speak. The stripes were mostly there, and the emblems were attached to the C-pillars. Some of the Branded top was still there, but what was visible was bleached by the sun. It didn’t run and the interior was shot, but it was mostly rust-free and it was a Branded Mustang. I wasn’t going to pass it up.”   Fran made the deal and dropped off the rough but rare coupe with Russ Turack of RST Restorations in Wyano, Pennsylvania, with directions to fully restore it down to the last nut and bolt. Eighteen months later, the job was done, and the Burnt Amber coupe was ready to represent a virtually lost chapter of Mustang history, launching a thousand questions from amazed enthusiasts who thought they knew just about every wrinkle there was in Mustang history. We caught up with it at Fords at Carlisle 2012, where it drew a lot of attention and generated plenty of buzz. For now, Fran and Becky enjoy showing their rare Branded Mustang, and raising eyebrows. The kit was originally supposed to stir up attention for some of the more easily overlooked Mustangs on the lot. Mission accomplished.

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THESE ARE FRAN’S PROMOTIONAL BRANDED MUSTANG CUFFLINKS.

CALLING ODDBALL MUSTANGS! A display of Special Edition Mustangs is set for the 50th anniversary at Carlisle in 2014. To have your car considered for the display, contact Fran at fcosentino@cprmedical.com. Polish your fenders, mark you calendars, tell your oddball friends!

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LEGEND SERIES #19

1967 BRANDED MUSTANG

OWNER: FRAN AND BECKY COSENTINO LOWER BURRELL, PENNSYLVANIA photography by Tom Shaw

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The

RADICAL Craig Waltjer loved the ’69 SportsRoof, but factory issue would never do

story and photography by Tom Shaw

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C

raig Waltjer works around jet aircraft, but after looking at his radical ’69 Mustang, that’s probably not surprising. If you look hard, you can likely find a stock part here and there — the sill plates, dashpad, maybe a bracket or two. But that’s it. Everything else is modified and/or upgraded. Even at startup, it sounds like an aircraft. Craig hits the power switch, and your heart starts pumping. Then you hear the starter, but it’s not the sound of an old-style starter. It’s a modern, high-torque model with highly engineered gear reduction for high-compression engines. But all of the

electronics and modern systems are in sync, because the engine — an FE-based, mega-cube, 532-incher — fires right up, runs smooth, and sounds ferocious. The prelims aren’t over, however. With the engine running, there’s another wave of clicking and whirring as relays and pumps within the suspension lift the body up off its superscraping, cockroach-crushing level in preparation for rollout. It’s an experience you might associate with advanced robotics or a university science lab, but no, it’s a city park in Sturgis, South Dakota. Craig has just finished the car and is on

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his first outing to the Sturgis Mustang Rally. He’s good enough to spend some time before our cameras and asks if we want the body all the way down. “Uh, yeah, guess so,” we mumble, not really understanding what he’s asking. As he shuts the engine off, we watch the body drop over the large wheels, and then we get it. There’s a midway point at which the air suspension “deflates” to if it’ll be restarted soon; then there’s the full drop at which it’s too low to drive. But it sure looks tough. This exotic ’69 is the culmination of a long-term hankerin’ for a Mustang. “I wanted a Mustang all the way back to my high school days, when my brother had a ’66 K-code fastback and a good friend had a ’69 Mach 1. The ’69 fastback was my favorite,” Craig says. College, marriage, career, and children kept the Mustang dream on the back burner for a long time, but when Craig’s brother bought a ’70 Mach 1 and started a restoration business, the flame was ignited. “I decided it was time for me to get a classic Mustang,” Craig says. He wasted no time scouring the Web for the right car. “I was looking for a ’69 Mach 1 big-block S-code (390 4V) car to restore back to original. I saw an ad on eBay for a 390 Mach 1 S-code northeast of Dallas, about 4½ hours away. It had been sitting outside, covered up, for eight years.” But it was no creampuff. “The car was mostly rust-free, but the body was rough,” Craig says. “Someone had installed a 351 Cleveland engine with a small-blockpattern C6 automatic. The intake manifold was off, and the engine was seized from the years of exposure. I purchased it at a good price for a rust-free, big-block car.”

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This isn’t your run-of-the-mill, mildly modded Mustang.

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Once home, Craig ordered a Marti Report and learned some surprising background. “The Mustang was a GT,” he says. “Now I had a decision to make. Do I restore it as a Mach 1 clone, as I originally wanted to, or go in a different direction?” It was then that he decided to skip the GT and Mach 1, and do something completely different. Lacking the skills and facilities for what he had in mind, Craig shipped the car to his brother’s restoration shop — Muscle Car Creations, in Tea, South Dakota. There, his brother Rod Waltjer and shop manager Greg Scheepstra would transform the tattered project into a radical beast.

“I knew I had to replace the 351C with a big-block that the VIN boasts,” Craig says. “I decided to go with the engine of the era, the Ford FE.” Good reasoning. Cressman Enterprises, a top engine builder in the Sioux Falls, South Dakota, area and known for their successful racing engines, was chosen and given the goals. “I want it fast but reliable, streetable, and able to run on pump gas,” Craig told them. Cressman came through big on this key portion of the build. “They gave me just what I wanted,” Craig says. “The engine made right at 600 hp and 640 lb-ft of torque, all under 5500 rpm. Making

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500 lb-ft of torque just off idle makes this car an absolute blast to drive. I’m also pleased that even in the Houston heat, idling with the A/C on, the engine has no overheating issues.” The body is all steel and retains most of its original styling. But the rocker panels are extended lower, door handles and drip rails are shaved, and don’t tell the feds, but the side marker lights are removed, too. It’s all covered in a glossy coat of Velocity Red Pearl paint. Up front, Ride Tech Strong Arms suspension

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and a ShockWave air-ride system provide the sizzling stance and wheel control. Steering has been upgraded to a Randall’s rack-and-pinion and an Ididit column. Rear suspension is a Ford 9-inch rearend (one of the few factory parts retained) with 3.70:1 Ford Racing gears in a Detroit Locker differential, and big 31-spline axles, mounted by a RideTech AirBar 4-Link system. Baer Brakes with 13-inch rotors and ABS provide major braking power. Wheels are Bonspeed Huntington, 19x8 front, 20x8 rear,

with General Exclaim tires, 245/35/19 front, 295/30/20 rear. The interior is extensively updated, too, with ’08 Mustang seats in period-look upholstery installed by Seats by Stitch, Auto Meter carbonfiber gauges, a Momo steering wheel, and a custom console built by Craig’s dad. This isn’t your run-of-the-mill, mildly modded Mustang. It’s a wild visionary ride, pushing the boundaries. What else would you expect from The Radical?


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GALVESTON, H

OH GALVESTON

H

MESSIN’ WITH TEXAS IN A ’66 SHELBY CLONE story and photography by Jim Kreuz

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G

len Campbell would have loved to join us as we took a short jaunt up the Texas coast to historic Galveston. The sun was shining and a cool breeze was blowing off the Gulf of Mexico. It was a perfect setting to listen to some nice music, but not in this instance. Any singing on this ride would have been drowned out by the rumble of our ’66 Hertz Shelby Mustang. Sorry Glen, but that’s a tune you just can’t beat. While some of you were shoveling snow last winter, my darling wife and I — dressed in shorts and T-shirts — hopped into a dream high-performance auto and took off on an empty stretch of road with unobstructed views of the ocean. Before I go too far, let me set the record straight. My ’66 Shelby is actually a clone, yet it could fool all but a few — the Shelby American Automobile Club (SAAC) Registrars would raise a flag in less time than a quarter-mile run in our ride.

This Candyapple Red with gold stripes Shelby “wanna be” has all of the same items Carroll Shelby added to his famous fleet, with the exception of a Shelby American VIN. It looks like Shelby. It handles like a Shelby. But the purchase price didn’t hit the wallet like a Shelby. We pulled over for lunch in Surfside, a community 30 miles south of Galveston, right on the coast, and ate at the Red Snapper. Their seafood is exceptional, but their chicken fried steak is what most rave about. The waitstaff is fun to interact with, and they help make the dining experience memorable. The Red Snapper is almost at the water’s edge. If you drop the “Shelby” below 2,000 rpm, you can actually hear the surf crashing, but we didn’t get to experience that sound too often on this trip. The road has a few twists and turns. Leaving Surfside and heading north, we came upon a slowmoving vehicle. It took little effort to quickly kick in the four-barrel and glide past, on to more open road.

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TOP: The Red Snapper Inn is located 30 miles south of Galveston, just off the beach in the community of Surfside. My mouth waters whenever someone mentions this restaurant. LEFT: As a result of the effects of hurricanes and land subsidence, portions of the beach south of Galveston have eroded to the point that at high tide the water comes close to the highway. Off in the distance the waves break, rarely reaching the height that attracts surfers. BOTTOM LEFT: Woody’s is a local favorite watering hole located just off the beach, south of the Galveston seawall. My son goes by the name Woody, so I had to add a T-shirt to my purchase this day. BOTTOM: Sand, salt grass, and shrimp boats. We must be in Galveston.

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Downtown in The Strand District, where there’s plenty to do and lots to eat and drink.

Almost immediately after accelerating, my wife’s urgent finger began pointing toward the “45 MPH” sign, but it did little to spoil the fun. One grin from the driver and she gave up. Next stop — Woody’s Bar. We were a bit early for the afternoon crowd, so a front-row parking place was an easy snag. The beer was cold and the barmaids were, well, let’s just say they’re the main attraction. Did I forget to mention it’s an open-air bar, with no A/C, so the bartender gets a workout serving all those drinks? Two minutes after leaving Woody’s we were up on the Galveston Sea Wall, a 17-foot-high concrete edifice erected in 1902 to ensure

that a repeat of the 1900 hurricane would not cause similar devastation. Evidence of this storm that took almost 8,000 lives can be found throughout this tiny island. As we passed the San Luis Resort hotel on the Sea Wall, I glanced at the World War II concrete gun emplacement that still remains on the front of the hotel’s grounds. The hotel’s Sunday brunch is “to die for,” but it’s not on today’s agenda. We then turn west and head toward the touristy part of town, The Strand, where the main commerce was carried out back in 1900, and horse carriages and trolleys still operate today.

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OUR RIDE

Source Code

CM13

‘65-70 Shelby Mustang ‘65-73 Mustang

‘74-04 Mustang

‘05-Present Mustang

‘67-73 Cougar

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Everything is here on this ’66 Hertz Shelby — small-block (302 instead of 289) Hi-Po with aluminum high-rise intake; Holley four-barrel; solid lifter cam; Windsor heads; Tri-Y exhaust; Flowmaster mufflers; four-speed trans; traction bars (just forward of rear wheels visible below the chassis); Koni shocks; Monte Carlo bar (just forward of the carburetor); aluminum Cobra valve covers; Shelby grille; hoodscoop; functioning rear-brake scoops (ducts route air from scoops mounted rear of the doors to the rear drum brakes for cooling); front-wheel disc brakes; dash-mounted tach; Shelby steering wheel, gas cap and racing seatbelts; Magnum 500 wheels; and triangle cut-out windows on each side. All standard on a ’66 Shelby Mustang. One added feature is the A/C. And no rust. We’ve owned this beauty for almost two years, purchased from one of the best Shelby restoration shops in the country, Billups Classic Cars in West Siloam Springs, Oklahoma, for $32,000. It’s my dream car. Carroll Shelby built 1,001 Shelby Mustangs for the Hertz rental car company in 1966, and only 85 of these came equipped with a four-speed. Hertz figured out early on that only the automatic transmission would hold up to the abuse the renters were inflicting on them. Most (800) were painted black, with 50 each painted blue, green, Wimbledon white, and Candyapple red. All Hertz cars came with gold stripes. The designation below the front fenders, “GT350 H,” indicates this vehicle is a Hertz (H) Shelby (GT350).

This car handles like a dream, and the four-speed with a high-ratio 9-inch Ford rearend makes it hard to take off without spinning the tires. Turning the ignition key also ignites a driver’s grin.

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The interior would fool most Shelby experts, with the Shelby tach, steering wheel, racing seatbelts, four-speed, and disc-brake pedal. Even the clutch pedal is heavy when depressing, typical of a Shelby.


Hungry while in Galveston? Try the Lunchbox Cafe just off The Strand.

For us, the shortest distance between two points that contain hundreds of gorgeous Victorian-styled homes is not a straight line — it’s a zigzag course. My wife and I have restored four old homes, but none that compare to these gems. All were at least two stories, with lots of gingerbread trim. And they appeared to be as well maintained as our Shelby. If you love these types of homes — most are survivors of the 1900 hurricane or built shortly thereafter — then Galveston is your cup of tea. The low rumble of the Hi-Po at 20 mph just adds to the experience. I don’t ever want to turn off the key. After the home tour, we arrived at The Strand, an area that encompasses approximately a five-block by three-block area. There are shops, restaurants, and businesses on the ground floor, and residences in the floors above. Most of the buildings are from the pre-1900 hurricane era, red brick with lots of architectural details. Here you can find just about anything: street performers, new and vintage clothing, new and dusty books, and the Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory — a must-stop for us. Try their chocolate-covered peanuts and freshly squeezed lemonade, or a chocolate shake. You can work off the calories waxing your Mustang. There were plenty of folks along the elevated sidewalks in this part of town, and most of the guys gave us the thumbs-up as we drove by. Was it for my “trophy car” or my “trophy passenger?” It’s better to give than receive, unless you’re the on the receiving end of all this attention. How I would’ve loved to own this car in high school. Better late than never, right? It was finally time to head on home. What a day. I can’t wait to return to this breathtaking island — a place that looks even better through a “Shelby” windshield.

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EIGHT-BARRELS for EIGHT BORES

PART 2: Trans Am Racing takes this 347-8V stroker to the dyno

by Jim Smart | photography by Jim Smart and Mark Jeffrey 70

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I

n our last issue, we showed you the way to a 347ci small-block stroker with eight-barrel Holley carburetion. We have to admit to being thrilled with a project like this because it’s a sweet slice of yesterday when multi-carburetion, stinky hydrocarbon emissions, and the loud roar of American horsepower got people fired up on Saturday nights. In this issue, Mark Jeffrey of Trans Am Racing buttons this puppy up and heads to the dyno at Westech Performance to give it a whirl. Let’s face it, this isn’t a 347 for the daily commute, but it sure provides its share of eyewash for cruising spots, car shows, and magazines. Time to find out what this twin 4V stroker can do with a mix of old-fashioned and new-fangled technology.

>>>

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1 1. When you add elements like a stud girdle and windage tray to an engine’s bottom end, be prepared for clearance gremlins you hadn’t counted on, which is why it’s best to do an engine mock-up before final assembly. Trans Am Racing’s Mark Jeffrey has to grind some meat off the oil pump to clear girdle, main stud, and crankshaft counterweight. However, he must take care not to grind through the pump housing.

2

2. Even if you’re building a stone-stock small-block Ford, never use a stock oil pump shaft. Use a heavy-duty piece like this ARP oil pump shaft for added insurance. As with the pump, check shaft clearances.

3

3. Mark opted for a Cobra T-pan from Tony D. Branda. Like the oil pump, the pan must also be clearanced. It must clear the stud girdle and windage tray. Pan baffle doors need to be checked for smooth operation. They must close in hard turns to keep sump oil around the pick-up, yet open as we enter the straights.

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4

4. Mark checks Cobra T-pan clearances before permanently installing the pan. What makes clearances tricky is the main stud girdle.

5 5. Lubricated roller tappets are installed and centered with dog bones. The “UP” speaks for itself, though you’d be surprised how many get this backward.

6

6. Spider studs are installed next using a high-heat thread locker. There are two approaches to spider security. You may use safety wire and castle nuts or high-heat lock nuts along with a thread locker because you can never be too careful here. Loose hardware can do a tremendous amount of engine damage.

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PROPER VALVE ADJUSTMENT

Valve adjustment doesn’t have to be a mystery, and every technician has his own approach. Mark suggests getting both lifters at both valves closed on the heel of each cam lobe at compression stroke, then, twirling the pushrod while tightening the adjustment. You will need a 5/8-inch deep well socket. When the pushrod cannot be turned with fingertips (but not too tight), tighten the adjustment one-half turn. Valve adjustment is best performed with a primed engine, meaning all oil galleries and lifters are loaded with engine oil. Once all sixteen valves are adjusted, go back and check all of them again by hand cranking the engine in firing order. Rocker arms should be slightly loose, but not loose. After you fire the engine for a break-in cycle, check valve adjustment again.

7

7. Mark has port-matched intake ports including a blueprint gasket match. He uses The Right Stuff around water jacket passages. Spray gasket adhesive is used elsewhere to ensure proper positioning before manifold installation.

8

8. Before the engine is fired, Mark primes the oil system, running the oil pump (counterclockwise) while observing pressure and flow. He has 60 pounds cold, which is excellent. We’re ready for start-up.

DO A MOCKUP

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Mark strongly suggests a mock-up, especially when you’re building a stroker. A mock-up is a fit check of everything — a trial run where the engine is assembled without piston rings, lubing cylinder walls and bearing journals, hand-cranking the engine to see what clears and what doesn’t. It’s common knowledge that most stroker kits will not clear the block without block modifications. Cylinder skirts must be notched to where opposing rod bolts will clear on the go-around. Another clearance issue with strokers is the camshaft. Will your stroker’s rod journals clear the camshaft? Ditto for counterweights which don’t always clear. This is why a mock-up is so important. You must have at least 0.060 inch clearance to allow for thermal expansion. Other mock-up issues include valve-to-piston clearances, pushrod and rocker arm clearances, valvespring coil bind, and intake manifold to cylinder head angles and gaps. All must be checked well before final assembly.


9

9. Our dual-quad 347 is dyno ready, primed, static tuned, and good to go. We like the nostalgic demeanor of this good-looking stroker, which is headed for a customer’s ’65 Shelby GT350 replica fastback.

PESKY DETAILS

There’s an old saying, the devil is in the details. It is those pesky details that can bite you when it’s time to fire an engine. Freeze and oil galley plugs must be secure. Even the most reputable builders use shallow freeze plugs and secure them with a silicone-based sealer. This can become trouble when they pop out at high rpm. Use the deepest freeze plug you can find and secure it with sealer. Mark uses JB Weld. Allow the JB Weld to cure for 24-48 hours. Cam plugs should also be secure with JB Weld for best results. Where possible, use screw-in oil galley plugs.

Use the deepest freeze plug available and secure with JB Weld. Ditto for the cam plug, which can be a problematic leaker. Always install screw-in oil galley plugs where possible. We don’t give ignition wires enough thought, but they can cause huge performance headaches if you’re not careful. If you don’t believe us, fire your engine and turn off the lights, then, observe your engine in the darkness. Crossfire is subtle, but it happens. And when it exists, you will see tiny arcing between ignition wires. Route ignition wires parallel and at least one inch apart for best results. ISSUE 19 MUSTANG MAGAZINE

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THE POLYGRAPH ROOM

There’s always a certain amount of apprehension when you put a new engine on the dyno. Even the most seasoned engine builders feel nervous because they’re trying an untested element. And even if their techniques are extremely methodical, there are always defective parts from time to time that can fail despite their best efforts. Mark goes to a dyno room with confidence because he is detailed with his engine building. When our 347-8V roared to life on Westech Performance’s dyno, it barked with authority and spooled to 2500 rpm for the warm-up and break-in process. Warm-up and break-in are important because oil temperature must be at least 140 degrees F

before you start leaning on an engine. We want good oil splash and fog before pinning the butterflies. We also want good ring and bearing seating, which comes primarily when we do a loaded 5000rpm pull to perform a spark plug reading to gauge carburetor jetting before really getting down to business. Once Mark is confident of carb jetting, it’s time to confirm power output with real numbers from Westech’s dyno room. When we dyno test an engine, we’re loading the engine with a computer-controlled water brake. In other words, we load the engine hydraulically and pin the throttles wide open. Then, we gradually ease the load and allow the engine to rev with a predetermined maximum rpm setting.

PULL 1 - The first pull is set for 5500-rpm maximum, which nets 411.2 hp at 5500 rpm and 394.9 ft/lbs of torque at 5200 rpm. Jetting is 0.62

primaries and 0.67 secondaries with a 6.5 power valve in the primary carburetor. “We made our first pull a 3600- to 5500-rpm sweep to take a baseline picture after initial calibrations,” Mark says. “Another point to this pull is to see how these carburetors work together. Our initial ignition timing is 32 degrees BTDC total advance. The nice things about our heads are their fast burn chambers, which enables us to run less total timing and more compression.” PULL 1 RESULTS: HORSEPOWER - 411.2 hp @ 5500 rpm | TORQUE - 394.9 ft/lbs @ 5200 rpm “This is what dyno testing is all about,” Mark says. “The engine isn’t always going to respond favorably to calibrations. What works with one doesn’t always work with the other. Talking about differences in jet sizes can be confusing for the average person. A #70 is actually 0.073 inch. A #74 is 0.080 inch, and so on.” Mark stresses the importance of this understanding and that one jet size change can be quite significant.

PULL 2 - Pull 2 is actually Pull 6 made after some false starts and tuning issues. Ignition timing remains at 32 degrees BTDC. One thing

Mark noticed on the first few pulls was secondary vacuum spring calibration. Secondaries were not opening fully, which greatly hindered power numbers. “I swapped the secondary vacuum spring to the lightest tension to enable improved secondary operation,” he says. “You have to think like a Sherlock Holmes in the dyno room.” With this, Mark picks up 6 hp and 6 ft/lbs. PULL 2 RESULTS: HORSEPOWER - 417.3 hp @ 5500 rpm | TORQUE - 401.1 ft/lbs @ 5200 rpm

PULL 3 - Pull 3 is about jet sizing, the meat and potatoes of power increase. Primary jet sizing increases from 0.62 to 0.64, and now for the pull. “Remember,” Mark says, “jet size numbers aren’t always a guarantee of actual jet size.” We’re going to take the 347-8V to 6500 rpm and watch this puppy make power. We gain 28 hp and 5 ft/lbs of torque with a jet swap. PULL 3 RESULTS: HORSEPOWER - 445.2 hp @ 6400 rpm | TORQUE - 396.8 ft/lbs @ 5100 rpm

PULL 4 - Pull 4 is actually Pull 11 with some Westech style tuning improvements. Steve Brule of Westech Performance tweaks the ignition

timing to see what happens — first to 34 degrees BTDC with no noticeable difference in power. Then, an unheard of retard to 28 degrees BTDC with no real change in power. Steve advances ignition timing to 30 degrees BTDC for an astonishing improvement of 7 hp and 9 ft/lbs of torque. Tuning is complete, and we have a 347-8V with 452 hp and 405 ft/lbs of torque. PULL 4 RESULTS: HORSEPOWER - 452.0 HP @ 6400 rpm | TORQUE - 405.0 ft/lbs @ 5100 rpm

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CONCLUSION Through Mark’s efforts with this Trans Am Racing 3478V stroker, we learn something important about power. When it comes to making power, you can’t have it all with a carbureted engine. If you want great low-end torque for the freeway, you’re going to sacrifice horsepower. And if you want screaming high-end horsepower for weekend racing, you’re going to give up torque. What Mark has achieved here is a nice compromise between horsepower and torque, with torque coming on strong at 5000 rpm and horsepower peaking at 6400 rpm. Although torque peaks at 5100, we have a nice strong torque curve that begins around 2500 and walks hand in hand with horsepower the rest of the way. As you might expect from a high-performance

V-8, horsepower and torque happen around the same time between 5000 and 6500 rpm. Mark credits this performance to a lot of research time in the dyno room at Westech, including time on the flow bench doing port work determining what works and what doesn’t. He learned that a nice gasket port-match along with cam and rocker arm selection did the trick, yielding 452 hp /405 ft/lbs. Mark tips his hat to L&R Automotive, which does all of his machine work. Another point about power we tend to forget is internal frictional loss. L&R understands exactly what Mark needs and wants from machining tolerances, which reduces internal friction significantly.

SOURCES AMK PRODUCTS | 800 Airport Rd. | Winchester, VA 22602 | (540) 662-7820 | www.amkproducts.com CALIFORNIA PONY CARS | 1906 S. Quaker Ridge Pl. | Ontario, CA 91761 | (888) 225-7669 | www.calponycars.com CRANE CAMS | 1830 Holsonback Dr. | Daytona Beach, FL 32117 | (866) 388-5120 | www.cranecams.com EARL’S PERFORMANCE | 15827 Hawthorne Blvd. | Lawndale CA 90260 | (310) 542-0856 | www.anplumbing.com L&R ENGINE | 13731 Bora Dr. | Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670 | (562) 802-0443 | www.lnrengine.com TRANS AM RACING | 13307 S. Manhattan Pl. | Gardena, CA 90249 | (310) 323-5417 | www.transamracing.net WESTECH PERFORMANCE | 11098 Venture Dr. | Mira Loma, CA 91752 | (951) 685-4767 | www.westechperformance.com

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D IAGNOSTIC DETECTIVES

THE CASE OF THE NO-FLY-BY WIRE story and photography by Tom Shaw

A

fresh Mustang with the ever-popular 289 V-8 — it starts, it purrs, it’s a joy to drive. You bond with the engine in a man-andmachine kind of Vulcan mind-meld that only car enthusiasts experience. It’s first love, automotive edition. It gets you there, and you’ve come to trust it. In return, you watch the gauges closely, check the fluids regularly, and won’t let your teenagers drive it. So out of nowhere, the 289 develops a hiccup in its otherwise flawless road manners. It starts as an intermittent cough, then gets more common and less intermittent. Predictably, the cough progresses to a full stall and hard-to-start situation, especially in the rain. It’s getting worse. What do you do? You open the distributor and examine the points, which appear to be OK. They’re not burned or loose. It acts like an electrical problem, but of all the wires in the car, how do you begin to narrow down the culprit? A multi-meter would be a great place to start, but your eyes might be just as useful. Sometimes the meters can just confuse matters. Or use both. The meter confirms that you’re getting voltage to the distributor. The points are opening and closing, energizing the coil. Hopefully. But how do you know for sure? It’s time to start digging deep for answers.

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The ever-popular 289 V-8.


D IAGNOSTIC DETECTIVES

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2 The meter reports that there is voltage to the distributor, which switches the points switch off and on. When current flows across the points, a big magnetic field develops around the coil. When the points open, current stops flowing, and the magnetic field collapses inward, generating voltage in the coil’s secondary windings, which are ultimately connected to the spark plug. The voltage is very high because the plates in the coil are big. The spark jumps the gap in the plug, and boom, you’ve got yourself a power stroke.

3

4 Check the ground strap in the distributor. It’s one of the last electrical links, and a loose screw or bad connection here will certainly kill your ignition. All was well here, too, but we cleaned the surfaces and reinstalled it just to be sure.

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Wouldn’t you know that when you drag out the meter, everything checks out fine? Wiggle the wires to see if you can re-create the problem and find the short. The terminals are old and worn, but are still making good connections.

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When coils fail, it’s all internal. They leave no visual clue whatsoever. You can check it with a meter and make sure there is continuity from BAT to IGN terminals, but just to be on the safe side, a sure-fire fix is to replace it with one known to be good, at least for the moment.


D IAGNOSTIC DETECTIVES

5

6 It seems like plug wires never get fully seated into the distributor cap. The coil wire, going from the coil to the center terminal in the distributor cap, is the only bad connection that could render the engine completely inoperative. The others would just kill one cylinder. Occasionally, corrosion can eat away a terminal, resulting in no connection and no spark to the cylinders, but that was not the issue here.

7

8 It’s time to look beyond the distributor and coil, and examine the wires and terminals in the engine compartment.

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We’ve eliminated some of the most common sources of ignition failure. Now we’re getting into head-scratching time.

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A sharp visual inspection turned up a spot where the wire had rubbed against the snorkel of the breather and eventually rubbed through all the insulation, creating a short. When the wire flexed to a position that contacted the snorkel, the ignition went dead. The fix was a simple retape and a zip-tie to secure it to the inner fender. With that, the engine was once again healthy, happy, and hitting on all cylinders. The joy was back.


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R ESTORATION The Fix-It Doc ERS DIY APPROVED

Chris “The Doc” Ingrassia is a long-time restorer and host of the OperationMustang.com web show. His series of restoration articles in Mustang Magazine will be accompanied by more in-depth companion videos on our website, www.mustangmagazineonline.com. The videos will remain on our website, so you’ll have a growing library of video how-to articles to reference.

HOW TO REPLACE YOUR GLOVEBOX LINER story and photography by Chris “the Doc” Ingrassia

T

here are always plenty of things to fix or replace on your Mustang, but for one reason or another some of those chores keep getting pushed back until next week, then the next week, and the next. You get the idea. Whether it’s because you have more pressing things that come before working on your vintage Mustang, or it’s just plain-old procrastination, it’s time to check off one of those chores from the list — replacing your Mustang’s glovebox liner. Truth be told, it’s one of the most easiest and inexpensive replacements you can do, but you’d be surprised at how many people put off this repair. Listen, those judges really will open up the glovebox, so for about $15 and 20 minutes of your time, you may as well make sure it looks great in there. All you need is a replacement liner, which you can get from any quality Mustang supply house, a stubby Phillips-head screwdriver, and less time than it takes to watch a Gilligan’s Island rerun. First, open your car’s glovebox and throw away all the wrappers, old letters, ketchup packets, expired coupons, broken gadgets, overdue parking tickets, etc. — anything but gloves. It’s unbelievable the stuff you find in a glovebox, and it’s all gotta go.

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1

2 With the glovebox empty, take a stubby Phillips-head screwdriver and remove each of the small screws holding the liner into the dash. These screws are at edge of the liner, around its opening. Put them in a safe place. You’ll need them again in about 10 minutes.

3

Remember to remove the thin cable screw that secures the glovebox door cable to the dash.

4 Once the liner screws are removed, you can pull out the liner. Most of the time this liner will be mangled, so getting it out of the liner opening will be easy. Remove all of those pieces of liner. Also check for any items that may have poked through the liner and into the open area behind the dash. With the liner removed and the door open, take this opportunity to clean up this area and/or do any work behind the dash, make radio adjustments, etc.

Before installing the new liner, inspect it for tears and damage. If it’s in good shape, line it up (the hole in the side goes where the glovebox light is, usually on the right).

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R ESTORATION

5

6 Push the entire liner through the opening and into position. Once you have it in its proper area, expand the liner back to its open position.

There are fold lines pressed into both sides of the liner. Collapse the liner along these guides into a pancake shape.

7

8 Line up the holes in the box and in the dash, and replace the screws that held in the old unit. Screw in each one all around the inside. Don’t overtighten them; just make sure they’re snug.

Remember to reattach the door cable. It’s the last screw to be secured. Once you’ve tightened each of the securing screws, you’re done. Carefully close the glovebox door, checking for smooth motion. Now, pat yourself on the back for not putting off this simple job for yet another weekend.

SOURCE CHRIS “THE DOC” INGRASSIA Mustang Restoration Inc. – Owner OperationMustang.com Web Show – Host mustangrestoration@hotmail.com | (847) 428-9889 Watch an extended video online at www.MustangMagazineOnline.com.

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R&A

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H ISTORY FROM THE ARCHIVES Reprinting Mustang’s History Continuing with the reprinting of the seldom-seen salesman’s booklet, Key Selling Features, News About the 1965 Mustang…1965 Mustang Line, here are pages 4 and 5 from the 14-page publication highlighting Mustang’s items of particular interest to potential buyers. It covers all body styles. When the series concludes, you’ll have every page, and all of the information and photographs of this book, which was not distributed to the general public.

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R ESTORATION

FIX MY MUSTANG PROBLEM? WE HAVE A SOLUTION by Jeff Yergovich

Q

SHOW YOUR STUFF

I know you guys are very involved in shows and car show judging, so I wanted to run this by you and get your opinion. I’m not trying to be petty, but I’ve been to two shows now showing my ’67 GTA fastback. It’s not a super-high-dollar restoration, but it’s a very clean, trailered driver, and I put a lot of work into it. I’m kind of new to shows, so maybe I shouldn’t let this bother me, but at both shows this year, the judges were very tough on my car, deducting points for what I’d consider minor imperfections, while at the same time going easy on other cars that I know have more shortcomings than mine. Is this just the way it is? Is there enough wiggle room in the judges’ opinions to affect the voting and move a car a whole place or two up or down? If so, then doesn’t the judging sheet become secondary, leaving the judges’ favoritism as the key to placing in your class? In boxing, they say, if you really want to win, don’t let it go to the judges. In car shows, there’s no choice. Name withheld by request

Q

WIPER TIME

Do you know of a good way to install an intermittent windshield wiper setup on my ’66? Is there a system or module that can be hidden so the switch still looks stock but has variable intervals? I love my Mustang, but I have to admit that I miss some of the modern features when I drive it. Wendel Eshlemann Bloomington, IN

A

At this time I am unaware of any conversion kits to add intermittent wipers on your ’66. Intermittent wipers first became available on the Mustang in 1969 and required a 4x6 control box under the hood. New items come out all the time for the Mustang. It wouldn’t surprise me to see something about this in the future.

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A

I am a judge in three different venues in the Mustang world. All three are a little bit different in how the program is run. Judging Mustangs takes dedication and knowledge of the cars. Judges are not paid to judge; they volunteer their time to pass on their knowledge to others. It’s not easy — I know from experience. Any head judge will be more than willing to sit and talk to you about your car and what he can do to help. In all of the Mustang venues, there’s always more than one judge looking at your car. This keeps us all on the same playing field and fair for everybody. I advise you to get the event rules for judging before you enter your car to have it judged. This will help you understand about judging. Maybe your Mustang would be more suited for a Peoples’ Choice class. That’s up to you to decide. Either way, the judges do not add the points up and decide a place. For example, the car has to score a certain percentage to place a Gold, Silver, or Bronze, or First, Second, or Third. Generally speaking, a point here or there will not affect how the car will place. The judges are there to help you — keep that in mind. If you’re going to another venue other than these three — SAAC, MCA, Mid America Shelby Nationals — I’m unable to advise you on what their rules are. Stick with the Big Three, and I’m sure you’ll do fine. See you on the show field. Good luck.

Q

OLD PAINT

I’m going to repaint the upper doors on my ’65 coupe. They’re worn and corroded where people have used them for an armrest. What’s the best type of paint to use for a correct, factory look and for long life? As I understand it, enamel was the factory paint, but polyurethane is harder and longer lasting. Is that right? What would you use for the doors, and how do they get that texture in it? Dave Vollner Shawnee, OK

A

The type of paint to use is acrylic urethane. Acrylic means fast, and urethane means strong. There are plenty of choices for manufacturers; we use PPG. You will want DBI (the code for acrylic urethane basecoat), and then give the supplier the body paint code and the interior paint code. Giving them both codes will allow you and the jobber the opportunity to figure out the color you want to use. As far as the texture or grain, that is stamped into the metal. If worn away, it would require replacement of the panel. Keep in mind that Ford interior paints were all semi-flat finish and not shiny.


Q

A

2+2 = ?

I’m a big fan of the ’65-’66 Mustang fastback. Some are marked as “2+2” on the front fender, and others aren’t. Why? What is the rule? Which cars got the 2+2 emblem, and which cars didn’t? Was this one of those deals where they only did it for a month or two? Stuart LaFontaine Houma, LA

Q

I’m glad you asked. Let’s straighten this out. In mid-August 1964, Ford added the Mustang fastback to its coupe and convertible line-up. In a real push to be a sports car, it came with a folddown seat in the rear. A “2” seater Mustang when folded down and a “+2” when folded up. All ’65 and ’66 Mustang fastbacks should have the “2+2” fender emblem. This was Ford’s design and intent. Nowhere have I found any documentation to differ from that. I’m always open to new things about the Mustang, so I try to never say never, as we’ve all seen anomalies in production runs of cars. Of course, those would need to be documented to be accepted. The GT package was the only version of the fastback not to say “2+2,” and all ’65-’66 fastbacks had a fold-down seat. In 1967 it became an option, and the “2+2” designation was dropped. If you’re still confused, don’t be. The ’65-’66 Mustang fastbacks (except GT models) were to say “2+2.”

TOP THIS

I have a ’70 coupe that was originally gold with the houndstooth vinyl roof. It’s kind of rare, but it has to be the ugliest thing ever built. I’ll be freshening up the car soon and want to get your opinion on what to do with the top. If I wanted, for some twisted reason, to replace the houndstooth roof, is the material available? If I did replace it, honestly, what would that do to the car’s value compared to a standard vinyl top? Originality is great, but would I be better off just replacing it with a solid color? Level with me. What should I do? Les Nelson Commerce, GA

Q

POWER-WINDOW CONVERSION

Do you know of a good way to install an intermittent windshield wiper setup on my ’66? Is there a system or module that can be hidden so the switch still looks stock but has variable intervals? I love my Mustang, but I have to admit that I miss some of the modern features when I drive it. Renfrow Jackson Los Angeles, CA

A

A

If the car is original everywhere else, go with the houndstooth. If there are other changes that take away from its originality (and value), go with something more appealing. Try SMS Auto Fabrics: www.smsautofabrics.com/products/vinyl-tops.php.

Power-window conversion kits are available from A1 Electric Automotive Accessories (www.A1electric.com). Kits are available for all early Mustangs for less than $300. We installed one on the Mystical Build Mustang charity car and found it works great. Install time is about one day.

ASK THE EXPERT Jeff Yergovich, president of Lee’s Summit, Missouri-based R&A Motorsports, has restored national show-winning and record-breaking Shelbys and Mustangs since 1975. Find more at www.r-amotorsports.com. Need some help with your Mustang? Ask the expert. Email us at tom@themustangmagazine.com,or write us at Fix My Mustang, P.O. Box 41, Lakeland, FL 33802.

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MARKER Lights, Ford and SAE logos • ‘69 Kit: 4 lenses, 4 bezels and gaskets – $79.95 • ‘70 Lens & Housings: Front – $39.95/pr., Rear – $36.95/pr. • ‘71-3 Lens & Housings: Front – $21.95/ea. Rear – $23.95/ea. BACK UP Light Kits, Housings, Lenses, Bulbs, Seals, Screws ‘65-’66 – $48.95 ‘67-’68 – $54.95 ‘69-’70 – $54.95 ’69-’73 FRONT SPOILERS (USA Made) – $59.95 ’71-3 RAM AIR KITS FOR 351C (also fits 302) Steel base, plenum w/flappers, seal, hardware – $539.95 UPHOLSTERY, Full Set – Front & Rear Sets • ‘65-8 Standard – $179.95 ‘65-6 Pony – $254.95 • ‘70-’73 Standard – $229.95 • ‘69-’70-’71-3 Mach 1 or Deluxe – $344.95 • Deluxe Door Panels: ‘69-’70 – $289.95 ‘71-3 – $314.95 ’65-’73 HEADLINERS – $29.95

Ohio Mustang Supply ‘64 1/2 - ‘73 Mustang Parts

Order: 888-685-9680 www.ohiomustang.com 732 Abbe Road, Sheffield Village, Ohio 44054

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LAST PAGE

CULTURE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF MUSTANG CLUBS

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t’s a name that doesn’t ring any bells today, but back in the ’60s and beyond, the National Council of Mustang Clubs was by far the biggest Mustang club around. It was created and supported by Ford, and kept active promoting rallies, autocrosses, tours, and social activities into the ’70s, when the orientation of the Mustang changed and private clubs began to attract the dedicated Mustang enthusiast. Left behind were lots of good memories, and some patches and dash plaques. These are from the collection of Fran Cosentino.

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1965–66 Kit Shown

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Mustang Magazine | Issue 19